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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 27, 2021 6:00am-9:00am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. the countdown to the budget. the chancellor promises a "new age of optimism" but faces pressure to do more to help people struggling with rising living costs. but what about those promises to level up outside of london? i have brought the cypher to burnley to find out what people are hoping to hear from the chancellor later today. the queen pulls out of hosting a reception at the global climate summit in glasgow on medical advice. a perfect ten for the lionesses as england show latvia no mercy in their world cup qualifier
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to continue their unbeaten run. and the emotional moment d—day veteran harry billinge finally sees the normandy memorial he helped fund. what a waste of life. marvellous men, marvellous men. this is a marvellous memorial. i never thought i'd be here, really. it's wednesday 27th october. our main story. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later today, with a promise to prepare for a new post—covid economy. a number of policies have already been announced, including nhs funding and a rise in the national living wage. but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. rishi sunak showing off his footwear
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and socks in a set of photos released by the treasury of the chancellor preparing for today. chatting through the budget with his advisers, always with an eye to his image. his dog nova even features, as do his snacks. but by the time we get to this moment later on... can the country afford this budget, mr sunak? and him addressing the commons, what will really matter is what it means for each of us. the biggest question for him is how much is he going to have to spend on all those public services, particularly the ones that have really suffered during the austerity years, in a world in which the economy, i'm afraid, is smaller as a result of the pandemic than it would have otherwise been. a big issue for many right now is the cost of living, and whether the government's upbeat language matches how things feel week by week for lots of people.
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this is going to be a brutal and bitter winter for millions of householders who are not going to be able to bear the extra cost of heating their homes because of the price rises. the chancellor today has got to match his fiscal responsibility with a bit of moral responsibility. in the last few days, loads of stuff about today's budget been already been announced. nhs england will get £5.9 billion to tackle the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans. £6.9 billion has been allocated to transport projects, including in west yorkshire, the west midlands and greater manchester. and the minimum pay rate for those aged 23 and over, known as the national living wage, will go up to £9.50 per hourfrom april. but even though plenty has been announced, what we will get from the chancellor later still really matters because it will be the detail about the state of the economy and the state of the government's finances. and so crucially, where our money will be spent and where it won't.
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now, then, it's over to the chancellor and his big moment at lunchtime. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. let's join our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, who's at downing street. we know quite a lot of the details of what is going to happen in the budget but the cabinet will be gathering in downing street later to discuss the details. away from the headlines we already know, i guess it is the detail, what else will be hidden in the pages.— it is the detail, what else will be hidden in the pages. morning, yeah, there have been _ hidden in the pages. morning, yeah, there have been a _ hidden in the pages. morning, yeah, there have been a little _ hidden in the pages. morning, yeah, there have been a little bit _ hidden in the pages. morning, yeah, there have been a little bit of - hidden in the pages. morning, yeah, there have been a little bit of the - there have been a little bit of the chancellor's speech released in advance overnight, and he talks about how this is a moment to start building the new economy for the post covid era. that is a pretty big obvious clue that the emergency period is over which means less
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spending on the virus but that might mean a return to old—fashioned things like chancellors who wants to balance the books it might mean that that means less generous in spending on other things. in terms of the details on what will be in the hundreds of pages of numbers that are being released today, it's not just the budget, it is a spending review which will spell out how much each government department spends over the next three years, mps will be looking at which towns and villages have money from the new levelling up fund, money that can be spent very quickly on visible projects which makes the government look like it is doing its main pledge of levelling up the country. lots of people will be looking for help on the cost of living because there is much bigger gas and electricity bills are starting to arrive on the front doors. i will be looking at the document from the office of budget of responsibility, which monitors the figures, and the key number will be the permanent damage to the economy caused by
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covid. there's lots of speculation that experts at the obr will say that experts at the obr will say that things are less bad than they thought it will be. and we have just seen trace of number 11, one of the cleanest, polishing every inch of the famous black door. —— we have just seen tracy from number 11, one of the cleaners, polishing every inch of the famous back door for photos later. we inch of the famous back door for photos later-— inch of the famous back door for hotos later. ~ , ., ., ~ ., photos later. we will be looking at the buduet photos later. we will be looking at the budget later _ photos later. we will be looking at the budget later on _ photos later. we will be looking at the budget later on in _ photos later. we will be looking at the budget later on in the - photos later. we will be looking at. the budget later on in the programme as well. the queen will not attend next week's climate change summit in glasgow following medical advice to rest. the announcement comes a week after the 95—year—old monarch spent a night in hospital for preliminary medical checks. buckingham palace say she'll address the delegates in a pre—recorded video message instead. james reynolds has this report. on tuesday last week,
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the queen hosted a reception for business leaders at windsor. the next morning, her trip to northern ireland was cancelled and she stayed overnight in hospital. yesterday, she gently resumed her public schedule. a video audience with the new korean ambassador. this was then followed by a palace statement. i'm quite sure what she's got at the back of her mind is that she wants to be absolutely fine and fighting fit on november ia, which is remembrance sunday. that is the most sacred day in her calendar. but i think to go to glasgow to stand in a room full of coughing, wheezing delegates from all over the world is probably an engagement too far.
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preparations for the climate change conference have been of keen interest to the queen. "we still don't know who's coming", she was overheard saying when opening the welsh senedd two weeks ago. we now know it won't be her. and so the queen will now rely further on that useful pandemic tool, the video message or call. she won't get to meet the glasgow delegates, but they will still get to hearfrom her. james reynolds, bbc news. the coronavirus test and trace programme in england has failed to achieve its "main objective" of helping break chains of covid transmission. that's according to a group of cross—party mps. the public accounts committee says a number of the programme's aims have been "overstated or not achieved," despite costing an "eye—watering" amount of money. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports.
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the performance of the test and trace programme in england has been under scrutiny for months. this assessment by mps could hardly be more damning. the public accounts committee, which examines value for money of government projects, says the programme's outcomes have been muddled and it hasn't achieved a number of its main objectives despite costing the taxpayer millions. the nhs test and trace programme has been one of the most expensive health programmes delivered during the pandemic. it has cost £37 billion over two years, equal to nearly a fifth of the entire nhs england budget. when it comes to test results, just 14% of 691 million lateral flow tests distributed by test and trace were registered. and in periods of pressure, like december 2020, just i7% of people were receiving test results within 2a hours. we found it very difficult to see what it had achieved for the 37 billion. it set out very bold aims, it failed on many of its own terms.
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crucially now, its responsibilities are in the new uk health security agency. but that's still got a lot to prove. the main objective for test and trace was to help break chains of covid—i9 transmission and enable people to return towards a more normal way of life. instead, england experienced two more national lockdowns and saw a dramatic rise in case numbers. the use of expensive private sector consultants who were meant to deliver the programme comes in for particular criticism. for all the eye watering sums of money spent on test and trace, mps say it's far from clear whether it will be a legacy system that's built to last, one that will be ready for the next crisis. dominic hughes, bbc news. a week after a cinematographer was accidentally shot dead on the set of a hollywood movie, it's emerged the assistant director of the production had been previously sacked over gun safety violations. according to a production company, dave halls was dismissed from a set
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in 2019 when a firearm unexpectedly went off. halyna hutchins died last thursday after being accidentally shot by actor alec baldwin. a man is believed to have died after falling from a boat off the essex coast while attempting to cross the channel. two other men, both of whom are somali nationals, were rescued on monday. the home office said the incident was a "reminder of the extreme dangers of crossing the channel in small boats". water companies will face new rules to reduce the amount of untreated waste that's released into waterways during wet weather, following a partial government u—turn. ministers say the new measures will force industries to make a "progressive reduction" in the sewage dumped in rivers. it follows pressure from the house of lords and campaign groups after mps originally rejected the proposal. we will talk to one of the
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campaigners later, feargal sharkey, the singer, he had led that campaign, we will talk about their possible compromise from the house of lords. let's take a look at the weather now with darren. there were two inches of rain in scotland on sunday, that is moving south, but it is still very mild. this is where we are expecting the rain today, it could affect eastern parts of northern ireland, in the central belt, most of the rain particularly in cumbria and clipping the north—west of wales. to the north, there will be some sunshine, sharp showers around, and south of the rain band, it is cloudy but there will be some breaks in the cloud, some sunshine coming through and it could be even more mild. the rain having moved further south will hang around over the next few days so we have some wet weather in the
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southern uplands of scotland, cumbria and north—west england and into west and wales by thursday. that is all going to lead to some flooding. he's been praised for his tireless fundraising efforts over more than six decades — and now world war two veteran harry billinge has finally had the chance to see one of his biggest dreams become a reality. the 96 year old has travelled to normandy to visit a special memorial honouring soldiers, sailors and airmen who died under british command following the d—day landings, a project his efforts helped to fund. 0ur reporterjohn maguire was there. as a former soldier, harry billinge would have done this thousands of times. but never was a salute more poignant and heartfelt.
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what a waste of life. marvellous men, marvellous men. this is the memorial. i never thought i'd be here. but it's wonderful. i feel very humble today and i'm deeply moved, because i didn't realise what a wonderful place it is now. beyond all comprehension. marvellous. he was just a teenager when he was one of the first to land here in normandy on what the allies called gold beach. he wanted to come to the british memorial, for the very first time, and to see the names of some of the men who died on d—day and during the battles that followed. alexander. and up there, look — bates.
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bates. can you see him? yes. chiselled into the memorial�*s stone are the names of 22,442 people who were killed here during the summer of 1944. marvellous man. he got promoted to lance corporal. he was a sapper. but he was an elderly bloke to be over here, really. i think he was old enough to be my dad. harry's fundraising has been tireless. a regular fixture at par market near his home in cornwall, he has raised almost £a0,000. and that dedication is recognised here on one of the walls. but typically, harry's reaction to seeing his name was to think of others. don't deserve that. i don't.
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we did it with all these wonderful men. thank you very much. can't believe it. i didn't expect my name to be here. the covid pandemic had prevented d—day veterans from being at the official opening back injune. harry was joined then by family and friends to watch the ceremony via a video link. but, today, he was able to see and to touch what he dreams of for so many years. and he was able to see another special tribute to his endeavours — harry's bench. marvellous. thank you very much. give me a kiss. and when you are laid in a hole in the ground, being shelled... and machine guns, rifle fire.
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when you are in a hole with a bloke, you get to know him. you get to know his very soul. i think it is a wonderful monument to all those wonderful men who gave up their lives. for are very small amount of money — they did it in a form of duty. for a very small amount of money — they did it in a form of duty. at the site's centre, a sculpture depicts three men fighting their way up the beach. it captures their determination, their aggression and their youth. bear with me. i'm breaking my heart standing here. i love you all. if you can hear me. just tanks and guns, weapons of murder. we did it though, didn't we? we knocked �*em back. harry is well known in the towns that line this coast and people
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here are eternally grateful to their liberators. for the local, it is something very important. we live with it. we had to go on living, but never forget, never forget. it is so important to remember that they came here, that they managed to pass so many obstacles to get freedom for us, first of all, but then for europe and the world. and it is amazing, all those young guys. yeah, it's important. and there is no rest for the committee. for the committed. he is planning to spend this afternoon collecting in the nearby town of arromanches, continuing to raise money for the memorial�*s upkeep and a planned education centre — something harry is passionate about. a man who has already done so much
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believes there is yet more to do to ensure his friends and colleagues who never made it home are always remembered. and may god bless you all. and may god bless me, too, and to give me strength to carry on a little while longer. 0h, oh, my goodness, what a beautiful place. at oh, my goodness, what a beautiful lace. �* , ., ., .,, place. a beautiful moment as well, what a special _ place. a beautiful moment as well, what a special thing _ place. a beautiful moment as well, what a special thing to _ place. a beautiful moment as well, what a special thing to have - what a special thing to have witnessed. john maguire was there with harry for that incredible moment. and hejoins us now from normandy. so special to be there, what are the things that you will take away from it that you will always remember?— take away from it that you will always remember? take away from it that you will alwa s remember? _,, ., , ., ., always remember? gosh, it was a real lum in always remember? gosh, it was a real lump in your— always remember? gosh, it was a real lump in your throat _ always remember? gosh, it was a real lump in your throat time. _ always remember? gosh, it was a real lump in your throat time. there - always remember? gosh, it was a real lump in your throat time. there was i lump in your throat time. there was not a _ lump in your throat time. there was not a dry— lump in your throat time. there was not a dry eye — lump in your throat time. there was not a dry eye in the house. just to
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see how— not a dry eye in the house. just to see how much it meant to harry, and a surprise _ see how much it meant to harry, and a surprise because we haven't met him several— a surprise because we haven't met him several times over the last few years _ him several times over the last few years -- _ him several times over the last few years -- we — him several times over the last few years. —— we have met him several times_ years. —— we have met him several times and — years. —— we have met him several times and he — years. —— we have met him several times and he has always been a great person— times and he has always been a great person to _ times and he has always been a great person to talk to. to see him come here _ person to talk to. to see him come here to _ person to talk to. to see him come here to touch — person to talk to. to see him come here to touch his own name i think is one _ here to touch his own name i think is one of— here to touch his own name i think is one of the — here to touch his own name i think is one of the most poignant moments. he repeatedly says as he always does. _ he repeatedly says as he always does. it's— he repeatedly says as he always does, it's not about me, it's about the others, — does, it's not about me, it's about the others, the men, his friends and colleagues _ the others, the men, his friends and colleagues and comrades, that were left behind. the names commemorated on these _ left behind. the names commemorated on these columns behind me and across— on these columns behind me and across the — on these columns behind me and across the memorial. a very special moment _ across the memorial. a very special moment it — across the memorial. a very special moment. it has also been interesting seeing _ moment. it has also been interesting seeing him _ moment. it has also been interesting seeing him here in the area, in normandy. _ seeing him here in the area, in normandy, it's like following around a rock— normandy, it's like following around a rock star, — normandy, it's like following around a rock star, wherever he goes people crowd _ a rock star, wherever he goes people crowd around and talk to him, a family— crowd around and talk to him, a family stopped him yesterday at breakfast yesterday, a french family. — breakfast yesterday, a french family, stopped him to say thank you
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and there _ family, stopped him to say thank you and there were two teenage boys who were looking at him in all. i'm joined — were looking at him in all. i'm joined by— were looking at him in all. i'm joined by some guests here, i know it is dark— joined by some guests here, i know it is dark and — joined by some guests here, i know it is dark and we have not had much chance _ it is dark and we have not had much chance to _ it is dark and we have not had much chance to see much of it, a special place _ chance to see much of it, a special place but _ chance to see much of it, a special place but very overdue. absolutely, it makes you _ place but very overdue. absolutely, it makes you wonder— place but very overdue. absolutely, it makes you wonder why _ place but very overdue. absolutely, it makes you wonder why we - place but very overdue. absolutely, it makes you wonder why we didn'tl place but very overdue. absolutely, i it makes you wonder why we didn't do this 60 years ago. it is fantastic at long last, there is now this fantastic memorial to the over 20,000 service people under british command who lost their lives injune and july 191m during the normandy campaign. someone like harry, as you were saying, it brings it home and it is really for the veterans that we have done this. wonderful that harry is still continuing to fund raise, as indeed we continue to fund raise, as indeed we continue to fund raise because we have built this now but we have got to maintain it for future generations. if any viewer wants to have a role in this, they
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can sign up to become a guardian, go onto the website, put a standing order in and help us maintain this fantastic facility. would we have also got to do is tell the story of that campaign so that future generations know how that wonderful force of people fought to produce freedom and liberty in europe in 1944 freedom and liberty in europe in 191m and freedom and liberty in europe in 1944 and i945 freedom and liberty in europe in 191m and 1945 under the freedom and liberty in europe in 1944 and 1945 under the command of henry's grandfather. and 1944 and 1945 under the command of henry's grandfather.— henry's grandfather. and that education _ henry's grandfather. and that education centre _ henry's grandfather. and that education centre is _ henry's grandfather. and that education centre is very - henry's grandfather. and that - education centre is very important to harry— education centre is very important to harry for— education centre is very important to harry for that exact reason. you have _ to harry for that exact reason. you have had _ to harry for that exact reason. you have had a — to harry for that exact reason. you have had a look, what did you think? briefly, _ have had a look, what did you think? briefly, it _ have had a look, what did you think? briefly, it was a bit dark but fantastic. _ briefly, it was a bit dark but fantastic, so _ briefly, it was a bit dark but fantastic, so impressed. - briefly, it was a bit dark butl fantastic, so impressed. and briefly, it was a bit dark but - fantastic, so impressed. and really impressed — fantastic, so impressed. and really impressed and _ fantastic, so impressed. and really impressed and grateful— fantastic, so impressed. and really impressed and grateful to - fantastic, so impressed. and really impressed and grateful to the - impressed and grateful to the trustees— impressed and grateful to the trustees who _ impressed and grateful to the trustees who have _ impressed and grateful to the l trustees who have campaigned impressed and grateful to the - trustees who have campaigned to make this happen _ trustees who have campaigned to make this happen i'm — trustees who have campaigned to make this happen. i'm looking _ trustees who have campaigned to make this happen. i'm looking forward - trustees who have campaigned to make this happen. i'm looking forward to - this happen. i'm looking forward to seeing _ this happen. i'm looking forward to seeing it— this happen. i'm looking forward to seeing it properly— this happen. i'm looking forward to seeing it properly in _ this happen. i'm looking forward to seeing it properly in daylight- this happen. i'm looking forward to seeing it properly in daylight and l seeing it properly in daylight and really— seeing it properly in daylight and really looking _ seeing it properly in daylight and really looking forward _ seeing it properly in daylight and really looking forward to - seeing it properly in daylight and really looking forward to seeing i seeing it properly in daylight and i really looking forward to seeing the group _ really looking forward to seeing the group of _ really looking forward to seeing the group of veterans _ really looking forward to seeing the group of veterans who _ really looking forward to seeing the group of veterans who are - really looking forward to seeing the group of veterans who are coming i group of veterans who are coming tater _ group of veterans who are coming later to _ group of veterans who are coming later to see — group of veterans who are coming later to see it _ group of veterans who are coming later to see it for _ group of veterans who are coming later to see it for the _ group of veterans who are coming later to see it for the first - group of veterans who are coming later to see it for the first time. . later to see it for the first time. you _ later to see it for the first time. you are — later to see it for the first time. you are with _ later to see it for the first time. you are with that _ later to see it for the first time. you are with that group, - later to see it for the first time. you are with that group, you i later to see it for the first time. . you are with that group, you have had a _ you are with that group, you have had a chance, we travelled over on
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the ferry— had a chance, we travelled over on the ferry a — had a chance, we travelled over on the ferry a couple of days ago, what is their— the ferry a couple of days ago, what is their mood?— is their mood? they are a lovely urou - , is their mood? they are a lovely group. sadly _ is their mood? they are a lovely group. sadly only _ is their mood? they are a lovely group, sadly only seven - is their mood? they are a lovely group, sadly only seven of- is their mood? they are a lovely | group, sadly only seven of them, is their mood? they are a lovely - group, sadly only seven of them, but we have _ group, sadly only seven of them, but we have been— group, sadly only seven of them, but we have been to _ group, sadly only seven of them, but we have been to two _ group, sadly only seven of them, but we have been to two ceremonies - we have been to two ceremonies yesterday— we have been to two ceremonies yesterday and _ we have been to two ceremonies yesterday and they— we have been to two ceremonies yesterday and they are _ we have been to two ceremonies yesterday and they are coming . we have been to two ceremonies i yesterday and they are coming later today— yesterday and they are coming later today to _ yesterday and they are coming later today to a _ yesterday and they are coming later today to a short _ yesterday and they are coming later today to a short ceremony - yesterday and they are coming later today to a short ceremony here - today to a short ceremony here today — today to a short ceremony here today. they— today to a short ceremony here today. they are _ today to a short ceremony here today. they are really - today to a short ceremony here today. they are really excited. i today to a short ceremony here - today. they are really excited. and i'm today. they are really excited. and i'm longing — today. they are really excited. and i'm longing to _ today. they are really excited. and i'm longing to see _ today. they are really excited. and i'm longing to see their— today. they are really excited. and i'm longing to see their faces. - today. they are really excited. and i'm longing to see their faces. i- i'm longing to see their faces. i think— i'm longing to see their faces. i think they— i'm longing to see their faces. i think they will— i'm longing to see their faces. i think they will be _ i'm longing to see their faces. i think they will be completely. think they will be completely overwhelmed _ think they will be completely overwhelmed and _ think they will be completely overwhelmed and it - think they will be completely overwhelmed and it will- think they will be completely overwhelmed and it will be l think they will be completely. overwhelmed and it will be very emotional— overwhelmed and it will be very emotional for— overwhelmed and it will be very emotional for them. _ overwhelmed and it will be very emotional for them. one- overwhelmed and it will be very emotional for them.— emotional for them. one of the secial emotional for them. one of the special moments _ emotional for them. one of the special moments yesterday - emotional for them. one of the | special moments yesterday was emotional for them. one of the - special moments yesterday was that harry arrived here with a couple of names _ harry arrived here with a couple of names that — harry arrived here with a couple of names that he wanted to seek out and we found _ names that he wanted to seek out and we found them for him on the columns and being _ we found them for him on the columns and being able to touch those names is very— and being able to touch those names is very special to him spot. yes, everyone _ is very special to him spot. yes, everyone who — is very special to him spot. yes, everyone who lost _ is very special to him spot. yes, everyone who lost their - is very special to him spot. yes, everyone who lost their lives - is very special to him spot. 1a: everyone who lost their lives that campaign, their name is on a column and the families can come and find that name and i think that makes it very personal and very special. also when it is daylight and people here,
