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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 27, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — the headlines. the chancellor promises a strong economy — fit for a "new age of optimism" as he delivers his budget. employment is up. investment is growing. public services are improving. the public finances are stabilising. and wages are rising. jeering. among the big announcements — changes to universal credit — allowing in—work claimants to keep more of the money they earn. the chancellor laid out the state of the economy — with inflation expected to hit 4%. there's a cut in air passenger duty tax between airports within the uk — and a freeze in fuel duty — the chancellor's accused of failing to tackle climate
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change in his budget. the current alcohol duty system will be overhauled — meaning drinks with a lower alcohol percentage will be cheaper. labour accused rishi sunak of living "in a parallel universe" — cutting taxes for bankers while ordinary people struggled to get by. so, madam deputy speaker, at least the bankers on short—haulflights, sipping champagne, will be cheering this budget today. jeering. we've been talking to lots of people and loads of small businesses here in bristol to see what they think today's announcements will mean for them. in other news: a serving metropolitan police officer has been charged with rape. pc adam zaman, who's 28, is a member of the east area command unit.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak has delivered his budget — saying it's preparing the uk for a post—covid era of optimism. mr sunak also announced the results of the spending review, revealing how much each government department will receive in the three years from april 2022. let's take a look at some of the measures. the chancellor announced changes to universal credit — which will mean working people who receive it will keep more of their earnings. the taper — the amount of taxpayer help people lose as their earnings increase — will drop from 63% to 55%. it's worth £2bn in all and will benefit nearly two million families with working adults whose incomes are topped up with the credit. this won't benefit those on universal credit who are without a job. last month, the chancellor ended the £20 uplift in universal credit introduced because of the pandemic.
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every government department will get a real terms increase in spending each year. air passenger duty on flights within the uk will be reduced. along with a cut in fuel duty, and this may prove controversial in the light of cop26 in glasgow next week. alcohol duty is being overhauled — meaning drinks with a lower alcohol content will be cheaper. ahead of those announcements — the chancellor laid out the state of the economy — with inflation expected to hit 4% next year — raising more concerns about the cost of living. unemployment is expected to peak at 5.2% next year. but the uk economy is expected to return to pre—covid levels by 2022 — which is quicker than previously predicted. replying for labour, the shadow chancellor rachel reeves — standing in for keir starmer, who has covid — said "bankers on short—haulflights, sipping champagne will be cheering this budget". 0ur political correspondent nick eardley reports. what's in the chancellor's red box?
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you could be forgiven for thinking that we know most of it already. but today in parliament we get the full picture — where the government is spending our money, the state of the economy and what it all means for cash in our pockets. but to start there was a ticking off for the chancellor for how much of the budget had been made public in advance. chancellor, we are all very much looking forward to hearing the remainder of your announcement! today's budget delivers a stronger economy for the british people, stronger growth, with the uk recovering faster than our major competitors, stronger public finances, with our debt under control. stronger employment, with fewer people out of work and more people in work. jeering. there was a warning that inflation could average 4% and last for months. but the economic picture is brighter than many had predicted and that means extra money
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for the government to spend. today's budget increases total departmental spending over this parliament by £150 billion. if anybody still doubts it, today's budget confirms that the conservatives are the real party of public services. jeering. there will be cash for the nhs, money to fund a wage increase for public sector staff, though no details yet, and funding for transport, including a cut in tax for flights around the uk. controversial, just a few days before the climate summit in glasgow begins. this budget is a chance for the treasury to set out its vision of the economy after the pandemic and the chancellor wants us all to know he is still prepared to spend money on big political priorities. but the devil will be in the detail because not everyone will get everything they want. rishi sunak, remember, is a fiscal conservative who wants to persuade his party that he can keep spending and borrowing under control.
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but many in the alcohol sector will be cheering this afternoon. sparkling wine rates are being cut and there is tax relief for draught pints in a pub. the government reckons that will save 3p on a pint of beer and up to 13p for a fruity cider. the way alcohol is taxed is also changing. it will soon be based on alcohol content, meaning savings on a number of drinks like rose wine. after extra universal credit payments ended, the chancellor announced measures to help in—work claimants, reducing the amount of benefits they lose for every extra pound they earn. i have decided to cut this rate, not by 1%, not by 2%, but by 8%. cheering. charities say that won't compensate for the end of the £20 a week uplift and with prices of things like gas going up opposition parties continue to warn of a cost of living crisis.
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the shadow chancellor had to step in at the last minute today after labour's leader tested positive for covid. families struggling with a cost of living crisis, businesses hit by a supply chain crisis. those who rely on our schools and hospitals and our police... they won't recognise the world that the chancellor is describing. they will think that he is living in a parallel universe. the only way to be a prudent and responsible chancellor is to be a green chancellor. to invest in the transition to a zero carbon economy and give british businesses a head start in the industries of the future. but with no mention of climate in his conference speech and the most passing of references today, we are burdened with a chancellor unwilling to meet the scale of the challenges we face. instead of doing whatever it takes, the chancellor has done as little as possible.
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and the tories�* half—hearted rhetoric about fairness has predictably only produced half measures when it comes to soaring household bills and the crippling cost of inflation. there will be a lot to pick over in the next few hours and days. details that really matter, as the government sets the economic course for the next few years. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is in parliament for us. the chancellor said towards the end of that speech that he really wanted to cut taxes and if he could reword. the fact is, all the tax increases he announced back in march, he could've reversed those courtney? because of the much faster growth that we are seeing in the uk economy following covid. he's got billions to play around with. so why hasn't he cut taxes?— he cut taxes? exactly as you say clive, a budget _ he cut taxes? exactly as you say clive, a budget for _ he cut taxes? exactly as you say clive, a budget for any - he cut taxes? exactly as you say. clive, a budget for any chancellor comes down to choices. and what happened in this budget is rishi
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sunak was facing a slightly brighter economic picture than predicted post— pandemic and he chose to spend it. that's why you heard £150 billions more billions spent on public services in a long list of specific aware that money will go. and the fuel duty frozen cut and passenger air duty which will prove controversial for some coming ahead of the climate change summit. in the big measure he announced we were expecting putting meat on the bone was a change to universal credits of the people could keep more of their benefits. but the criticism levelled at the chancellor by the opposition that this doesn't go far enough. as you say people are still facing a very high tax burden right now for the pre— budget we were told that national insurance was going to go up national insurance was going to go up for next spring to help pay for health and in the longer—term social care. i think there will be some nurse on the conservative bent is about that. the chancellor did address that towards the end of his speech, you're absolutely right. he
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said he didn't like higher taxes his aim was to bring them down but he hasn't done that just yet. aim was to bring them down but he hasn't done thatjust yet. it's also worth noting that a lot of this budget still depends on what might pay out in the economy which is still fragile and uncertain because of the pandemic. although it does look slightly rosier than some of predicted. some of these spending commitments won't come in for the next couple years so we will have to see who is do to get wet and exactly where and. and labours argument is the measures today simply won't do what many people were hoping which is addressed spiralling prices, spiralling energy bills and of course there is a tax burden in the background. the measure of this budget as is the measure of any budget as is the measure of any budget is will people, will businesses, will parts of the government feel better off or worse off as a consequence?— government feel better off or worse off as a consequence? thank you for that. let's look at some more of the detail of today's announcements — our economics correspondent, andy verity is here. thanks it's interesting you're
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actually seeing a big expansion of the savior by rishi sunak. also expanding their tax burden to its highest level since the 1950s. just to look at some of those measures bit by bit, you've got one of the biggest measures which was increasing spending for no austerity even for unprotected departments. boosting departmental spending by £24.8 billion. the universal credit measures that we've been talking about, that's improving the taper where you take money away from people when they are in money and also boosting the amount they can earn before you withdraw the benefit, that cost £2.2 billion. and the other measure business rates for hospitality businesses £1.9 billion. the reason that is all possible is because of the economic contacts if you have a look at this chart, if the economy were measured by richter scale that's the earthquake there. we bounce back since then. 6.5 economic growth better than expected largely because the vaccines enabled
