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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 27, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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has been recommended to face criminal charges over his handling of the covert pandemic. new details on the fatal shooting of the alec baldwin film set. national security concerns... queen elizabeth will not be attending the global climate summit in glasgow after being advised by her doctors to rest. withjust four days until the cop26
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four days until the c0 p26 summit, four days until the cop26 summit, we speak to an activist as part of our climate critical series. senators in brazil recommended criminal charges be laid against president bolsonaro, they said his handling of the coded pandemic —— covid pandemic, misuse of public vans and crimes against humanity. the senate voted by a majority told him responsible for many of brazil's covid deaths which has now gone past 600,000. katy watson reports. today marked the end six months of hearings, scandal uncovered. and now a
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recommendation to charge the man at the top with a very long list of crimes. the senators in favour of president bolsonaro said it was a witchhunt. translation: i said it was a witchhunt. tuna/mom- said it was a witchhunt. translation: ., ., translation: i vote for the re'ection translation: i vote for the rejection of _ translation: i vote for the rejection of the _ translation: i vote for the rejection of the report. - the commotion in the senate todayis the commotion in the senate today is far removed from the city's poorer neighbourhoods. but here, they are wanting to make a noise too. max is a community leader and aspiring politician. he runs music and dance workshops for young people. culture, he says, gives him the chance to talk politics
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and change their futures. translation:— and change their futures. translation: , ., , , , translation: this congress is debatina translation: this congress is debating with _ translation: this congress is debating with itself _ translation: this congress is debating with itself in _ translation: this congress is debating with itself in a - debating with itself in a language that does not reflect the real brazil of the working people who wake up early, get on a crowded bus, struggled to pay the bills and live in a difficult neighbourhood. there are people in the suburbs going hungry, having to rob food. fake news, corruption and more.
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these are the accusations he faces but will he have to stand up faces but will he have to stand up in court to defend his actions? few people here think justice will be done.— justice will be done. some of the major — justice will be done. some of the major news _ justice will be done. some of the major news stories. - justice will be done. some of the major news stories. 150 l the major news stories. 150 people expected of selling illegal goods via the duckworth had been arrested in a major international police operation. people were detained in the us, the uk and germany and police confiscated ? and virtual currency is worth tens of millions of dollars as well as drugs and guns. the sting operation wasi drugs and guns. the sting operation was i of the largest ever targeting criminals this way. protests have into dan against the military seizure of power with reports of teargas in the capital. the general behind the takeover said it had been carried out to avoid a civil war.
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mister trudeau was returned to power in september following a snap election. flooding triggered by a powerful storm has overwhelmed the sicilian city and the storms hit leaving roads completely submerged in parts of the island of sicily. skills are closed in the city and nearby towns. an advisory committee has recommended the
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use of pfizer's covert vaccine in children aged 5 to ii saying the benefits outweigh the risks. the decision brings the vaccine i step closer to 28,000,000 children and shots could be offered as early as next week should the fda and centres for disease control accept the recommendation. a us prosecutor investigating last week's fatal shooting of a crew member by the actor alec baldwin says a real gun, not a prop, was being used and that is among a number of new details from the district attorney. 0ur north america correspondent has following the story. this is mary. she is the district attorney and has been talking to the new york times and she said that, at this stage in the investigation, nothing has been filled in or out in terms of possible criminal charges. that is the least surprising thing because
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you are not expected so early into an investigation to have made a final conclusion on that but she also talked about what they've found on the set. she about an enormous amount of bullets and an enormous amount of bullets found strewn around. we understand 3 revolvers were found, spent casings and the ammunition. tests are continuing on that material to establish exactly what it was and of course interviews are continuing in terms of who had access to those clans, who loaded the gun because it is very clear now this was a real gun. she said she takes issue with the terminology, a prop gun, which has been heard quite a lot over the last couple of days and says it was a legitimate antique era appropriate gun which would follow because this was a 19th century western that was being made. but it does, i think,
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paint any picture in terms of exactly what the authorities are finding and the root of their investigation. she said she is not ruling out charges. what is the state of play now in terms of the investigation? she has been saying that it could be weeks. it could indeed be months. from what she has been saying this is a complex investigation and an unusual investigation and an unusual investigation on a film set. the authorities are determined to take their time to interview everyone and look at all the evidence. we are expecting later on wednesday and is convinced by the police. they've only had i so far in the hours after this incident. the united states has revoked china telecom's licence to operate in the country, citing national security concerns.