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the site is fantastic. this part of france is spectacular. behind me to the right is gold beach were 50th division landed, to the left you can see the remains of the mulberry harbour where the logistics flew through into arromanches. and over there, where the only victoria cross was one on the day. so this site is fantastic looking at the pieces of history and with all of the names on these columns, it is fantastic. it is quite spectacular. international visitors are _ is quite spectacular. international visitors are possibly _ is quite spectacular. international visitors are possibly not - is quite spectacular. international visitors are possibly not aware . is quite spectacular. international. visitors are possibly not aware that this was— visitors are possibly not aware that this was a — visitors are possibly not aware that this was a combined british operation, there is so much attention— operation, there is so much attention on the american contribution which was massive. untii— contribution which was massive. untii this— contribution which was massive. until this memorial, there was a lack of— until this memorial, there was a lack of awareness on that.- lack of awareness on that. well, that surprises _ lack of awareness on that. well, that surprises me. _ lack of awareness on that. well, that surprises me. but - lack of awareness on that. well, that surprises me. but i - lack of awareness on that. well, that surprises me. but i don't i lack of awareness on that. well, i that surprises me. but i don't think certainty— that surprises me. but i don't think certainly the — that surprises me. but i don't think certainly the village _ that surprises me. but i don't think certainly the village where - that surprises me. but i don't think certainly the village where i -
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that surprises me. but i don't think certainly the village where i have . certainly the village where i have 'ust certainly the village where i have just been. — certainly the village where i have just been, where _ certainly the village where i have just been, where we _ certainly the village where i have just been, where we had - certainly the village where i have just been, where we had the - certainly the village where i have - just been, where we had the ceremony yesterday. _ just been, where we had the ceremony yesterday. the — just been, where we had the ceremony yesterday, the villagers _ just been, where we had the ceremony yesterday, the villagers there - just been, where we had the ceremony yesterday, the villagers there were - yesterday, the villagers there were very aware — yesterday, the villagers there were very aware that _ yesterday, the villagers there were very aware that the _ yesterday, the villagers there were very aware that the british - yesterday, the villagers there were very aware that the british were i very aware that the british were fully involved _ very aware that the british were fully involved and _ very aware that the british were fully involved and obviously - very aware that the british were j fully involved and obviously that was one — fully involved and obviously that was one of— fully involved and obviously that was one of the _ fully involved and obviously that was one of the main— fully involved and obviously that was one of the main beaches i fully involved and obviously that. was one of the main beaches that fully involved and obviously that - was one of the main beaches that the british— was one of the main beaches that the british landed — was one of the main beaches that the british landed on. _ was one of the main beaches that the british landed on. they— was one of the main beaches that the british landed on. they were - british landed on. they were fa nta stically _ british landed on. they were fantastically supportive - british landed on. they were fantastically supportive and i british landed on. they were - fantastically supportive and there was a _ fantastically supportive and there was a good — fantastically supportive and there was a good crowd _ fantastically supportive and there was a good crowd in— fantastically supportive and there was a good crowd in the - fantastically supportive and there was a good crowd in the village . fantastically supportive and there i was a good crowd in the village out there _ was a good crowd in the village out there yesterday _ was a good crowd in the village out there yesterday. i— was a good crowd in the village out there yesterday. ithink— was a good crowd in the village out there yesterday. i think they - was a good crowd in the village out there yesterday. i think they were i there yesterday. i think they were totally _ there yesterday. i think they were totally aware _ there yesterday. i think they were totally aware. and _ there yesterday. i think they were totally aware. and on _ there yesterday. i think they were totally aware. and on that - there yesterday. i think they were totally aware. and on that beach, | totally aware. and on that beach, also. _ totally aware. and on that beach, also. there — totally aware. and on that beach, also, there was— totally aware. and on that beach, also, there was the _ totally aware. and on that beach, also, there was the french - totally aware. and on that beach, - also, there was the french commandos who also— also, there was the french commandos who also landed — also, there was the french commandos who also landed on _ also, there was the french commandos who also landed on the _ also, there was the french commandos who also landed on the beach. - also, there was the french commandos who also landed on the beach. 0n - also, there was the french commandos who also landed on the beach. 0n the i who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword _ who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword beach — who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword beach. and _ who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword beach. and i— who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword beach. and i had _ who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword beach. and i had the _ who also landed on the beach. 0n the sword beach. and i had the privilegel sword beach. and i had the privilege of meeting _ sword beach. and i had the privilege of meeting one — sword beach. and i had the privilege of meeting one of— sword beach. and i had the privilege of meeting one of the _ sword beach. and i had the privilege of meeting one of the commandos. of meeting one of the commandos yesterday. — of meeting one of the commandos yesterday. a — of meeting one of the commandos yesterday, a french— of meeting one of the commandos yesterday, a french commander, i of meeting one of the commandos. yesterday, a french commander, and we sang _ yesterday, a french commander, and we sang happy— yesterday, a french commander, and we sang happy birthday— yesterday, a french commander, and we sang happy birthday to _ yesterday, a french commander, and we sang happy birthday to him. - yesterday, a french commander, and we sang happy birthday to him. he i yesterday, a french commander, and we sang happy birthday to him. he is| we sang happy birthday to him. he is going _ we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to _ we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to he _ we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to he 99 — we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to be 99 tomorrow. _ we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to be 99 tomorrow. and - we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to be 99 tomorrow. and i- we sang happy birthday to him. he is going to be 99 tomorrow. and i metl going to be 99 tomorrow. and i met the daughter— going to be 99 tomorrow. and i met
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the daughter of— going to be 99 tomorrow. and i met the daughter of a _ going to be 99 tomorrow. and i met the daughter of a major, _ going to be 99 tomorrow. and i met the daughter of a major, who - going to be 99 tomorrow. and i met the daughter of a major, who led i going to be 99 tomorrow. and i meti the daughter of a major, who led the franch— the daughter of a major, who led the french commandos. _ the daughter of a major, who led the french commandos. and _ the daughter of a major, who led the french commandos. and that - the daughter of a major, who led the french commandos. and that man i the daughter of a major, who led the i french commandos. and that man was born and _ french commandos. and that man was born and lived — french commandos. and that man was born and lived around _ french commandos. and that man was born and lived around here _ french commandos. and that man was born and lived around here so - french commandos. and that man was born and lived around here so he - french commandos. and that man was born and lived around here so he was i born and lived around here so he was coming _ born and lived around here so he was coming home — born and lived around here so he was coming home it— born and lived around here so he was coming home it was— born and lived around here so he was coming home. it was fantastic. - born and lived around here so he was coming home. it was fantastic. the . coming home. it was fantastic. the other thing — coming home. it was fantastic. the other thing to _ coming home. it was fantastic. other thing to marimba is coming home. it was fantastic. tip; other thing to marimba is part coming home. it was fantastic. other thing to marimba is part of the memorial site is memorial to the franch— the memorial site is memorial to the french the _ the memorial site is memorial to the french the millions —— to remember is part— french the millions —— to remember is part of— french the millions —— to remember is part of the — french the millions —— to remember is part of the memorial site is a memorial— is part of the memorial site is a memorial to the french civilians who lost their— memorial to the french civilians who lost their lives in this campaign, largely— lost their lives in this campaign, largely as — lost their lives in this campaign, largely as a result of allied bombing. field marshal montgomery was in _ bombing. field marshal montgomery was in command of all of the allied forces. _ was in command of all of the allied forces. and — was in command of all of the allied forces, and the americans played a key role. _ forces, and the americans played a key role. as— forces, and the americans played a key role, as did the canadians, but the brits— key role, as did the canadians, but the brits did as well so it is fantastic— the brits did as well so it is fantastic we have now got many years too late. _ fantastic we have now got many years too late, this wonderful memorial to the brits— too late, this wonderful memorial to the brits who lost their lives in this campaign. the brits who lost their lives in this campaign-— the brits who lost their lives in thiscamaian. . ~ , . this campaign. thank you very much indeed, gentlemen, _ this campaign. thank you very much indeed, gentlemen, wonderful- this campaign. thank you very much indeed, gentlemen, wonderfulto i this campaign. thank you very much l indeed, gentlemen, wonderfulto see indeed, gentlemen, wonderful to see you here this morning. that final
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recognition with the british normandy memorial, it is a wonderful location, as i'm sure you gathered in the film earlier. we will talk to some more veterans later on, join us for that. some more veterans later on, 'oin us for that. . ~ some more veterans later on, 'oin us for that. ., ,, , ., some more veterans later on, 'oin us for that. . ~' , ., , some more veterans later on, 'oin us for that. ., ,, , ., , . some more veterans later on, 'oin us for that. . ~' ,. , . �* for that. thank you very much, i'm lad to for that. thank you very much, i'm glad to see — for that. thank you very much, i'm glad to see that — for that. thank you very much, i'm glad to see that harry _ for that. thank you very much, i'm glad to see that harry is _ for that. thank you very much, i'm glad to see that harry is getting i for that. thank you very much, i'm glad to see that harry is getting a| glad to see that harry is getting a lie this morning. it's the least he deserves after that busy day. the rock star, deserves after that busy day. tie: rock star, according to john, deserves after that busy day. tie: rock star, according tojohn, which is great! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to viewers in the bbc south today region too. kensington and chelsea council has apologised for not acting fast enough to install fire doors at grenfell tower, which could have saved lives. 0n the night of the disaster in 2017, a number of doors were missing or faulty, which led to toxic smoke and flames spreading. the grenfell inquiry heard that the council's former head
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of housing had previously said the doors should not be inspected and thought it was too expensive to replace them. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later. so far we already know there'll be a rise in the national living wage, but the government's under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living so what would londoners like to see? i would like to see a reduction in national insurance across the board for everybody. i think we know the pandemic has cost an awful lot of money and the government has had to find money, borrow an awful lot, but you can't get it back from all the workers that support the economy of this country. staying with the budget, some of london's museums and galleries are among those to benefit. the v&a will get a share of £850 million over 3 years to help redevelop and refurbish its buildings. we'd love to hear from you — what do you want to hear from the budget? you can get in touch... hellobbclondon@bbc. co. uk
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a soldier who suffered brain damage aftera bombing in iraq has been nominated for an award after completing a 60—mile virtual bike ride. stephen vause raised over five thousand pounds for charity by taking part in the london to brighton challenge. he's been put forward for a soldiering 0n award, which recognises outstanding achievements in the armed forces. let's take a look at the travel now... we've got problems again this morning with trains being cancelled the circle line has minor delays as does the metropolitan line between moor park and amersham. chesham and watford. time for the weather. hello, good morning. it's a very mild start to the day with temperatures in double figures across the board. there is a lot of cloud around and it is still rather breezy. a noticeable south—westerly wind. it is a windier day than we saw yesterday. some gusts throughout the day, up to 35 mph across the capital. it will be cloudy throughout the day but there could be brighter spells in the afternoon. it should stay dry.
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perhaps spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times and temperatures will be above seasonal average, peaking at 17 or 18 celsius. this evening and overnight, not a lot is set to change. we will keep layers of cloud. temperatures will stay in double figures as we head into tomorrow morning. on thursday, the wind will not be as brisk. it is still mild. temperatures peaking at 17—18. plenty of cloud with a few brighter spells. by the time we get to friday, there will be outbreaks of rain moving eastwards. that is a cold front. behind it, some cooler air, so temperatures are set to dip as we head through the weekend and it will be rather unsettled at times. i'm back in half an hour. time to hand you back tojon and sally. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay.
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0n breakfast this morning. horsing around for a good cause — why actor martin clunes brought his trusted sidekick bruce to a hospice in dorset. we'll have the story in about 15 minutes. the magic and mayhem of the self—styled gypsy king — paris furyjoins us on the sofa to discuss life with her husband tyson — the heavyweight boxing world champion. and what prompted actor hugh grant to donate ten thousand pounds to a charity set up by a plumberfrom burnley? we'll have the details just after nine. rishi sunak is preparing to deliver his second budget as chancellor this afternoon. so what can we expect? ben is in burnley for us. good morning. welcome to queen street mill in burnley built in
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1894. take a look at some of the looms. the last remaining steam powered mill in the world. 300 looms here at the moment and there were 900 in its heyday at the height of the cotton industry that put this place and east lancashire on the map, bringing wealth and prosperity. times have changed. the town fell on hard times. in the last election it put its faith in tory promises to level up. in a moment we will look at what that could mean for a town like burnley and what the chancellor could announce for people here later today. first, i have looked at how the chancellor might try to make the numbers add up. the chancellor's challenge, claw back the cost of covid or protect people from the squeeze on living. begin to balance the books or give in to the prime minister's urge to splurge on
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levelling up places like here in burnley. the uk deficit is the difference between what the government spends and brings in. it rose to £320 billion last year. that is the highest level since the second world war. the is the highest level since the second world war. ., . ., �*, second world war. the chancellor's instinct is clear. _ second world war. the chancellor's instinct is clear. tax _ second world war. the chancellor's instinct is clear. tax rises _ second world war. the chancellor's instinct is clear. tax rises are - instinct is clear. tax rises are unpopular. some will even say not conservative. i will tell you what is not conservative. ledges not funded, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. the funded, reckless borrowing and soaring debt-— soaring debt. the independent institute for _ soaring debt. the independent institute for fiscal _ soaring debt. the independent institute for fiscal studies - soaring debt. the independent| institute for fiscal studies says the uk tax burden is set to reach its highest sustained peacetime level, even before today's speech. the new health and social care levy will raise £36 billion. the treasury will raise £36 billion. the treasury will also make more from corporation and income tax. but where else can
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the chancellor find some cash? asking students to repay their loans sooner, higher council tax, alcohol duty or a levy on online retailers. pensions or taxes on inheritance and profits. jt pensions or taxes on inheritance and rofits. . pensions or taxes on inheritance and rofits. , ., ,. , profits. it is not 'ust cuts in the chancellor's — profits. it is notjust cuts in the chancellor's sites, _ profits. it is notjust cuts in the chancellor's sites, but - profits. it is notjust cuts in the chancellor's sites, but also - profits. it is notjust cuts in the chancellor's sites, but also a l profits. it is notjust cuts in the i chancellor's sites, but also a pay rise on the way for millions. but can it keep up with the rising cost of living? inflation is currently at 3.1% and it is forecasted to rise even higher. even though the climate summit may be just around the corner, persistently high prices could force another freeze in petrol duty and there could be more support for the price we pay for home energy bills. government departments that are not protected such as courts and prisons, could see their day—to—day budgets squeezed. last week, the chancellor was given a boost.
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borrowing for this year is so far lower than forecast, but with the economic recovery still fragile, that will not make today's decisions any easier. how does that translate to places like here in burnley? i can introduce you to the pastor. ate me a picture of the challenge in birmingham right now. the a picture of the challenge in birminuham riaht now. . . , birmingham right now. the challenges are individual. _ birmingham right now. the challenges are individual. people _ birmingham right now. the challenges are individual. people struggle - birmingham right now. the challenges are individual. people struggle with i are individual. people struggle with mental health issues, a lack of resource. unable to access. poverty is unequal access so whatever that is, that is where we try to step into. . , is, that is where we try to step into. ., , , ., is, that is where we try to step into. ., , y., , ., .,, is, that is where we try to step into. ., , , ., ., into. originally you started as a food bank _ into. originally you started as a food bank and _ into. originally you started as a food bank and it _ into. originally you started as a food bank and it has _ into. originally you started as a food bank and it has grown. i into. originally you started as a l food bank and it has grown. what into. originally you started as a i food bank and it has grown. what are people coming to you asking for help
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with? ., , people coming to you asking for help with? . , ., ., , with? largely mental health, being able to fill in _ with? largely mental health, being able to fill in forms _ with? largely mental health, being able to fill in forms for _ with? largely mental health, being able to fill in forms for universal. able to fill in forms for universal credit. debt, people seem to be wracked with fear around the future. you mention universal credit and in the headlines, with the cut, the chancellor will stand up in parliament and say they are offering more targeted help to people. itrufhat more targeted help to people. what would make — more targeted help to people. what would make a _ more targeted help to people. ib’d�*ué�*ii would make a difference here? more targeted help to people. “twat would make a difference here? to reinstate it. it seems incredible. it is pouring down with rain and you go out and take the coats off the back of people. what you do is wait till summer and take the coats off then. the poor spend their money because they cannot afford to save, so it goes back into the economy. it seems a foolish move on every level. when we look around the town, there are different elements that need to
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change and earlier in the week we spoke about apprenticeships, jobs for young people, training is a big issue. i wonder how you start to change that from a town that has had a bad reputation for so long. how do you get people back? jt a bad reputation for so long. how do you get people back?— you get people back? it has been under resourced _ you get people back? it has been under resourced year-on-year. i | under resourced year—on—year. i believe there is hope and hopefully the government and local authorities will invest in smaller communities. because they support one another and it is organic and it grows. when it is en masse, it does not work in places like burnley. the community, it needs... the seeds need to be planted in small communities. that is where growth will come. it is a massive opportunity missed if they
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do not do that.— do not do that. what will that look like? we are _ do not do that. what will that look like? we are not— do not do that. what will that look like? we are not talking _ do not do that. what will that look like? we are not talking about i do not do that. what will that look| like? we are not talking aboutjust spending money, sending a few million pounds to a project here and there. how does what happens in westminster look like on the ground? investing in people so the economy is driven by people. giving people hope and opportunities. using the finances to create those opportunities for people and the young. people are losing hope. we want to see new soil being created for growth. want to see new soil being created for urowth. . . want to see new soil being created for urowth. . , ., want to see new soil being created for growth-— want to see new soil being created for urowth. . , ., , .,~ ., for growth. that is about breaking a cle and for growth. that is about breaking a cycle and also _ for growth. that is about breaking a cycle and also to — for growth. that is about breaking a cycle and also to talk— for growth. that is about breaking a cycle and also to talk about - for growth. that is about breaking a cycle and also to talk about mental| cycle and also to talk about mental health, breaking the mental image of somewhere like this and saying burnley is somewhere that is quite different now, come and invest and create jobs. different now, come and invest and createjobs. we spoke different now, come and invest and create jobs. we spoke to a business and they are selling all around the world, made here. repeating what you saw in the cotton industry.— saw in the cotton industry. people fall through _
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saw in the cotton industry. people fall through the _ saw in the cotton industry. people fall through the gaps. _ saw in the cotton industry. people fall through the gaps. picking i saw in the cotton industry. people j fall through the gaps. picking over grapes and telling people to make mine, it is not there, they need a resource to bring hope and change and it is in those gaps in those gaps are where the injustice is. people cannot access things. we have people who cannot access the internet, for goodness' sake. we need to support these people and thatis need to support these people and that is what will bring the change. it is really good to see you this morning. you are doing very good work in the town. we will be here all morning looking at some of the challenges for places like burnley. they are not unique to burnley but repeated up and down the country, particularly in towns may be in the north—west that has suffered the same way burnley has. and we will look at what the budget could mean for our own budgets. we will do that from here in burnley. i will see you
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a little later. thanks. we should say full coverage of the budget begins at 11:15am on bbc two. you can also follow it live on the bbc news channel. and then lots of reaction and here again tomorrow morning we have it covered. time for sport. speaking of numbers, in terms of football, it does not get much bigger than 10—0 for england, and it could have been more with seven names on the scoresheet. fourwins more with seven names on the scoresheet. four wins from four. and a brilliant night for wales in front of a record crowd in cardiff. the same cannot be said for northern ireland. they will be happy with their performance. so a great night for two out of the three home nations — northern ireland agonisingly close to beating an austrian side ranked 27 places above them,
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while england were the giants in their world cup qualifier in latvia. and the lionesses showed no mercy. jo currie reports. stepping out in chilly latvia. england cruising through qualifying, looking for another big win. and they only had to wait seven minutes to find the opener. ella toone with time and space on the edge of the box had no problem slamming it home. minutes later, she was at it again, with almost a carbon copy of her first. good work from fran kirby on her 50th cap to set toone up to score again, with white and bright adding two more before the break. england made four changes at the start of the second half. but there was no change of pace. beth mead continuing her good form with this individual effort to net england's fifth, before toone notched up a hat—trick, picking herself up and going it alone to make it a very special night on only her sixth appearance. and the goals kept coming with rachel daly eventually wrapping up proceedings and a 10—0 win
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to make from four and a very happy birthday for manager sarina wiegman. elsewhere in group d, northern ireland came within seconds of a famous win. after going behind in the first half, they hit back twice after the break, with demi vance scoring a stunning free kick to give them the lead. they couldn't cling onto it, though, and they conceded in injury time to settle for a draw. many of the northern ireland squad, however, are semiprofessional and this point could go a long way in their bid to qualify for the world cup. meanwhile, wales claimed a comfortable 4—0 victory at home to estonia in cardiff in front of a record crowd. the pick of the goals came from helen ward, who got on the end of a brilliantly weighted pass. wales now have ten points from their opening four games. arsenal are through to the last eight of the league cup. they beat leeds 2—nil at the emirates stadium. calum chambers scored the first, then a mistake in the leeds defence allowed former leeds loanee eddie nketiah to get arsenal's second and secure
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their place in the next round. chelsea are also through to the quarter—finals after beating southampton on penalties at stamford bridge. the game finished 1—all — reece james scored the decisive spot—kick for chelsea. elsewhere sunderland beat qpr — also on penalties. the papers this morning feature so many heartfelt tributes to the former scotland, rangers, and everton manager walter smith, who died at the age of 73. he was a legend at ibrox, winning 21 trophies. former club owner sir david murray and former manager graeme souness issued a joint statement saying he had had a profound effect on both their lives. current manager steven gerrard said smith made him a better person. he's decorated all over the club and he will be for ever because he gave many years to this football club. he loved the club. he was honest, he was genuine.