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the economy to reopen. you can see there that it's going to slow down again in the coming years. you got government borrowing, because of the economic growth it means more tax money rolling in. that means the chancellor has to borrow less in order to cover his spending. barring here is dropping even from where it was back in march. that's the blue predictions and matt did not march. the orange predictions that's what's predicted now. have a look at the purple bids. that showing the day—to—day spending. that's the chancellor is the new fiscal goal. he setting himself a goal that must be falling x including the bank of england which is quite a lot. but that must be falling and also the second goal is that borrowing will be coming down. but barring crucial enough or investment buffer day—to—day spending. that's is the rule just like gordon brown zero 18 years ago. that fiscal charter is easier to meet partly because the chancellor is raising taxes like thatcher would have dared to do. if
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you look at here you've got a tax burden 32% the highest since the 19505. if burden 32% the highest since the 1950s. if you take it on a sustained basis you can look at it as a highest tax burden ever in the history of this country. what's happening there is you've got spending measures and tax measures. if you look overall at the budget and the spending review that's wrong with it, you got additional spending of £38,000,000,000. you've also got tax rises of £12.7 billion. if you not that out it adds up to a giveaway form the chancellor to the wider economy of £25,000,000,000. although the chancellor may say he's are in a way he's not acting like one. ~ ., ~ are in a way he's not acting like one. a, ~ ,., ., are in a way he's not acting like one. ~ ., �* ., are in a way he's not acting like one. ~ ., one. more like gordon brown. many thanks. let's get some reaction from outside london and let's go to northumberland — our correspondent fiona trott has been getting reaction in morpeth. ina region in a region with some of the highest
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unemployment rates in the country and the highest child poverty rates people here have welcomed today's announcement about the public sector pay freeze being lifted, changes universal credit which means they can keep more of their money and of course the rise in the national living wage. but what does that mean for small, living wage. but what does that mean forsmall, local living wage. but what does that mean for small, local businesses in places? lets speak with janet who helps run a local hairdressers. what does that mean for how much you have to spend on wages of the business? just on a comparison and are wage hillsm _ just on a comparison and are wage hillsm we — just on a comparison and are wage bills... we have two for our workforce _ bills... we have two for our workforce is going to £800 a month. obviously— workforce is going to £800 a month. obviously it's going to come from somewhere. we don't know... we put our prices _ somewhere. we don't know... we put our prices up — somewhere. we don't know... we put our prices up injanuary anyway somewhere. we don't know... we put our prices up in january anyway so prices _ our prices up in january anyway so prices go — our prices up in january anyway so prices go up — our prices up in january anyway so prices go up before april increase for the _ prices go up before april increase for the wages. and willjust have to see how— for the wages. and willjust have to see how we — for the wages. and willjust have to see how we manage. because you got to stay— see how we manage. because you got to stay competitive. in our
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industry. _ to stay competitive. in our industry, there lots of hairdressers was at _ industry, there lots of hairdressers was at work— industry, there lots of hairdressers was at work going to have to see, maybe _ was at work going to have to see, maybe bite — was at work going to have to see, maybe bite the bullet. bite was at work going to have to see, maybe bite the bullet.— maybe bite the bullet. bite the bullet, is that _ maybe bite the bullet. bite the bullet, is that enough? - maybe bite the bullet. bite the i bullet, is that enough? anything else a chance or announce it makes you feel competent? hat else a chance or announce it makes you feel competent?— you feel competent? not as far as we are concerned. _ you feel competent? not as far as we are concerned, not _ you feel competent? not as far as we are concerned, not for _ you feel competent? not as far as we are concerned, not for our _ you feel competent? not as far as we are concerned, not for our business. | are concerned, not for our business. obviously— are concerned, not for our business. obviously i _ are concerned, not for our business. obviously i know he's given close to the nhs _ obviously i know he's given close to the nhs which is fantastic. and were obviously— the nhs which is fantastic. and were obviously going to have to pay 1.25% for national — obviously going to have to pay 1.25% for national insurance next year. not sure — for national insurance next year. not sure if— for national insurance next year. not sure if the employers should've been included in that but it's not a huge _ been included in that but it's not a huge amount of money. i personally going _ huge amount of money. i personally going to _ huge amount of money. i personally going to pay back 28p a week. that's nothing _ going to pay back 28p a week. that's nothing to— going to pay back 28p a week. that's nothing to put to social care, i don't — nothing to put to social care, i don't have _ nothing to put to social care, i don't have a problem paying that at all. ~ . don't have a problem paying that at all. . ., ., don't have a problem paying that at all. . . , don't have a problem paying that at all. . . all. what about the customers coming in, do they feel _ all. what about the customers coming in, do they feel comfortable? - all. what about the customers coming in, do they feel comfortable? are - in, do they feel comfortable? are people spending as much as they did before, are they watching the pennies? before, are they watching the ennies? ., , ., ., . ., pennies? know they are not. we have no problems — pennies? know they are not. we have no problems of— pennies? know they are not. we have no problems of our— pennies? know they are not. we have no problems of our clients _ pennies? know they are not. we have no problems of our clients coming - pennies? know they are not. we have no problems of our clients coming in i no problems of our clients coming in and paying _ no problems of our clients coming in and paying what they had to get their— and paying what they had to get their hair— and paying what they had to get
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their hair done. we've had a problem maybe _ their hair done. we've had a problem maybe when— their hair done. we've had a problem maybe when some of the elderly clients _ maybe when some of the elderly clients are not coming back as often as they— clients are not coming back as often as they normally do just because still not — as they normally do just because still not confident about the coronavirus. so still not confident about the coronavirus.— still not confident about the coronavirus. . ., , coronavirus. so the new chapter the chancellor is — coronavirus. so the new chapter the chancellor is talking _ coronavirus. so the new chapter the chancellor is talking about - coronavirus. so the new chapter the chancellor is talking about making l chancellor is talking about making us feel a bit more confident and optimistic about the future, their pandemic itself is still making people maybe feel a little bit wary about coming in. how about you as a householder, how do you feel at the moment, do you feel levelled up? well, no i don't. i'll tell you why you don't. — well, no i don't. i'll tell you why you don't, worst disposing of the 4% pay rise _ you don't, worst disposing of the 4% pay rise which is great. at the moment— pay rise which is great. at the moment the inflation is about 3.4%. we got _ moment the inflation is about 3.4%. we got the — moment the inflation is about 3.4%. we got the extra 1.25% of national insurance — we got the extra 1.25% of national insurance. i know he's... electric bill, _ insurance. i know he's... electric bill, gas— insurance. i know he's... electric bill, gas bills— insurance. i know he's... electric bill, gas bills particularly are going — bill, gas bills particularly are going through the roof. he's bringing _ going through the roof. he's bringing sparkling wine and beer down _ bringing sparkling wine and beer down but — bringing sparkling wine and beer down but meanwhile were actually getting _ down but meanwhile were actually getting stoned left right and centre for petrol. me, i travelled from
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chester — for petrol. me, i travelled from chester street and my petrol costs have gone — chester street and my petrol costs have gone up. that's not going to be covered _ have gone up. that's not going to be covered by— have gone up. that's not going to be covered by my rise next year. it certainly — covered by my rise next year. it certainly isn't. that's not including gas, electric, food prices are going — including gas, electric, food prices are going up because the pectorals going _ are going up because the pectorals going up— are going up because the pectorals going up and obviously were not getting — going up and obviously were not getting things as regularly as we can from — getting things as regularly as we can from abroad. but no. luckily my husband _ can from abroad. but no. luckily my husband is _ can from abroad. but no. luckily my husband is retired and is get a pension, — husband is retired and is get a pension, not a massive pension, i havent— pension, not a massive pension, i haven't got— pension, not a massive pension, i haven't got my pension by the way. i don't _ haven't got my pension by the way. i don't know. — haven't got my pension by the way. i don't know, we willjust have to wait _ don't know, we willjust have to wait and — don't know, we willjust have to wait and see, we willjust have to wait and see, we willjust have to wait and — wait and see, we willjust have to wait and see, we willjust have to wait and see how much for doing that food goes _ wait and see how much for doing that food goes up and petrol. and until we find _ food goes up and petrol. and until we find out — food goes up and petrol. and until we find out what can happen then i don't _ we find out what can happen then i don't actually think will be able to see where — don't actually think will be able to see where we get to be next year at this tinre _ see where we get to be next year at this time. . ~' , ., , see where we get to be next year at this time. ., ,, y., , . this time. thank you very much for chattin: this time. thank you very much for chatting today- _ this time. thank you very much for chatting today. one _ this time. thank you very much for chatting today. one view— this time. thank you very much for chatting today. one view here - this time. thank you very much for| chatting today. one view here from the high street. many people in this market town like many others across the country are enjoying the messages from the chancellor, it feels positive about people like
