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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 27, 2021 10:00am-11:16am BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. it's budget day in the uk and the chancellor rishi sunak is preparing to deliver his big speech to the house of commons. measures announced so far include a rise in the national living wage and an end to the public sector pay freeze. but the uk government's under pressure to do more to help with the rising costs of living in other news — a new report says the government's coronavirus test and trace programme in england failed to break chains of transmission despite costing an "eye—watering" amount of money. pipeline politics. the gas crisis intensifies in moldova, europe's poorest state,
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as moscow threatens to turn off the taps. russia is trying to punish moldovan citizens because they decided to vote against the pro—russian party at the parliamentary elections so it is pure politics. the queen withdraws on medical advice from hosting a reception at the global climate summit in glasgow. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk chancellor rishi sunak will deliver his budget and spending review today. a number of policies have already been announced, but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. so far, we've been told there will be a rise
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in the national living wage from £8.91 per hour to £9.50, and an end to the pay freeze for public sector workers. there'll be £5.9 billion for nhs england to tackle the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans. and £2.6 billion to be spent on creating 30,000 new school places for children with special educational needs and disabilities. in all, the promises already unveiled will cost billions of pounds in extra spending. but we'll have to wait until after midday to hear how the chancellor plans to fund these policies and labour has warned the spending pledges do not go far enough to make up for tax and price hikes. here's our political correspondent chris mason. rishi sunak showing off his footwear and socks in a set of photos released by the treasury of the chancellor preparing for today.
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chatting through the budget with his advisers, always with an eye to his image. his dog nova even features, as do his snacks. but by the time we get to this moment later on... can the country afford l this budget, mr sunak? ..and him addressing the commons, what will really matter is what it means for each of us. the biggest question for him is how much is he going to have to spend on all those public services, particularly the ones that have really suffered during the austerity years, in a world in which the economy, i'm afraid, is smaller as a result of the pandemic than it would have otherwise been. a big issue for many right now is the cost of living, and whether the government's upbeat language matches how things feel week by week for lots of people. this is going to be a brutal and bitter winter for millions of householders who are not going to be able to bear the extra
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cost of heating their homes because of the price rises. the chancellor today has got to match his fiscal responsibility with a bit of moral responsibility. in the last few days, loads of stuff about today's budget been already been announced. nhs england will get £5.9 billion to tackle the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans. £6.9 billion has been allocated to transport projects, including in west yorkshire, the west midlands and greater manchester. and the minimum pay rate for those aged 23 and over, known as the national living wage, will go up to £9.50 per hourfrom april. but even though plenty has been announced, what we will get from the chancellor later still really matters because it will be the detail about the state of the economy and the state of the government's finances, and so crucially, where our money will be spent and where it won't. now, then, it's over to the chancellor and his big moment at lunchtime.
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chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is in downing street. chris mason was mentioning the detail, there. what should we be looking out for?— detail, there. what should we be looking out for? isn't it always the wa that looking out for? isn't it always the way that the _ looking out for? isn't it always the way that the devil _ looking out for? isn't it always the way that the devil really _ looking out for? isn't it always the way that the devil really is - looking out for? isn't it always the way that the devil really is in - looking out for? isn't it always the way that the devil really is in the l way that the devil really is in the detail? in less than an hour, we expect the chancellor to walk out of the door of number 11 and brandished the door of number 11 and brandished the red box and that is when we will really find out how all of those bits and pieces that chris was talking about that we have heard and out so far fit into the bigger picture. what we are expecting is that he will say the state of the public finances is broadly a little bit better than a lot of the number crunches had predicted. that may give him a bit more money to play with and we have heard a lot about where they want to invest, so for example, the nhs, in skills, in early years. we have heard about the increases to the national living wage and the public sector pay
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freeze already being lifted. what we have not heard so much about is what the chancellor might do to directly address what many are calling a cost of living crisis, that squeeze on household budgets we are seeing from prices, in particular energy bills going up. it is worth looking for something around that, it is thought he might do something with universal credit, you will remember that through the pandemic, the government increased universal credit payments by £20 per week and that came to an end and a lot of people said that was the wrong decision. it may be they do something around that, probably not a u—turn but perhaps looking at the rate of universal credit and at how much people can keep when they start to earn, whether they can keep a bit more so thatis whether they can keep a bit more so that is worth watching out for as well. broadly, ithink that is worth watching out for as well. broadly, i think what we are going to hearfrom well. broadly, i think what we are going to hear from the chancellor is the message that things are perhaps a bit rosier than we thought but beneath that, i think there will still be a pretty stern warning that this is not a chancellor that wants to splash the cash. he wants to be seen to be keeping the reins on the public finances and remember, this is rishi sunak�*s first budget that
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is rishi sunak�*s first budget that is not directly affected by the emergency state of the pandemic. covid is still around and everybody recognises that but i think what he will try to do is focus on spending in other areas a bit more, if you like, more of a normal budget. we will also have to see what is going to happen to various departmental spending budgets, that will be key as well? ~ , spending budgets, that will be key aswell? ~ ,~ ,, as well? absolutely crucial because ou aet as well? absolutely crucial because you get the — as well? absolutely crucial because you get the budget _ as well? absolutely crucial because you get the budget and _ as well? absolutely crucial because you get the budget and you - as well? absolutely crucial because you get the budget and you also i as well? absolutely crucial because | you get the budget and you also get what is called the spending review which sets out how much the government wants to spend on each of its departments over the course of the next three years. some of those departments are what is called protected, so things like the nhs, which means they know what they are going to get and it is going to be a certain amount. also, we have heard a lot about investment in the nhs are ready. we had the announcement of five point knit —— five 9p already to clear what is a record backlog of people waiting for things like tests and scans so the big question is, what is going to happen to those departments which are not protected? what is going to happen to their budgets? that might be things like local government who say
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they have taken a lot of strain on they have taken a lot of strain on the front line through the course of the front line through the course of the pandemic and they have had their budgets cut for years and they will be watching very closely to see what they get. and remember, local government is responsible for a lot of social care which is quite a big one, too, and things like the justice department, parts of the criminaljustice justice department, parts of the criminal justice system, justice department, parts of the criminaljustice system, we know there was a backlog in the courts and they will be looking very closely to see what they are going to get when it comes to that spending review so there will be a lot of announcements today and there will be a lot of big picture figures but the absolute crux of this will be what is buried in the detail. we will leave it there for now. alex forsyth, in downing street, many thanks. so what's the economic background to the chancellor's announcements today? 0ur economic correspondent andy verity is here with more. good morning. this is one of the leaky budgets i can remember and i have covered dozens of them. all the announcements we have seen already amount to billions, as you have been reporting already so what do we know? let's have a look at a few of the measures that have been preannounced. 0ne the measures that have been preannounced. one of them is that we
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are going to get national insurance rising. that was the big move which was announced a few weeks back and the 1.25% extra national insurance, we will all pay to pay for social care will kick in in april, as are the other moves like the national living wage which is not really a government measure, it is employers' money but we know that will go up to £9.50 per hour. you will get no vat cut on energy bills, even though some people thought the government might do that to help people with rising bills. we have also heard the public sector pay freeze introduced last year is going to end. so we can expect that to go up again, public sector pay in april next year sometime. let's look at the context of this. what about economic growth? how does the economic picture look for the last few years? if the economy were measured on the richter scale, you can see the earthquake right at the beginning, and then we come back up in the second half of last year, and then you have got a few after—shocks and right here, we
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are still not quite back up to pre—pandemic levels. although it looks like a tiny squeak below where we were before the pandemic, it is actually the size of a large recession. then you have a look at what has happened to government borrowing. that has shot up in the pandemic, of course. it hasjumped up, it was forecast at the last budget to be £355 billion but look at this, how fast it has come down. this is really interesting because thatis this is really interesting because that is before any tax cuts or spending —— tax rises or spending cuts have been announced. with austerity measures, it has dropped really sharply, about half of what it was last year just because really sharply, about half of what it was last yearjust because we don't have to spend as much on emergency measures. —— without austerity measures. then you look at what is happening to tax, remember, this is a conservative chancellor who likes to think he is not a tax—and—spend guy but is driven by demographics and if you look at the tax burden, it has risen to its highest level since the 1960s and thatis highest level since the 1960s and that is going to rise further, basically, to pay for the cost of
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social care and also to pay for health care, mainly because we have just got an ageing population. we will hear about other measures of causing a couple of hours. 0ne will hear about other measures of causing a couple of hours. one of the things we think they might do is give some money back to those on universal credit that it has taken £20 a week from. we will have to wait and see, though. we will and we will be waiting with bated breath. andy verity, thank you. isabella 0'dowd is the head of climate at the world wildlife fund. shejoins me now. good morning. what are you hoping to hearfrom the good morning. what are you hoping to hear from the chancellor in the budget to ensure public spending is compatible with climate targets? good morning. today, we are really hoping that the chancellor shows real leadership ahead of the climate talks happening next week in glasgow. we are calling on the chancellor to commit to a net zero test, so that is a test to look at the overall spending from the