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and he has made me a better person. i have nothing but good words to say. south africa cricket captain temba bevuma says the team was surprised and taken aback after teammate quinton de kock refused to take the knee ahead of their t20 world cup game against west indies. it overshadowed south africa's win over the defending champions who are now heading for an early exit after losing by 8 wickets. despite the result, bavuma described the day as the toughest he had dealt with as captain. so far as so faras me so far as me personally, as captain, to be honest, one of the toughest days i have had to deal with as a captain. i guess if there is a disagreement in terms of beliefs, our views, that is why we have conversations. i cannot force anyone to see things the way i do and neither can they force me.
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and pakistan continued their impressive start — they beat new zealand by 5 wickets and with 8 balls to spare. they also won their tournament opener against fierce rivals india. emma raducanu has won her first match since her stunning us open triumph — and herfirst ever wta match — at the transylvania open in romania. she came from a set down to beat polona hercog to move into the second round. this was her first time competing in her father's homeland. there were no fans present, but her her 88—year—old grandmother niculina was there to watch her. what was really impressive at the end of it. she was being interviewed and they spoke to her in english and she had to respond and say actually i speak perfect romanian and did the post match interview in fluent romanian and even tell them what her favourite food was. js it romanian and even tell them what her favourite food was.— favourite food was. is it three or four languages _ favourite food was. is it three or four languages she _ favourite food was. is it three or four languages she speaks? i i favourite food was. is it three or. four languages she speaks? i have lost count- —
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four languages she speaks? i have lost count. please _ four languages she speaks? i have lost count. please let _ four languages she speaks? i have lost count. please let me - four languages she speaks? i have lost count. please let me be i four languages she speaks? i have lost count. please let me be her. lost count. please let me be her when i grow up! patients at a hospice in dorchester have been treated to a surprise visit from one of the uk's best—known actors — and his horse. doc martin star martin clunes and his sidekick bruce joined patients and staff for a special kind of therapy at the centre. doc martin is not great on bedside manner! but this was rather special. david allard was there. hey, is that doc martin with a giant horse? is he a vet now? actually, no. the grouchy gp hasn't changed profession for the new series of the itv drama, it's actor martin cleans of the itv drama, it's actor martin clunes and his heavy horse bruce paying a surprise visit to weldmar hospice in dorchester. he's a good ambassador for his breed because he's so gentle. they are great levellers. you can stand next to a horse and have a conversation with a queen or a rag and bone man or a jockey. they are great levellers.
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12—year—old bruce took a little while to get used to his surroundings, but there was no behaving badly. he was soon happy to say hello to staff and day patients. i think it's very kind and really therapeutic for people to have such experiences. it makes everybody very happy. i nearly didn't come today because i haven't felt very well, but i am just so glad i've come because it has really pushed my day up. ia lot of our patients come here, | it's the one day a week, perhaps, they get distraction from their illness. so they are not thinking i about medical appointments or treatment plans or anything, they are coming for— a real distraction. the fact that we can give them i experiences like this with martin and bruce today is just fantastic. i think it'sjust helping people to remind themselves - they are people, not patients. do you think doc martin could benefit from some horse therapy? he needs something. i'll suggest it to him. smiles on prescription. the day one man and his horse
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brought happiness to the hospice. com pletely completely the opposite of the doc martin character. here's carol with a look at the weather. good morning. a lot of whether in the forecast for the next days with heavy rain especially. but it will be very mild. we are pulling in mild airfrom the tropics be very mild. we are pulling in mild air from the tropics and across our shores. and this front is a waving front so it is moving north and south and producing a fair bit of rain. the heaviest likely to be in southern scotland, north—west england and west wales. flooding is likely. we will see large rainfall totals. the rain has been falling steadily across southern scotland and northern england and northern ireland overnight and this is where
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it will be today. where we have green, we are looking at heavy bursts. it moves further north across southern scotland. cloud producing drizzle today across south—west england, central and southern england and into the south—east. we have showers in the far north—west of scotland. there will be sunny intervals, especially to the east of high ground. temperature is above average. 13—18. the average is 10—14. this is where we will see heavy rain today and to give you an idea, these are the amounts we are looking at, hence flooding is possible. the met office has yellow weather warnings for this. 0vernight we hang onto the waving front producing heavy rain and gusty wind. gales around the irish sea coast lines tonight. to the north, clearer skies and to this
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—— the south,. this rain pushing further east compared to where it has been and will be. brighter skies behind it across scotland and northern ireland with showers but staying largely dry, sunny intervals down into the south—eastern corner. temperatures 11 in stornoway and 17 in london. this is the waving front on thursday and anotherjoins in london. this is the waving front on thursday and another joins forces with it on friday. they will push northwards taking rain with them. the chance of local flooding from this. you can see where we have the fronts draped across central and southern parts of the uk into the far south—east, there will be showers. to the far north—west there will be showers. a fairly unsettled day during friday. temperatures
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starting to slip. 11 in the north, 16 as we push down towards the south. thanks. it is so mild. toasty. and it is the end of october. today's budget will prepare the uk for a "new economy" in the wake of the pandemic — that's according to the chancellor, rishi sunak. but the snp says millions of families will be hundreds of pounds worse off unless he completely reverses cuts to spending. we're joined now by snp treasury spokesperson, alison thewliss. you have criticised the government plan —— for making poorfamilies worse off. plan -- for making poor families worse off-— plan -- for making poor families worse off. . . ., ., , worse off. the credit cut, that has been a lifeline _ worse off. the credit cut, that has been a lifeline to _ worse off. the credit cut, that has been a lifeline to people. - worse off. the credit cut, that has been a lifeline to people. the i worse off. the credit cut, that has. been a lifeline to people. the extra £20 has kept people from food banks
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and meant they can put food on the table and pay bills and with that being removed, food banks in my constituency, they will see additional people this winter. you have the rise in fuel costs, rising prices in the shops and a struggle for many through the winter to come. they are factors we talk about a lot but i am sure rishi sunak would say that uplift was always going to be temporary and it has to end. for man it temporary and it has to end. for many it was _ temporary and it has to end. fr?" many it was not temporary. many claim universal credit for the first time in the pandemic and that was money they got as a matter of course and that has been taken away and that additional support leaves a hole in pockets and difficulty for many people. hate hole in pockets and difficulty for many people-— hole in pockets and difficulty for man --eole. ~ . ., ,, ., many people. we are talking about... you suggest — many people. we are talking about... you suggest the _ many people. we are talking about... you suggest the uk _ many people. we are talking about... you suggest the uk government i many people. we are talking about... l you suggest the uk government should do more to help families in poverty but the rowntree foundation report
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said the scottish government is not doing enough to help families in need. ., ., ,., doing enough to help families in need. ., ., y., , need. how would you respond? the scottish government _ need. how would you respond? the scottish government is _ need. how would you respond? the scottish government is doing i need. how would you respond? the scottish government is doing a i need. how would you respond? the | scottish government is doing a great deal to help families with the child payment putting money into the pockets of families in scotland. the chancellor is picking those buckets and taking money back out again. we do not have the full benefit powers to tackle poverty in the way uk government has powers. flan to tackle poverty in the way uk government has powers. can you continue to — government has powers. can you continue to spend _ government has powers. can you continue to spend at _ government has powers. can you continue to spend at high - government has powers. can youj continue to spend at high levels? government has powers. can you i continue to spend at high levels? at what point do you think the deficit has to be cut? the what point do you think the deficit has to be cut?— has to be cut? the scottish government _ has to be cut? the scottish government spends - has to be cut? the scottish government spends money has to be cut? the scottish l government spends money it has to be cut? the scottish i government spends money it can has to be cut? the scottish - government spends money it can to try to boost the economy and try to reduce inequality and those should be the factors that drive decisions on spending. the chancellor is presiding over a widening inequality in the uk, the worst in north—west europe, and nothing trailed in the budget so far suggests reducing
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inequality is a priority. you offered workers _ inequality is a priority. you offered workers a - inequality is a priority. you offered workers a 496 i inequality is a priority. you offered workers a 4% pay increase but some unions suggested a 12.5% would be a fairer amount. is that a valid reward for people working on the front line?— valid reward for people working on the front line? people have done an incredible job _ the front line? people have done an incredible job through _ the front line? people have done an incredible job through the _ the front line? people have done an incredible job through the pandemic on the front line but the scottish budget is constrained. we cannot spend an unlimited amount of money on this. we would like the uk government to do their bit to put more money into the pockets of care workers and workers across the public sector, which they are not doing enough. they are putting in extra but there has been so much taken out it does not meet with the challenges with inflation. if the uk government spend more here on wages the barnett consequential feeds through to scotland and we could give additional money to public sector workers in scotland so i am interested in what the uk government
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proposes. the suggestion has been it is not additional money. and spending departments will have to take that from budgets they have, which budgets have been constrained over the past decade of austerity. copper 26, the eyes of the world on glasgow. —— cop2 six. we have gp appointments cancelled, so there is not so much traffic on the road and other issues. is it sending the right impression to the rest of the world? j right impression to the rest of the world? . . ., ., world? i am excited at the world cominu world? i am excited at the world coming to _ world? i am excited at the world coming to my — world? i am excited at the world coming to my constituency i world? i am excited at the world coming to my constituency and l world? i am excited at the world i coming to my constituency and there is an opportunity for people to see what glasgow offers. i would encourage the rail unions to come together and make an agreement on the terms offered by the scottish government. i understand some unions have agreed to those terms and one has not. i would encourage them to
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look again at this and see if that can be resolved. cop26 coming to scotland and yet you have missed emissions targets. what is going wrong? we have the most ambitious climate change targets and we are doing everything we can to do that. what would make a difference to that would be investment in projects such as carbon capture and storage in the north—east of scotland, a project on the books, slated since 2014 and the uk government has reneged time and again to spend money on a project such as this which would help with the transition from oil and gas. we would like to hear the chancellor putting money towards that scheme rather than putting it to the back of the queue. rather than putting it to the back of the queue-— rather than putting it to the back of the queue. rather than putting it to the back of the cueue. . ~' ., ., ., of the queue. thank you. coverage of the budaet of the queue. thank you. coverage of the budget on — of the queue. thank you. coverage of the budget on bbc— of the queue. thank you. coverage of the budget on bbc two _ of the queue. thank you. coverage of the budget on bbc two from - of the queue. thank you. coverage of the budget on bbc two from 11:15am | the budget on bbc two from 11:15am today. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. hello there and welcome to viewers in the bbc south today region too who are alsojoining us this morning. kensington and chelsea council has apologised for not acting fast enough to install fire doors at grenfell tower which could have saved lives. a number of doors were missing or faulty which led to toxic smoke and flames spreading. the grenfell inquiry heard that the council's former head of housing had previously said the doors should not be inspected and thought it was too expensive to replace them. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later. so far we already know there'll be a rise in the national living wage but the government's under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living, so what would londoners like to see? i would like to see a reduction in national insurance across the board for everybody. one of the things that i'd like to see is help for the families, especially now with the price increases
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of the energy prices. help even for those who are employed, those who are unemployed, i think people are struggling at the moment. staying with the budget, some of london's museums and galleries are among those set to benefit. the v&a will get a share of £850 million over three years to help redevelop and refurbish its buildings. we'd love to hear from you too once we get the full details of the budget this lunchtime. let us know how it affects you. you can get in touch at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk let's take a look at the travel now. a couple of problems on the tube this morning. the district line has minor delays between turnham green and ealing broadway because of a track fault. the metropolitan line has minor delays between moor park and amersham. chesham and watford. and for all the latest travel news where you are tune into your bbc local radio station, they'll have regular updates throughout the morning. time for the weather, here's elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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it's a very mild start to the day with temperatures in double figures across the board. there is a lot of cloud around and it is still rather breezy. a noticeable south—westerly wind. it is a windier day than we saw yesterday. some gusts throughout the day, up to 35 mph across the capital. it will be cloudy throughout the day but there could be brighter spells in the afternoon. it should stay dry. perhaps spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times and temperatures will be above seasonal average, peaking at 17 or 18 celsius. this evening and overnight, not a lot is set to change. we will keep layers of cloud. temperatures will stay in double figures as we head into tomorrow morning. on thursday, the wind will not be as brisk. it is still mild. temperatures peaking at 17—18. plenty of cloud with a few brighter spells. by the time we get to friday, there will be outbreaks of rain moving eastwards. that is a cold front.
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behind it, some cooler air, so temperatures are set to dip as we head through the weekend and it will be rather unsettled at times. i'm back in half an hour, lots more on our website. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today. the countdown to the budget. the chancellor promises a "new age of optimism" but faces pressure to do more to help people struggling with rising living costs. the queen pulls out of hosting a reception at the global climate summit in glasgow on medical advice. turning the tide — the government bows to pressure and says water companies will face stricter rules around dumping sewage in seas and rivers.
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rugby league's first concussion class action. the sport is set to be rocked as a number of players diagnosed with dementia announce their intention to sue for negligence. good morning. another breezy day ahead, once again some heavy rain across the north and west which could lead to some flooding issues. lot of cloud, some drizzle but there will be some sunshine to the east of the higher ground. all of the later on. it's wednesday 27th october. our main story. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later today, with a promise to prepare for a new post—covid economy. a number of policies have already been announced, including nhs funding and a rise in the national living wage. but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. rishi sunak showing off his footwear and socks in a set of photos
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released by the treasury of the chancellor preparing for today. chatting through the budget with his advisers, always with an eye to his image. his dog nova even features, as do his snacks. but by the time we get to this moment later on... can the country afford this budget, mr sunak? and him addressing the commons, what will really matter is what it means for each of us. the biggest question for him is how much is he going to have to spend on all those public services, particularly the ones that have really suffered during the austerity years, in a world in which the economy, i'm afraid, is smaller as a result of the pandemic than it would have otherwise been. a big issue for many right now is the cost of living, and whether the government's upbeat language matches how things feel week by week for lots of people. this is going to be a brutal and bitter winter for millions
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of householders who are not going to be able to bear the extra cost of heating their homes because of the price rises. the chancellor today has got to match his fiscal responsibility with a bit of moral responsibility. in the last few days, loads of stuff about today's budget been already been announced. nhs england will get £5.9 billion to tackle the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans. £6.9 billion has been allocated to transport projects, including in west yorkshire, the west midlands and greater manchester. and the minimum pay rate for those aged 23 and over, known as the national living wage, will go up to £9.50 per hourfrom april. but even though plenty has been announced, what we will get from the chancellor later still really matters because it will be the detail about the state of the economy and the state of the government's finances. and so crucially, where our money will be spent and where it won't.
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now, then, it's over to the chancellor and his big moment at lunchtime. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. let's join our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, who's at downing street. good morning, great to see you. we already know quite a bit about what the chancellor might say later on today, is there anything left for him to announce? j today, is there anything left for him to announce?— today, is there anything left for him to announce? i think there is because there _ him to announce? i think there is because there is _ him to announce? i think there is because there is still _ him to announce? i think there is because there is still a _ him to announce? i think there is because there is still a long i him to announce? i think there is because there is still a long list l because there is still a long list of things that people want him to address and this is an opportunity for him to either address some of them or leave some of those concerns. what we do know is there was a little snippet of the speech released overnight where he talks about this being an opportunity to build a post—name—macro economy, and thatis build a post—name—macro economy, and that is a pretty strong hint that the treasury thinks that the emergency of covid is over which means less emergency spending but perhaps return to old—fashioned things like chancellors and it's in
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the books which could mean less spending in some areas in future. mps will be looking out for this new levelling up fund, millions of pounds being funnelled to local projects on high streets and neighbourhoods, people will want to see if they are going to get a slice of that pie. i think people are also starting to receive those bigger gas and electricity bills on their doorstep so people will be watching out if there is any help for the cost of living. yesterday the treasury was rejecting labour's idea of reducing vat on domestic fuel. there will be other things to look out for. for example, is the second half of the eastern part of the hs2 rail project being put on hold so that investments can be made in rail infrastructure across the north generally? if the government going to start spending the billions of pounds a year they say will be required to help the uk reached net zero carbon emissions by 2050? so plenty to look out for.— plenty to look out for. thank you very much. _ plenty to look out for. thank you very much. we — plenty to look out for. thank you very much, we will— plenty to look out for. thank you very much, we will keep - plenty to look out for. thank you very much, we will keep in i plenty to look out for. thank you | very much, we will keep in touch. and we'll be getting reaction
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to the budget from labour in the next half hour. the queen will not attend next week's climate change summit in glasgow following medical advice to rest. the announcement comes a week after the 95—year—old monarch spent a night in hospital for preliminary medical checks. buckingham palace says she'll address the delegates in a pre—recorded video message instead. the coronavirus test and trace programme in england has failed to achieve its main objective of helping break chains of covid transmission. that's according to a group of cross—party mps. the public accounts committee says a number of the programme's aims have been overstated or not achieved, despite costing an eye—watering amount of money. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. the performance of the test and trace programme in england has been under scrutiny for months. this assessment by mps could hardly be more damning. the public accounts committee, which examines value for money
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of government projects, says the programme's outcomes have been muddled and it hasn't achieved a number of its main objectives despite costing the taxpayer millions. the nhs test and trace programme has been one of the most expensive health programmes delivered during the pandemic. it has cost £37 billion over two years, equal to nearly a fifth of the entire nhs england budget. when it comes to test results, just 14% of 691 million lateral flow tests distributed by test and trace were registered. and in periods of pressure, like december 2020, just 17% of people were receiving test results within 24 hours. we found it very difficult to see what it had achieved for the 37 billion. it set out very bold aims, it failed on many of its own terms. crucially now, its responsibilities are in the new uk health security agency. but that's still got a lot to prove. the main objective for test and trace was to help break chains of covid—19 transmission and enable
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people to return towards a more normal way of life. instead, england experienced two more national lockdowns and saw a dramatic rise in case numbers. the use of expensive private sector consultants who were meant to deliver the programme comes in for particular criticism. for all the eye watering sums of money spent on test and trace, mps say it's far from clear whether it will be a legacy system that's built to last, one that will be ready for the next crisis. dominic hughes, bbc news. it's eight minutes past seven, and carol has the weather. it feels remarkably, we were saying, it feels so mild. it doesn't feel like, you have to check your watch, is it really 0ctober, nearly november? yes, you are right, temperatures overnight were higher than they
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would have been on average by day in october. today is going to be mild 0ctober. today is going to be mild as well, but there is some heavy rain for some of us, notjust today but for the next few days. this weather front is draped across parts of southern scotland, northern england, north wales and east of northern ireland, producing heavy rain. it is moving further north into central scotland through the course of the day and it could lead to some issues with localised flooding. to the north and south there will be cloud around, some drizzle here and there but to the east of high ground, we will see some sunny intervals. the irish sea and areas adjacent with local gales and areas adjacent with local gales and breezy inland. these are the temperatures, 13 to 18, the average is roughly ten to 14 north to south. we have a band of rain in a similar location overnight, it moves through more of northern ireland and a bit more of northern ireland and a bit more of northern ireland and a bit more of wales. sliding up the east coast of scotland. not a cold night,
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overnight lows nine to 11. even into tomorrow, we will still have this rain to still the risk of local flooding. over the past week, we've been covering the issue of spiking on nights out after a growing number of women reported falling victim to the crime, either by injection or in their alcohol. tonight, as part of a campaign to highlight the problem, thousands of people will boycott nightclubs and bars across the uk. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley has been speaking to some of them. we all kind of have our own ways of protecting ourselves in the club. they were watching their drinks and looking out for each other. but two weeks ago, their night ended in distress. it wasn't anybody�*s fault what happened to you, like, it was the only person is the perpetrator who should have any blame. zara believes she was spiked in a nightclub in nottingham with a needle containing drugs. i had a complete memory loss
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from one point of the night to the other point of the night. and that's something that never happens to me. and then when i got up, i felt this really sharp pain in my leg. it was a pinprick mark. more people are coming out and people need to realise, it is an issue and it is happening, and it's horrifying that it's happening. it's a terrifying ordeal. to have someone out there, you know, just saying, are you 0k, you know how you're getting home? astrid was with zara on that night and is struggling to come to terms with what happened. i'm feeling quite paranoid and quite anxious. i've been in a situation where i actually went home from a nightclub because ijust, i didn't, i was in the queue, i was surrounded, it was a very boisterous queue and i was around a lot of people and ijust kind of thought, actually, i don't feel comfortable doing this. i don't want to put myself into this position of vulnerability. and every time my arm was being scratched i was checking for it. it's such a scary time.