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janice are asking, how's that going to play out in reality with the cost of living going up. as one of the market try to us earlier today "i don't feel better off, i don't feel worse off. we can speak now to richard hughes, chairman of the 0br. the watchdog which provides independent analysis of the uk's public finances. hello. there was a cloud hanging over this budget despite the billions that were being given away and that's inflation. and the prediction seems to be 1r% over the prediction seems to be 1r% over the next year. the prediction seems to be 496 over the next year-— the next year. that's what were forecasting _ the next year. that's what were forecasting rise _ the next year. that's what were forecasting rise above - the next year. that's what were forecasting rise above for - the next year. that's what were | forecasting rise above for parent before falling back to the target of around 2%. how do you factor in gas prices that factors in what we saw the recent surge in gas prices over the recent surge in gas prices over the course of the autumn. it does reflect the effect of gas prices on inflation. what we don't assume the forecast as we see a big surge in
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wage inflation which could push medium expectations are. we expect inflation mostly confined to the market for that which makes it easier and bring it back at the target over the medium term. the fiscal studies _ target over the medium term. the fiscal studies are showing after you do factor in gas prices you are talking closer to 5% and then you would have wage inflation potentially on top of that. haifa potentially on top of that. how wa . es potentially on top of that. how wages respond _ potentially on top of that. how wages respond as _ potentially on top of that. how wages respond as a _ potentially on top of that. how wages respond as a matter for people who set wages in the economy we will have to wait and see. we don't assume that in our forecast was that we assume this inflation can be brought back under control by the bank of england for the what does mean is in ourforecast wages bank of england for the what does mean is in our forecast wages are adjusting to prices much in the medium—term. as a result it starts to erode the disposable income of households because prices are matching the rising wages plus they've also got tax rises coming in and also some cuts and the benefits of the next few years. that means livings standards are brad probably stagnant to the pre— pandemic level. the average expenditure for a family
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household is not really going to be going up over the next two or three years despite everything that's in this budget, you don't think was that it this budget, you don't think was thatitis this budget, you don't think was that it is probably factored over the medium outlook and improve partly because we revised down our assumption of the scoring effect of the pandemic on the economy so you get more real growth of the medium—term. abs, get more real growth of the medium-term.— get more real growth of the medium-term. . ., , , medium-term. a more grossly in interns but _ medium-term. a more grossly in interns but households _ medium-term. a more grossly in interns but households have - medium-term. a more grossly in interns but households have gotl medium-term. a more grossly in| interns but households have got a challenging months hence dealing with rising prices and wages that are just struggling to keep up with that. �* , ., are just struggling to keep up with that. �*, ., . ~ are just struggling to keep up with that. �*, ., . ,, ., are just struggling to keep up with that. �*, ., ., that. let's go back, when do you think inflation _ that. let's go back, when do you think inflation will— that. let's go back, when do you think inflation will begin - that. let's go back, when do you think inflation will begin to - that. let's go back, when do you think inflation will begin to fall? | think inflation will begin to fall? because the bank of england believed that this would be a very of the visionary. that this would be a very of the visiona . ., ., that this would be a very of the visionary-— that this would be a very of the visiona . ., ., , ., , ., visionary. inflation peaks next year in 2022 and — visionary. inflation peaks next year in 2022 and then _ visionary. inflation peaks next year in 2022 and then falls _ visionary. inflation peaks next year in 2022 and then falls back - visionary. inflation peaks next year| in 2022 and then falls back towards its target to the tail end of 2023 towards 2024. it takes a while to have affect and bring inflation that back onto its target but we assume he gets back there by the mid—20 �*205. he gets back there by the mid-20 '20$. ., he gets back there by the mid-20 '20s. ., ,, he gets back there by the mid-20 '20s. ., i. , he gets back there by the mid-20 '20s. ., ,, , ., '20s. you say you revised on the scarrin: '20s. you say you revised on the scarring effects _ '20s. you say you revised on the scarring effects of _ '20s. you say you revised on the scarring effects of the _ '20s. you say you revised on the scarring effects of the pandemic| '20s. you say you revised on the i scarring effects of the pandemic on the economy. your predictions aren't as rosy some might argue as a bank
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of england. why is that disparity because it partly because we had a rosy prediction pre— pandemic about what potential output was going to be. . , what potential output was going to be. ., , , ., what potential output was going to be. . , , ., ., be. the gap between what we thought was aood be. the gap between what we thought was good happen _ be. the gap between what we thought was good happen now _ be. the gap between what we thought was good happen now is _ be. the gap between what we thought was good happen now is a _ be. the gap between what we thought was good happen now is a bit - be. the gap between what we thought was good happen now is a bit bigger. was good happen now is a bit bigger because we are more optimistic pre— pandemic. it also reflects there are some things we lost along the weight of the pandemic which are harder to get back. we think we lost hundred and 60,000 working people compared to the labour force without working out before the pandemic. multitude layer that migration and higher rates. we lost investments along the way. businesses have not been investing during the pandemic and they lost £70 worth of capital stock which they otherwise would he created and would've supported the output going into the future. there are some things that we think we are more reasonably more optimistic but some things we lost along the way and are more difficult to get back because that investment hasn't happened, those people are a bit lost from the economy and it's hard to get them back. do you think you be making revisions again? we always
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keep this under review. this is first on we've actually change it we can keep looking at the data look at investment in particular one of the big uncertainties is what can be the impact of on productivity. thanks to the vaccines. _ on productivity. thanks to the vaccines, the _ on productivity. thanks to the vaccines, the sort _ on productivity. thanks to the vaccines, the sort the - on productivity. thanks to the - vaccines, the sort the government given to the economy, more about pre— pandemic economy which we kind of frozen over the last 18 months. we can still basically turn back on and use in a post world. there were big changes in behaviour and the pandemic morse all my shopping, more working from home and i may have an effect on how the pre— pandemic economy was especially retail shops, transport, how much we can leave the way it was going into the future compared to before. if that needs to be change, back and had an effect on productivity of the economy for time while it reconfigures to the new way in which we spend our lives and money. in which we spend our lives and mone . ., , ., in which we spend our lives and mone. ., , in which we spend our lives and mone. ., ._ money. lots of variables potentially but the fundamental _ money. lots of variables potentially but the fundamental is _ money. lots of variables potentially but the fundamental is this - money. lots of variables potentially but the fundamental is this that - but the fundamental is this that ordinary families, households around the country they are probably going
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to see stagnant levels of income across their households over the next year or 18 months. into next year or 18 months. into mid-2023 — next year or 18 months. into mid-2023 according - next year or 18 months. into mid-2023 according to - next year or 18 months. iritf: mid—2023 according to our forecast was up over the medium—term things there obviously looking brighter and because we think there's going to be less long—term damage, less long—term damage to real wages it's a good story in the long run but certainly some difficult months ahead. you keir starmer miss today's labour budget due to testing positive for covid he's been speaking on the video made message in his own. i video made message in his own. i was actually gutted — video made message in his own. i was actually gutted this _ video made message in his own. ions; actually gutted this morning to test positive for covid just between the night before the budget response. i find but it's important we all the rules. rachel reeves in the budget response just brilliant. both of
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them stepped up on short notice, very short notice to absolutely call out the government for their failure on the climate crisis. and to hammer the chancellor on his smoke and mirror budget which does nothing for working people and nothing about the cost of living crisis. i'll now be working from home but if you have symptoms or any cause for concern get tested. and stop the spread of this virus. 5ir get tested. and stop the spread of this virus. ., get tested. and stop the spread of this virus. ,, ,, ., get tested. and stop the spread of this virus. ,, ,, . , , this virus. sir keir starmer is self isolatin: this virus. sir keir starmer is self isolating at _ this virus. sir keir starmer is self isolating at home. _ sir keir starmer is self isolating at home. one of the big announcements today was on universal credit. the government has been under pressure on this issue since it ended the £20 boost to the benefit earlier this month. today the chancellor announced a cut to the taper rate. that's the rate at which univesal credit is reduced once a claimant starts to earn above a certain amount. currently it's 63p which means that if you earn an extra pound you lose 63p in benefit. that's to be cut to 55p in every pound — allowing people to keep more of their money as they start to earn more.