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budget, ora the overall spending from the budget, or a comprehensive spending review, to make sure it is aligning with the legally binding climate change targets. qm. with the legally binding climate change targets.— with the legally binding climate change targets. 0k, we will talk about the net _ change targets. 0k, we will talk about the net zero _ change targets. 0k, we will talk about the net zero test - change targets. 0k, we will talk about the net zero test because | change targets. 0k, we will talk. about the net zero test because my understanding is you have already applied it to the budget that rishi sunak delivered earlier this year, in march. what did you find? yes. sunak delivered earlier this year, in march. what did you find? yes, so we tested it — in march. what did you find? yes, so we tested it earlier _ in march. what did you find? yes, so we tested it earlier this _ in march. what did you find? yes, so we tested it earlier this year, - in march. what did you find? yes, so we tested it earlier this year, the - we tested it earlier this year, the march budget, and what we found was government was spending more on policies that were harmful to the environment rather than ones that were positive. so overall, 2% of gdp, which is around £40 billion, was spent on negative policies, whereas 0.01% was spent on positive policies and that was looking at new spending. 0verall, ourassessment is that over the timespan of the next six years, it increased emissions to the equivalent of 5% of the uk's emissions. so the equivalent of 596 of the uk's emission— the equivalent of 596 of the uk's emissions. , ., ., ., , , , emissions. so if you are applying our net emissions. so if you are applying
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your net zero _ emissions. so if you are applying your net zero test _ emissions. so if you are applying your net zero test to _ emissions. so if you are applying your net zero test to this - emissions. so if you are applying your net zero test to this budget | your net zero test to this budget and i appreciate as all of the contributors and reporter—macros have been saying, we don't know the details yet but we have had some announcements, how is it looking at the moment?— the moment? that is the point for us, we the moment? that is the point for us. we need _ the moment? that is the point for us. we need to — the moment? that is the point for us, we need to see _ the moment? that is the point for us, we need to see the _ the moment? that is the point for us, we need to see the overall- us, we need to see the overall picture is so currently, the government does assessment on individual policies but it does not have the overall assessment so we need to make sure the test is applied so it can highlight some of the harmful, negative ones, to make sure that maybe there are things we can do to make their move into the green category, for example, you can put green conditionality on certain policies to make sure we are unlocking the benefits for the future and investing in a net zero transition. it future and investing in a net zero transition. , . ., transition. it is tricky, though, isn't it, because _ transition. it is tricky, though, isn't it, because we _ transition. it is tricky, though, isn't it, because we know- transition. it is tricky, though, isn't it, because we know that| transition. it is tricky, though, - isn't it, because we know that one of the government's priorities is to level up? that is going to involve spending and building and increase transport links, for example. how do
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you balance that with getting to zero? ~ ~ , .., ., zero? well, i think they come hand in hand. zero? well, i think they come hand in hand- net _ zero? well, i think they come hand in hand. net zero _ zero? well, i think they come hand in hand. net zero really _ zero? well, i think they come hand in hand. net zero really needs - zero? well, i think they come hand in hand. net zero really needs to l zero? well, i think they come hand| in hand. net zero really needs to be at the heart of levelling up. analysis that we have done shows that that can really unlock benefits for the uk. if we invest in climate change, we can unlock £90 billion of annual benefits here in the uk and thatis annual benefits here in the uk and that is betterjobs for the annual benefits here in the uk and that is better jobs for the future, warmer homes, better transport and reduced health risks. we need to make sure we are investing, levelling up across the country and thatis levelling up across the country and that is also unlocking those benefits for the future. did that is also unlocking those benefits for the future. did you say 90 million or— benefits for the future. did you say 90 million or 90 _ benefits for the future. did you say 90 million or 90 billion? _ benefits for the future. did you say 90 million or 90 billion? 90 - 90 million or 90 billion? 90 billion. how _ 90 million or 90 billion? 90 billion. how do _ 90 million or 90 billion? 90 billion. how do you - 90 million or 90 billion? 90 billion. how do you get - 90 million or 90 billion? 90 billion. how do you get to l 90 million or 90 billion? 90 i billion. how do you get to that fiuure? billion. how do you get to that figure? we — billion. how do you get to that figure? we did _ billion. how do you get to that figure? we did some - billion. how do you get to that figure? we did some analysis| billion. how do you get to that - figure? we did some analysis earlier this ear figure? we did some analysis earlier this year that _ figure? we did some analysis earlier this year that looked _ figure? we did some analysis earlier this year that looked at _ figure? we did some analysis earlier this year that looked at different - this year that looked at different areas, so if you invested that i% of gdp that the committee on climate
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change says we need to invest, which is around £30 billion, then that would massively reduce the risk of health problems around air quality. we know that air quality improvements reduce deaths by 17,000 each year. it increases jobs, improvements reduce deaths by 17,000 each year. it increasesjobs, green jobs for the future, and it also reduces the risk of flooding. we're already seeing the impacts of climate change here in the uk. they are going to get worse if we are not tackling climate change. and so if we are not spending now to mitigate those effects, then we know that the costs will double for future generations and we will have to spend more. generations and we will have to spend more-— generations and we will have to send more. , ., �* ., ., spend more. isabella o'dowd, head of climate at the — spend more. isabella o'dowd, head of climate at the w _ spend more. isabella o'dowd, head of climate at the w ws, _ spend more. isabella o'dowd, head of climate at the w ws, thank _ spend more. isabella o'dowd, head of climate at the w ws, thank you - spend more. isabella o'dowd, head of climate at the w ws, thank you for - climate at the w ws, thank you for joining us. i'm joined by carys roberts, executive director of the institute of public policy research. good morning. the big picture first
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i think to you if i may. where are we as a nation with regards to the public finances and your view? we were speaking to pauljohnson from the institute for fiscal studies a little earlier, to say the economic outlook actually looks rosier than perhaps the chancellor might have been anticipating even six months ago. i been anticipating even six months auo. ~' ~' , been anticipating even six months alo, ~ ~ , , ., ago. i think the key question here is not so much _ ago. i think the key question here is not so much the _ ago. i think the key question here is not so much the public - ago. i think the key question here is not so much the public finances as what state the economy is in because that is going to determine the public finances also. you know, people's living standards and so on and i think we are at a really critical moment in that regard. if you look at the challenges people have coming up over the winter, there are lots of price rises that are going to put a squeeze on people's pockets, and there is a cut to universal credit that the chancellor has made. you know, public services are in dire need of investment. 0n public services are in dire need of investment. on top of that, the government has said that it is committed to the net zero agenda, and it's levelling up agenda. that is the context for today that there
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are these really big challenges coming down the track. if the chancellor wants to meet them, that is going to take investment, not pulling back spending now. so you said the question _ pulling back spending now. so you said the question needs _ pulling back spending now. so you said the question needs to - pulling back spending now. so you said the question needs to be - pulling back spending now. so you said the question needs to be not| said the question needs to be not about public finances but about the state of the economy so how do you assess that?— state of the economy so how do you assess that? ., ., ., , , , , ., assess that? how do we assess that? if ou assess that? how do we assess that? if you look. — assess that? how do we assess that? if you look. we _ assess that? how do we assess that? if you look, we will _ assess that? how do we assess that? if you look, we will obviously - assess that? how do we assess that? if you look, we will obviously see - if you look, we will obviously see the full assessment from the office for budget responsibility today but one of the things you can see is that they are anticipating permanent damage to the economy. that does not have to be the case, if you look at, for instance, the usa, they have much lower damage done to their economy and also, if you look at what actually the economy is in terms of the money people have in their pockets, the ability they have to buy the things they need, that is where i think you have some really big problem coming down the track. a lot of families are going to find themselves worse off, including those who see the universal credit
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cut by £1000 per year, just as you have got these price rises coming down the track. i think it is very urgent that the chancellor addresses those challenges. what urgent that the chancellor addresses those challenges.— those challenges. what would help? we are hearing _ those challenges. what would help? we are hearing reports _ those challenges. what would help? we are hearing reports this - those challenges. what would help? we are hearing reports this morning | we are hearing reports this morning that the chancellor may be tweaking the universal credit, but we don't know the details. what else would help address some of the challenges you havejust help address some of the challenges you have just outlined? help address some of the challenges you havejust outlined? i help address some of the challenges you have just outlined?— you have 'ust outlined? i think he needs a you have just outlined? i think he needs a short-term _ you have just outlined? i think he needs a short-term plan, - you have just outlined? i think he needs a short-term plan, and - you have just outlined? i think he | needs a short-term plan, and that needs a short—term plan, and that should include reversing the £20 universal credit cut. some of the tweaks that have been trailed would be good things but would not compensate the people who have lost out. he also needs to be looking to the long term. for instance, it has been widely trailed that he will be cutting back spending on public services. we have been here before and in fact, services. we have been here before and infact, it services. we have been here before and in fact, it is underinvestment in public services that meant that when the pandemic it, we were less able to deal with it. and so it is very important he does invest in for
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instance social care, and in the people that have got us through this pandemic and it is very important that he sets a direction for the economy and for businesses to know that for instance, they can invest in green measures to decarbonise the economy and hits net zero. he needs to be looking at the short—term picture, helping families through, and that should include reversing the cuts but he also needs to be investing for the future. so that we can find ourselves better placed to address the challenges like climate change in the future. we address the challenges like climate change in the future.— change in the future. we will see. thank you — change in the future. we will see. thank you for— change in the future. we will see. thank you forjoining _ change in the future. we will see. thank you forjoining us. - and for viewers in the uk, we'll bring you the budget speech in a special programme later this morning here on bbc news. we'll have pre—budget analysis and all the reaction. that's live from 11.15am here in the uk. the uk government's coronavirus test and trace programme in england has failed to achieve its "main objective"