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the chinese state owned entity has 60 days to dismantle its us operations, a decision that could reignite tensions between the two powers. so who are they? — china telecom america is a subsidiary of a state owned entity, which has over 335 million subscribers world wide. data services, vpns, cloud and mobile networks are among its offerings in the us. the federal communications commission says its main target however are chinese—americans, and chinese students, business people and tourists. the regulator's report found that the company was a serious security risk, as it could be forced to comply with orders from beijing without any judicial oversight from washington. now china telecom have asserted they're an independent corporate entity, not a tool of chinese intelligence. i put this to former cia technology analyst martijn rassler.
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all the national laws in china are very explicit and the fact that any chinese entity operating either domestically or overseas has to comply with any request from the chinese government to include participating in any law enforcement or espionage activities. right back in terms of risk, can you explain where the risks would lie? there is 2 main areas. i, of course, is the fact that this company become a vector for cyber attacks on us networks. the other issue is that it is a conduit for espionage. anyi of conduit for espionage. any i of the conduit for espionage. anyi of the devices that are connected to the company's network can be used to track people so, yeah, the risks are quite significant.- the risks are quite significant. the risks are quite siunificant. ., , , ., significant. how big is china telecom within _ significant. how big is china telecom within the - significant. how big is china telecom within the us? - significant. how big is china i
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telecom within the us? there are other chinese concerns as well. i don't know there were likely to be following suit here. it likely to be following suit here. , . . . , likely to be following suit here. ., , ., , here. it is actually fairly small. here. it is actually fairly small- i _ here. it is actually fairly small. i think— here. it is actually fairly small. i think the - here. it is actually fairly small. i think the totall small. i think the total subscriber base is in the mid 100,000, and a lot of chinese national visitors use it as well. to your point there is a few other chinese telecoms operators that are already being looked much more closely at by the fcc and i think the fcc will follow suit. .- at by the fcc and i think the fcc will follow suit. . that is the federal— fcc will follow suit. . that is the federal communicationsj the federal communications commission. you would expect some kind of retaliation to come from beijing?- some kind of retaliation to come from beijing? come from bei'ing? there is a few things — come from beijing? there is a few things that _ come from beijing? there is a few things that i _ come from beijing? there is a few things that i think - come from beijing? there is a few things that i think beijing | few things that i think beijing made it to send a message. it could, for example, slow down the process of certain export
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licences for us companies with manufacturing capabilities. may be a snap inspection, production facility to down production facility to down production but ultimately most us firms operating in china are already, they face challenges just in their day—to—day operations but don't forget most firms that are still operating their have some value to the chinese state in the sense that there is something the chinese i so by and large their work will be unimpeded for now. here in the uk, the queen's pulled out of attending the cop26 climate summit which begins in scotland on sunday. her majesty, who's 95, spent a night in hospital last week and her doctors have recommended some rest. the queen was expected to play a prominent role in welcoming world leaders to the event but will instead address delegates in a video message. 0ur royal correspondent jonny dymond reports.
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this time last week, a reception for business leaders at windsor castle, and then a trip to northern ireland was cancelled and a visit to hospital substituted. today, it was back to official engagements where a beaming queen gave a virtual audience to the new korean ambassador, but this evening, a palace statement. i'm quite sure at the back of her mind is that she wants to be absolutely fine and fighting fit on the 14th of november for remembrance sunday, the most sacred day
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in her calendar. to go to glasgow and to stand in a room full of coughing, wheezing delegates from all over the world is probably an engagement too far. the message from the palace, remain calm. the queen is still carrying out official engagements, and she spoke to the chancellor about his budgetjust a few hours ago and she will address the delegates to the conference, albeit by video, and the journey to glasgow, however, was just too long for her doctors' liking. the climate change conference is close to the heart of the queen, and when opening the welsh parliament a few weeks ago, she was overheard complaining about those who hadn't said whether they would turn up. and at the queen's absence is a blow for the conference and its organiser, the government. meeting the queen is an experience few turn down, even fewer forget. jonny dymond, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come. we speak to environment campaigner bill mckibben as part of our climate
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critical series. indira gandhi, ruler of the world's largest democracy, died today. 0nly yesterday, she had spoken of dying in the service of her country and said, "i would be proud of it. "every drop of my blood will contribute to the growth of this nation." after 46 years of unhappiness, these two countries have concluded a chapter of history. no more suspicion, no more fear, no more uncertainty of what each day might bring. booster ignition and lift off. of discovery with a crew of six astronaut heroes and one american legend. - this is beautiful. a milestone in human history. born today, this girl in india
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is the seven billionth person on the planet. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. a vote in the brazilian senate reccomends, president bolsonaro face criminal charges over his handling of the pandemic. new details emerge over the fatal shooting on the alec baldwin film set — the gun used was a real one, and criminal charges aren't ruled out. every week at this time we take a look climate change ? bringing you stories with big implications for our planet 5 future. today in climate critical, we re looking at the urgency of the climate crisis and why the global cop26 summit is so important. it begins in glasgow in a few days time is ? many call it the last, best chance to avoid a climate catastrophe.