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it's notjust happening here in nottingham. police forces across the uk are investigating an increasing number of cases of women who fear they were spiked with needles containing drugs. spiking drinks has long been a concern. there are many questions about how needles are being used and how widespread these assaults are. how these things are i getting into the clubs, why they're even doing it. tonight, these students willjoin others in a campaign which has been called girls night in, by boycotting nightclubs in order for venues to take more responsibility. this is why the clubs need to take better measures, better precautions, having medics that are accessible on site, and even rooms or points where people who are lost can go and find their friends. you can walk into a club and not even have anyone open your bag to look inside it. and obviously these people are going to be crafty about where they hide things. but it seems ludicrous that there is absolutely
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nothing in some clubs. and it's notjust women taking part in the boycott. their housemate is also joining in and says it's important that men show solidarity. coming to second year, it's the first year that we have been able to go clubbing because of covid. one of the first thing that shocked me was some of my female friends told me that you can't walk through a dance floor, you can't walk past a dance floor, without being groped. and that truly shocked me. also i have friends that have been spiked, female friends that have been spiked, i have female friends that have been injected. and i feel as though we have to show solidarity in this boycott. and stand up together for what this movement is and what it represents. these students are staying in to highlight the dangers of going out. for too many, spiking has been brought close to home. elaine dunkley, bbc news, in nottingham. joining us now is ilana el—baz, who believes she was a victim of drink spiking a month ago
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while out with friends. and with herfrom glasgow, is hannah thomson, whose petition calling for nightclubs to thoroughly search guests on entry, has received more than 160,000 signatures. good morning to you both. if we can come to you first, ilana, what happened to you? j come to you first, ilana, what happened to you?— come to you first, ilana, what happened to you? come to you first, ilana, what ha ened to ou? . ,, ., happened to you? i went clubbing at the time with _ happened to you? i went clubbing at the time with my _ happened to you? i went clubbing at the time with my boyfriend - happened to you? i went clubbing at the time with my boyfriend and i - happened to you? i went clubbing at| the time with my boyfriend and i had a drink in my hand, i ended up talking toa a drink in my hand, i ended up talking to a guy, i'm not sure if he was the one who spiked me but looking back on it, i'm guessing he was. and he ended up telling me he was. and he ended up telling me he was 31 and asked if i wanted to dance with him. in the moment i said i was with my boyfriend, sorry, no, he left me completely. and when i left the club, an hour after i had spoken to this guy, i was nearly completely paralysed. and luckily my
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boyfriend took a video of me as evidence to show two clubs. 50 looking back on it, i'm very grateful he had the videos. i should make it clear— grateful he had the videos. i should make it clear to _ grateful he had the videos. i should make it clear to people _ grateful he had the videos. i should make it clear to people that - grateful he had the videos. i should make it clear to people that you - grateful he had the videos. i should l make it clear to people that you are happy to share these images in order to show people what has happened to you. i to show people what has happened to ou. ~' ., to show people what has happened to ou. ~ ., ., ., , �* you. i think a lot of people didn't think it was _ you. i think a lot of people didn't think it was spiking _ you. i think a lot of people didn't think it was spiking and - you. i think a lot of people didn't think it was spiking and even - think it was spiking and even talking about, sorry, i've got completely blank.— talking about, sorry, i've got comletel blank. ., �*, , , completely blank. that's completely fine. the response _ completely blank. that's completely fine. the response i _ completely blank. that's completely fine. the response i got _ completely blank. that's completely fine. the response i got from - fine. the response i got from eo - le, fine. the response i got from peeple. they _ fine. the response i got from people, they didn't _ fine. the response i got from people, they didn't realise i fine. the response i got from | people, they didn't realise the severity of this until they saw the video. ., , ., ., severity of this until they saw the video. . , ., ., , ., video. have you ever thought, you had a drink— video. have you ever thought, you had a drink in _ video. have you ever thought, you had a drink in a _ video. have you ever thought, you had a drink in a glass _ video. have you ever thought, you had a drink in a glass when - video. have you ever thought, you had a drink in a glass when you - video. have you ever thought, you | had a drink in a glass when you are out, i'm assuming. did you ever think, maybe i shouldn't have a drink in a glass, i should have a bottle and i can see some take the
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top of? bottle and i can see some take the to of? ., . , bottle and i can see some take the to of? ., ., , .,�* bottle and i can see some take the toof? ., ._ _ top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and _ top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and when _ top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and when i _ top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and when i do _ top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and when i do it _ top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and when i do it is - top of? normally i don't buy drinks in clubs and when i do it is usually| in clubs and when i do it is usually a bottle or a shop sol in clubs and when i do it is usually a bottle or a shop so i can protect magical drink it straight away but it isjust by magical drink it straight away but it is just by client —— a bottle or a shot so i can protect my drink or drink it straight away but it is just unlucky that i had a glass that day. just unlucky that i had a glass that da . ., , ., , just unlucky that i had a glass that da. ., . ., day. young people particularly women are not going — day. young people particularly women are not going clubbing _ day. young people particularly women are not going clubbing tonight, - are not going clubbing tonight, staying at home to make a stand, you are part of that?— are part of that? yeah, i think, even the _ are part of that? yeah, i think, even the media _ are part of that? yeah, i think, even the media attention - are part of that? yeah, i think, even the media attention it - are part of that? yeah, i think, j even the media attention it has gathered, it is amazing. it'sjust the beginning of change, and i think clubs have a massive responsibility to change the clubbing experience to make it a safer and prevent it in the first place. and we really hope any clubs that are also boycotting this, and doing the girls night in, do use this time to train their staff and know what to look out for when spiking does happen, or do
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first aid when spiking does happen, or do firstaid training, when spiking does happen, or do first aid training, just so you can prevent it in the first place but also support people when they are spiked to. also support people when they are siked to. ., . ~' also support people when they are siked to. ., ., ~ ., ,., also support people when they are siked to. ., ., ~ ., . ., spiked to. you talked about change, let's talk to — spiked to. you talked about change, let's talk to hannah, _ spiked to. you talked about change, let's talk to hannah, she _ spiked to. you talked about change, let's talk to hannah, she is - let's talk to hannah, she is campaigning for change. we talked about the petition that you started, tens of thousands of signatures now on it. do you get a sense that change is coming, are you getting messages back from decision—makers and politicians that they are going to act on what you want? i and politicians that they are going to act on what you want?- and politicians that they are going to act on what you want? i have so far not heard _ to act on what you want? i have so far not heard anything _ to act on what you want? i have so far not heard anything from - far not heard anything from politicians, but i have heard a lot of positive — politicians, but i have heard a lot of positive comments from clubs who are starting _ of positive comments from clubs who are starting to implement these changes — are starting to implement these chan . es. are starting to implement these chances. . ., , i. are starting to implement these chances. . ., , ., are starting to implement these chanes. . . , y., . y., changes. the changes you want, you want preper — changes. the changes you want, you want proper searches _ changes. the changes you want, you want proper searches as _ changes. the changes you want, you want proper searches as people - changes. the changes you want, you want proper searches as people go l changes. the changes you want, you| want proper searches as people go in to make sure they have not got equipment that can be used to spike somebody, or drugs? how would it work? . somebody, or drugs? how would it work? , , ., ., , somebody, or drugs? how would it work? , , ., , . work? yes, the petition was started with the idea _ work? yes, the petition was started with the idea that _ work? yes, the petition was started with the idea that clubs _ work? yes, the petition was started with the idea that clubs will - work? yes, the petition was started with the idea that clubs will search | with the idea that clubs will search guests— with the idea that clubs will search guests on— with the idea that clubs will search guests on arrival to prevent harmful weapons _ guests on arrival to prevent harmful weapons such as needles getting onto
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these clubs. find weapons such as needles getting onto these clubs. �* ., , , , ., these clubs. and what inspired you to start this _ these clubs. and what inspired you to start this petition, _ these clubs. and what inspired you to start this petition, where - these clubs. and what inspired you to start this petition, where did - these clubs. and what inspired you to start this petition, where did it i to start this petition, where did it come from for you? i to start this petition, where did it come from for you?— come from for you? i was 'ust readina come from for you? i was 'ust reading about it i come from for you? i was 'ust reading about it on i come from for you? i was 'ust reading about it on social h come from for you? i wasjust i reading about it on social media, come from for you? i wasjust - reading about it on social media, a lot of— reading about it on social media, a lot of girls — reading about it on social media, a lot of girls started being spiked in edinburgh. i was a student in edinburgh. i was a student in edinburgh for four years, edinburgh. i was a student in edinburgh forfouryears, i edinburgh. i was a student in edinburgh for four years, i came home _ edinburgh for four years, i came home last — edinburgh for four years, i came home last year. so to hear that these _ home last year. so to hear that these things were happening somewhere where i spent so much of my time, _ somewhere where i spent so much of my time, somewhere that i called home, _ my time, somewhere that i called home, it — my time, somewhere that i called home, it really scared me. and i felt, _ home, it really scared me. and i felt, how— home, it really scared me. and i felt, how are they getting the needles — felt, how are they getting the needles into the night clubs? so then i_ needles into the night clubs? so then i searched that and i realised there _ then i searched that and i realised there is— then i searched that and i realised there is no— then i searched that and i realised there is no real law to search guests— there is no real law to search guests on— there is no real law to search guests on arrival and i thought that had to— guests on arrival and i thought that had to change. this guests on arrival and i thought that had to change-— guests on arrival and i thought that had to change. this campaign today, sta inc had to change. this campaign today, sta in: in had to change. this campaign today, staying in in — had to change. this campaign today, staying in in protest, _ had to change. this campaign today, staying in in protest, are _ had to change. this campaign today, staying in in protest, are you - staying in in protest, are you backing that as well, you going to be marking that?— backing that as well, you going to be marking that? yes, of course, and i know it's happening _ be marking that? yes, of course, and i know it's happening today _ be marking that? yes, of course, and i know it's happening today and - i know it's happening today and tomorrow _ i know it's happening today and tomorrow. i think it's happening in scotland _ tomorrow. i think it's happening in scotland tomorrow. just because of
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our different student nights across the uk _ our different student nights across the uk so— our different student nights across the uk. so it's happening today and tomorrow— the uk. so it's happening today and tomorrow so yes, definitely backing that. tomorrow so yes, definitely backing that i _ tomorrow so yes, definitely backing that. , , , tomorrow so yes, definitely backing that. , ,., tomorrow so yes, definitely backing that. , , that. i suppose the flip of this, ilana, that. i suppose the flip of this, ilana. some — that. i suppose the flip of this, ilana, some people _ that. i suppose the flip of this, ilana, some people will- that. i suppose the flip of this, ilana, some people will say, i that. i suppose the flip of this, ilana, some people will say, it| ilana, some people will say, it should not be up to the women to have to stay home and protests. you are not the problem, you should be out there doing what you wants to do. has it been a bit of a conflict for you deciding to be this protest? it is counterintuitive, isn't it? i it is counterintuitive, isn't it? i do agree, the attention it has gathered is good but i think the responsibility isn't on the victims, it's in everyone else to prevent it happening on the first place. i'm just looking back on it, in clubs in general, i think there is a massive lack of signage that they do gather cctv footage and the penalty for spiking, i think preventing it in the first place rather than helping someone once you are being spiked, i think there is a massive opportunity to change it and prevent it in the
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first place. but i also think having been spiked, the lack of support i got, also wants to do, if you are spiked, who to talk to, do you talk to the police, is it the clubs? when i did go to the clubs, they looked at the cctv footage and said, we can't confirm anything due to confidentiality and that was it so i didn't really bother going to the police because i didn't get any support. police because i didn't get any su ort. �* , , ., police because i didn't get any suuort. �* ,, ., ., support. and i guess, we have all come past _ support. and i guess, we have all come past clubs _ support. and i guess, we have all come past clubs late _ support. and i guess, we have all come past clubs late at _ support. and i guess, we have all come past clubs late at night - support. and i guess, we have all come past clubs late at night and | come past clubs late at night and seen people who are just drunk, did you find people who are saying, she is just drunk? they didn't necessarily accept or believe that you have been spiked or understand it? i you have been spiked or understand it? “ you have been spiked or understand it? ~ , you have been spiked or understand it? 4' , , ., , it? i think it first, people did think, oh. — it? i think it first, people did think, oh, she's _ it? i think it first, people did think, oh, she'sjust- it? i think it first, people did think, oh, she'sjust drunk. l it? i think it first, people did i think, oh, she'sjust drunk. but having been spiked, i mean, i have been both drunk and are spiked and it is a massive difference. and i think also the videos, it's not drunk behaviour. but i do
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understand.— drunk behaviour. but i do understand. ., ., ., understand. how do you feel about auoin out understand. how do you feel about going out again _ understand. how do you feel about going out again now? _ understand. how do you feel about going out again now? not - understand. how do you feel about going out again now? not tonight i going out again now? not tonight obviously, but when you get back to normal days, would you feel confident enough? i’m normal days, would you feel confident enough? i'm hoping it's aoian confident enough? i'm hoping it's aoain to confident enough? i'm hoping it's going to be _ confident enough? i'm hoping it's going to be safer. _ confident enough? i'm hoping it's going to be safer. i _ confident enough? i'm hoping it's going to be safer. i already - confident enough? i'm hoping it's going to be safer. i already feel l confident enough? i'm hoping it's going to be safer. i already feel a j going to be safer. i already feel a lot safer, i know clubs are putting lives on caps and stuff now. just going out, i'm a lot more cautious in what i wear, i carry a denim jacket around my waist, and even on the weekend i went out and i was the only one in a skirt and ever and around me was injeans and only one in a skirt and ever and around me was in jeans and trousers. that really shocked me. that we have to change our behaviour to prevent this. i am a lot more aware of it happening now. buti this. i am a lot more aware of it happening now. but i also know it's not happening just in clubs, it is also in the queues to clubs, i know friends who have said they have been spiked in pubs, and it'sjust scary the scale of it all. i think people do need to speak out about it. it’s do need to speak out about it. it's awful when you hear people, women have to modify their behaviour and what they are wary because they're
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frightened. ilana, really, thank you so much for talking to us this morning, and hannah, thank you to you as well for being part of this conversation on bbc breakfast. if you have been affected by any of the issues raised in that interview, you can find help and information on the bbc action line. it was expected to be a major event in the royal calendar but buckingham palace has now announced the queen will not attend next week's climate change summit in glasgow. she will instead deliver a pre—recorded video message to delegates, after doctors advised her to rest. james reynolds has the story. on tuesday last week, the queen hosted a reception for business leaders at windsor. the next morning, her trip to northern ireland was cancelled and she stayed overnight in hospital. yesterday, she gently resumed her public schedule. a video audience with
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the new korean ambassador. this was then followed by a palace statement. i'm quite sure what she's got at the back of her mind is that she wants to be absolutely fine and fighting fit on november 1a, which is remembrance sunday. that is the most sacred day in her calendar. but i think to go to glasgow to stand in a room full of coughing, wheezing delegates from all over the world is probably an engagement too far. preparations for the climate change conference have been of keen interest to the queen. "we still don't know who's coming", she was overheard saying when opening the welsh senedd two weeks ago.
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we now know it won't be her. and so the queen will now rely further on that useful pandemic tool, the video message or call. she won't get to meet the glasgow delegates, but they will still get to hearfrom her. james reynolds, bbc news. we're joined now by royal commentator, jennie bond. good morning, great to see this morning. we are not used to hearing the queen cancelled things, are we? at this point how much do we know about the situation she is in? i think it's important we try to stick to facts, really. what we know? we know that something is up to the cream 's kelv, we know she had preliminary —— something is up with the cream's health. we
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we know she has had some preliminary tests, but she is not feeling old, if you remember, she reviews the oldie of the year award recently saying that you are only as old as you feel. but something is going on with her health, but people want to keep it private. they have announced now that she is not going to cop26, because they probably did not want a last—minute emergency, peoplejump last—minute emergency, people jump when last—minute emergency, peoplejump when something is announced last—minute with the queen. and the news of her not being there will not overshadow the important conference. we have seen pictures there of her majesty only yesterday carrying out air zoom engagement with a couple of ambassadors. she looks well in those pictures, she is resting and it is virtual but that is a good sign. it
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absolutely is. we have to take what the palace says at face value that she is in good spirits. but the fact that william and catherine have gone away, they went away the day after the queen was in hospital, a couple of days after, they have gone away on a half term break, they would not do that if there was definitely seriously up. we believe she has not been walking the dogs, she didn't go to sunday service which normally doesin to sunday service which normally does in the windsor estate, but there is a private chapel in windsor castle and she is a very religious woman. so there are other signs that may be it is a mobility issue. certainly going to glasgow is a big thing for a 95—year—old lady. and i think robert hartman is absolutely right that it's madness in this present covid situation with infections as high as they are to go into a room full of delegates and people are leaders from around the world, it's crazy for a 95—year—old
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lady. world, it's crazy for a 95-year-old lad . ~ world, it's crazy for a 95-year-old lad . . . , , . , world, it's crazy for a 95-year-old lad. . ,. lady. we recently saw pictures of the queen _ lady. we recently saw pictures of the queen or _ lady. we recently saw pictures of the queen or king _ lady. we recently saw pictures of the queen or king with _ lady. we recently saw pictures of the queen or king with a - lady. we recently saw pictures of the queen or king with a stick. . lady. we recently saw pictures of i the queen or king with a stick. that was picked up, —— the queen or king with a stick. that was picked up, -- queen walking with a stick. but she is a 95—year—old lady, a lot more active and lots of 95—year—olds. lady, a lot more active and lots of 95-year-olds-_ lady, a lot more active and lots of 95-year-olds. there are lots of us! lots of 45-year-olds! _ 95-year-olds. there are lots of us! lots of 45-year-olds! so _ 95-year-olds. there are lots of us! lots of 45-year-olds! so can - 95-year-olds. there are lots of us! lots of 45-year-olds! so can we i lots of 45—year—olds! so can we sometimes read too much into things? we should not go into the realms of speculating about her health. i know she was riding until relatively recently, incredible for a woman in her 90s, there —— that is extraordinary in itself. this wartime generation is indomitable, look at her mother, she had two walking sticks, and the queen
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mother, 101 years old, two walking sticks, she was on the aircraft carrier the quarry. she stumbled a bit but she walked around i made a wonderful speech, and she said, captain, splice the main base. thank ou ve captain, splice the main base. thank you very much _ captain, splice the main base. thank you very much for — captain, splice the main base. thank you very much for that. _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to viewers in the bbc south today region, too. kensington and chelsea council has apologised for not acting fast enough to install fire doors at grenfell tower, which could have saved lives in the disaster in 2017. a number of doors were missing or faulty, which led to toxic smoke and flames spreading. the grenfell inquiry heard that the council's former head of housing had previously said the doors should not be inspected and thought it was too
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expensive to replace them. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later. so far, we already know there'll be a rise in the national living wage, but the government's under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. so what would londoners like to see? i would like to see a reduction in national insurance across the board for everybody. one of the things that i'd like to see is help for the families, especially now with the price increases of the energy prices. help for those who are unemployed, those who are unemployed, i think people are struggling at the moment. staying with the budget, some of london's museums and galleries are among those set to benefit. the v&a will get a share of £850 million over three years to help redevelop and refurbish its buildings. we'd love to hear from you once we get the full details of the budget this lunchtime. let us know how it affects you. you can get in touch...