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but campaigners and charities — say the amount doesn't address wider issues of cost of living or help those who are on benefits and out of work. 0ur social affairs editor, alison holt, is here. this is a measure of good news for some of those people, not all but some of those people, not all but some of those people, not all but some of those people who are you on universal credit.— universal credit. that's exactly ri . ht. universal credit. that's exactly right- it's _ universal credit. that's exactly right. it's targeted _ universal credit. that's exactly right. it's targeted at - universal credit. that's exactly right. it's targeted at working i right. it's targeted at working families. so low paid families who are in work and it is saying, we are making changes which will allow you to keep more of that money. so it's both a change to that paper ray, that complicated calculation that is made whereby people at the moment can keep 60 3pm the pound take away if they earn above a working allowance, that will change to 55 pa. they are also increasing the amount of money that people will be allowed to keep before that taper comes in. it's complicated changes but the chancellor estimates about 2,000,000 families will benefit from
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that to a tune of about £1000 a year. i think the thing we should compare that with his the £20 uplift which was ended at the beginning of this month was up and that benefited everyone who received universal credit, it was about 5.5, 5.8 million people who benefited from it by about £20 a week. put so a lot of the charities and organisations in this area are saying 0k, the charities and organisations in this area are saying ok, that's fine, you're helping people in work but there are lots of people unable to work. for instance people with disabilities who may be facing much higher say heating and food bills and this does nothing to address the problems they are already facing in terms of hardship. 50 problems they are already facing in terms of hardship.— problems they are already facing in terms of hardship. so people who are not in work and _ terms of hardship. so people who are not in work and frankly successive - not in work and frankly successive budgets of hammered them and people are not earning that much and are on universal credit as well but the change in the taper, that does not make out even for the very people
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who are working full—time and earning pretty well, that doesn't make—up for the £20 kite? i earning pretty well, that doesn't make-up for the £20 kite? i think it's one of — make-up for the £20 kite? i think it's one of those _ make-up for the £20 kite? i think it's one of those things _ make-up for the £20 kite? i think it's one of those things you've - make-up for the £20 kite? i think it's one of those things you've got to drill right down into the numbers and it's going to vary from person to person, family to family. so the chancellor estimates that about 2,000 , 000 chancellor estimates that about 2,000,000 people will benefit to the tune of about £1000 which is roughly the same as the £20 a week over a year. but i suspect it's when we get down to the individual level we will really know how many people it benefits. we certainly know that there are lots of people on universal credit who it won't benefit. and the message from the chancellor today was very clear, he was saying that he wanted to reward work and this is one way in which he aims to do it by reducing what he described as a hidden tax on work. so we got to see. it is always the
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case with the budget there's a lot of fun picking of the numbers and looking at the nitty—gritty of what it really means. looking at the nitty-gritty of what it really means.— joining me now from northern ireland is caroline rice. she's a single parent and has been claiming universal credit since being made redundant over the summer. thanks for being with us. to be clear you are out of work and claiming universal credit. as a result the taper is not can help you the changes today?— the changes today? know i lost my 'ob last the changes today? know i lost my job last august _ the changes today? know i lost my job last august so _ the changes today? know i lost my job last august so i'm _ the changes today? know i lost my job last august so i'm on _ the changes today? know i lost my job last august so i'm on universal| job last august so i'm on universal credit i'm actually self—employed at the minute. the taper will help me a little bit but not big. 50 the minute. the taper will help me a little bit but not big.— little bit but not big. so the £20 ulift little bit but not big. so the £20 u - lift that little bit but not big. so the £20 uplift that had _ little bit but not big. so the £20 uplift that had been _ little bit but not big. so the £20 uplift that had been there - uplift that had been there because of the pandemic, that's now been cut. the taper is not going to replace that for you. ha.
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cut. the taper is not going to replace that for you.- cut. the taper is not going to replace that for you. no. it might rive me replace that for you. no. it might give me an _ replace that for you. no. it might give me an extra _ replace that for you. no. it might give me an extra 20, _ replace that for you. no. it might give me an extra 20, £30 - replace that for you. no. it might give me an extra 20, £30 a - replace that for you. no. it might l give me an extra 20, £30 a month replace that for you. no. it might - give me an extra 20, £30 a month but i'm still getting that cut by 50 five if you take into consideration the rising cost of our energy and our food the rising cost of our energy and ourfood bills the rising cost of our energy and our food bills and style. so the rising cost of our energy and ourfood bills and style. so i'm worse off even while working. 50 worse off even while working. so what were you hoping the chancellor would say, were you hoping that he would say, were you hoping that he would perhaps reverse that £20 cut? yes. it would've been nice to see that £20 cut be reversed. especially of the winter months when our energy prices are going up and using more energy in our homes, where using more heating in our homes. just to provide that we bit of security. especially for our children. itjust would've been nice to have a little bit more. �* ., would've been nice to have a little bit more. . ., . bit more. and how much more difficult given _
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bit more. and how much more difficult given all— bit more. and how much more difficult given all that, - bit more. and how much more difficult given all that, the - bit more. and how much more| difficult given all that, the cost of living crisis, gas prices, energy and so on, how much more difficult is life to be for you as a single parent? is life to be for you as a single arent? , . parent? extremely tight. there is no luxuries in this _ parent? extremely tight. there is no luxuries in this house. _ parent? extremely tight. there is no luxuries in this house. we _ parent? extremely tight. there is no luxuries in this house. we just - parent? extremely tight. there is no luxuries in this house. we just get i luxuries in this house. wejust get by with what we have. i don't know what else we can cut back. at this stage we are still having to cut back even with the taper being reduced and stuff like that, yeah. the chancellor says he wants to reward work. do you think you're being punished for being out of work? ~ �* . being punished for being out of work? ~ �* , ., ~' being punished for being out of work? ~ �* , ., ,, , work? well, i've been work but i don't feel— work? well, i've been work but i don't feel like _ work? well, i've been work but i don't feel like i'm _ work? well, i've been work but i don't feel like i'm being - work? well, i've been work but i| don't feel like i'm being rewarded for work. don't feel like i'm being rewarded forwork. i'm don't feel like i'm being rewarded for work. i'm self—employed. don't feel like i'm being rewarded forwork. i'm self—employed. i actually support parents to get out to work and finances into the earlier years and young children
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it's not can it benefit me for that potentially may not benefit the children in my service obviously we live in northern ireland, it's completely different level of support here. there is no childcare problem here i'm still struggling to get back out to work. has problem here i'm still struggling to get back out to work.— get back out to work. has enough attention been _ get back out to work. has enough attention been paid _ get back out to work. has enough attention been paid to _ get back out to work. has enough attention been paid to people - get back out to work. has enough j attention been paid to people like you who are self—employed and are on universal credit? it’s you who are self-employed and are on universal credit?— universal credit? it's truly not can hel me. universal credit? it's truly not can help me- i— universal credit? it's truly not can help me. i would _ universal credit? it's truly not can help me. i would just _ universal credit? it's truly not can help me. i would just like - universal credit? it's truly not can help me. i would just like to say i help me. i would just like to say the government listen to us more and take on board our circumstances. not everybody circumstances are the same. but there has to be some form of consensus on people with enough experience involved in this policymaking. experience involved in this policymaking— experience involved in this oli makinu. . �*, ., _ policymaking. and it's obviously not. the