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massive and immediate cuts in co2 emissions are needed ? and yet this year saw the second—largest increase in history. if we continue emitting carbon at this rate ? we have just seven years before chances of restricting warming to 1.5 degrees become increasingly unlikely. this is ? according to science ? the decade the climate battle will be won or lost. i m joined now by the author and environmentalist bill mckibben — one of the first to warn of the dangers of global warming and leader of one of the world s most successful climate campaigns — 350.org his latest book is falter: has the human game begun to play itself 0ut?
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a depressing title for a book. is itjustified?— is itjustified? well, look, there is — is itjustified? well, look, there is no _ is itjustified? well, look, there is no way _ is itjustified? well, look, there is no way to - is itjustified? well, look, there is no way to look i is itjustified? well, look, - there is no way to look around there is no way to look around the planet right now and not be worried. think aboutjust the planet right now and not be worried. think about just the last few weeks on planet earth. i was in new york city a month ago and we had the biggest rainstorm in that city's history. it broke the record that had been set 11 days earlier. yesterday in california 3 days after the end of the driest i2 california 3 days after the end of the driest 12 month period ever recorded was the largest rainstorm in california history. 2 weeks ago we had the biggest rainstorm in the history of europe in italy. these are the kind of things now that happen every day and are symptoms of a planet that is in violent chaotic flux. with melted most of the sea ice in the summer arctic which is thejet stream in in the summer arctic which is the jet stream in the gulf stream out of kilter. we have ordered things in fundamental levels and as you say, we have
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but a few years to keep that from getting so out of control that our ability to have the civilisations we're used to will be culled deeply into question. it will be culled deeply into question-— question. it is a dismal picture _ question. it is a dismal picture and _ question. it is a dismal picture and most - question. it is a dismal. picture and most people question. it is a dismal- picture and most people will see that. on a day—to—day basis they see it on telly all the time now and it is seeping in. at the same time, we have the vast majority of countries renewing their commitments and extending their commitments to pushing back on c02 extending their commitments to pushing back on co2 emissions. get internet 0 x 2050 or mid century and that is what everyone was hoping for in paris 5 or 6 years ago so surely things are going in the right direction?— right direction? there is no question — right direction? there is no question that _ right direction? there is no question that sometime . right direction? there is no | question that sometime this century will run the planet on sun and wind. it is now the cheapest form of power on earth and the problem is that if it takes is 30 or a0 years together than the planet will be a broken planet and that is
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just for the fossil fuel industry is proposing. they are industry is proposing. they are in an all—out effort to get their business model extended for another couple of decades. you can see it in the united states where they are pushing hard to prevent real climate action and you can see it in brazil, you can see it in russia. the incident in saudi arabia, you can see it in many, many places around the world. many of these fossil fuel companies and huge companies as they are also investing ever more billions into renewables, into non— fossilfuel more billions into renewables, into non— fossil fuel energy opportunities, let's put it that way. and you probably have to recognise you cannot turn the taps of overnight. you cannotjust the taps of overnight. you cannot just stop the taps of overnight. you cannotjust stop using: stop using oil and stop using gas overnight. i using oil and stop using gas overnight-— using oil and stop using gas overniaht. ., �* ~ ., i. overnight. i don't think anyone is predicting — overnight. i don't think anyone is predicting that _ overnight. i don't think anyone is predicting that by _ overnight. i don't think anyone is predicting that by tomorrow| is predicting that by tomorrow morning will be fossil fuels but we should point out that
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scientists tell us that we have to be mostly offered by the end of the decade because we are not negotiating here with, you know, in the end were not negotiating between countries or political parties or ideologies. we negotiating with physics. the oil companies are not moving in the right direction. they're continuing to expand their exploration and production of oil and gas and thatis production of oil and gas and that is why it was really good news today when the divestment movement around the world announced it had reached the $a0,000,000,000,000 mark in thatis $a0,000,000,000,000 mark in that is bigger than the gdp. it that is bigger than the gdp. it is happening? that is part of the point, whatever these fossil fuel companies may or may not be doing, there is a momentum. almost a tidal momentum. almost a tidal momentum moving away. hora momentum. almost a tidal momentum moving away. now we are in a race- — momentum moving away. now we are in a race. climate _ momentum moving away. now we are in a race. climate change - are in a race. climate change is not like political issues that we are used to having. we do a little bit now and come