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student climate activists have been holding a protest inside london's science museum. members of the uk student climate network said they were staying the night in protest over its sponsorship deals with fossil fuel companies, including shell and bp. let's take a look at the travel. the district line has minor delays between turnham green and ealing broadway because of a track fault. the metropolitan line has minor delays between moor park and amersham, chesham and watford. time for the weather — here's elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a very mild start to the day with temperatures in double figures across the board. there is a lot of cloud around and it is still rather breezy. a noticeable south—westerly wind. it is a windier day than we saw yesterday. some gusts throughout the day, up to 35 mph across the capital.
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it will be cloudy throughout the day but there could be brighter spells in the afternoon. it should stay dry. perhaps spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times and temperatures will be above seasonal average, peaking at 17 or 18 celsius. this evening and overnight, not a lot is set to change. we will keep layers of cloud. temperatures will stay in double figures as we head into tomorrow morning. on thursday, the wind will not be as brisk. it is still mild. temperatures peaking at 17—18. plenty of cloud with a few brighter spells. by the time we get to friday, there will be outbreaks of rain moving eastwards. that is a cold front. behind it, some cooler air, so temperatures are set to dip as we head through the weekend and it will be rather unsettled at times. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. let's return to our main story.
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it isa it is a big day in politics for the economy. the chancellor promising it will breed a new age of optimism. but labour has warned his pledges so far don't go far enough to make up for the rising cost of living. bridget phillipson is the shadow chief secretary to the treasury and joins us now. it is always difficult because we know quite a lot of what will be in it but not all the details and neither do you, so we are slightly in the dark. we do know the government will talk about raising the minimum wage and that is something you have campaigned for as labour. you something you have campaigned for as labour. ., , . ., ., something you have campaigned for as labour. ., , .., ., , labour. you must welcome that bit? we believe in _ labour. you must welcome that bit? we believe in a _ labour. you must welcome that bit? we believe in a high _ labour. you must welcome that bit? we believe in a high pay, _ labour. you must welcome that bit? we believe in a high pay, high i labour. you must welcome that bit? we believe in a high pay, high skill. we believe in a high pay, high skill economy but unfortunately sometimes what the government gives in one hand it takes away with the other so when you take the cut to universal credit and the increase in national insurance, the freeze on income tax
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threshold, a lot of families are worse off even when you take account of any increase the government will bring forward on the minimum wage. what labour wants from the budget is one that responds to immediate pressures facing families on the cost of living but longer term challenges in the economy and society, particularly when it is responding to climate change, growing the economy and getting well paid and high skilled jobs in every part of the country. rishi paid and high skilled 'obs in every part of the country._ part of the country. rishi sunak would say _ part of the country. rishi sunak would say we — part of the country. rishi sunak would say we are _ part of the country. rishi sunak would say we are raising - part of the country. rishi sunak would say we are raising the i part of the country. rishi sunak i would say we are raising the minimum wage, and we are unfreezing public sector pay, more for nhs and public transport and other areas, and it is hard to argue with that? i am happy to have an argument _ hard to argue with that? i am happy to have an argument with _ hard to argue with that? i am happy to have an argument with the i to have an argument with the chancellor on living standards because what labour is saying would really help families now. we are committed to cutting vat on heating bills. forsix committed to cutting vat on heating bills. for six months. committed to cutting vat on heating bills. forsix months. many committed to cutting vat on heating bills. for six months. many people
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face a tough winter and facing the pinch. when the bills have been arriving, everything is more expensive, the same with their weekly shop, filling up your car. there are immediate changes the government should make and that we would be doing from government. longer term, the government does not have a plan for dealing with bigger changes in the economy. we want an overhaul in business taxes around business rates, because for small firms, it can make life hard. we want to see a level playing field between big online giants and family firms on the high street who had a hard time in the pandemic. the headhne hard time in the pandemic. the headline for _ hard time in the pandemic. the headline for la _ hard time in the pandemic. the headline for la -- _ hard time in the pandemic. the headline for la -- a _ hard time in the pandemic. the headline for la —— a labour budget would be we would spend more. iie: government would be we would spend more. ina: government have would be we would spend more. "iia: government have wasted would be we would spend more. iia: government have wasted billions on contracts that did not deliver, and we take a responsible approach to how we spend public money because we
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know how hard people work for their money and they want the government to take that seriously and we would be serious in our approach which is why we set out for rules showing we ensure we balance spending. support for businesses and around vat is costed. in politics it is about choices and priorities and i think the government have got it wrong if they think the online giants like amazon need help when it is family is facing a squeeze.— is facing a squeeze. vat, fuel, you sa it is is facing a squeeze. vat, fuel, you say it is costed. _ is facing a squeeze. vat, fuel, you say it is costed. but _ is facing a squeeze. vat, fuel, you say it is costed. but the _ is facing a squeeze. vat, fuel, you say it is costed. but the chancellorj say it is costed. but the chancellor will say they cannot afford to do that, that they have to help people but also rebuild a damaged economy and cannot afford to do that. having to be what gordon brown once said, to be what gordon brown once said, to be what gordon brown once said, to be more prudent. do you not risk looking like high spending labour not being prudent? fin
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looking like high spending labour not being prudent?— not being prudent? on vat and heatina not being prudent? on vat and heating bills — not being prudent? on vat and heating bills it _ not being prudent? on vat and heating bills it is _ not being prudent? on vat and heating bills it is fully _ not being prudent? on vat and heating bills it is fully costed. l heating bills it is fully costed. because receipts from vat have been higher we could put it towards supporting families so it is costed. the chancellor has wasted a lot of money on things that have not worked. politics is about choices you make. there has never been a shortage of cash for friends of tories and the conservative party with these terrible contracts awarded stop we would not go ahead with the vanity on the prime minister wants to build. we would put that money into supporting policing, tackling crime and making communities safer because that is a priority. i communities safer because that is a ariori . . ., . communities safer because that is a riori . .., , ., communities safer because that is a ariori . , ., , priority. i can see a yacht gets headlines _ priority. i can see a yacht gets headlines and _ priority. i can see a yacht gets headlines and is _ priority. i can see a yacht gets headlines and is something i priority. i can see a yacht gets| headlines and is something we priority. i can see a yacht gets i headlines and is something we can grab onto but in the scheme of things it is a drop in the ocean. i can give you more. we set out how we would raise 1.3 billion by closing the loophole on private schools and
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ending charitable status and putting that money to giving all children a great start in life. that is a different approach a labour government would be taking. we think the tax system needs an overhaul. it is not fit for the modern age. it has not kept pace with changes in the economy. on climate change, we face the challenge and need to tackle it. i also think it is an opportunity to bring morejobs tackle it. i also think it is an opportunity to bring more jobs to our country and create opportunities for well—paid jobs particularly in parts of the country that do not have as manyjobs. in the northeast where i we need more well—paid jobs, withjob where i we need more well—paid jobs, with job security. we where i we need more well—paid jobs, withjob security. we need immediate challenges for families and businesses dealt with. and what we have seen from the government is there is no plan for the long—term.
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they lurch from crisis to crisis. we understand he will unfreeze the public sector pay and allow pay rises in the public sector. it will be up to the pay review body to decide on those rises. would you go with what the public sector pay bodies came up with if you were in government?— bodies came up with if you were in government? yes, we would look to what the review _ government? yes, we would look to what the review body _ government? yes, we would look to what the review body say _ government? yes, we would look to what the review body say but - government? yes, we would look to what the review body say but it i government? yes, we would look to what the review body say but it is i what the review body say but it is for ministers to set the direction for ministers to set the direction for those bodies. it is not clear from what has been announced whether this will amount to a real terms pay increase for public sector workers because ministers have not confirmed that. what if the public sector pay bodies suggest an increase that is not a real terms increase? would you accept it? we want a real terms increase and that is the mandate we would set. we need to see more
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pressure from the government on bringing down supply issues driving inflation. you see gaps on the shelves. the other problem is if the government do not fund it properly you end up in a position where the government gave a pay increase to school staff and teachers in the past but because it was not properly funded, it involved taking resources away from children. that is not a responsible way to do that. we will look if the government have properly set out how they intend to do this in a way that is fair and recognises the contribution of public sectors. and also provides resilience to public services that have been slowly crumbling because of neglect from the government. we slowly crumbling because of neglect from the government.— slowly crumbling because of neglect from the government. we will get all the details later. _ from the government. we will get all the details later. what _ from the government. we will get all the details later. what we _ from the government. we will get all the details later. what we know- from the government. we will get all the details later. what we know this | the details later. what we know this morning is what the chancellor wears on his feet. pictures of rishi sunak preparing with his sliders and socks
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on. as the chief secretary to the labour shadow, what do you think of his fashion statement? i labour shadow, what do you think of his fashion statement?— his fashion statement? i tend to refer a his fashion statement? i tend to prefer a warmer _ his fashion statement? i tend to prefer a warmer set _ his fashion statement? i tend to prefer a warmer set of - his fashion statement? i tend to prefer a warmer set of slippers l his fashion statement? i tend to l prefer a warmer set of slippers to those but even though i am a northerner i tend to get cold so i prefer a warmer pair of slippers. i am wearing a decent pair of shoes in the studio. a nice pair of heels. ila the studio. a nice pair of heels. no sliders this morning. i _ the studio. a nice pair of heels. no sliders this morning. i think- the studio. a nice pair of heels. no sliders this morning. i think i i sliders this morning. i think i would get — sliders this morning. i think i would get in _ sliders this morning. i think i would get in trouble - sliders this morning. i think i would get in trouble with i sliders this morning. i think i would get in trouble with the j would get in trouble with the speaker to turn up in sliders. thank ou ve speaker to turn up in sliders. thank you very much- _ holly has important news from the world of rugby league. that is right. so much focus on head trauma in sport and the link with concussion and early onset dementia and there is a lawsuit in rugby union and now it seems there will be
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similar legal action taken in rugby league. rugby league is set to be rocked by news this morning that a group of former players will be taking legal action against the rugby football league for what they say was a failure to protect players from the risks caused by concussion. one of the players involved is the former oldham, swinton and wales prop michael edwards. he was diagnosed with early onset dementia earlier this month, hejoins me now. good morning. good morning. you are aged 48 and have been diagnosed with early onset dimension. talk me through the symptoms that led to this. it through the symptoms that led to this. . ., through the symptoms that led to this. , ., ., through the symptoms that led to this. ., , ., , through the symptoms that led to this. , ., ., , ., this. it started for years and ears, this. it started for years and years. after— this. it started for years and years, after playing - this. it started for years and years, after playing the i this. it started for years and i years, after playing the game, wandering around like a lost soul because you suffer in silence. we are not guys to talk about our feelings. i had headaches, bright
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lights. confusion. being clumsy. and that was never mean. i basically wanted to get a test to see what was up wanted to get a test to see what was up with me instead of suffering in silence. i had had enough. there are hundreds of players like me. i am one of the lucky ones who is getting... having a voice. but there are other players suffering in silence. it is not fair. there is no after—care in rugby league and no arm around your shoulder when you have finished playing. it is not right. have finished playing. it is not riaht. ., , ., ., right. you played for over ten ears. right. you played for over ten years- what _ right. you played for over ten years. what was _ right. you played for over ten years. what was your - right. you played for over ten i years. what was your experience, right. you played for over ten - years. what was your experience, why do you feel let down? the physicality _ do you feel let down? the physicality of _ do you feel let down? the physicality of rugby i do you feel let down? iia: physicality of rugby league is intense. just to stand on that field. you deserve every accolade. as a player it is drilled into you
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that you put your body on the line. you all work together to get the outcome which is to win, so you would do anything to win. i was an honest player. anytime i went out i my best. you got injured, you got concussion, just by slightly mistiming a tackle you would be concussed. but after your career is finished you are basically thrown away like a broken toy. and you suffer in silence for the rest... a lot of players, i am resilient and done ok for myself, but a lot of players are not as resilient and basically struggling and some have taken their life. i basically struggling and some have taken their life.— taken their life. i suppose some miaht sa taken their life. i suppose some might say some _ taken their life. i suppose some might say some of _ taken their life. i suppose some might say some of the - taken their life. i suppose some i might say some of the information and science we have now, it is relatively new, the link between
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head trauma and concussion and dementia. the rugby football league might have argued they did not know this at the time. what do you hope to achieve from the lawsuit? ihere to achieve from the lawsuit? there have to be — to achieve from the lawsuit? there have to be changes, _ to achieve from the lawsuit? there have to be changes, especially i to achieve from the lawsuit? ii77 have to be changes, especially after care. when you finish playing that is basically it. you have been playing from seven years old and everything you think about is to be a rugby league player, a professional. you would do anything to be a professional rugby league player. but when you have been a player. but when you have been a player and managed to be a high level player, and then basically thrown away like an unwanted broken toy, or treated like a piece of meat, it is totally not fair. there is nothing from the rugby league. they basically do not do anything. and some clubs. the club i was out, i was treated disgracefully because
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i was treated disgracefully because i am no use to them any more. i suppose there are players who might be watching this in their 40s, 50s, and quote your lawyers, who are a walking ticking time bomb. what and quote your lawyers, who are a walking ticking time bomb. what is our walking ticking time bomb. what is your message _ walking ticking time bomb. what is your message to — walking ticking time bomb. what is your message to them? _ walking ticking time bomb. what is your message to them? i _ walking ticking time bomb. what is your message to them? i can i walking ticking time bomb. what is your message to them? i can onlyl walking ticking time bomb. what is l your message to them? i can only go back. a lot of players are suffering in silence. there really is. i am upset because i have still not digested what i have gone through and what i am going to go through in the future. it is like waiting to go into a shift pattern, nights, i do not know what is in the future. i am slowly declining my symptoms. i do not know if there will be any help. to stop the progress. it is not
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good. i have still not come to terms with what i am going through. we are so sor to with what i am going through. we are so sorry to hear _ with what i am going through. we are so sorry to hear about _ with what i am going through. we are so sorry to hear about your _ so sorry to hear about your condition. we appreciate you taking the time out. you have a long journey ahead. thank you forjoining us this morning. thank you. we had a statement from the rugby football league who say they take player safety or welfare seriously and were saddened to hear about some former players' difficulty and they say as a result of scientific knowledge the sport continues to improve its approach to concussion. it is a difficult topic. we have seen it in rugby union and it will be a long battle for those involved. and important that if change is coming, they affect children and young people say they are not in this situation. it feels like a really important day on that. thank you.
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here's carol with the weather. it is a little bit warm today. it is a little bit warm today. it is a little bit warm today. it is mild to start across the board. i have temperatures to show you from inverness to cardiff and london. 11—16. and it is quite widely. we have mild conditions the next few days. dragging up mild air from the tropics. we are looking at heavy rain over the next days. not everywhere, but there will be the risk of localised flooding. this morning, you can see where we have the rain. showers across northern scotland and drizzle across parts of england and wales. heavy rain in southern scotland, north—west england and west wales the next few days, and flooding is possible with numerous warnings out to this end. through today, the weather front is
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draped across northern ireland, north wales and northern england, moving into scotland. to the north of it bright spells. to the south, quite a bit of cloud, thick enough for drizzle in central and southern areas and into the south—east. in eastern parts it should brighten up, especially if you are in the shelter of some hills. windy through the irish sea and areas adjacent. with local gales. the average temperature at this time is roughly 10—14. but these are the temperatures... and this weekend the clocks go back an hour, meaning the end of british summer time. these are the amounts of rainfall you are likely to see in southern scotland and north—west england. hence the risk of some flooding. through this evening and overnight, we carry on with rain. the weather front is waving which
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means it will move slightly north and slightly south at times. more rain in wales and south—west england. but still a lot across north—west england in particular. not a cold night. mild. 9—13. tomorrow we start with a band of rain. it will slightly change position in that it will move a little bit further east getting into the midlands and north—east england. to the north of that in scotland and northern ireland, a brighter day with more sunshine but still showers. to the south, cloud. but there will be sunny spells and temperatures 12—17. from thursday into friday, we have a second front joining forces with the first. both moving northwards. friday is looking unsettled and wet. the strongest winds will be in central and eastern
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areas. it will feel cooler because the temperatures will slip. getting cooler after all this warm weather this week. on yesterday's programme we showed you some incredible pictures of waste being discharged into rivers in england. the issue got lots of you talking, and following pressure from campaigners and constituents, the government said last night it would take action — as zoe conway reports. it's hardly surprising thatjo and laura are taking their time entering the water. it is cold. but that is not the only reason why they are hesitant. they are anxious about sewage. when there is heavy rain, the local waste water plant, less than a mile away, discharges untreated sewage. they are currently allowed to do this if it helps prevent water backing up in other parts
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of the system and causing flooding. after times of flood you will see rag, which is basically sanitary products hanging from the branches of the bushes that run alongside the river. you will see not infrequently sanitary products that have washed up onto the beaches of the river. and you will also see foam, this browny disinfectant type foam floating down the river and collecting. it's an absolute outrage that it is being used as an open sewer by our water companies, by thames water in particular. it's shocking to me and i think it has got worse over the last three or four years, as well. we know there is a sewage treatment plant about a mile up the river — upstream. so we will not be putting our faces in today, because there has been heavy rain and we have seen foam drifting past. last year, the benson waste water plant discharged untreated sewage into this stretch of river for 993 hours. thames water admits these discharges are unacceptable and says it is working with the government
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to stop them happening. this is another river in nearby witney in oxfordshire. also suffering the after—effects of sewage. what you are looking at is sewage fungus. which is absolutely disgusting. like a grey, brown, gelatinous goo coating everything in the river. all of the weeds, checking everything and, frankly, not something you would expect to see in the 21st—century in the developed world. after coming under intense pressure to act, the government announced last night that water companies would now be legally required to reduce the number of sewage discharges from overflow pipes over the next five years. this discharge in hampshire last week went on for 49 hours straight. we have been very clear we want to see a reduction in storm overflows over the next five—year period of the water pricing plan. that will need to be funded and will lead to some increases
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in water bills to fund that. but the big figures that we have seen as estimates, ranging from 150 billion to £600 billion, that is the cost of eliminating these altogether. now, some people are calling for the total elimination of these. we need to do the detailed work first to understand the feasibility of doing that. it may be far from clear how much it will cost and who will pay to fix britain's victorian water system. but what is certain is that environmental campaigners like matt in the lake district will continue to crudely speak out. i will let you guys be the judge of what is coming out of this pipe. but i can tell you one thing, by standing just a couple of metres from it, it smells like absolut- zoe conway, bbc news. i think we can probably guess. pretty unpleasant. and something that means an awful lot to lots of
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you. we're joined now my musician feargal sharkey, who has been campaigning on this issue. you are next in what looks like a lovely river. shall we start with this government partial u—turn. they say water companies will have to do more checks and publish figures. does that go any way to satisfy new? it does not come remotely close. to be clear on this, the courts ruled nine years ago that what is going on in this country is illegal. storm overflows should only be used in exceptional situations. the best illustration from comments last night, the house of lords clearly dissatisfied with what government proposing and the lords have once again amended the legislation and sent it back to the house of commons. that gives government
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another opportunity to get this right. i strongly suggest to them to use that time well. the government sa the use that time well. the government say the alternative _ use that time well. the government say the alternative to _ use that time well. the government say the alternative to letting - use that time well. the government say the alternative to letting out i say the alternative to letting out the water the way they do is it might end up inside people's homes. that is surely not an option. what that is surely not an option. what the government _ that is surely not an option. what the government neglects - that is surely not an option. inst the government neglects to that is surely not an option. ixn“isgi the government neglects to mention is they have known about the issue for 30 years and the courts ruled it illegal nine years ago and they are now confessing to large—scale underinvestment and profiteering by water companies over the past 30 years. the simple truth is government have allowed the principle of the polluters paid into overturned into it pays to pollute. putting it right is going to be expensive. we are on budget day talking about costs the government faces and recovering from the
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pandemic. it would cost potentially tens of billions to create an infrastructure that stops this happening. can we afford to do it at a moment like this in our history? it is part of the debate in the past couple of days. government claim it will cost between 150 billion up to £600 billion to fix this. when someone gives you that range of numbers, they are telling you they have no idea. what should happen now is not more legislation. we have all the legislation we need. government should enforce what is on the statute. we need someone to have a grown—up conversation and come up with a plan to fix this and to link shareholder dividends and executive bonuses to delivering and meeting that plan. that is the grown—up thing to do. that plan. that is the grown-up thing to do— that plan. that is the grown-up thing to do. let's try to have the grown-up _ thing to do. let's try to have the grown-up conversation. - thing to do. let's try to have the grown-up conversation. if- thing to do. let's try to have the grown-up conversation. if you i thing to do. let's try to have the l grown-up conversation. if you are thing to do. let's try to have the i grown-up conversation. if you are to grown—up conversation. if you are to have it, and you mentioned making
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the financial link, what smaller steps could be put in place? the government do not want to spend 150 billion. what could be put in place to start solving the problem? let me auestion to start solving the problem? let me question that- _ to start solving the problem? let me question that. ask _ to start solving the problem? let me question that. ask a _ to start solving the problem? let me question that. ask a government i to start solving the problem? let me question that. ask a government for| question that. ask a government for breakdown of the 150 billion. i have done so the last three days and been met with silence. i am led to one conclusion. somebody made that number up. what we could do is start at the sewage works, increase capacity to hold back water, to hold back sewage. those are easy, cheap things to achieve and we could work on that tomorrow. we do not need more measuring and reporting and writing endless discussion papers that will sit on shelves another 30 years. we need action and we need it today. i years. we need action and we need it toda . ~ . years. we need action and we need it toda . ~' , .., years. we need action and we need it toda. ~' ., ., , today. i keep coming back to money. we are talking _ today. i keep coming back to money. we are talking about _ today. i keep coming back to money.