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policymaking. and it's obviously not- they are — policymaking. and it's obviously not. they are out _ policymaking. and it's obviously not. they are out of— policymaking. and it's obviously not. they are out of touch - policymaking. and it's obviously not. they are out of touch are l policymaking. and it's obviously - not. they are out of touch are they? very much — not. they are out of touch are they? very much out _ not. they are out of touch are they? very much out of touch. _ not. they are out of touch are they? very much out of touch. it's - not. they are out of touch are they? very much out of touch. it's like - very much out of touch. it's like the top rung of the ladder to the very bottom rung of the ladder. the ones at the bottom... it’s very bottom rung of the ladder. the ones at the bottom. . ._ ones at the bottom... it's a long wa to ones at the bottom... it's a long way to shout _ ones at the bottom... it's a long way to shout out. _ ones at the bottom... it's a long way to shout out. good - ones at the bottom... it's a long way to shout out. good luck- ones at the bottom... it's a long| way to shout out. good luck with everything. and if you have got any questions about the budget and how it may affect you, please do get in touch with us. at 8:30 we'll put them to our experts. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbcyourquestions and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. much more coming up nick miller has the details. all eyes on the rain that continue to fall across southern scotland especially in the southwest of the parts of the scottish borders and such a wet day
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in cumbria. there is a met office amber warning. in cumbria. there is a met office amberwarning. in cumbria in cumbria. there is a met office amber warning. in cumbria we could end up with over 200 mm of rain in the weather spots around the hundred in the wettest parts of scotland. so as the rain falls the rain totals amount, the risk of flooding and disruption from that will increase along with a flood warning. the rain has been following through here, look how it continues as we go through tonight for into more northwest wales was to elsewhere maybe a few showers around and mild and windy night to come for the gaels through the irish sea along with this area of wet weather that still around tomorrow. mayjust push northwards across scotland again back into the central beltjust ease ease eastward into more wells as well work continues through thursday, thursday night before clearing on friday. towards the east of england will be a few breaks in the cloud and another very mild day. as for wind speeds these are your averages, because at a high particularly with the rain through the irish sea. as for your temperatures yeah, it's very mild, it's cooler this weekend. usurious
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hello this is bbc news with clive myrie. the headlines: the chancellor promises a strong economy, fit for a " new age of optimism," as he delivers his budget employment is up. investment is . rowin: . employment is up. investment is growing. public _ employment is up. investment is growing. public services - employment is up. investment is growing. public services are - growing. public services are improving the public finances are stabilizing and wages are rising. among the big announcements, changes to universal credit, allowing in—work claimants to keep more of the money they earn. rishi sunak laid out the state of the economy, with inflation expected to hit four per cent. there's a cut in air passenger duty tax between airports within the uk, and a freeze in fuel duty.the chancellor's accused of failing to tackle climate change, in this budget. labour accused rishi sunak of living "in a parallel universe" — cutting taxes for bankers while ordinary people
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struggled to get by madam deputy speaker, at least the bankers sipping champagne will be chairing this budget today. let's go back to our main story today, and the chancellor has delivered what he's called a post—covid era budget, with a focus on higher skills and higher wages. rishi sunak said there would be a real terms rise in overall spending for every single government department. let's get more analysis on what has been announed today. i'm joined by miatta fahnbulleh who's chief executive at the new economics foundation. and alsojoining me is anne mcelvoy who's senior editor at the economist. hello to you both. thank you for joining us. if i can start with you, how would you characterize this budget? spend, spend, spend wasn't
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it? it budget? spend, spend, spend wasn't it? ., , , budget? spend, spend, spend wasn't it? .,, , ., , it? it was definitely a bigger ro'ect it? it was definitely a bigger project and _ it? it was definitely a bigger project and said _ it? it was definitely a bigger project and said to - it? it was definitely a bigger project and said to me - it? it was definitely a bigger project and said to me than | it? it was definitely a bigger| project and said to me than i it? it was definitely a bigger - project and said to me than i was expecting. the commitment to spend an additional 150 billion over the course of the parliament with a good thing. it was a good move by the chancellor and frannie i think i hope the period of restoration and that on the investment in public services is well behind us. it's not enough to pull back the losses that we had seen in terms of investment in public service is about the last decade but that step in the right direction. the chancellor talked about a new economy which i loved. that the new economics foundation but that two policies of that are improvements in living standards and protecting the planet and on both of those i thought the budget was really weak. he barely said anything about climate change except for increasing passenger duty for domestic flights in the living standards when he's on economic watchdog is projecting that we are about to have 20 years in which wages will not have budged and i see
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far more from him in terms of what he would do to boost wages and living standards. [30 he would do to boost wages and living standards.— he would do to boost wages and living standards. do you think there are some of — living standards. do you think there are some of the _ living standards. do you think there are some of the conservative - living standards. do you think there l are some of the conservative benches who are queasy about the fact that he spending all this money and it's not necessarily the result of an improving economy which some of it is. a lot of it in fact, the majority of it is as a result of tax raises that he introduced in march. there is certainly some on the conservative benches who thought they were — conservative benches who thought they were listening to a gordon brown — they were listening to a gordon brown budget and had many similarities with that kind of early period _ similarities with that kind of early period of— similarities with that kind of early period of gordon brown. he said on the one _ period of gordon brown. he said on the one hand i'm not going to write checks— the one hand i'm not going to write checks for— the one hand i'm not going to write checks for spending, that's going to be balanced against tax revenues. but then— be balanced against tax revenues. but then we went into a quite major splurge _ but then we went into a quite major splurge as _ but then we went into a quite major splurge as he was pointing out. there _ splurge as he was pointing out. there was— splurge as he was pointing out. there was a bigger budget and bigger giveaway— there was a bigger budget and bigger giveaway than many thoughts richie sylla who _ giveaway than many thoughts richie sylla who was a fiscal conservative would _ sylla who was a fiscal conservative would make at this point in the election— would make at this point in the election cycle. so that would be the criticism _ election cycle. so that would be the criticism and we have not yet seen any rises _ criticism and we have not yet seen any rises and he says he's very
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optimistic— any rises and he says he's very optimistic about growth. good. but we have _ optimistic about growth. good. but we have not really see what's happening to uk productivity, that's something that's befuddled all governments, notjust this something that's befuddled all governments, not just this one and at the _ governments, not just this one and at the same — governments, not just this one and at the same time yet inflation pressures and you have seen the projection— pressures and you have seen the projection of 4% inflation which is where _ projection of 4% inflation which is where germany is actually that's not extreme _ where germany is actually that's not extreme if— where germany is actually that's not extreme. if that all happens and you have a _ extreme. if that all happens and you have a lot _ extreme. if that all happens and you have a lot of spending at the same time the _ have a lot of spending at the same time the uk economy is really going to have _ time the uk economy is really going to have to— time the uk economy is really going to have to fly for the receipts to come _ to have to fly for the receipts to come in — to have to fly for the receipts to come in and not make itjust to spend — come in and not make itjust to spend that _ come in and not make itjust to spend that many thought his opponents would deliver. he cut the ground _ opponents would deliver. he cut the ground from under their feet, yes that's— ground from under their feet, yes that's true. — ground from under their feet, yes that's true, but he is the chancellor in conservative government.— chancellor in conservative government. chancellor in conservative covernment. ., ., , ., government. his calculation is that he can aet government. his calculation is that he can get away — government. his calculation is that he can get away with _ government. his calculation is that he can get away with it _ government. his calculation is that he can get away with it because . government. his calculation is that. he can get away with it because he's there fairly early in this part in it. he can keep their tax rises and can use them to improve the economy and the economy improves he helps and the economy improves he helps and gets towards the election and you get a pledge lower ? lo and behold. it according budget. just very briefly. _ behold. it according budget. just very briefly. i — behold. it according budget. just