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of helping break chains of covid transmission — that's according to a group of cross—party mps. the public accounts committee says a number of the programme's aims have been "overstated or not achieved," despite costing an "eye—watering" amount of money. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. the performance of the test and trace programme in england has been under scrutiny for months. this assessment by mps could hardly be more damning. the public accounts committee, which examines value for money of government projects, says the programme's outcomes have been muddled and it hasn't achieved a number of its main objectives despite costing the taxpayer millions. the nhs test and trace programme has been one of the most expensive health programmes delivered during the pandemic. it has cost £37 billion over two years, equal to nearly a fifth of the entire nhs england budget. when it comes to test results,
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just 14% of 691 million lateral flow tests distributed by test and trace were registered. and in periods of pressure, like december 2020, just 17% of people were receiving test results within 24 hours. we found it very difficult to see what it had achieved for the 37 billion. it set out very bold aims, it failed on many of its own terms. crucially now, its responsibilities are in the new uk health security agency. but that's still got a lot to prove. the main objective for test and trace was to help break chains of covid—19 transmission and enable people to return towards a more normal way of life. instead, england experienced two more national lockdowns and saw a dramatic rise in case numbers. the use of expensive private sector consultants who were meant to deliver the programme comes in for particular criticism. for all the eye—watering sums of money spent on test and trace, mps say it's far from clear whether it will be a legacy system that's built to last, one that will be ready
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for the next crisis. dominic hughes, bbc news. the climate protest group insulate britain has blocked two sections of major roads into london this morning. activists obstructed the a40 in west london and a roundabout in dartford to the south—east of the capital, to urge the government to better insulate homes. protesters have been unglued from the road by police and 17 people have been arrested at the protest in acton. and this happened earlier, where a member of the public sprayed protesters with ink. 0ur correspondentjames waterhouse is at that demonstration in dartford. i think ithinka i think a sense there of both sides of this argument. you
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i think a sense there of both sides of this argument.— of this argument. you are exactly riuht. of this argument. you are exactly right- you — of this argument. you are exactly right. you usually _ of this argument. you are exactly right. you usually see _ of this argument. you are exactly right. you usually see with - right. you usually see with demonstrations, beeps of support, as cars come by but when you target one of the busiestjunctions in the country, just over there is the dartford crossing which connects kent and essex, their drivers have reacted as you would expect. it was around 10am that 12 protesters roughly took themselves up the path and sat in that now familiar style, on the traffic lightjunction come here, and some of them glued themselves to the roadside. when you see it first hand, you realise that is how it helps them delay and stay there for as long as possible. the police made a couple of very quick arrests but the others managed to stay there for the best part of half an hour, trapping what must have been 100 cars on the bridge that sits across the m25, the busiest motorway in a country so it does cause disruption, you can see the last few waiting to be searched and taken away and they are very much intent on being carried the whole
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way. their message, they want every home in the uk to be insulated by 2030. they say the people they want to speak to our ministers, not the public but when there are demonstrations like this, it is the public that are affected.— public that are affected. james waterhouse, _ public that are affected. james waterhouse, thank _ public that are affected. james waterhouse, thank you - public that are affected. james waterhouse, thank you for - public that are affected. james | waterhouse, thank you for that update from the demonstration in dartford. the us prosecutor investigating the accidental fatal shooting on the set of the film rust in new mexico says criminal charges have not been ruled out. it's also emerged that the assistant director of the production had been previously sacked over gun safety violations. according to a production company, dave halls was dismissed from a set in 2019 when a firearm unexpectedly went off. halyna hutchins died last thursday after being accidentally shot by actor alec baldwin. senators in brazil have recommended criminal charges be laid against president bolsonaro over his handling of the covid pandemic.
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he's been facing accusations varying from misuse of public funds to crimes against humanity. a senate committee voted by a majority to hold him responsible for many of brazil's covid deaths, which have now passed 600,000. coronavirus cases in poland have gone up by 50% since last week. the spike has seen 8361 new infections. the health ministerfor poland has described it as an "explosion". it's the first time the number of new infections has gone above 8000 since april. 63% of adults there are fully vaccinated compared to the eu average of 74%. public health experts in the united states have recommended children aged 5—11 should get the pfizer—biontech vaccine. the decision will affect around 28 million children and is likely to come into place
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within a matter of weeks. it now awaits further approval from the the food and drug administration and the centers for disease control and prevention. survivors and family members of the paris terror attacks nearly six years ago have been giving testimony in court. 130 people were killed in a series of co—ordinated attacks. most of them died in the bataclan concert hall. 20 people are now on trial in relation to the attacks, including the sole survivor of the isis cell and a self—proclaimed "islamic state soldier" salah abdeslam. nick alexander was at the bataclan concert venue to work alongside the us band eagles of death metal and was the only british national to die in the attacks. his sister zoe spoke in court yesterday and she joins me now.
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we are delighted to have you with us on bbc news, thank you. i wondered first of all how difficult it was to relive what happened in court? it was very emotional. it is a very intense atmosphere in the courtroom anyway, listening to people's stories and their experience of that night so yeah, it was emotional but it felt really important to do it and very powerful. tell it felt really important to do it and very powerful.— it felt really important to do it and very powerful. tell us what you told the court _ and very powerful. tell us what you told the court about _ and very powerful. tell us what you told the court about your _ and very powerful. tell us what you told the court about your brother. l and very powerful. tell us what you told the court about your brother. i | told the court about your brother. i told the court about your brother. i told them that he had a huge energy. he was a very vibrant person. you knew when he had walked into a room without him saying a word. he had a kind of magnetic personality. he loved music. he loved to travel. but he was also really connected to home as well. yeah, he was a great guy to be around and the amount of messages we got from people all across the
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world, some of whom had only met him once at the concert, after the attack, really bore testament to that. i attack, really bore testament to that. ~ ., , ., attack, really bore testament to that. ~ ., y., , , that. i know you spent some time in court during — that. i know you spent some time in court during the _ that. i know you spent some time in court during the trial _ that. i know you spent some time in court during the trial so _ that. i know you spent some time in court during the trial so far. - that. i know you spent some time in court during the trial so far. i - court during the trial so far. i wonder how have the other survivors and family members and indeed you yourself found the process? it is a bit of a double-edged _ yourself found the process? it is a bit of a double-edged sword, - yourself found the process? it is a bit of a double-edged sword, i - bit of a double—edged sword, i think. it is very... it is very intense and hard to relive those details, especially six years later, when a lot of healing has gone on, to go back to the very brutal and graphic details of that night, to unpack those stories again. i think it has been a very difficult process for a lot of the survivors. but at the same time, there has been some really positive things that have come out of it, some bonds have been strengthened, people have found people they have been looking for, for the last six years, thinking, "i wonder what happened to that person?" so the puzzle pieces for a lot of people are coming together as well which is a hugely positive
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experience top white that is good to hear and what is it like for you navigating a court process in a different country? i mean, you may speak fluent french for all i know but i'm assuming it is all in french. it is. we are provided with translators in court. and i are, you know, the whole process, we have been guided very well by the legal team here in paris. we have not felt hugely disconnected, although i would say that it is very difficult when you are not in paris to follow it because there is a web radio that you can tune into but it is only in french so if you don't speak fluent french, it is hard to follow what is happening if you not actually a. find happening if you not actually a. and what happens next? can you attend court as often as you like? absolutely, anyone who is registered as a civil party can visit court anytime they like over the next six orseven anytime they like over the next six or seven months, for as long as the
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trial is to continue. we will probably come may be another couple of times. zoe probably come may be another couple of times. ., ~ ., , of times. zoe alexander, we must leave it there _ of times. zoe alexander, we must leave it there but _ of times. zoe alexander, we must leave it there but thank _ of times. zoe alexander, we must leave it there but thank you - of times. zoe alexander, we must leave it there but thank you so - of times. zoe alexander, we must i leave it there but thank you so much for talking to us, i know it is difficult but it is really good to hear from you.— difficult but it is really good to hear from ou. ., ,, ., ., hear from you. thank you for having me. officials in moldova are due to hold a fresh round of negotiations with russia's state energy giant gazprom today amid a gas crisis in the country. moldova, which relies heavily on russian gas, declared a state of emergency last week after failing to agree a new deal with russia. gazprom has threatened to cut moldova's gas supply if a contract isn't signed. from the moldovan capital chisinau, steve rosenberg reports. once in moscow's orbit, moldova has been looking for a new direction, tilting from russia towards the west. its government wants to move closer to the eu, but there's a problem. all of the gas here comes
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from russia, so what do you do if moscow turns off the tap? it's threatening to if moldova doesn't sign a new contract at a higher price. the russians have already cut supplies by a third. just business, or is it? basically, russia is trying to punish moldovan citizens because they decided to vote against the pro—russian party at the parliamentary elections, so it is pure politics and nothing more. that's pure fantasy, thinks gazprom. russia's state energy giant says it will gladly pump gas if there's a deal and if moldova settles its debt. but is the kremlin using energy as a weapon? vladimir putin recently called that accusation nonsense and tittle—tattle.