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we are talking about money - today. i keep coming back to money. we are talking about money with i today. i keep coming back to money. we are talking about money with the | we are talking about money with the budget. people watching was say it is disgusting what is happening in the rivers. but that we cannot afford to spend the cash it would cost right now. let afford to spend the cash it would cost right now.— afford to spend the cash it would cost right now. let me put it this way around- _ cost right now. let me put it this way around. why _ cost right now. let me put it this way around. why is _ cost right now. let me put it this way around. why is the - cost right now. let me put it this way around. why is the taxpayer| way around. why is the taxpayer asked to pay? these are private companies. water companies have profited to the tune of over 60 billion over the last 30 years while filling rivers with sewage. perhaps it is the shareholders of the companies that should pick up the debt and certainly not the customers.— debt and certainly not the customers. ~ , ., ., , customers. where you are this mornina customers. where you are this morning looks _ customers. where you are this morning looks lovely. - customers. where you are this morning looks lovely. are i customers. where you are this| morning looks lovely. are there lessons we can learn from places like that, spots around the country that you think could help improve things in other places? the simple fact is two things _ things in other places? the simple fact is two things need _ things in other places? the simple fact is two things need to - things in other places? the simple fact is two things need to happen. | fact is two things need to happen. government need to enforce existing
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legislation. water companies last year spent 3.1 billion hours dumping sewage in over 400,000 locations into our rivers and government needs to start delivering an action plan and not more endless vacuous discussion about reports, measuring and gathering data. there is not a single river in england that meets good overall environmental health. everyone is polluted. one of the biggest sources of pollution is the water industry. what has happened the last 30 years is profiteering and a failure of the regulator and government oversight and that needs to be corrected.— government oversight and that needs to be corrected. thank you very much indeed. i think— to be corrected. thank you very much indeed. i think this _ to be corrected. thank you very much indeed. i think this story _ to be corrected. thank you very much indeed. i think this story will - indeed. i think this story will continue. if you have thoughts about it, pictures, keep them coming. if you have seen those pictures, i think you will have an opinion on this. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. the countdown to the budget. the chancellor promises a "new age of optimism" but faces pressure to do more to help people struggling with rising living costs. the queen pulls out of hosting a reception at the global climate summit in glasgow on medical advice. and the emotional moment d—day veteran harry billinge finally sees
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the normandy memorial he helped fund. what a waste of life. marvellous men, marvellous men. this is a marvellous memorial. i never thought i'd be here, really. ten former rugby league players take legal action against the sport. they claim they've been left with brain damage and are suing the rfl for alleged negligence. and the highs and lows of life with the gypsy king. paris furyjoins us on the sofa. for the next few days we are looking at further heavy rain across essential suedes of the uk which could lead to localised flooding, it will be windy at times but it will also be unseasonably mild. shall oi also be unseasonably mild. all of that it has _ also be unseasonably mild. all of that it has coming _ also be unseasonably mild. all of that it has coming up _ also be unseasonably mild. all of that it has coming up later. i it's wednesday 27th october.
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our main story. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later today, with a promise to prepare for a new post—covid economy. a number of policies have already been announced, including nhs funding and a rise in the national living wage. but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. rishi sunak showing off his footwear and socks in a set of photos released by the treasury of the chancellor preparing for today. chatting through the budget with his advisers, always with an eye to his image. his dog nova even features, as do his snacks. but by the time we get to this moment later on... can the country afford this budget, mr sunak? and him addressing the commons, what will really matter is what it means for each of us. the biggest question for him is how much is he going to have to spend on all those public services, particularly the ones that have really suffered
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during the austerity years, in a world in which the economy, i'm afraid, is smaller as a result of the pandemic than it would have otherwise been. a big issue for many right now is the cost of living, and whether the government's upbeat language matches how things feel week by week for lots of people. this is going to be a brutal and bitter winter for millions of householders who are not going to be able to bear the extra cost of heating their homes because of the price rises. the chancellor today has got to match his fiscal responsibility with a bit of moral responsibility. in the last few days, loads of stuff about today's budget been already been announced. nhs england will get £5.9 billion to tackle the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans. £6.9 billion has been allocated to transport projects, including in west yorkshire, the west midlands and greater manchester.
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and the minimum pay rate for those aged 23 and over, known as the national living wage, will go up to £9.50 per hourfrom april. but even though plenty has been announced, what we will get from the chancellor later still really matters because it will be the detail about the state of the economy and the state of the government's finances. and so crucially, where our money will be spent and where it won't. now, then, it's over to the chancellor and his big moment at lunchtime. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. let's join our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, who's at downing street. the cabinet will be meeting there very soon. we know what he wears on his feet, what else are we going to find out about what is in the budget, one are the details? we got a little snippet _ budget, one are the details? we got a little snippet of _ budget, one are the details? we got a little snippet of the _ budget, one are the details? we got a little snippet of the speech - budget, one are the details? we got a little snippet of the speech that i a little snippet of the speech that the chancellor will give in the
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house of commons at lunchtime overnight, and he talks about this being a moment to start building the post—covid economy, a sign that the treasury thinks that the emergency of the coronavirus is effectively over, and that means less emergency spending and a return to old—fashioned things like old —fashioned things like chancellors old—fashioned things like chancellors are saying it's time to balance the books. perhaps a bit less spending in some areas in future. in terms of the detail that is going to be a lot, it's notjust the budget today, it's also a spending review where the government sets out how much money each government department gets to spend over the next few years so there will be a lot to wade through. we will be a lot to wade through. we will also get some forecasts for the economy from the office of publish —— the office for budget responsibility, the independent watchdog, and the key thing will be what the permanent damage will be to the economy by covid, there is speculation that it will be less than they were predicting even a few months ago so rishi sunak might have a bit extra cash to play with. mps will be looking out at what areas in
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the uk will be the first to receive money from the levelling up fund. people starting to receive those whopper electricity and gas bills will be looking to see if there is any help on the cost of living. but yesterday, the treasury rejected labour's idea of cutting vat on domestic fuel bills. there is lot to look at for budget day tradition, the rabbit coming out of the hat, the rabbit coming out of the hat, the thing which has not been announced beforehand, we will find out what that is in a few hours. the queen will not attend next week's climate change summit in glasgow following medical advice to rest. the announcement comes a week after the 95—year—old monarch spent a night in hospital for preliminary medical checks. buckingham palace said the queen was 'disappointed not to attend the reception but will deliver an address to the assemble delegates via a recorded video message.�* our royal correspondantjonny dymond
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is with us and can tell us more. buckingham palace is saying the queen is disappointed so you think she will be very disappointed not to make it? i she will be very disappointed not to make it? ~ ., . she will be very disappointed not to make it? ~' .. ., make it? i think the fact that the word disappointment _ make it? i think the fact that the word disappointment was - make it? i think the fact that the word disappointment was in i make it? i think the fact that the word disappointment was in the | word disappointment was in the statement and regretfully, that's a clear indication that as far as this particular engagement is concerned, and in general, cancelling any engagement is a blow for the queen. and for the palace. there are two ways to look at it, number one, you can say that this is the second engagement she has cancelled in seven days, she had spent some time in hospital, she is 95 years old, everyone should be terribly concerned. the other way is to say that she is a remarkably robust 95—year—old who has been working pretty much constantly and she has barely spent any time in hospital over the last few years. and she
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manages a lot of engagement over that of her normal duties and the palace says there is no cause for alarm. the climate change conference is a big dealfor the alarm. the climate change conference is a big deal for the government and it has now lost a bit of its lustre because the queen will not be there. the coronavirus test and trace programme in england has failed to achieve its main objective of helping to break chains of covid transmission. that's according to a group of cross—party mps. the public accounts committee says a number of the programme's aims have been "overstated or not achieved," despite costing an "eye—watering" amount of money. the government has pointed to its record building a testing network from scratch, but the chair of the committee said it did not go far enough. we found it very difficult to see what it had achieved for the 37 billion. it set out very bold aims, it failed on many of its own terms. crucially now, its responsibilities are in the new uk health security agency. the us prosecutor investigating the accidental fatal shooting
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on the set of the film rust says the weapon fired by alec baldwin was a real gun and not a prop. criminal charges have not been ruled out following the death of cinematographer halyna hutchins in new mexico last week. the director, joel souza, was also injured in the incident. a man is believed to have died after falling from a boat off the essex coast while attempting to cross the channel. two other men, both of whom are somali nationals, were rescued on monday. the home office said the incident was a "reminder of the extreme dangers of crossing the channel in small boats". here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. she has already reminded us this morning that the weather is changing this week and the clocks are changing as well. that's right, the clocks go back this weekend so for some of us an extra hour in bed, and for others,
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an extra hour at work. we have a fair bit of cloud around today, some heavier rain, that will be the forecast for the next few days for some of us. the common denominator is it is very mild wherever you are, i'll start and it will be a mild day. there is a weather front which is going to extend across central and southern scotland during the day. to the north, some cloud around, but some sunshine. and some heavy showers at the moment. and to the south, quite a lot of cloud around. thick enough for some drizzle here and there. but if you are in the shelter of the hills in the east you could see some sunshine. it is windy to the irish sea at the moment with local gales, that will continue through the day. tend to 14 is the average —— at the average at the time of year is ten to 14 degrees. the band of rain is
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getting into more of wales and scotland. when need in the irish sea but it will not be called. the unsettled weather continues tomorrow. thank you, see a bit later. he's been praised for his tireless fundraising efforts over more than six decades, and now world war two veteran harry billinge has finally had the chance to see one of his biggest dreams become a reality. the 96 year old has travelled to normandy to visit a special memorial honouring soldiers, sailors and airmen who died under british command following the d—day landings, a project his efforts helped to fund. our reporterjohn maguirejoined him. good morning. an incredible place, this. it all started as a seed of an
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idea, a conversation between our bbc colleague nicholas witchell and the normandy veteran george patsy pointed out to nick that there was no memorial to the british forces here. different regiment had different memorials along the normandy coastline but there was a lack along this stretch of the north french coast where there is no memorial. until now. it actually opened back in the summer on the 77th anniversary of the d—day landings come the 6th ofjune1944. but because of covid restrictions, this is the first time the veterans have been able to come here, to walk among the columns and touch the names of theirformer among the columns and touch the names of their former comrades, stand in front of this incredible sculpture and think back to what happened although there decades ago. we were with harry when he visited yesterday. as a former soldier, harry billinge would have done this thousands of times.
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but never was a salute more poignant and heartfelt. what a waste of life. marvellous men, marvellous men. this is a marvellous memorial. i never thought i'd be here. but it's wonderful. i feel very humble today and i'm deeply moved, because i didn't realise what a wonderful place it is now. beyond all comprehension. marvellous. he was just a teenager when he was one of the first to land
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here in normandy on what the allies called gold beach. he wanted to come to the british memorial, for the very first time, and to see the names of some of the men who died on d—day and during the battles that followed. alexander. and up there, look — bates. bates. can you see him? yes. chiselled into the memorial�*s stone are the names of 22,442 people who were killed here during the summer of 1944. marvellous man. he got promoted to lance corporal. he was a sapper. but he was an elderly bloke to be over here, really. i think he was old enough to be my dad. harry's fundraising has been tireless. a regular fixture at par market near his home in cornwall,
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he has raised almost £40,000. and that dedication is recognised here on one of the walls. but typically, harry's reaction to seeing his name was to think of others. don't deserve that. i don't. we did it with all these wonderful men. thank you very much. can't believe it. i didn't expect my name to be here. the covid pandemic had prevented d—day veterans from being at the official opening back injune. harry was joined then by family and friends to watch the ceremony via a video link. but, today, he was able to see and to touch what he had dreamed of for so many years. and he was able to see another special tribute to his endeavours — harry's bench. marvellous. thank you very much.
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give me a kiss. and when you are laid in a hole in the ground, being shelled... and machine guns, rifle fire. when you are in a hole with a bloke, you get to know him. you get to know his very soul. i think it is a wonderful monument to all those wonderful men who gave up their lives. for a very small amount of money — they did it in a form of duty. at the site's centre, a sculpture depicts three men fighting their way up the beach. it captures their determination, their aggression and their youth. bear with me. i'm breaking my heart standing here. i love you all. if you can hear me. just tanks and guns,
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weapons of murder. we did it though, didn't we? we knocked 'em back. harry is well known in the towns that line this coast and people here are eternally grateful to their liberators. for the local, it is something very important. we live with it. we had to go on living, but never forget, never forget. it is so important to remember that they came here, that they managed to pass so many obstacles to get freedom for us, first of all, but then for europe and the world. and it is amazing, all those young guys. yeah, it's important. and there is no rest for the committed. he is planning to spend this
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afternoon collecting in the nearby town of arromanches, continuing to raise money for the memorial�*s upkeep and a planned education centre — something harry is passionate about. a man who has already done so much believes there is yet more to do to ensure his friends and colleagues who never made it home are always remembered. and may god bless you all. and may god bless me, too, and to give me strength to carry on a little while longer. the irrepressible harry billinge visiting here the first time yesterday. more veterans who were here yesterday, mervyn and jack, very good to see you here today. what your first impressions of the
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memorial? i what your first impressions of the memorial? ., . what your first impressions of the memorial? . , , . , , memorial? i had seen pictures, but it is very oppressive, _ memorial? i had seen pictures, but it is very oppressive, more - it is very oppressive, more impressive than the actual photographs. i'm very pleased it's here. it's taken a long, long time to be built. but it was needed and i'm very pleased it's here. it will last long after our. fight! i'm very pleased it's here. it will last long after our.— last long after our. and that the idea, of course. _ last long after our. and that the idea, of course. i— last long after our. and that the idea, of course. i would - last long after our. and that the idea, of course. i would how- idea, of course. iwould how important it is to you to come here and spend some time here to see the memorial? it is and spend some time here to see the memorial? . , and spend some time here to see the memorial? , , ,., ., and spend some time here to see the memorial? , , ., ., , memorial? it is very important, asi sa , for memorial? it is very important, asi say. for the — memorial? it is very important, asi say, for the future _ memorial? it is very important, asi say, for the future generations, i memorial? it is very important, asi say, for the future generations, to i say, for the future generations, to learn the learn the lesson of being strong, the country being strong so it won't have to go to war and to be attacked, and to remember the names, the individuals and the families who passed on. it must be like looking at nelson's column. nelson has gone and his family has gone but it reminds us of what has happened. share
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reminds us of what has happened. are there names you will be looking out there names you will be looking out for? there names you will be looking out for? ., there names you will be looking out for? . ., , ., for? there are three names that i shau for? there are three names that i shall be looking _ for? there are three names that i shall be looking out _ for? there are three names that i shall be looking out for. - for? there are three names that i shall be looking out for. enjoy i for? there are three names that i i shall be looking out for. enjoy your shall be looking out for. en'oy your da to shall be looking out for. en'oy your day to day, — shall be looking out for. en'oy your day to day, a i shall be looking out for. en'oy your day to day, a speciali shall be looking out for. enjoy your day to day, a special ceremony i day to day, a special ceremony organised for later. good morning, jack. same question to you, what are your first thoughts of sameness of the first time? i your first thoughts of sameness of the first time?— the first time? i think it's fantastic. _ the first time? i think it's fantastic. -- _ the first time? i think it's fantastic. -- seeing i the first time? i think it's fantastic. -- seeing this| the first time? i think it's | fantastic. -- seeing this for the first time? i think it's - fantastic. -- seeing this for a fantastic. —— seeing this for a first— fantastic. —— seeing this for a first time? _ fantastic. —— seeing this for a first time? i— fantastic. —— seeing this for a first time? i think they have done a great _ first time? i think they have done a great thing. — first time? i think they have done a great thing, definitely. what first time? i think they have done a great thing, definitely.— great thing, definitely. what are the most important _ great thing, definitely. what are the most important aspects - great thing, definitely. what are the most important aspects for. great thing, definitely. what are - the most important aspects for you? one of the most important aspects is that my— one of the most important aspects is that my friend's name is here, king, charlie _ that my friend's name is here, king, charlie kim} — that my friend's name is here, king, charlie king. he might be here. you will be charlie king. he might be here. 7m, will be looking out for him. and the location above gold beach, i know you have both been back here for many years. it you have both been back here for many years— you have both been back here for many years.- you - you have both been back here for many years.- you have .