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very briefly, i would say yes, that might— very briefly, i would say yes, that might be — very briefly, i would say yes, that might be true but on the other hand, budget— might be true but on the other hand, budget before elections tend to be myjan _ budget before elections tend to be myjan ? _ budget before elections tend to be myjan ? generous. can we figure out why that _ myjan ? generous. can we figure out why that may— myjan ? generous. can we figure out why that may be? i think as you say it's surprising so early in the cycle — it's surprising so early in the cycle. what's is reason close? he does _ cycle. what's is reason close? he does not — cycle. what's is reason close? he does not want to find out with boris johnson _ does not want to find out with boris johnson we — does not want to find out with boris johnson we heard them talk about at one point— johnson we heard them talk about at one point that prime minister and it was quite _ one point that prime minister and it was quite telling. we know it's a bit of— was quite telling. we know it's a bit of tension and you can perhaps see it _ bit of tension and you can perhaps see it around. he's not big, a big spender— see it around. he's not big, a big spender of— see it around. he's not big, a big spender of the green sensation. he has some _ spender of the green sensation. he has some concerns about the efficiency _ has some concerns about the efficiency of that and how long it takes _ efficiency of that and how long it takes to — efficiency of that and how long it takes to come good for votes for people _ takes to come good for votes for people at— takes to come good for votes for people at the sharp end he really does _ people at the sharp end he really does want to go early on this. i think— does want to go early on this. i think partly because that's what boris _ think partly because that's what borisjohnson wants. i think partly because that's what boris johnson wants. i think also we are coming — boris johnson wants. i think also we are coming out of the pandemic. these _ are coming out of the pandemic. these are — are coming out of the pandemic. these are extra in a times. he said he said extraordinary _ these are extra in a times. he said he said extraordinary measures. i he said extraordinary measures. there is the goal in front of the chancellor, it's called cop 26, he can see the next, he's got the ball at his feet. he shoots, and he
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completely misses. he did not talk about the climate at all. cop 26 starts next week.— about the climate at all. cop 26 starts next week. what panic is he on? it's absolutely _ starts next week. what panic is he on? it's absolutely extraordinary. | on? it's absolutely extraordinary. the government to its credit has put together a net zero strategy that does stretch the boundaries article and makes us a leader in the world. but those commitments are not worth the paper they are written on. if you don't back them up with investment. and that was but i was desperately hoping from the chancellor in the week before cop 26 and he barely said a word. and i think for me, that is going to be a big error. i think he is going to the back and say and worry i wonder why he did not do that, particularly because yes, that progress by the economy is looking good but if you look at the lb our projections, they are telling us that by 2024 the economy will still be two to 3% below its post covid—19 path. so actually, she should have been
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investing far more in things like green infrastructure, green technology than the new economy of the future in order to shore up the recovery and shore up our pathways and do that zero in a way that potentially could have created hundreds of hundreds of thousands of jobs and that if they living standards and for me it was an absolute on—call that he did not do that. absolute on-call that he did not do that. �* absolute on-call that he did not do that. , that. agree with the possibility that. agree with the possibility that there are _ that. agree with the possibility that there are some _ that. agree with the possibility that there are some on - that. agree with the possibility that there are some on the - that there are some on the conservative benches who feel that with cop coming up and we know when the public are by and large when it comes to day environments and part? climate change and so on that he did miss an opportunity?— miss an opportunity? now, i don't auree. i miss an opportunity? now, i don't agree- i don't _ miss an opportunity? now, i don't agree. i don't think— miss an opportunity? now, i don't agree. i don't think we _ miss an opportunity? now, i don't agree. i don't think we know - miss an opportunity? now, i don't agree. i don't think we know that l agree. i don't think we know that where _ agree. i don't think we know that where the — agree. i don't think we know that where the public are until we see the costs— where the public are until we see the costs and reach saad is firm and aligned _ the costs and reach saad is firm and aligned and — the costs and reach saad is firm and aligned and you will see he wanted to see _ aligned and you will see he wanted to see what other governments put on the table _ to see what other governments put on the table at _ to see what other governments put on the table at cop 26. if not always the table at cop 26. if not always the case — the table at cop 26. if not always the case that this advantage if the uk. the case that this advantage if the uk what— the case that this advantage if the uk. what you could find is that you have countries undercutting you and
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you call— have countries undercutting you and you call a _ have countries undercutting you and you call a super green very quickly on a huge — you call a super green very quickly on a huge green transition in business _ on a huge green transition in business and you find that others are triaging you and taking business away from _ are triaging you and taking business away from the and said it's not quite _ away from the and said it's not quite as— away from the and said it's not quite as simple as that. of course i think— quite as simple as that. of course i think we _ quite as simple as that. of course i think we will get a rude awakening about— think we will get a rude awakening about what the public thinks asking people _ about what the public thinks asking people whether they want these targets — people whether they want these targets is one thing and asking them how they— targets is one thing and asking them how they see transitions in terms of the energy— how they see transitions in terms of the energy crisis in their heating bills are — the energy crisis in their heating bills are now happening which put that under strain is quite another. my guess— that under strain is quite another. my guess is— that under strain is quite another. my guess is that richie sunak is a sequencing vest and we will see some commitment and i think they will come _ commitment and i think they will come after cop 26. i doubt that he du- come after cop 26. i doubt that he dug in— come after cop 26. i doubt that he dug in and — come after cop 26. i doubt that he dug in and said to the neighbor what i dug in and said to the neighbor what i know— dug in and said to the neighbor what i know you've got this big party going _ i know you've got this big party going on— i know you've got this big party going on in glasgow and anyone can from the _ going on in glasgow and anyone can from the international leadership community but i'm not going to help. i community but i'm not going to help. i don't _ community but i'm not going to help. idon't think— community but i'm not going to help. i don't think that's the way of it. idon't think that's the way of it. ithink— idon't think that's the way of it. i think what— i don't think that's the way of it. i think what he has said is be quite cautious— i think what he has said is be quite cautious in— i think what he has said is be quite cautious in at the international agreements and not how things interact— agreements and not how things interact because they do.
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i don't know if you read some of that discussion there but was this goal or was he being clever? and waiting to see what might come out of cop 26 before making any real commitment when it comes to climate change and the environment? if that change and the environment? if that is the case. — change and the environment? if that is the case, that's _ change and the environment? if that is the case, that's the _ change and the environment? if that is the case, that's the total - is the case, that's the total opposite of their leadership we need to see. particularly when the uk is bleeding on the global stage in the run—up to the cop 26. it seems that richie sunak completely missed the memo on the client at we need to be taking real this bold action now to put our economy on a path to net zero emissions. and with that delivered a real practical improvements that we can see for people of everyday lives at the same time while we have seen from this government in the last to be found in this budget is policies that take us and they'll wrong direction.