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russia says it never mixes pipelines and politics, but if you've got a lot of gas, that gives you a lot of influence and a lot of power. and if you're a country like moldova, which has been getting all of its gas from russia but now wants a closer relationship with europe, that can give you a lot of trouble. moldova has declared a state of emergency. this crisis centre is making sure the gas keeps flowing. the country is seeking alternative sources in europe, but it's bad timing. well, it's the worst time to have a gas crisis. at home, the prices are higher than ever. can moldova get all the gas that it needs at a price you can afford to pay if you don't get a deal with russia? well, you see the gas prices today. we don't know how high or how low they will be in two months or in five months, right? so i cannot tell you whether these prices are affordable.
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in the town of balti, less gas means long queues at the propane station. some of these cars have been waiting for three hours for fuel. for a government that has set a pro—european course, there is a danger here that amid a gas crisis, moldovans may start to question the direction their country has taken. the headlines on bbc news... it's budget day in the uk — and the chancellor rishi sunak is preparing to deliver his big speech to the house of commons.
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measures announced so far include a rise in the national living wage — and an end to the public sector pay freeze. but the uk government's under pressure to do more to help with the rising costs of living. in other news... a new report says the government's coronavirus test and trace programme in england failed to break chains of transmission — despite costing an "eye—watering" amount of money. pipeline politics. the gas crisis intensifies in moldova — europe's poorest state — as moscow threatens to turn off the taps. it's budget day in the uk — the chancellor will deliver his spending review and budget within the next couple of hours. a number of policies have already been announced, but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. let's go to bristol in western england, where our correspondent andrew plant has been speaking to people about the impact of the
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pandemic on the economy there. good morning. yes, there has been lots for us to pick over, preannounced from this budget already. a lot of talk in bristol about the money announced for regional public transport improvements, because here there are particular problems on some routes with buses. for example, between bristoland with buses. for example, between bristol and bath, a journey of ten miles, that can take over an hour. so it looks like 550 million coming here to try and help improve that network, a journey that hundreds of people have to make every single day. but from talking too small businesses like these ones setting up businesses like these ones setting up in the centre to start serving people are their morning coffee and lunch is, for them it is still all about recovery from the pandemic. they say that has only just started and is still casting a long shadow, and is still casting a long shadow, and they want to see a lot more help with that. we have got some guests here this morning. first up is adam
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britton. the organisation represents hundreds of bars, pubs and restaurants across the city. what have your members been saying about what they would like to see? thea;r what they would like to see? they want to see _ what they would like to see? they want to see the _ what they would like to see? they want to see the support _ what they would like to see? they want to see the support remain in place _ want to see the support remain in place for— want to see the support remain in place for longer than it currently is. place for longer than it currently is there — place for longer than it currently is there is _ place for longer than it currently is. there is quite a scare amongst the hospitality businesses in particular, because they are only feeling _ particular, because they are only feeling it— particular, because they are only feeling it is being normal now. we have _ feeling it is being normal now. we have to _ feeling it is being normal now. we have to remember that as a nation, we are _ have to remember that as a nation, we are only— have to remember that as a nation, we are only seeing that we feel nounal— we are only seeing that we feel normal because we have been doing things— normal because we have been doing things and _ normal because we have been doing things and going out but financially, they are onlyjust ctuning — financially, they are onlyjust coming back now. financially, they are only 'ust coming back nomi financially, they are only 'ust coming back now. financially, they are only 'ust comin: back now. . ., ., , coming back now. what about the rise in the minimum _ coming back now. what about the rise in the minimum wage? _ coming back now. what about the rise in the minimum wage? that _ coming back now. what about the rise in the minimum wage? that could - coming back now. what about the rise | in the minimum wage? that could cost employers a lot of money. with lots of employees, you are travelling costs. what do they think about that? i costs. what do they think about that? ., , costs. what do they think about that? . , . ., ., ., ., that? i have been chatting to a lot ofthe that? i have been chatting to a lot of the venues _ that? i have been chatting to a lot of the venues and _ that? i have been chatting to a lot of the venues and the _ that? i have been chatting to a lot of the venues and the common . that? i have been chatting to a lot - of the venues and the common themes for us _ of the venues and the common themes for us were _ of the venues and the common themes for us were about, if we can keep the vat— for us were about, if we can keep the vat at — for us were about, if we can keep the vat at 12.5% and keep the business — the vat at 12.5% and keep the business rates lower, in terms of the national minimum wage, a lot see
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it as a _ the national minimum wage, a lot see it as a positive thing for their staff— it as a positive thing for their staff members. it may increase people — staff members. it may increase people coming back to hospitality. but it _ people coming back to hospitality. but it is _ people coming back to hospitality. but it is one of those cost factors. we represent businesses, obviously, but also _ we represent businesses, obviously, but also individual people. and while _ but also individual people. and while the — but also individual people. and while the national wage increase is good, _ while the national wage increase is good, there is national insurance and a _ good, there is national insurance and a tax — good, there is national insurance and a tax hike that could put not much _ and a tax hike that could put not much money into people's buckets. thanks _ much money into people's buckets. thanks we — much money into people's buckets. thanks. we also have james drury here. you are the head of a local chamber of commerce. what would you like to see the chancellor talking about? . , ., about? there are three things are members would _ about? there are three things are members would like _ about? there are three things are members would like to _ about? there are three things are members would like to see - about? there are three things are members would like to see with l about? there are three things are - members would like to see with keen interest _ members would like to see with keen interest at— members would like to see with keen interest. at this _ members would like to see with keen interest. at this moment, _ members would like to see with keen interest. at this moment, they- members would like to see with keen interest. at this moment, they wantl interest. at this moment, they want to sustain _ interest. at this moment, they want to sustain support _ interest. at this moment, they want to sustain support for— interest. at this moment, they want to sustain support for businesses. . to sustain support for businesses. some _ to sustain support for businesses. some businesses— to sustain support for businesses. some businesses are _ to sustain support for businesses. some businesses are only- to sustain support for businesses. some businesses are onlyjust - some businesses are onlyjust starting — some businesses are onlyjust starting to— some businesses are onlyjust starting to rebuild _ some businesses are onlyjust starting to rebuild their- some businesses are onlyjustl starting to rebuild their balance sheets — starting to rebuild their balance sheets, carrying _ starting to rebuild their balance sheets, carrying a _ starting to rebuild their balance sheets, carrying a lot _ starting to rebuild their balance sheets, carrying a lot of - starting to rebuild their balance sheets, carrying a lot of debt. i starting to rebuild their balance i sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so at a time — sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so at a time when _ sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so at a time when we _ sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so at a time when we are _ sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so at a time when we are still- sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so at a time when we are still not. sheets, carrying a lot of debt. so i at a time when we are still not sure where _ at a time when we are still not sure where we _ at a time when we are still not sure where we are — at a time when we are still not sure where we are in— at a time when we are still not sure where we are in terms— at a time when we are still not sure where we are in terms of— at a time when we are still not sure where we are in terms of the - where we are in terms of the pandemic, _ where we are in terms of the pandemic, there _ where we are in terms of the pandemic, there is— where we are in terms of the pandemic, there is hope - where we are in terms of thej pandemic, there is hope that where we are in terms of the . pandemic, there is hope that it where we are in terms of the - pandemic, there is hope that it is going _ pandemic, there is hope that it is going to — pandemic, there is hope that it is going to improve _ pandemic, there is hope that it is going to improve but— pandemic, there is hope that it is going to improve but we -