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you have both been back here for. many years.- you have been many years. 11 years. you have been back for 11 years. _ many years. 11 years. you have been back for 11 years. what _ many years. 11 years. you have been back for 11 years. what memories i many years. 11 years. you have been | back for 11 years. what memories and what thoughts when you look across those sounds?— those sounds? really, you can't exlain those sounds? really, you can't exptain it. _ those sounds? really, you can't explain it, really. _ those sounds? really, you can't explain it, really. it's— those sounds? really, you can't explain it, really. it's so - explain it, really. it's so fantastic.— explain it, really. it's so fantastic. �*, ., �*, ., fantastic. it's a good view. it's a different view _ fantastic. it's a good view. it's a different view that _ fantastic. it's a good view. it's a different view that we _ fantastic. it's a good view. it's a different view that we saw first | different view that we saw first from the sea, where i landed. from the beach, looking towards the land. i haven't found any photographs yet of such a place. it’s i haven't found any photographs yet of such a place-— of such a place. it's the opposite view. of such a place. it's the opposite view- and _ of such a place. it's the opposite view. and what _ of such a place. it's the opposite view. and what strikes _ of such a place. it's the opposite view. and what strikes me - of such a place. it's the opposite view. and what strikes me is - of such a place. it's the opposite view. and what strikes me is the distance between here, which would have been the german positions, of course, and where you came up the beach, it's such a short distance, no cover. �* , . , beach, it's such a short distance, no cover-— beach, it's such a short distance, no cover. �* , ., , , ., no cover. i'm pleased they thought i was not worth _ no cover. i'm pleased they thought i was not worth firing _ no cover. i'm pleased they thought i was not worth firing out. _ no cover. i'm pleased they thought i was not worth firing out. thank- no cover. i'm pleased they thought i was not worth firing out. thank you | was not worth firing out. thank you for what you _ was not worth firing out. thank you for what you did _ was not worth firing out. thank you for what you did all _ was not worth firing out. thank you for what you did all those _ was not worth firing out. thank you for what you did all those decadesl for what you did all those decades ago, and thank you for being here with us today. lets say hello to the
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former head of the british army, and henry montgomery, whose grandfather was commander of the allied forces. it is daylight, you have had a chance to have a look around, order your first chance to have a look around, order yourfirst impressions? it chance to have a look around, order your first impressions? it is chance to have a look around, order your first impressions?— your first impressions? it is every bit as wonderful _ your first impressions? it is every bit as wonderful as _ your first impressions? it is every bit as wonderful as we _ your first impressions? it is every bit as wonderful as we hoped - your first impressions? it is every bit as wonderful as we hoped it i bit as wonderful as we hoped it would be and more. looking over my shoulder, it's the most fantastic view out to sea, mulberry harbour of aaron marsh, and the gold beach. this is the box seat, the most perfect location, this had to be where the british memorial would be. to see it completed probably 60 years too late but to see it here with the names of the service people who lost their lives in the normandy campaign, it is wonderful. it's fantastic to have some veterans with us as well, at long last we have been able to bring them here to see the memorial and the names of those that they served with and who fail. it's wonderful to be here, a great
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privilege. it's wonderfulto be here, a great rivileue. ., ., ., . ., . ., , privilege. you had a chance to see this culture _ privilege. you had a chance to see this culture before _ privilege. you had a chance to see this culture before today, - privilege. you had a chance to see this culture before today, and - privilege. you had a chance to see this culture before today, and hadl this culture before today, and had some views on it. what struck me about it, how young they looked, the men were young, but it is captured in this culture, that dynamism, it's very evocative. in this culture, that dynamism, it's very evocative-— very evocative. that's true, i saw the sculpture _ very evocative. that's true, i saw the sculpture while _ very evocative. that's true, i saw the sculpture while it _ very evocative. that's true, i saw the sculpture while it was - very evocative. that's true, i saw the sculpture while it was being i the sculpture while it was being made back in england and we were here two years ago when the site was unveiled. they were young, armies are full of young people, determined people. just look at the expression on theirfaces, people. just look at the expression on their faces, they are a team working together, determined, going forward. one has a rifle, one has a sterling, they are doing the business in a determined fashion, storming the show. that's why i think that sculpture is perfect for here amongst the pillars with the names of all those who died in the campaign. it's a great privilege and a pleasure to be here and fantastic to have some veterans with us here
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today. to have some veterans with us here toda . .,, , , ., to have some veterans with us here toda. ,, ., _ today. those views shared by everybody- — today. those views shared by everybody. henry, _ today. those views shared by everybody. henry, your- today. those views shared by - everybody. henry, your grandfather's name and quote is part of the memorial as well.— name and quote is part of the memorial as well. ~ ., ., , ., ., ,, memorial as well. what do you make of it? i have — memorial as well. what do you make of it? i have obviously _ memorial as well. what do you make of it? i have obviously seen - memorial as well. what do you make of it? i have obviously seen that - of it? i have obviously seen that before, — of it? i have obviously seen that before, but it's fantastic to see it here _ before, but it's fantastic to see it here i_ before, but it's fantastic to see it here. i think the last bit of the sentence. _ here. i think the last bit of the sentence, in the better days that lie ahead, — sentence, in the better days that lie ahead, men will speak with pride of our— lie ahead, men will speak with pride of our doings, that's what this memoriat— of our doings, that's what this memorial is all about and it will help— memorial is all about and it will help us. — memorial is all about and it will help us, my generation and my children— help us, my generation and my children and grandchildren's generation, who i hope will soon be able to— generation, who i hope will soon be able to come over, who haven't done yet. able to come over, who haven't done yet they— able to come over, who haven't done yet. they will — able to come over, who haven't done yet. they will be able to come over and hear— yet. they will be able to come over and hear the stories. and that's what _ and hear the stories. and that's what this— and hear the stories. and that's what this memorial is all about, being _ what this memorial is all about, being able to keep the story going so that— being able to keep the story going so that we don't forget the cost at which _ so that we don't forget the cost at which this— so that we don't forget the cost at which this freedom was bought. as henry which this freedom was bought. henry said, which this freedom was bought. is henry said, it's important that the next phase, the development of this site, is how we are going to tell
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the story for successive generations so that everyone learns the lessons and we never have to fight a war on that bloody scale which we did to bring freedom and liberty to europe in the 19405. it's something everyone can play a role in. this memorial cost £30 million, we have got to maintain it and make sure it is here for years to come. i hope that viewers would like to become a guardian for this site, go to the website and put a small standing order into contribute and make sure we have got a significant income to make sure that these memorials are here for years to come. you make sure that these memorials are here for years to come.— here for years to come. you have sent here for years to come. you have spent some _ here for years to come. you have spent some time _ here for years to come. you have spent some time with _ here for years to come. you have spent some time with some - here for years to come. you have spent some time with some of. here for years to come. you have l spent some time with some of the veterans, what is their mood generally? what do you think they will make this place? i generally? what do you think they will make this place?— will make this place? i think they will make this place? i think they will be very _ will make this place? i think they will be very impressed, - will make this place? i think they will be very impressed, you - will make this place? i think they will be very impressed, you can't| will be very impressed, you can't fail to— will be very impressed, you can't fail to he — will be very impressed, you can't fail to be impressed, this position is fantastic. i was here at 6:30am
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and standing just out there in the dark, _ and standing just out there in the dark. lrut— and standing just out there in the dark. but i— and standing just out there in the dark, but i could see the beach and that i_ dark, but i could see the beach and that i think— dark, but i could see the beach and that i think was roughly went the first landing took place. obviously it was _ first landing took place. obviously it was daylight because it was june. that sense — it was daylight because it was june. that sense of what was happening, and i_ that sense of what was happening, and i think— that sense of what was happening, and i think they will be able to come — and i think they will be able to come here and i think it will be very— come here and i think it will be very emotional for them to come and stand _ very emotional for them to come and stand here _ very emotional for them to come and stand here and be reminded of what they were _ stand here and be reminded of what they were doing, 77 years ago now. thank— they were doing, 77 years ago now. thank you _ they were doing, 77 years ago now. thank you very much indeed for your time, gentlemen. a5 everyone has been saying this morning, this is a very special place, a sombre place, it is poignant but it feels somehow perfect as well, looking up at those young faces and imagining the horrors that those young men face in front of them all those years ago and the sacrifices they made. the names that are on the columns and the memorial, notjust the place of
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remembrance but as we have heard, a place for the future, to ensure that what happened on these beaches in 1944 can never happen again. well said, lovely work this morning, thank you so much. and i'm glad that harry himself is having a line after that busy day yesterday but he is straight back to work today, is that right? ? straight back to work today, is that riuht? , , ., , straight back to work today, is that ritht? , , ., , , , right? ? yes, unbelievable, spending time with harry _ right? ? yes, unbelievable, spending time with harry is _ right? ? yes, unbelievable, spending time with harry is a _ right? ? yes, unbelievable, spending time with harry is a life _ right? ? yes, unbelievable, spending time with harry is a life affirming - time with harry is a life affirming experience, he has got more energy than me and mickjagger put together. an incredible character, he is mobbed everywhere, there was a french family yesterday from lyon who came over and shook his hand, two young boys are there as well. you could see that maybe they had studied what happened here in history at school, i'm not sure, but you could see that they were thinking about, what is happening here, who is this chap, what is it all mean? the family, all four of them shook harry 's cannon said very
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simply, thank you. and that's probably the most important word in all of this, the gratitude of the french people for their liberators. thank you very much, john maguire, reporting from normandy. harri;r reporting from normandy. harry billinae reporting from normandy. harry billinge the _ reporting from normandy. harry billinge the rock— reporting from normandy. harry billinge the rock star _ reporting from normandy. harry billinge the rock star i _ reporting from normandy. harry billinge the rock star i called - reporting from normandy. harry billinge the rock star i called him earlier, quite appropriate. more ener: earlier, quite appropriate. more energy than _ earlier, quite appropriate. more energy than john _ earlier, quite appropriate. more energy than john maguire - earlier, quite appropriate. ire energy thanjohn maguire and mick jagger together, that is some energy! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to viewers in the bbc south today region, too. kensington and chelsea council has apologised for not acting fast enough to install fire doors at grenfell tower that could have saved lives in the disaster in 2017. a number of doors were missing or faulty, which led to toxic smoke and flames spreading. the grenfell inquiry heard that the council's former head of housing had previously said the doors should not be inspected and thought it was too
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expensive to replace them. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his budget later. so far, we already know there'll be a rise in the national living wage, but the government is under pressure to do more to help people struggling with the rising cost of living. so what would londoners like to see? i would like to see a reduction in national insurance across the board for everybody. one of the things that i'd like to see is help for the families, especially now with the price increases of the energy prices. help for those who are unemployed, those who are unemployed, i think people are struggling at the moment. staying with the budget, some of london's museums and galleries are among those set to benefit. the v&a will get a share of £850 million over three years to help redevelop and refurbish its buildings. we'd love to hear from you once we get the full details of the budget this lunchtime. let us know how it affects you. you can get in touch... student climate activists have
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been holding a protest inside london's science museum. members of the uk student climate network said they were staying overnight in protest over its sponsorship deals with fossil fuel companies, including shell and bp. let's take a look at how the tube is running. we have minor delays still on both the district line and the metropolitan line. there's no tfl rail services between liverpool street and shenfield. time for the weather — here's elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a very mild start to the day with temperatures in double figures across the board. there is a lot of cloud around and it is still rather breezy. a noticeable south—westerly wind. it is a windier day than we saw yesterday. some gusts throughout the day, up to 35 mph across the capital. it will be cloudy throughout the day but there could be brighter spells in the afternoon. it should stay dry. perhaps spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times and temperatures will be above seasonal average, peaking at 17 or 18 celsius. this evening and overnight,
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not a lot is set to change. we will keep layers of cloud. temperatures will stay in double figures as we head into tomorrow morning. on thursday, the wind will not be as brisk. it is still mild. temperatures peaking at 17—18. plenty of cloud with a few brighter spells. by the time we get to friday, there will be outbreaks of rain moving eastwards. that is a cold front. behind it, some cooler air, so temperatures are set to dip as we head through the weekend and it will be rather unsettled at times. that's it for now. i'm back in half an hour. time to hand you back tojon and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one today.
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gethin and rev can tell us what they have lined up — and it includes a someone special. he certainly is. the boys are in charre he certainly is. the boys are in charge today- _ he certainly is. the boys are in charge today. we _ he certainly is. the boys are in charge today. we have - he certainly is. the boys are in charge today. we have a - he certainly is. the boys are in. charge today. we have a packed he certainly is. the boys are in - charge today. we have a packed show. coming up on today's morning live. they face high risk and danger to catch criminals and protect the public. and as a former police officer, i know how important they are to the force. we discover how this special armour is helping to protect police dogs in the line of duty. and you've been talking about it on breakfast, it's budget day. a5 chancellor rishi sunak prepares to deliver his plan this afternoon, financialjournalist iona bain predicts how it will affect the nation's purse strings as well as your back pocket. plus, 55,000 women are diagnosed with it every year in the uk — to mark breast cancer awareness month, dr punam's here with a vital check list. yes, i'm going to take you through some of the myths,
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including whether or not an underwired bra can increase your chances of getting the disease and why men should be checking themselves too. also coming up — it's the brand new sunday night drama from the makers of vigil. you know it is going to be good. showtrial has plenty of twists and turns. but is celine buckens' character guilty or not guilty? we'll be attempting to get a verdict when she joins us later. we're used to speaking to him on your sofa. dan walker tells us about making it through to week 6 on strictly — and how he's aiming for his first 10 of the series. the big lobster willjoin usjust after 9:15am. lobster, i think that might stick. see you later.
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the climate protest group, insulate britain, it is disrupting traffic on the a4 t. and also add a major roundabout in dartford. these are live pictures with this news coming in in the past few minutes. our correspondent is on the ground. what is the situation? good morning. i was one of the firstjournalists here this morning with insulated britain who have blocked the a40 in west london. they are calling on the government to insulate british home starting with social housing first. they are saying to reduce co2 emissions. this is the 15th time insulate britain have carried out this action. many have believed their hand to the ground. the police
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are here. pretty much powerless to do anything. the tailbacks go on for as long as the eye can see. this is an important road because it leads to heathrow airport a few miles in that direction. insulate britain say they will continue the actions until they will continue the actions until they are listened to and are planning more later this morning. many passengers getting out of their cars this morning, visibly angry, swearing at protesters and confronting them. one lady saying she is a doctor and she needed to get to hospital to treat her patient. she said this is no way to treat normal folk trying to get to work. basically, not happy with the protests. work. basically, not happy with the rotests. , , ., ., , protests. this is what we have seen with previous _ protests. this is what we have seen with previous protests, _ protests. this is what we have seen with previous protests, the - protests. this is what we have seen l with previous protests, the response from people disrupted by what is happening. what have protesters said about why they have chosen today at
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that point? about why they have chosen today at that oint? , _ , about why they have chosen today at that oint? , , , ., ., that point? they say they want to cause as much — that point? they say they want to cause as much disruption - that point? they say they want to cause as much disruption as - cause as much disruption as possible. they say they need members of the public to listen to this emergency, climate emergency. they say that in the long—term, all of us, despite this disruption for a few hours, will benefit. they claim in ten years' time we will look back thanking these protesters. i am not sure many people here trying to get to work will agree with that. ultimately, there have been injunctions issued by national highways, to prevent the protesters carrying out actions such as this, and even transport for london early this week granted an injunction to stop the protesters blocking these major roads in the capital. but the protesters have simply ignored those
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injunctions and now they will potentially face jail once they are arrested. the police are here and admitted they are short—staffed to move them off the road. so this disruption will probably last at least a few hours this morning until they are arrested and cleared. i wonder if you are able to get the cameraman perhaps to move the camera to see what the situation is with the protest that is happening live as we speak. i do not know if you are technically able to talk to protesters. irate are technically able to talk to protesters-— are technically able to talk to rotesters. . ., ., ., protesters. we are on a tripod. do ou protesters. we are on a tripod. do you think- -- _ protesters. we are on a tripod. do you think... we _ protesters. we are on a tripod. do you think... we can _ protesters. we are on a tripod. do you think... we can probably - protesters. we are on a tripod. do you think... we can probably try i protesters. we are on a tripod. do| you think... we can probably try to get one of the protest is over. maybe let's hear from a protester and see what they are saying. if you crab and see what they are saying. if you grab matthew- _ and see what they are saying. if you grab matthew. let's _ and see what they are saying. if you grab matthew. let's take _ and see what they are saying. if you grab matthew. let's take the - and see what they are saying. if gm. grab matthew. let's take the camera down. i think we are not going to be
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able to. you are not going to hear them because i only have one macro microphone and it is on myjacket. let's see if we can chat. can i ask you why you are here from bbc news, bbc news, matthew. tell us why you are here. irate bbc news, matthew. tell us why you are here. ~ . bbc news, matthew. tell us why you are here. . ., ., , bbc news, matthew. tell us why you are here. . ., .,, ., are here. we are here as part of the insulate britain _ are here. we are here as part of the insulate britain protests _ are here. we are here as part of the insulate britain protests to - are here. we are here as part of the insulate britain protests to raise - insulate britain protests to raise the profile of the need to address carbon— the profile of the need to address carbon and fossil fuels in the housing _ carbon and fossil fuels in the housing stock in the uk. people are an: housing stock in the uk. people are angry today- _ housing stock in the uk. people are angry today- i— housing stock in the uk. people are angry today. i have _ housing stock in the uk. people are angry today. i have been _ housing stock in the uk. people are angry today. i have been on - housing stock in the uk. people are angry today. i have been on your. angry today. i have been on your protests. people were getting out of their cars at one stage i thought there would be a physical altercations. people are not happy. we understand people people are not happy _ we understand people people are not happy. it— we understand people people are not happy. it is— we understand people people are not happy. it is understandable if they have lreen— happy. it is understandable if they have been held up for a time. one of the roads— have been held up for a time. one of the roads has been released so the delays _ the roads has been released so the delays will— the roads has been released so the delays will still be there but at least _ delays will still be there but at least people can get through
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eventually. it isjustified to delay people _ eventually. it isjustified to delay people for a short time because it is so _ people for a short time because it is so important that we address the climate _ is so important that we address the climate crisis, the people being killed _ climate crisis, the people being killed lry— climate crisis, the people being killed by the climate emergency, and we have _ killed by the climate emergency, and we have to _ killed by the climate emergency, and we have to have action. what killed by the climate emergency, and we have to have action.— we have to have action. what about the lady trying _ we have to have action. what about the lady trying to — we have to have action. what about the lady trying to get _ we have to have action. what about the lady trying to get to _ we have to have action. what about the lady trying to get to work. - we have to have action. what about the lady trying to get to work. she l the lady trying to get to work. she is a doctor. the lady trying to get to work. she is a doctor-— is a doctor. surely that is not riuht? is a doctor. surely that is not right? everybody _ is a doctor. surely that is not right? everybody who - is a doctor. surely that is not right? everybody who goes l is a doctor. surely that is not| right? everybody who goes to is a doctor. surely that is not - right? everybody who goes to work will have _ right? everybody who goes to work will have an importantjob. she has gone _ will have an importantjob. she has gone now— will have an importantjob. she has gone now because she was released, so she _ gone now because she was released, so she had _ gone now because she was released, so she had a — gone now because she was released, so she had a half—hour delay or something. that is not unusual for people _ something. that is not unusual for people travelling on london roads. we apologise, but it is a fact of life _ we apologise, but it is a fact of life. �* , ., _, life. and in terms of continuing toda , life. and in terms of continuing today. more — life. and in terms of continuing today, more action _ life. and in terms of continuing today, more action later? - life. and in terms of continuing today, more action later? yes, j life. and in terms of continuing - today, more action later? yes, more action is planned _ today, more action later? yes, more action is planned later. _ today, more action later? yes, more action is planned later. all— today, more action later? yes, more action is planned later. all right, - action is planned later. all right, matthew. that _ action is planned later. all right, matthew. that is _ action is planned later. all right, matthew. that is matthew - action is planned later. all right, matthew. that is matthew from | matthew. that is matthew from insulate britain. the protesters say they will continue protesting for they will continue protesting for the next days, even weeks, until
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they are listened to. they want british homes insulated. we can hear that people are not happy. if we spin the camera around this way. horns beeping. studio: thank you very much. we can see people getting very frustrated on the a40. and greg was talking to protester matthew doubt why what they were doing, they. it looked like traffic was starting to move. we will keep you in touch with that on the news channel. rishi sunak is preparing to deliver his second budget as chancellor this afternoon. so what can we expect? ben is in burnley for us.