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cutting the deity on short fights. and £27 billion for a road—building programme promoting airport expansion and relying on technologies that are not yet further that carbon capture and storage and so—called sustainable aviation fuel. we needed to be moving away from these carbon intensive industries and taking the opportunity we have for the whole country if we investing their green industry of the future that can warm our homes and improve our transports and protect environmentally friendly forms of farming. this is the transition we need to see and read the uk should be showing leadership that's needed on the global stage. the government would argue that this is a budget that is about growth, it's about raising peoples living standards. about encouraging businesses to invest think it's about the future. and it's only when you settle those discussions and those debates that it's possible for
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potentially people to turn towards what longer—term goals and it comes to the climax. what would be sick of that argument? i to the climax. what would be sick of that argument?— that argument? i am not sure this buduet that argument? i am not sure this budget really _ that argument? i am not sure this budget really is — that argument? i am not sure this budget really is about _ that argument? i am not sure this budget really is about raising - budget really is about raising peoples living standards because if you look for example at the changes that have been made recently to national insurance in order to support social care, then they are disproportionately affecting people on lower incomes while people in higher incomes still benefit from having a lower proportion of national insurance contributions. we need to completely rethink our tax system so that higher earners are asked to pay more and that we clamp—down on corporate tax avoidance and evasion. and we have a family of funding are public service is. and what i would say more than thatis is. and what i would say more than that is yes there is plenty of evidence that the public does want to see both climate action. survey after survey recently has shown the climate emergency right at the top of people lists of concerns and 94% support for one of the policy is the most wanted to see in this budget
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which is a carbon tax, a tax on the most polluting industries which would enable us to deliver that transition to the queen industries of the future and fun changes to create a fairer green society at the same time. create a fairer green society at the same time-— create a fairer green society at the same time. didn't and have a point about richie _ same time. didn't and have a point about richie sylla _ same time. didn't and have a point about richie sylla on _ same time. didn't and have a point about richie sylla on this _ about richie sylla on this government not wanting to do themselves into a corner and put themselves into a corner and put themselves into a corner and put themselves into a corner because if you do have several other big polluters around the world, not making commitments to climate change, and therefore not affecting the way that their economies run potentially in looking towards improving the state of the climate and the environment, then the uk is left out on its own and that could be a problem. i left out on its own and that could be a problem-— be a problem. i think that underlines _ be a problem. i think that underlines the _ be a problem. i think that underlines the issue - be a problem. i think that underlines the issue that l be a problem. i think that - underlines the issue that richie sunak on the governing see climate change as a cost rather than an opportunity because there is also at that improvements we want to see an investment we want to see will make real improvements to peoples everyday lives will stop we are living through an energy crisis
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where people spending more and more of their incomes on energy bills and disproportionately affecting people on lower incomes and get if we were putting the investment into insulating peoples homes and making home renewable energy affordable to all households throughout the country that can support peoples everyday lives as well as reducing carbon emissions. so, this can help on the domestic level and internationally this is about leadership. the uk was one of the first countries to industrialize and too often poor countries in the world are suffering and the biggest effects of climate change despite having been one of the country still contributing released to the problem. we need to be showing global leadership in putting in place the policies as needed to deliver on the net zero ambition and bringing richer countries to get it to get those commitments that are needed for an effective deal at cop 26. ., ~ needed for an effective deal at cop 26. . ~ , ., .
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needed for an effective deal at cop 26. . ~ ,., . ., needed for an effective deal at cop 26. . ~ . ., ., 26. thank you. we want to get reaction from _ 26. thank you. we want to get reaction from around - 26. thank you. we want to get reaction from around the - 26. thank you. we want to get l reaction from around the country outside the westminster bubble as it were to the chancellor richie sunak�*s proposals and plans for the budget. andrew has been speaking to people about the impact of the pandemic on the local economy out in bristol. hello. 0verto you. 0verwhelmingly here in bristol today almost everybody we spoke to that walk past us on the street for today have brought up one subject and that is unsurprisingly the rising cost of household bills specifically talking about the increased cost of putting fueling your car and the rising cost of food in the supermarkets and time and time again the increasing cost of heating your home. most people predicting that their heating bills this winter will be several hundred pounds more than they were at this time last year and it's also fair to say not hearing a lot from the budget today to convince them that their budgets will not be more thinly stretched over the next two months. they have been some positives and a lot of interest here in bristol on the money set aside to
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improve public transport networks outside london and some variants of the bus routes here and some variants of the bus route crm very congested roads and lots of people curious to see how they could be improved and it looks like about 540 million from that coming bristol's way at some point in the future. we have got an expert witness here from the local financial services here have got an expert witness here from the localfinancial services here in bristol. you have been looking at the winners and losers today and some of the small print of the budget as well. let's start with the leaners, who have done well today? some good news for people on lower incomes. looking at people on the national living wage which was announced prior to the budget. they will see their wages rise 6.6% that's good news for them and they're about it out of the hat at they're about it out of the hat at the end of the budget was then used on universal credit so that people who are working and getting the credit and the change is what's known as the tape so what happens is for every pound you earn, you lose 60p of your benefit to her eyes up to the changes and only lose 55p so you get to keep more of any wage you
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have. 50 you get to keep more of any wage you have, ., �*, ., , you get to keep more of any wage you have. ., �*, ., , ., you get to keep more of any wage you have. . �*, ., , ., , have. so that's only for people workin: have. so that's only for people working at _ have. so that's only for people working at an _ have. so that's only for people working at an universal - have. so that's only for people working at an universal creditl have. so that's only for people i working at an universal credit but for those just on universal credit to £20 is still gone.— for those just on universal credit to £20 is still gone. that's right. the money _ to £20 is still gone. that's right. the money that _ to £20 is still gone. that's right. the money that was _ to £20 is still gone. that's right. the money that was introduced l to £20 is still gone. that's right. i the money that was introduced to people throughout the pandemic will be counteracted for a lot of people who are working by this increase but if you are not working then a 20 take it so you'll be worse off. if take it so you'll be worse off. if you are working and on universal credit and you lose the £20 but you gain is that roughly the same amount? in gain is that roughly the same amount? ,., ..,, , gain is that roughly the same amount? _ , ., amount? in some cases yes. some of the examples — amount? in some cases yes. some of the examples that _ amount? in some cases yes. some of the examples that chancellor - amount? in some cases yes. some of the examples that chancellor was - the examples that chancellor was giving it was about £1000 which is depending on your own circumstances and if you are unable to work then you want to take advantage of this anyways so it's a finely balanced thing. there are other changes that benefit other people in the budget. there was change to fuel deity. there was change to fuel deity. there was change to fuel deity. there was a plan to increase that after the budget and they decided to freeze that unseen but the alcohol deity and they have been somewhere to changes with the alcohol duty because how the process went before
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i was for of strange anomalies so there are training those out. so you there are training those out. so you the draft discount that any kind of paint in a pub. the draft discount that any kind of paint in a pub-— the draft discount that any kind of paint in a pub. who has done not so well? it's paint in a pub. who has done not so well? it's the _ paint in a pub. who has done not so well? it's the stuff _ paint in a pub. who has done not so well? it's the stuff that's _ paint in a pub. who has done not so well? it's the stuff that's not - paint in a pub. who has done not so well? it's the stuff that's not an - well? it's the stuff that's not an ounce in the — well? it's the stuff that's not an ounce in the budget _ well? it's the stuff that's not an ounce in the budget but - well? it's the stuff that's not an ounce in the budget but if- well? it's the stuff that's not an ounce in the budget but if a - well? it's the stuff that's not an ounce in the budget but if a lot | well? it's the stuff that's not an i ounce in the budget but if a lot to pay tax. we set heard before the budget about the change in national insurance and it means all of them up insurance and it means all of them up a national insurance pay more but obviously there is changes in the budget and the small paid up the budget and the small paid up the budget document which is the counterattacks would increase up to at the same time the changes announced in the previous budget about the freezing up to the present and at the same time the changes announced in the previous budget about the phrasing of that threshold attacks and that began thank you. some of the businesses i've been talking to today safer than it still all about recovery from the pandemic. they say they're beginning to get back on fb but it's a long way to go i need to help to continue