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pandemic, there is hope that it is going to improve but we are - pandemic, there is hope that it is going to improve but we are not. going to improve but we are not sure, _ going to improve but we are not sure. so— going to improve but we are not sure, so sustaining _ going to improve but we are not sure, so sustaining the - going to improve but we are not sure, so sustaining the supportl going to improve but we are not - sure, so sustaining the support that has been _ sure, so sustaining the support that has been in — sure, so sustaining the support that has been in place. _ sure, so sustaining the support that has been in place. secondly- sure, so sustaining the support that has been in place. secondly is- has been in place. secondly is around — has been in place. secondly is around the _ has been in place. secondly is around the infra— _ has been in place. secondly is around the infra— structure i has been in place. secondly is| around the infra— structure we has been in place. secondly is- around the infra— structure we need for the _ around the infra— structure we need for the whole — around the infra— structure we need for the whole of _ around the infra— structure we need for the whole of the _ around the infra— structure we need for the whole of the region. - around the infra— structure we need for the whole of the region. we - around the infra— structure we needl for the whole of the region. we have seen some _ for the whole of the region. we have seen some announcements - for the whole of the region. we have seen some announcements around i seen some announcements around bristol— seen some announcements around bristol and _ seen some announcements around bristol and bath. _ seen some announcements around bristol and bath, but _ seen some announcements around bristol and bath, but there - seen some announcements around bristol and bath, but there are - seen some announcements around l bristol and bath, but there are some bil bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket— bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket items _ bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket items we _ bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket items we need _ bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket items we need to - bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket items we need to see - bristol and bath, but there are some big ticket items we need to see in i big ticket items we need to see in this city — big ticket items we need to see in this city at— big ticket items we need to see in this city. at bristol— big ticket items we need to see in this city. at bristol temple - big ticket items we need to see inl this city. at bristol temple meads, we are _ this city. at bristol temple meads, we are expecting _ this city. at bristol temple meads, we are expecting a _ this city. at bristol temple meads, we are expecting a large _ this city. at bristol temple meads, i we are expecting a large commitment which _ we are expecting a large commitment which enables — we are expecting a large commitment which enables the _ we are expecting a large commitment which enables the growth _ we are expecting a large commitment which enables the growth of- we are expecting a large commitment which enables the growth of a - we are expecting a large commitment which enables the growth of a new . which enables the growth of a new university— which enables the growth of a new university campus— which enables the growth of a new university campus in _ which enables the growth of a new university campus in the _ which enables the growth of a new university campus in the city- which enables the growth of a new university campus in the city and l which enables the growth of a new university campus in the city and aj university campus in the city and a lot of— university campus in the city and a lot of new— university campus in the city and a lot of new homes _ university campus in the city and a lot of new homes which _ university campus in the city and a lot of new homes which need - university campus in the city and a lot of new homes which need to i university campus in the city and a| lot of new homes which need to be built _ lot of new homes which need to be built and — lot of new homes which need to be built. and thirdly, _ lot of new homes which need to be built. and thirdly, around - lot of new homes which need to be built. and thirdly, around tax. - lot of new homes which need to be built. and thirdly, around tax. fori built. and thirdly, around tax. for many— built. and thirdly, around tax. for many businesses, _ built. and thirdly, around tax. for many businesses, particularly - built. and thirdly, around tax. for. many businesses, particularly those paying _ many businesses, particularly those paying business— many businesses, particularly those paying business rates, _ many businesses, particularly those paying business rates, we _ many businesses, particularly those paying business rates, we are - paying business rates, we are nationally— paying business rates, we are nationally calling _ paying business rates, we are nationally calling for- paying business rates, we are nationally calling for this, - paying business rates, we are nationally calling for this, the| nationally calling for this, the british— nationally calling for this, the british chambers— nationally calling for this, the british chambers of— nationally calling for this, the . british chambers of commerce. nationally calling for this, the - british chambers of commerce. it feels _ british chambers of commerce. it feels like — british chambers of commerce. it feels like a — british chambers of commerce. it feels like a tax _ british chambers of commerce. it feels like a tax from _ british chambers of commerce. it feels like a tax from another - british chambers of commerce. it feels like a tax from another age, and trying — feels like a tax from another age, and trying to _ feels like a tax from another age, and trying to compete _ feels like a tax from another age, and trying to compete with - and trying to compete with e—commerce _ and trying to compete with e—commerce businesses. and trying to compete with . e—commerce businesses when and trying to compete with - e—commerce businesses when you and trying to compete with _ e—commerce businesses when you are sad for— e—commerce businesses when you are sad for that— e—commerce businesses when you are sad for that commitment _ e—commerce businesses when you are sad for that commitment is— e—commerce businesses when you are sad for that commitment is a - e—commerce businesses when you are sad for that commitment is a real- sad for that commitment is a real problem — sad for that commitment is a real problem and _ sad for that commitment is a real problem. and within— sad for that commitment is a real problem. and within that, - sad for that commitment is a real problem. and within that, also i problem. and within that, also sustaining _ problem. and within that, also sustaining the _ problem. and within that, also sustaining the vat _ problem. and within that, also sustaining the vat with - problem. and within that, also sustaining the vat with that i sustaining the vat with that reduction, _ sustaining the vat with that reduction, because - sustaining the vat with that reduction, because any- sustaining the vat with that reduction, because any cliff| sustaining the vat with that - reduction, because any cliff edge now is— reduction, because any cliff edge now is going _ reduction, because any cliff edge now is going to— reduction, because any cliff edge now is going to cause _ reduction, because any cliff edge now is going to cause serious - now is going to cause serious problems _ now is going to cause serious problems-— now is going to cause serious roblems. ~' , ., ., ., . ., problems. 6.9 billion announced for rerional problems. 6.9 billion announced for
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regional transport _ problems. 6.9 billion announced for regional transport networks - problems. 6.9 billion announced for regional transport networks to - regional transport networks to improve this. it looks like 540 million coming to bristol and bath. is that going to help things here? it is certainly welcomed, but there is a lot— it is certainly welcomed, but there is a lot more — it is certainly welcomed, but there is a lot more needed. _ it is certainly welcomed, but there is a lot more needed. we - it is certainly welcomed, but there is a lot more needed. we have - it is certainly welcomed, but there is a lot more needed. we have got it is certainly welcomed, but there i is a lot more needed. we have got an economy— is a lot more needed. we have got an economy which— is a lot more needed. we have got an economy which wants _ is a lot more needed. we have got an economy which wants to _ is a lot more needed. we have got an economy which wants to recover- is a lot more needed. we have got an| economy which wants to recover here. we have _ economy which wants to recover here. we have businesses— economy which wants to recover here. we have businesses that _ economy which wants to recover here. we have businesses that want - economy which wants to recover here. we have businesses that want to - economy which wants to recover here. we have businesses that want to get i we have businesses that want to get going. _ we have businesses that want to get going. but— we have businesses that want to get going. but they— we have businesses that want to get going, but they need _ we have businesses that want to get going, but they need a _ we have businesses that want to get going, but they need a decent - we have businesses that want to get going, but they need a decent public transport _ going, but they need a decent public transport system _ going, but they need a decent public transport system. £500 _ going, but they need a decent public transport system. £500 million - going, but they need a decent public transport system. £500 million willl transport system. £500 million will move _ transport system. £500 million will move towards — transport system. £500 million will move towards that, _ transport system. £500 million will move towards that, but _ transport system. £500 million will move towards that, but it _ transport system. £500 million will move towards that, but it is- transport system. £500 million will move towards that, but it is not- move towards that, but it is not enough — move towards that, but it is not enough we _ move towards that, but it is not enough. we need _ move towards that, but it is not enough. we need sustained - move towards that, but it is not- enough. we need sustained investment over a _ enough. we need sustained investment over a long _ enough. we need sustained investment over a long time — enough. we need sustained investment over a long time to— enough. we need sustained investment over a long time to get— enough. we need sustained investment over a long time to get a _ enough. we need sustained investment over a long time to get a proper- over a long time to get a proper mass _ over a long time to get a proper mass transit _ over a long time to get a proper mass transit system _ over a long time to get a proper mass transit system for- over a long time to get a proper mass transit system for the - over a long time to get a proper mass transit system for the city| mass transit system for the city around — mass transit system for the city around bristol— mass transit system for the city around bristol and _ mass transit system for the city around bristol and bath. - mass transit system for the city around bristol and bath. we - mass transit system for the city. around bristol and bath. we need mass transit system for the city- around bristol and bath. we need to see investment _ around bristol and bath. we need to see investment around _ around bristol and bath. we need to see investment around some - around bristol and bath. we need to see investment around some of- around bristol and bath. we need to see investment around some of ouri see investment around some of our hi-h see investment around some of our high streets — see investment around some of our high streets we _ see investment around some of our high streets. we really— see investment around some of our high streets. we really need - see investment around some of our high streets. we really need that. high streets. we really need that strong _ high streets. we really need that strong commitment _ high streets. we really need that strong commitment not - high streets. we really need that strong commitment notjust- high streets. we really need that strong commitment notjust for. high streets. we really need that - strong commitment notjust for town centres. _ strong commitment notjust for town centres. but— strong commitment notjust for town centres. but our— strong commitment notjust for town centres, but our high _ strong commitment notjust for town centres, but our high streets. - strong commitment notjust for town centres, but our high streets. if- strong commitment notjust for town centres, but our high streets. if we l centres, but our high streets. if we don't _ centres, but our high streets. if we don't see _ centres, but our high streets. if we don't see that, _ centres, but our high streets. if we don't see that, i _ centres, but our high streets. if we don't see that, i fear— centres, but our high streets. if we don't see that, i fear for— centres, but our high streets. if we don't see that, i fear for the - don't see that, i fear for the future — don't see that, i fear for the future of— don't see that, i fear for the future of some _ don't see that, i fear for the future of some of— don't see that, i fear for the future of some of those - don't see that, i fear for the - future of some of those businesses. james _ future of some of those businesses. james and _ future of some of those businesses. james and adam, _ future of some of those businesses. james and adam, thank— future of some of those businesses. james and adam, thank you - future of some of those businesses. james and adam, thank you for- james and adam, thank you for joining us. a lot of the small businesses i am talking to, for them it is all about working from home. they don't want to see that coming back because obviously, to make a profit, they are relying on people being out shopping and popping out