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you are you are somewhere you are somewhere that looks fantastic. welcome, we are at queen street mill on the outskirts of the town. this was built in 1894, making cotton, which it sold around the world and put east lancashire on the map. it was paramount for its importance in bringing wealth and growth to this area. but things changed. manufacturing declined and it left the town struggling for a purpose and so there are big questions. the town put its faith in the conservative government and promises to level up. we wonder what it might look like for places like here and what change could the chancellor deliver in his speech. we will speak to a couple of people in a moment. we will assess the challenges for burnley and what might be delivered for personal budgets, what difference it will make in our pockets. before that, i
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have been out in burnley looking at how the chancellor might make the numbers add up. the chancellor's challenge — claw back the cost of covid or protect people from the squeeze on living. begin to balance the books or give in to the prime minister's urge to splurge on levelling up places like here in burnley. some of the big budget numbers are pretty eye—watering. the uk deficit — the difference between what the government spends and brings in — rose to £320 billion last year. that is the highest level since the second world war. the chancellor's instinct is clear. tax rises are unpopular. some will even say un—conservative. i will tell you what is un—conservative. unfunded pledges, reckless borrowing and soaring debt. the problem is, the independent institute for fiscal studies says the uk tax burden is set to reach its highest sustained peacetime level,
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even before today's speech. the new health and social care levy will raise £36 billion. the treasury will also make more from corporation and income tax. but where else can the chancellor find some cash? asking students to repay their loans sooner, higher council tax, alcohol duty, or a levy on online retailers, pensions or taxes on inheritance and profits. it is notjust cuts in the chancellor's sights, there is also a pay rise on the way for millions. but can it keep up with the rising cost of living? inflation is currently at 3.1% and it is forecast to rise even higher. even though the climate summit may be just around the corner, persistently high prices could force another freeze in petrol duty and there could be more support
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for the price we pay for our home energy bills. government departments that are not protected, including courts, local government and prisons, could reporedly see their day—to—day budgets squeezed. last week, the chancellor was given a boost. borrowing for this year is so far lower than forecast, but with the economic recovery still fragile, that will not make today's decisions any easier. those are the big numbers. the big question is what difference they will make in burnley. i am joined by justine, a landlady at a pub near here and a personal finance expert, laura. justine, you bought your pub three years ago and given the pandemic, you do not even know what a normal year looks like. tell me about the last 18 months. it a normal year looks like. tell me about the last 18 months.- about the last 18 months. it has been intense. _
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about the last 18 months. it has been intense. going _ about the last 18 months. it has been intense. going into - about the last 18 months. it has i been intense. going into lockdown about the last 18 months. it u—s been intense. going into lockdown in march last year, very difficult. really unpredictable. we were not sure when we would be able to open again and the 4th ofjuly we reopened and were excited but there were restrictions. we felt under pressure and my staff felt under pressure. the rules and restrictions on people. it was a difficult time. as far as financial help goes, you made use of the furlough scheme but you did not take out loans, you navigated through it, even with uncertainty. mr; navigated through it, even with uncertainty-— uncertainty. my business had savinas. uncertainty. my business had savings. others _ uncertainty. my business had savings. others were - uncertainty. my business had savings. others were not - uncertainty. my business had savings. others were not as. savings. others were not as fortunate. we fell back on those savings. but i felt in time it was just the right time to reopen. we were lucky with the timing. its, just the right time to reopen. we were lucky with the timing. its. 1th just the right time to reopen. we were lucky with the timing. a lot of costs. we will _ were lucky with the timing. a lot of costs. we will talk _ were lucky with the timing. a lot of costs. we will talk about _ were lucky with the timing. a lot of costs. we will talk about those - were lucky with the timing. a lot of costs. we will talk about those in l were lucky with the timing. a lot of costs. we will talk about those in a j costs. we will talk about those in a second. laura, for all of us, we
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will look at what the chancellor announces and what difference it can make to the money in our pockets. it feels they have announced everything already. what could he be talking about we don't know? thea;r already. what could he be talking about we don't know?— about we don't know? they are announcing _ about we don't know? they are announcing a — about we don't know? they are announcing a lot _ about we don't know? they are announcing a lot ahead - about we don't know? they are announcing a lot ahead of - about we don't know? they are announcing a lot ahead of time | about we don't know? they are - announcing a lot ahead of time but crucially— announcing a lot ahead of time but crucially a — announcing a lot ahead of time but crucially a lot of the good stuff ahead — crucially a lot of the good stuff ahead of— crucially a lot of the good stuff ahead of time so perhaps more of the negative _ ahead of time so perhaps more of the negative things, the cuts are what we will— negative things, the cuts are what we will look out for today. a couple of things _ we will look out for today. a couple of things we expect. news on student loans _ of things we expect. news on student loans. talking about lowering the threshold — loans. talking about lowering the threshold at which you repay which would _ threshold at which you repay which would make costs higher for graduates. and they are talking about— graduates. and they are talking about overhauling alcohol tax and looking _ about overhauling alcohol tax and looking at — about overhauling alcohol tax and looking at the way the system is run and how— looking at the way the system is run and how different alcohol is taxed. there _ and how different alcohol is taxed. there is— and how different alcohol is taxed. there is a — and how different alcohol is taxed. there is a campaign to reduce the levy on— there is a campaign to reduce the levy on draught beers so it makes it more _ levy on draught beers so it makes it more attractive to drink in the pub rather— more attractive to drink in the pub rather than — more attractive to drink in the pub rather than buying alcohol from the supermarket. 35m rather than buying alcohol from the supermarket-— supermarket. an issue right now is risinu supermarket. an issue right now is rising prices- _ supermarket. an issue right now is rising prices- i— supermarket. an issue right now is rising prices. i am _ supermarket. an issue right now is rising prices. i am interested - supermarket. an issue right now is rising prices. i am interested in - rising prices. lam interested in your business. everything you need
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to sell is going up in price. you talked about gas cylinders. irate to sell is going up in price. you talked about gas cylinders. we do not have a full— talked about gas cylinders. we do not have a full financial _ talked about gas cylinders. we do not have a full financial year - talked about gas cylinders. we do not have a full financial year so i talked about gas cylinders. we do | not have a full financial year so we are not sure what we need to budget throughout the year so gas cylinders we do not put it into that cost. gas cylinders, last week's fee doubled compared to the previous week. now we have to look at that. you compared to the previous week. now we have to look at that.— we have to look at that. you cannot ass the we have to look at that. you cannot pass the cost _ we have to look at that. you cannot pass the cost onto _ we have to look at that. you cannot pass the cost onto customers - we have to look at that. you cannot pass the cost onto customers right| pass the cost onto customers right away? it pass the cost onto customers right awa ? , ., ,., ., away? it is not something i would like to do- — away? it is not something i would like to do. we _ away? it is not something i would like to do. we have _ away? it is not something i would like to do. we have always - away? it is not something i would like to do. we have always been i away? it is not something i would i like to do. we have always been fair with customers. we put it up 10p every year to keep up with cost increases but it is not something i would do now. i am not sure people would do now. i am not sure people would have an understanding of it either. �* . . either. the vat cut, cut in the pandemic _ either. the vat cut, cut in the pandemic to — either. the vat cut, cut in the pandemic to make _ either. the vat cut, cut in the pandemic to make it - either. the vat cut, cut in the pandemic to make it easier i either. the vat cut, cut in the | pandemic to make it easier for people to make money does not apply to you because you just sell drinks, not food. taste to you because you 'ust sell drinks, not food. ~ . to you because you 'ust sell drinks, not food. . ., ., , .,
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not food. we are wet only way we do not food. we are wet only way we do not sell food- — not food. we are wet only way we do not sell food. we _ not food. we are wet only way we do not sell food. we make _ not food. we are wet only way we do not sell food. we make profit - not sell food. we make profit selling drinks, soft drinks, alcohol. we missed out on the lowering of vat and the help out to eat out. hopefully, with tax on beer, maybe. i eat out. hopefully, with tax on beer, maybe. lam eat out. hopefully, with tax on beer, maybe. i am sure every business owner, they will feel like maybe they have been forgotten about. this maybe they have been forgotten about. �* , . .,, maybe they have been forgotten about. �* , ., .,, ., maybe they have been forgotten about. a ., ., , ., about. as far as our personal finances. _ about. as far as our personal finances, things _ about. as far as our personal finances, things looking - about. as far as our personal| finances, things looking more expensive with gas bills, petrol, food. ~ . , , ~ food. what help might there be? we ho -e for food. what help might there be? we hope for help — food. what help might there be? we hope for help on _ food. what help might there be? we hope for help on energy _ food. what help might there be? we hope for help on energy bills. - food. what help might there be? we hope for help on energy bills. it - hope for help on energy bills. it seems — hope for help on energy bills. it seems the government has ruled out on cutting _ seems the government has ruled out on cutting vat. it is 5% on energy bills _ on cutting vat. it is 5% on energy bills but — on cutting vat. it is 5% on energy bills. but we might see help with things— bills. but we might see help with things like the warm home discount which _ things like the warm home discount which is _ things like the warm home discount which is £140 off energy bills. it is complicated. the government gives money— is complicated. the government gives money to— is complicated. the government gives money to the companies who give it
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to end _ money to the companies who give it to end users. they might expand that _ to end users. they might expand that 0r— to end users. they might expand that. or some other help for people struggling _ that. or some other help for people struggling with energy bills. we look for struggling with energy bills. 7 look for the rabbit he might pull out of the hat. a gift to everyone. he has pulled his rabbits out of his hat already. i think the increase in the living — hat already. i think the increase in the living wage and end of the pay freeze _ the living wage and end of the pay freeze. the only other benefit we are looking to see is they talked about— are looking to see is they talked about they might freeze fuel duty again. _ about they might freeze fuel duty again, the 12th year in a row. i think— again, the 12th year in a row. i think when— again, the 12th year in a row. i think when petrol prices have risen it does— think when petrol prices have risen it does not— think when petrol prices have risen it does not look a smart move to increase — it does not look a smart move to increase that further. it is it does not look a smart move to increase that further.— it does not look a smart move to increase that further. it is nice to see ou increase that further. it is nice to see you both- — increase that further. it is nice to see you both. a _ increase that further. it is nice to see you both. a lot _ increase that further. it is nice to see you both. a lot of _ increase that further. it is nice to - see you both. a lot of announcements have been leaked, particularly as we talked yesterday, the rise in the national living wage, giving low pay workers a boost. the conundrum is, prices for so much else going up, evenif
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prices for so much else going up, even if you have a pay rise, does it get swallowed up by the rising price of petrol and gas? the chancellor has a lot of balancing to do. he will be in parliament to give the details today. including the spending review, spending for government departments they will have to deliver on promises. i will be back tomorrow looking at the impact of that. full coverage of the budget begins at 11:15am on bbc two. you can also follow it live on the bbc news channel and online. full reaction and all those details in breakfast tomorrow. here's carol with a look at the weather. what you have? almost everything. a lot of heavy rain, mild conditions, cloud, it is windy. there will be
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sunshine as well. a weather front is draped across southern scotland, northern england, north wales, northern ireland, producing heavy rain. moving north through the day. ahead of it a lot of cloud, some sunny intervals with heavy showers across north—west scotland. the other side of the weather front, a lot of cloud thick enough for drizzle. again, sunny intervals in the shelter of the hills. windy through the irish sea and locally we are looking at gales. mild north to south. overnight, the weatherfront is draped across northern england, wales, southern scotland and northern ireland. windy especially through the irish sea. it will not be cold. tomorrow, we have this rain extending from eastern scotland to southwest england. either side of it, sunshine. but some showers and
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still pretty mild. a bit of everything. there's absolutely no doubting that tyson fury is a larger than life character both in and out of the boxing ring. so what is it like living with him? childhood sweethearts, tyson and his wife paris have been through highs and lows, something paris has written all about it in her new book. shejoins us now. good morning. we were catching up. you have a baby, the other kids. how's it going? going really good. we are keeping afloat, which is what i usually say. we are managing. irate i usually say. we are managing. we are juggling life. the youngest is arejuggling life. the youngest is 11 weeks and the eldest 12. do they look after each other? that 11 weeks and the eldest 12. do they look after each other?— look after each other? that is the ho e! m look after each other? that is the hope! my girl— look after each other? that is the hope! my girl venezuela - look after each other? that is the hope! my girl venezuela she - look after each other? that is the hope! my girl venezuela she is i look after each other? that is the hope! my girl venezuela she is a | hope! my girl venezuela she is a good girl and hope! my girl venezuela she is a good girland a hope! my girl venezuela she is a good girl and a big help. the ones in the middle are the terrors. i went to london yesterday and had the
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oldest and youngest and i had the good ones. oldest and youngest and i had the aood ones. ., . oldest and youngest and i had the good ones-— good ones. you have six in all. i was going _ good ones. you have six in all. i was going to — good ones. you have six in all. i was going to say _ good ones. you have six in all. i was going to say which - good ones. you have six in all. i was going to say which is - good ones. you have six in all. i was going to say which is your. was going to say which is your favourite! givers words to describe life in your household with the kids, with tyson, your busy life and career. . ., .,, kids, with tyson, your busy life and career. . ., h kids, with tyson, your busy life and career. . ., �*, , kids, with tyson, your busy life and career. . �*, , ., , career. pure chaos, let's be honest. it is ure career. pure chaos, let's be honest. it is pure excitement _ career. pure chaos, let's be honest. it is pure excitement every - career. pure chaos, let's be honest. it is pure excitement every day. - it is pure excitement every day. daily there is something new. constantly daily there is something new. co nsta ntly jetting daily there is something new. constantlyjetting off, we have all the children, school run, daily life, cooking and cleaning, all of this wejuggle and life, cooking and cleaning, all of this we juggle and we managed to pull off quite well. irate this we juggle and we managed to pull off quite well.— pull off quite well. we are seeing fantastic pictures. _ pull off quite well. we are seeing fantastic pictures. you _ pull off quite well. we are seeing fantastic pictures. you seem - pull off quite well. we are seeing fantastic pictures. you seem to l fantastic pictures. you seem to travel a lot- — fantastic pictures. you seem to travela lot. i— fantastic pictures. you seem to travel a lot. i have _ fantastic pictures. you seem to travel a lot. i have learned - fantastic pictures. you seem to travel a lot. i have learned to l fantastic pictures. you seem to i travel a lot. i have learned to live out of a suitcase. from being married, we were constantly away on training camps. we had the young kids, the eldest now, always went abroad with us and we lived in and out of europe. in the last years we have been in america. we bought a
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house in vegas recently. it has been crazy, which i have written about in my book, telling the story of what it is like to live that mad life of being constantly on the go, all the family, the chaos, the highs and lows of life. family, the chaos, the highs and lows of life-— lows of life. you are childhood sweethearts. _ lows of life. you are childhood sweethearts. you _ lows of life. you are childhood sweethearts. you were - lows of life. you are childhood sweethearts. you were 15, - lows of life. you are childhood sweethearts. you were 15, 16 l lows of life. you are childhood - sweethearts. you were 15, 16 when you met. i sweethearts. you were 15, 16 when ou met. . , sweethearts. you were 15, 16 when ou met. ' sweethearts. you were 15, 16 when oumet. ' sweethearts. you were 15, 16 when oumet. ~. you met. i was 15, tyson was 16. we met at a wedding. _ you met. i was 15, tyson was 16. we met at a wedding. at _ you met. i was 15, tyson was 16. we met at a wedding. at the _ you met. i was 15, tyson was 16. we met at a wedding. at the wedding, i you met. i was 15, tyson was 16. we| met at a wedding. at the wedding, at 16, tyson looked like a man of 25 with a beard, six foot six, a giant. i remember thinking you are too old to be talking to me. weeks later it was my 16th birthday and we met again and from there, it was pure attraction. love at first sight, i suppose. attraction. love at first sight, i su ose. ., ., , suppose. you were with him at his latest fight- _ suppose. you were with him at his latest fight. has _ suppose. you were with him at his latest fight. has he _ suppose. you were with him at his latest fight. has he recovered? i suppose. you were with him at hisj latest fight. has he recovered? he has. he latest fight. has he recovered? he has- he came _ latest fight. has he recovered? he has. he came back— latest fight. has he recovered? he has. he came back with _ latest fight. has he recovered? he has. he came back with two - latest fight. has he recovered? he has. he came back with two black| has. he came back with two black eyes, but he is fine. he was really
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happy with the fight. he had not fought two years which is a long time out of the ring. he was over the moon to get back in there, even though it was an up—and—down fight. he has so much going on afterwards. we can see pictures of him under the lights, the profile, the public face of being a boxer. you see him at home. what do you see that we do not? he home. what do you see that we do not? , . , , home. what do you see that we do not? , ., , , , ., , ., not? he is a big teddy bear. he is a soft-hearted _ not? he is a big teddy bear. he is a soft-hearted person. _ not? he is a big teddy bear. he is a soft-hearted person. tyson - not? he is a big teddy bear. he is a soft-hearted person. tyson is - not? he is a big teddy bear. he is a soft-hearted person. tyson is what| not? he is a big teddy bear. he is a | soft-hearted person. tyson is what i soft—hearted person. tyson is what i describe as a gentle giant. he is loud and brash and has a showman personality in the ring, but at home he is just personality in the ring, but at home he isjust dad. taking the kids on the school run, doing the trips to the school run, doing the trips to the park. it is normal life people do not see. they sea the stars and the glitz, but there is the normal
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side we try to keep hold of. part of his normal— side we try to keep hold of. part of his normal life _ side we try to keep hold of. part of his normal life he _ side we try to keep hold of. part of his normal life he has _ side we try to keep hold of. part of his normal life he has spoken - side we try to keep hold of. part of| his normal life he has spoken about his normal life he has spoken about his struggles with mental health and depression. how tough have those times being for you as a family? thank god, the children did not see it. it was a couple of years ago and they were that bit younger. for me, it was a constant battle with tyson. he had his demons and was depressed and suffered mental—health problems about four years. he has had it all his life but really deep about three, four years. it was me trying to support him and be that person, anybody who has been with someone with mental—health problems, you always support your partner. it is hard to do. tyson has come through that and he is back to good health and a stable mind. but there were dark times when tyson was saying to me i do not want to live any more. i
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tried my best but it was never any good, i could not cure it, i could only support him and try to be there. . , only support him and try to be there. ., , ., ., ,., there. that is tough for you, the times when _ there. that is tough for you, the times when you _ there. that is tough for you, the times when you think— there. that is tough for you, the times when you think where - there. that is tough for you, the times when you think where do i turn? , ., ., turn? there were times i wanted to run away and _ turn? there were times i wanted to run away and thought _ turn? there were times i wanted to run away and thought i _ turn? there were times i wanted to run away and thought i could - turn? there were times i wanted to run away and thought i could not i run away and thought i could not deal with this, i did not sign on for this when we got married. but i could not have left him, could not have let him sink. it was something i knew. i loved him, wanted to be there, and had to support him. i wrote about it in my book. it was a hard time but we have come through it and we have the happy ending. irate it and we have the happy ending. we are living on top of the world. the connection between you is clear. we have this brilliant clip now of tyson serenading you after beating deontay wilder in february 2020. watch this. # and can you teach me how to dance
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real slow? _ real slow? # - real slow? # well i know that i'm in rear stow? — # well i know that i'm in love with you _ # well i know that i'm in love with you |_ # well i know that i'm in love with ou. , ., # well i know that i'm in love with ou. .,. , you. i saw you dancing in the gym. he is 'ust you. i saw you dancing in the gym. he isjust a — you. i saw you dancing in the gym. he isjust a madman! _ you. i saw you dancing in the gym. he isjust a madman! the - you. i saw you dancing in the gym. he isjust a madman! the big - you. i saw you dancing in the gym. | he isjust a madman! the big smile he is 'ust a madman! the big smile on he isjust a madman! the big smile on our he isjust a madman! the big smile on your face _ he isjust a madman! the big smile on your face when _ he isjust a madman! the big smile on your face when you _ he isjust a madman! the big smile on your face when you saw - he isjust a madman! the big smile on your face when you saw that. it | on your face when you saw that. it is great memories. he sees the microphone and thinks, now is my moment. ~' ., ., ., moment. like karaoke at the bar. you talked about — moment. like karaoke at the bar. you talked about buying _ moment. like karaoke at the bar. you talked about buying a _ moment. like karaoke at the bar. you talked about buying a house _ moment. like karaoke at the bar. you talked about buying a house in - talked about buying a house in vegas, is that the next stage? milli vegas, is that the next stage? will home be vegas, is that the next stage? ll home be america? i think home will always be written. i cannot see us becoming americans. we spend time there and it with the kids it's nice to have the home and not be in hotels. we bought the house recently and will probably spend time there but it will not ever be home, home is britain. �* . , but it will not ever be home, home is britain. . ., , , is britain. and what is next? is the bi firht is britain. and what is next? is the big fight ever _ is britain. and what is next? is the big fight ever going _ is britain. and what is next? is the big fight ever going to _ is britain. and what is next? is the big fight ever going to happen? . is britain. and what is next? is the| big fight ever going to happen? we big fight ever going to happen? 7 would love to. as soon he was on the
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play home he was saying, i am going to fight ajay. ajay has his own fights to fight and tyson has other people. andy has mandatory fights for the belts. so it will be what they can put on. tyson is willing to fight anybody and i am sure the big fight anybody and i am sure the big fight is to come. i fight anybody and i am sure the big fight is to come.— fight is to come. i would love to see a tv series _ fight is to come. i would love to see a tv series behind - fight is to come. i would love to see a tv series behind the - fight is to come. i would love to l see a tv series behind the scenes fight is to come. i would love to - see a tv series behind the scenes in your house. see a tv series behind the scenes in your house-— your house. there has been a documentary _ your house. there has been a documentary and _ your house. there has been a documentary and we - your house. there has been a documentary and we did - your house. there has been a documentary and we did that | your house. there has been a i documentary and we did that so people could see the true us in life. but we limited it to the one. thanks. paris's book 'love and fury the magic and mayhem of life with tyson' is out now.
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this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones with the latest headlines. it's budget day — and the chancellor rishi sunak is limbering up to deliver his big speech to the house of commons. we'll have full live coverage. around £20 billion of spending's been announced so far — including a rise in the national living wage and an end to the public sector pay freeze. but the government's facing pressure to do more to help with the rising costs of living. but what about those promises to level up outside of london? we brought to the sofa to burnley to out what people want to hear from the chancellor when he stands up in parliament a little later. in other news, a new report says the government's coronavirus test and trace programme in england failed to achieve its main objective
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of breaking chains of transmission — despite costing an "eye—watering"

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