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in coronavirus is unfortunately still casting a very long shadow. to find the eight ways to those budget could affect deal. go to our bbc website. from universal credit changes to the price of the plane. in the last half hour, the santa fe county sheriff in california has been getting an update into the fatal shooting of a cinematographer on a film set last week at the hands of the actor alec baldwin. halyna hutchins was killed after being accidentally shot by the actor alec baldwin on the set of the western movie rust in new mexico. santa fe county sheriff adan mendoza revealed a "lead projectile" was recovered from the director's shoulder. what we have learned is we suspect there were other rounds that were found on the set. we want to comment on how they were found there. that's part of the active investigation so i will not comment on how they got
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there but we suspect they are there and that's will be determined when testing is done by the being reference as to whether or not they are officially liable. the people that inspected or handled the firearm when it was noted before it got to alec baldwin were we are interviewing and there is follow—up questions we need to do. this further investigation and further interviews and we will try and determine how that happened and if they should have known there was a live round and that firearm. we know it was a lead projectile. it still to be determined by the ballistic analysis by the fbi and crime lab exactly what the weight of the but it is. whether or not it was fired from that actual firearm with things will be tested and compared sedate sedate up of testing that needs to be done to ensure that projectile death that firearm so that's what we
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suspect. a serving metropolitan police officer has been charged with rape. pc adam zaman, who's 28, is alleged to have carried out the attack in the city of london on sunday evening when he was off duty. he's been remanded in custody to appear at westminster the government has released its daily coromavirus figures. they show: a further 43,941 people in the uk have tested positive for coronavirus, and 207 people have died within 28 days of testing positive for the virus. from today, the government will publish daily figures on the number of booster or third vaccine doses given out in the uk — which is currently about 6.7 million. a 52—year—old man has been arrested in halifax in west yorkshire after the deputy labour leader, angela rayner, received a string of threats. greater manchester police said they launched an investigation after multiple threatening and abusive phone calls, emails and letters were sent over recent weeks. a spokesman for ms rayner said the abuse didn'tjust have an impact on her, but also on her family
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and her staff. climate protesters attempted to block to major roads in london after warranting its resistance will continue. dozens of people have been arrested near the crossing and there were further arrests at a separate demonstration on the a 40 and london. my shower, and once again one of london's mean archery is blocked by protesters. their aim is to bring traffic to a standstill. mt; to bring traffic to a standstill. ij�*i patients to bring traffic to a standstill. m patients are to bring traffic to a standstill. m1: patients are not to bring traffic to a standstill. m1 patients are not going to to bring traffic to a standstill. m1: patients are not going to be to bring traffic to a standstill. m1 patients are not going to be happy about this because you are blocking me. people need us and you are blocking us from getting to them. but their protests have angered many ordinary people simply trying to get to work. one man's brain inc. in the faces of those who glued themselves
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to the floor. they have done this 15 times all over the capital. they are being spoken to by the police and they will be removed. many of them have glued themselves to the floor. why are you doing this? irate have glued themselves to the floor. why are you doing this?— have glued themselves to the floor. why are you doing this? we have pod called holmes. _ why are you doing this? we have pod called holmes. people _ why are you doing this? we have pod called holmes. people are _ why are you doing this? we have pod called holmes. people are dying. - why are you doing this? we have pod called holmes. people are dying. he| called holmes. people are dying. he will barbrady and what's coming down the line is unbearable to think about. , , , . the line is unbearable to think about. , . . . . the line is unbearable to think about. , ,, ., , ., about. despite a number of injunctions— about. despite a number of injunctions granted - about. despite a number of injunctions granted to - about. despite a number of i injunctions granted to prevent about. despite a number of - injunctions granted to prevent these actions they have failed to stop the protesters. in dartford on the and 25, a second action list staged. causing misery to all of those stuck in the traffic. causing misery to all of those stuck in the traffic-— in the traffic. they are obnoxiously holdin: u- in the traffic. they are obnoxiously holding up traffic _ in the traffic. they are obnoxiously holding up traffic and _ in the traffic. they are obnoxiously holding up traffic and holding - in the traffic. they are obnoxiously holding up traffic and holding up i holding up traffic and holding up medical services. holding up traffic and holding up medicalservices. kyle holding up traffic and holding up medical services. kyle is giving them a bit of taste of their own medicine. ,., . them a bit of taste of their own medicine-— them a bit of taste of their own medicine. ,., . ., ., ., medicine. the police have made a number of — medicine. the police have made a number of arrests _ medicine. the police have made a number of arrests and _ medicine. the police have made a number of arrests and both - medicine. the police have made a| number of arrests and both scenes were created within a matter of
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hours. but the environment groups say they will be back until the government agrees to insulate all uk homes by 2030 to cut carbon emissions. here is the muse six and all the weather. the rain keeps falling as it will tonight and into tomorrow as well. there is a met office amber warning as rain mounts the risk of flooding would increase and there are some flood warnings and disruption as a result. this is the rainfall picture today. you will be struck by the fact that the rain is continuing to feed into across the same areas whereas many other places have stay dry around 18 degrees. we have seen some sunshine and parts of eastern england. overnight the rain is still falling and southwest scotland into the scottish borders and more of northwest wales as well. on either
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side it will be dry with a few showers into single figures in northern scotland and mild there but it might be at this time of year. the the weather system is in no hurry to move away so it will feed in the rain to cumbria and said in scotland and the essential belts and more of northwest england and wales getting into the rain in cornwall and back then as well. by the time it's done we could have over 200 mm of rain in the latest parts of cumbria. it has to feed down into the river systems. it's another mild but windy day. a few showers in scotland and northern ireland. dry into central and eastern parts of england and that will continue into thursday evening. changes begin on friday, overnight into friday another pulse of rain in northern ireland. it will feed across scotland and the weather funds will push some outbreaks of rain towards eastern areas of england during the day after a dry week. it's after thatis day after a dry week. it's after that is a spread east it will be a much drier and to the day whereas
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the moment it's very wet. 0ver much drier and to the day whereas the moment it's very wet. over the weekend no pressure is close by and weekend no pressure is close by and we are going to see some further rain heading our way. on saturday you may start the day tried but we are going to see this move north so it will be a bit of shock rain but there will be happy and it will last there will be happy and it will last the tests up across scotland and brighten up with a few showers. temperatures will fall close to where we might imagine he will be. and over the weekend on sunday it would have some low pressure bringing in more heavy rain north and east across the uk. they will be some rain but strong winds with lead assistant as well. we will be seeing the heavy rain with the risk of flooding and such check out the latest front end weather warning online.
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the chancellor promises an economy fit for a new age of optimism with an extra £150 billion of spending over three years. every government department will get an increase in funding as rishi sunak pledges to invest rather than cut back. this budget helps with the cost of living, this budget levels up to a high—wage, high—skilled, high—productivity economy, this budget builds a stronger economy for the british people and i commend it to the house. with inflation due to rise to 4% for the next year, labour says the budget does little for struggling families. in the long story of this parliament, never has a chancellor asked the british people to pay so much for so little. among today's announcements, universal credit will be adjusted
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so that people will pay back less for every extra pound earned.

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