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and grabbing their lunch. later, we will hear what the chancellor has to say, starting from 12.30 this afternoon. say, starting from 12.30 this afternoon-— say, starting from 12.30 this afternoon. �* ., ,, , ., ., afternoon. andrew, thank you. that is the picture _ afternoon. andrew, thank you. that is the picture in _ afternoon. andrew, thank you. that is the picture in bristol. _ afternoon. andrew, thank you. that is the picture in bristol. let- afternoon. andrew, thank you. that is the picture in bristol. let me - is the picture in bristol. let me take you to downing street to number 11, where we are expecting the chancellor, rishi sunak, to emerge with his team in the next few moments, where he will do the traditional photo opportunity with the red box containing his budget speech and all the details before heading to the house of commons to deliver the speech. we will bring you that speech live this morning on bbc news. kate blagojevic is the uk head of climate at greenpeace. shejoins me now. i wondered what you are hoping to hear from the chancellor to ensure that public spending is compatible
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with climate targets?— with climate targets? absolutely. with only a _ with climate targets? absolutely. with only a few— with climate targets? absolutely. with only a few days _ with climate targets? absolutely. with only a few days to _ with climate targets? absolutely. with only a few days to go - with climate targets? absolutely. with only a few days to go until i with climate targets? absolutely. i with only a few days to go until the climate talks, we have got warnings from un scientists and the extreme weather events that are already happening around the world. we want to be seeing rishi sunak outlining the kind of policies, but also the money needed to tackle the climate crisis. this should be a at the centre of his spending plans this afternoon. but based on his previous ignoring of the issue, i am concerned that actually, he will do very little to tackle it. we should be seeing new green spending of around £25 billion per year over the next three years. that is what is needed to cut emissions from our homes and buildings, invest in a
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great green transport system that we have just been talking about, restore and protect nature and support workers in moving from high carbon industries like oil and farming. we can't afford not to tackle the climate crisis. every year that we delay climate action, the worse it gets and the more expensive action will ultimately be. so you are suggesting 25 billion per year over the next three years. do you really think you're going to get this? after all, there are a lot of pressures on the public purse. ah, just wait there, kate. we are going straight to downing street now. there is rishi sunak and his team. there is rishi sunak and his team. the speech is contained in the red box, his eagerly awaited budget. 0ur correspondent alex forsyth was
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telling us earlier that in many ways, this is rishi sunak�*s first budget and his first spending review, which hasn't come at a time of crisis. i think alex forsyth might be watching alongside us. if you are, alex, talk us through who we are seeing?— you are, alex, talk us through who we are seeing? you are, alex, talk us through who we are seeinr ? ,., ., ., ., .., we are seeing? good morning. you can see the chancellor— we are seeing? good morning. you can see the chancellor rishi _ we are seeing? good morning. you can see the chancellor rishi sunak- we are seeing? good morning. you can see the chancellor rishi sunak and - see the chancellor rishi sunak and his team, rishi sunak brandishing that red box which contains those all—important budget papers. he is going to finish off here and then he will get into his car and make his way across to downing street, where there will be prime ministers and after that, there will be prime ministers and afterthat, he there will be prime ministers and after that, he will deliver his budget around 12.30. so all eyes are eagerly trained on the red box, waiting to see the detail on site. you canjust waiting to see the detail on site. you can just see waiting to see the detail on site. you canjust see rishi sunak on his own at the moment. he was surrounded by members of his treasury team, but with one notable absence, simon clark, the treasury minister, who said that while he has keenly worked alongside the chancellor on this
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budget, hasn't appeared at this moment in the street because he tweeted saying he struggles with agoraphobia, outdoorspaces. so he wasn't present for the photo opportunity moment but he has worked alongside rishi sunak to deliver this budget. the chancellor has delivered a number of other fiscal statements, but he has been the chancellor throughout the course of the coronavirus pandemic, so much of what he has had to do has been to respond to that pandemic. he has been known as the crisis chancellor. today will be his first budget which is not entirely consumed by coronavirus. that is not to say the pandemic isn't very much with us and the economic impacts of the pandemic is still being felt, but the chancellor will want to focus on spending in other tax areas as well and make it feel like a budget for more normal times. you can see the
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car departing for westminster, where he will be set alongside the prime minister at 12.30 this afternoon. everybody because my eyes will be trained on that red box and the details it contains inside. $5 trained on that red box and the details it contains inside. as you sa , details it contains inside. as you say. alex. _ details it contains inside. as you say. alex. we — details it contains inside. as you say, alex, we are _ details it contains inside. as you say, alex, we are waiting - details it contains inside. as you say, alex, we are waiting to - details it contains inside. as you say, alex, we are waiting to see j details it contains inside. as you i say, alex, we are waiting to see all sorts of announcements including what the chancellor might have up his sleeve in terms of helping people with the rising costs of living and rising petrol prices, news that the government is expected to make changes to universal credit in the budget, what are you hearing about that? this in the budget, what are you hearing about that? , ., , , in the budget, what are you hearing about that? , . , , ., , about that? this has been a big issue, about that? this has been a big issue. what _ about that? this has been a big issue, what people _ about that? this has been a big issue, what people are - about that? this has been a big issue, what people are calling l about that? this has been a big j issue, what people are calling a cost of living crisis. that is going to be the focus of what the government might do on it. you might remember that universal credit had an extra £20 a week added at the start of the pandemic. that came to an end and that prompted a lot of
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criticism from the labour party and also some conservative mps and peers, who said that was leaving some of those on the lowest income is really quite vulnerable, so there has been some pressure on the government to move on this. we are expecting that there might be changes to some of those universal credit payments announced in the budget. we are not expecting a total u—turn on that £20 a week, but it may be that the government does something to what is called the taper rate. that means the amount you get to keep from you and your universal credit versus the amount you earn from your wages. it would effectively mean that people might be able to keep a bit more of their universal credit payments. it is important to say that this hasn't been confirmed yet, but there is an expectation that that might be one the government could look at around the government could look at around the cost of living squeeze, because thatis the cost of living squeeze, because that is where ministers are feeling the pressure. we have heard a lot announced across the board about where the government wants to invest, but the labour party are making the point that so far, there hasn't been a lot to help those on the lowest incomes. and a lot of people are seeing the impact of
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rising prices, particularly around energy bills. so watch closely what the government might say around that. �* ., that. alex, we will leave it there for now, that. alex, we will leave it there for now. now — that. alex, we will leave it there for now, now we _ that. alex, we will leave it there for now, now we know— that. alex, we will leave it there for now, now we know rishi - that. alex, we will leave it there i for now, now we know rishi sunak that. alex, we will leave it there - for now, now we know rishi sunak has arrived safely at the house of commons. we will no doubt be talking to you from downing street later. let's rejoin kate blagojevic, head of climate at greenpeace. thank you for your patience. we just wanted to take those pictures of rishi sunak leaving number 11 for the house of commons. you were mentioning that you want to see £25 billion a year over the next three years to fund green policy is compatible with climate targets. how confident are you are realistically getting that kind of money? there is not that kind of money? there is not that kind of money out there as we emerge from the pandemic.— from the pandemic. well, i think there is that _ from the pandemic. well, i think there is that money _ from the pandemic. well, i think there is that money out - from the pandemic. well, i think there is that money out there. i from the pandemic. well, i think.
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there is that money out there. the chancellor needs to understand that if he invested in the kind of green policies that are required, it could be a win—win situation. proper investment would create jobs. be a win—win situation. proper investment would createjobs. it would boost the economy. he can do it so that it protects people on low incomes and it cuts emissions. ultimately, that is a win—win win. we want to see a proper understanding of that in this government. they have a lot of great sounding targets and some policies to match them, but what is absent is the money that makes that real. and without the money, it is just words on paper that won't achieve the kind of cuts in emissions we need to see. you will be aware that one of the government target is to level up, and that will inevitably mean spending on, for example, transport infrastructure. how do you balance
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the desire to level up with getting to net zero? i the desire to level up with getting to net zero?— the desire to level up with getting to net zero? i think the two things are very compatible, _ to net zero? i think the two things are very compatible, actually. - to net zero? i think the two things are very compatible, actually. for| are very compatible, actually. for example, if we saw public investment in insulating our homes and decarbonising homes and buildings, we have done a study that showed that proper investment in that could create over 100,000 jobs and give a real boost to the economy. and that would bejobs real boost to the economy. and that would be jobs all over the country. the chancellor needs to understand that green spending can lead to jobs in those areas that he wants to level up. in those areas that he wants to level u -. . in those areas that he wants to levelu. . a, ., . in those areas that he wants to levelu. . �* ., ., . ., ., level up. kate blago'evic, head of climate at level up. kate blagojevic, head of climate at greenpeace, _ level up. kate blagojevic, head of climate at greenpeace, thanks i level up. kate blagojevic, head of| climate at greenpeace, thanks for your patience and thanks for talking to us. the queen will not attend next week's climate change summit in glasgow following medical advice to rest. the announcement comes a week after the 95—year—old monarch spent a night in hospital for preliminary medical checks.
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buckingham palace says she'll address the delegates in a pre—recorded video message instead. james reynolds has this report. on tuesday last week, the queen hosted a reception for business leaders at windsor. the next morning, her trip to northern ireland was cancelled and she stayed overnight in hospital. yesterday, she gently resumed her public schedule. a video audience with the new korean ambassador. this was then followed by a palace statement. i'm quite sure what she's got at the back of her mind is that she wants to be absolutely fine and fighting fit on november
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14, which is remembrance sunday. that is the most sacred day in her calendar. but i think to go to glasgow to stand in a room full of coughing, wheezing delegates from all over the world is probably an engagement too far. preparations for the climate change conference have been of keen interest to the queen. "we still don't know who's coming", she was overheard saying when opening the welsh senedd two weeks ago. we now know it won't be her. and so the queen will now rely further on that useful pandemic tool, the video message or call. she won't get to meet the glasgow delegates, but they will still get to hearfrom her. james reynolds, bbc news. women across the uk are boycotting nightclubs this week, after a growing number reported falling victim to spiking, either by injection or in their alcohol.
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the girls night in campaign — which has drawn some criticism for suggesting women should stay at home rather than go out — is calling for more preventative measures. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley has more. we all kind of have our own ways of protecting ourselves in the club. they were watching their drinks and looking out for each other. but two weeks ago, their night ended in distress. it wasn't anybody�*s fault what happened to you, like, it was the only person is the perpetrator who should have any blame. zara believes she was spiked in a nightclub in nottingham with a needle containing drugs. i had a complete memory loss from one point of the night to the other point of the night. and that's something that never happens to me. and then when i got up, i felt this really sharp pain in my leg. it was a pinprick mark. more people are coming out and people need to realise, it is an issue and it is happening, and it's horrifying that it's happening. it's a terrifying ordeal.
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to have someone out there, you know, just saying, are you 0k, you know how you're getting home? astrid was with zara on that night and is struggling to come to terms with what happened. i'm feeling quite paranoid and quite anxious. i've been in a situation where i actually went home from a nightclub because ijust, i didn't, i was in the queue, i was surrounded, it was a very boisterous queue and i was around a lot of people and ijust kind of thought, actually, i don't feel comfortable doing this. i don't want to put myself into this position of vulnerability. and every time my arm was being scratched, i was checking for it. it's such a scary time. it's notjust happening here in nottingham. police forces across the uk are investigating an increasing number of cases of women who fear they were spiked with needles containing drugs. spiking drinks has long been a concern. there are many questions about how needles are being used and how widespread these assaults are. how these things are i
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getting into the clubs, why they're even doing it. tonight, these students willjoin others in a campaign which has been called girls' night in, by boycotting nightclubs in order for venues to take more responsibility. this is why the clubs need to take better measures, better precautions, having medics that are accessible on site, and even rooms or points where people who are lost can go and find their friends. you can walk into a club and not even have anyone open your bag to look inside it. and obviously these people are going to be crafty about where they hide things. but it seems ludicrous that there is absolutely nothing in some clubs. and it's notjust women taking part in the boycott. their housemate is also joining in and says it's important that men show solidarity. coming to second year, it's the first year that we have been able to go clubbing because of covid. one of the first things that
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shocked me was some of my female friends told me that you can't walk through a dance floor, you can't walk past a dance floor, without being groped. and that truly shocked me. also, i have friends that have been spiked, female friends that have been spiked, i have female friends that have been injected. and i feel as though we have to show solidarity in this boycott. and stand up together for what this movement is and what it represents. these students are staying in to highlight the dangers of going out. for too many, spiking has been brought close to home. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in nottingham. some news just into us here at the bbc that an inquest into the death of the mp sir david amess, who was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery at a church in leigh—on—sea in essex has been opened and adjourned. the hearing, which lasted less than five minutes, was told that the father of five died of
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multiple stab wounds to the chest. the coroner because my office said that on october the 15th, sir david was stabbed during a meeting with one individual. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. for some of us over the next few days, we're going to continue with some heavy rain and there is the risk of some local flooding. but for all of us, it's going to be very mild for the time of year. what's happening is, we're dragging in this milder air all the way from the tropics across the azores and across our shores. and you can see this weatherfront that's going to be with us for the next few days, producing the rain, especially across southern scotland, north—west england and west wales. so if you're travelling, bear that in mind. there will be a lot of surface water and spray around and as i mentioned, the risk of flooding.
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today we've got the weatherfront draped across northern england, parts of wales, northern ireland, moving northwards into central and southern scotland through the day. to the north of that, there will be some sunshine but there will also be heavy showers. to the south of it, quite a lot of cloud, but some breaks, but in the west the cloud is thick enough for some drizzle and windy through the irish sea and areas adjacent to it. these are the kind of rainfall totals you can expect today, and they are fairly high. as we head through the evening and overnight, we continue with our weatherfront still draped across northern england, north wales and central and southern scotland, edging through northern ireland as well. to the north of it, some clear skies. to the south of it, we are looking at a fair bit of cloud at times but there will be some clear skies too. nonetheless, it's going to be a mild night ahead and still windy through the irish sea, strong winds. tomorrow, our weatherfront will be
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draped round eastern scotland, northern england, wales and the south—west. if anything, it edges further eastwards. but the south—east should stay dry with some sunshine and a much brighter day for scotland and northern ireland, sunshine and a few showers. temperatures range from 12 to 17, still above average, which is roughly ten to 14 north to south. thursday and friday, we now have two weatherfronts, both heading northwards. both of them producing some heavy rain. this is the track we expect them to take. it may change slightly by the time we get to friday, but it's looking fairly cloudy. it's looking fairly wet and behind the main band of rain, we will see a return to some showers. the strongest winds will be across central and eastern areas.
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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 11. it's budget day, and the chancellor, rishi sunak, is preparing to deliver his big speech to the house of commons. measures announced so far include a rise in the national living wage, and an end to the public sector pay freeze. and amid concern over the rising costs of living, the government is expected to make changes to the universal credt system, to allow in—work claimants to keep more of the money they earn. within the last few minutes, the chancellor has arrived at parliament, for one of the major events of the westminster year. we will have live coverage.
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the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget and spending review shortly, and the government is now expected to make changes to universal credit, the bbc understands. it's expected the chancellor to allow in—work claimants to keep more of the money they earn, by changing the taper rate, although the treasury would not comment on any changes. a number of policies have already been announced, but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. so far, we've been told there will be a rise in the national living wage from £8.91 per hour to £9.50, and an end to the pay freeze for public sector workers. there'll be £5.9 billion for nhs england to tackle the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans. and £2.6 billion to be spent on creating 30,000 new school places for children with special educational needs and disabilities.
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in all, the promises already unveiled will cost billions of pounds in extra spending. in all, the promises already unveiled will cost billions of pounds in extra spending. but we'll have to wait until after midday to hear how the chancellor plans to fund these policies, and labour has warned the spending pledges do not go far enough to make up for tax and price hikes. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. rishi sunak showing off his footwear and socks in a set of photos released by the treasury of the chancellor preparing for today. chatting through the budget with his advisers, always with an eye to his image. his dog nova even features, as do his snacks. but by the time we get to this moment later on...
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can the country afford i this budget, mr sunak? ..and him addressing the commons, what will really matter is what it means for each of us. the biggest question for him is, how much is he going to have to spend on all those public services? particularly the ones that have really suffered during the austerity years, in a world in which the economy, i'm afraid, is smaller as a result of the pandemic than it would have otherwise been. a big issue for many right now is the cost of living, and whether the government's upbeat language matches how things feel week by week for lots of people. this is going to be a brutal and a bitter winter for millions of householders who are not going to be able to bear the extra costs of heating their homes because of the price rises. the chancellor today has got to match his fiscal responsibility with a bit of moral responsibility. in the last few days, loads of stuff about today's budget been already been announced. nhs england will get £5.9 billion to tackle the backlog of people
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waiting for tests and scans. £6.9 billion has been allocated to transport projects, including in west yorkshire, the west midlands and greater manchester. and the minimum pay rate for those aged 23 and over, known as the national living wage, will go up to £9.50 per hourfrom april. but even though plenty has been announced, what we will get from the chancellor later still really matters because it will be the detail about the state of the economy and the state of the government's finances, and so crucially, where our money will be spent and where it won't. now, then, it's over to the chancellor and his big moment at lunchtime. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is in downing street. we alex forsyth is in downing street. edge ever close|
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moment, we edge ever closer to that big moment, don't we? as chris was saying, there is pressure on rishi sunak to ease the squeeze being felt by people because of the rising cost of living. what will he be able to do to help?— do to help? that's definitely something _ do to help? that's definitely something people _ do to help? that's definitely something people are - do to help? that's definitely something people are going j do to help? that's definitely i something people are going to do to help? that's definitely - something people are going to be looking out for in this budget. we saw the chancellor come out about half an hour ago and brandished that big red box before he made his way across to the houses of parliament and the details will be in there. one thing we are expecting is some changes to universal credit. you might remember at the start of the pandemic, the government put an extra 20 pounder week on universal credit payment to help those on the lowest incomes. that came to an end and that came to a lot of criticism not just from the and that came to a lot of criticism notjust from the labour party but conservative mps and peers concerned about the impact of that in some of those who have the lowest income. the government has been under pressure to do something. we don't expect a full u—turn but they might make changes to something called the
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taper rate. that's as you earn more, the amount you receive an universal credit goes down, and the government may be looking at changing that point so that you lose less of your universal credit as you earn more, which should in theory mean a bit more money in people's pockets. that's not been confirmed but that's one thing we are expecting, certainly something they have been looking at. other areas, we know they will not cut vat on domestic energy bills, something labour propose and the government has ruled out. they may have some mitigations around energy bills because that's a particular pressure point for people's household budget. more broadly, we will be looking at the chancellor's woods in the state of public finances and we think it will look more rosy than the number crunches has expected meaning the country has been recovering a little bit better than people predicted which may give the chancellor a bit more to play with. we know this is a chancellor who has been mindful of the amount that has been spent
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through the pandemic, he will want to portray himself as a chancellor who is responsible with public finances so while we will hear today what is going to be spent from each government department, you cannot expect him to splash the cash everywhere because he wants to portray the image of a chancellor that takes responsible decisions. there's a lot to look out for but the really important thing is going to be, does he do enough to help people who are really feeling the pinch? so, what's the economic background to the chancellor's announcements today? 0ur economic correspondent andy verity is here with more. this really is one of the luckiest budgets i can ever remember. if you look at what has already been announced. —— leaky. national insurance is going to go up by 1.25% for all of us from next april. also not a budget measure but an
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improvement in the pay of people on the national living wage will rise by up to £9 50 an hour. there will also be no vat cut on energy bills. a lot of people struggling with those, there was speculation that might be helped by the government have ruled that out. also that the public sector pay freeze which was brought in next year is now not going to continue. public—sector workers can help to have some rise next year, now they have a real terms pay cut. let's look at the economic background. what has happened to the economy in recent years, and if the economy were measured by electricity, you can see there's quickly went through last year when the government you have after—shocks and now we're back up close to where we were before the pandemic. there is still a gap and that's the size of a large
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recession, quite a serious gap, not back up to pre—pandemic levels yet. what has that done to government borrowing? you can see on this chart how it has shot up in the pandemic. it was forecast to hit 355 billion in the year to april last year and it is now dropping rapidly. this is key because it's dropping without any kind of austerity measures, no tax rises, no spending cuts have affected that and it's nevertheless dropping rapidly, simply because the economy is growing, you get more tax money rolling in which means the government has to borrow less to cover its spending. let's look at tax levels generally. this is a conservative chancellor. we have been rising and rising. and in fact have got up to their highest level since the 1960s, some 36% of the size of the economy is the tax burden right now, with high national insurance and higher corporation tax. that's happening just because
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of demographics, and ageing population, care cost more, health costs more. we can expect another measure, it might have to do with universal credit, but we will find out in just over universal credit, but we will find out injust over an universal credit, but we will find out in just over an hour's time. i'm joined by mike brewer, chief economist at the resolution foundation. good to have you with us. i want to start by asking what you are looking for from the chancellor. brute start by asking what you are looking for from the chancellor.— for from the chancellor. we are really looking — for from the chancellor. we are really looking for _ for from the chancellor. we are really looking for the _ for from the chancellor. we are j really looking for the chancellor for from the chancellor. we are i really looking for the chancellor to address the cost of living crunch that's coming this winter. it's right that the economy is doing better—than—expected, it's likely the 0biang will adjust upwards for gdp those are good pieces of news for the chancellor. what was not expected is the surge inflation caused by global pressures as we all recover from the pandemic and it's really going to bear down hard on families this winter. we really going to bear down hard on
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families this winter.— families this winter. we had the announcement _ families this winter. we had the announcement at _ families this winter. we had the announcement at the _ families this winter. we had the announcement at the national l families this winter. we had the - announcement at the national living wage will rise to £9.50. we are also hearing although i stress it has not been confirmed, that a government is expecting to make changes to universal credit, allowing any work claimants to keep more of the money that they earn. will those measures presumably help?— that they earn. will those measures presumably help? those measures will certainly help- — presumably help? those measures will certainly help- 2 _ presumably help? those measures will certainly help. 2 million _ presumably help? those measures will certainly help. 2 million people - presumably help? those measures will certainly help. 2 million people do - certainly help. 2 million people do arise in their wages because of the rise in the living wage and if there is a change in universal credit that will help those on benefits and working keep more, but we mustn't forget that government has just cut £5 billion off the benefit bill when it reduced universal credit by £20 a week, affecting the most poor 4.5 million household in the country. it's also gambling with tax rises in april bearing down on households with a rise in national insurance and also freezing income tax threshold. the chancellor is
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gambling with getting away with cutting benefits and increasing taxes at a time with inflation bearing down heavily on households. that's interesting. we hear about levelling up, what in your view would be the best measures to deliver that? would be the best measures to deliverthat? it would be the best measures to deliver that? it will be interesting to see how much money michael gove's new levelling up department is given. i new levelling up department is . iven. ~ ., new levelling up department is liven. ~ ., ., ., given. i think we need to wait for the levelling _ given. i think we need to wait for the levelling up _ given. i think we need to wait for the levelling up white _ given. i think we need to wait for the levelling up white paper - given. i think we need to wait for. the levelling up white paper which will happen later this year before we get a good idea of the government approach to how to reduce inequality for different parts of the country. that will be an incredible different oh important thing to do. we are also looking for the budget to, it will be able to give out a lot of capital spending, the government has pencilled in large rises in capital spending during this parliament, that was a key part of boris johnson's pledge in 2019. we are likely to see a bit more of that allocated later today. whether that leads to levelling up or some of the net zero ambitions. in the
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difficulty _ net zero ambitions. in the difficulty is _ net zero ambitions. in the difficulty is you _ net zero ambitions. in the difficulty is you cannot continue to spend at exceptionally high levels. when do you stop spending and try to cut the deficit? i when do you stop spending and try to cut the deficit?— cut the deficit? i think we need to focus on how _ cut the deficit? i think we need to focus on how difficult _ cut the deficit? i think we need to focus on how difficult it _ cut the deficit? i think we need to focus on how difficult it is - cut the deficit? i think we need to focus on how difficult it is to - cut the deficit? i think we need to focus on how difficult it is to pay l focus on how difficult it is to pay the interest on debt rather than the level of debt or in any given year. because of low interest rates the amount we are, the government is spending on paying interest is actually at some of its lowest levels ever. there is not too much of a concern about public finances right now. i would be more concerned if the chancellor was to retrench more quickly. we are in a recession so we think cutting spending and increasing taxes too quickly would run the risk of derailing the recovery. run the risk of derailing the recovery-— run the risk of derailing the recove . , ., ., recovery. 0k, very good to hear your thou~hts recovery. 0k, very good to hear your thoughts and — recovery. 0k, very good to hear your thoughts and insights. _ recovery. 0k, very good to hear your thoughts and insights. we _ recovery. 0k, very good to hear your thoughts and insights. we must - recovery. 0k, very good to hear your| thoughts and insights. we must leave it there. thanks so much forjoining
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us here on bbc news. we will be bringing you the budget speech live in a special programme here on bbc news from 11:15am. you're watching bbc news. in a moment, we'll bring you a special programme for live coverage and analysis of the chancellor's budget. let's take a look back at rishi sunak emerging from number 11 downing street in the past half hour, clutching the ministerial red box containing his budget papers. the chancellor's statement in the house of commons will follow prime minister's questions at midday. many announcements about the content of the budget have already been made, including new money for the nhs, a rise in the national living wage and public sector pay rises. there has also been speculation about changes to the way universal credit is paid.
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sources have told the bbc that the chancellor is expected to allow claimants to keep more of the money they earn by changing the taper rate. it's wednesday, it's 11.15, and we're live in westminster where rishi sunak is preparing to deliver his autumn budget and spending review. joining me for this politics live budget special, business editor simonjack, political editor laura kuenssberg and economics editor faisal islam. the chancellor will say the country can move on from the pandemic to an economy for a new age of optimism.

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