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backin do a little bit now and come back in a few years and bit more. this is the 1st time we've really faced a timed test as a species and as you know, our political and economic systems are not geared to move quickly and that is why it is a good thing we have these giant movements pushing. and i will tell you. ifelt more tell you. i felt more optimistic tell you. ifelt more optimistic this afternoon than i did this morning because of the day the 5th biggest pension fund in the world announced that it too was divesting from fossil fuels.— that it too was divesting from fossil fuels. maybe it does not need to be _ fossil fuels. maybe it does not need to be purely _ fossil fuels. maybe it does not need to be purely the - need to be purely the politicians that do the work, she said, they move slowly. she said before winning slowly in climate are simply another way of losing. the pace is not there. can you give me what you would consider your biggest realistic wish, then, from the countries of this word, the governments of this word, as they gather in glasgow in a few days time? we
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they gather in glasgow in a few days time?— they gather in glasgow in a few da stime? ~ ., , ., days time? we need a couple of thins. days time? we need a couple of things. dramatically _ days time? we need a couple of things. dramatically increased l things. dramatically increased that may be hard of the us is not able to provide serious commitment from congress. we will see in the next few days. and we need real commitment, finally, to this long—standing promise of serious financial aid the global south and the global north so that they can make this transition.- make this transition. sounds like that is — make this transition. sounds like that is not _ make this transition. sounds like that is not coming, - make this transition. sounds| like that is not coming, well, i say not coming, they're going to be a bit disappointed, you know, to be a bit disappointed, you know. we — to be a bit disappointed, you know, we have _ to be a bit disappointed, gm. know, we have seen a lot of these conferences and most of them have ended in disappointment. we are running out of time and that is why there will be civil society there will be civil society there pushing hard stop we will see. as you pointed out when we began the title of my last book was a little depressing so not here to give you a glib optimistic outlook. when he to tell you that we need everybody pushing really hard. i
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pushing really hard. i appreciate that is the line you're coming from but can you me some cause for optimism that the world is changing? we are at a point of change? the the world is changing? we are at a point of change?- at a point of change? the 2 causes for _ at a point of change? the 2 causes for optimism - at a point of change? the 2 causes for optimism are . at a point of change? the 2. causes for optimism are that the engineers have done their job and drop the price of renewable energy about 90% in the last decade. it is now the cheapest form of energy on the planet so there is no financial or technological obstacle. an 0xford study from 2 weeks ago showed that the word would save trillions of dollars if it made a rapid transition. the 2nd reason to be optimistic is there is this big movement of people around the world. many organisations taken together organisations ta ken together almost organisations taken together almost as powerful as the fossil fuel industry and that of the titanic battle that is going on. can you break the power of this industry in time or will they be able to cling to their business model long enough to bring down the planet? i enough to bring down the lanet? ., �* ~ ., enough to bring down the lanet? ., �* 4' ., , planet? i don't know the summit will answer _ planet? i don't know the summit will answer all _ planet? i don't know the summit will answer all of _
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planet? i don't know the summit will answer all of those - planet? i don't know the summit will answer all of those huge - will answer all of those huge elements but perhaps it will give us a few more pieces in thejigsaw as we give us a few more pieces in the jigsaw as we draw closer to the jigsaw as we draw closer to the end of these 2 weeks. thank you very much indeed for your time and analysis. a court in the netherlands has ruled that a collection of crimean gold loaned to a dutch museum must be returned to ukraine — and not to crimea. the artefacts were sent to a museum in amsterdam from galleries in crimea shortly before russia annexed the peninsula from ukraine in 201a. the pieces include a solid gold scythian helmet and a golden neck ornament — which weigh more than a kilo each. it says the injection of cash will keep basic healthcare facilities operating until the end of the year. a reminder of our top story. a brazilian senate enquiry has given final approval to a report recommending presidentjair bolsonaro faces a series of criminal indictments over his handling of the world's second highest covid death toll. the vote, by the eleven—member committee,
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passed seven to four. afterwards, the senators stood in silence in memory of the country's six hundred and six thousand covid victims. the enquiry�*s rapporteur, renan calheiros, said the report would be sent to brazil's prosecutor—general who is responsible for pressing charges. he said the allegations of crimes against humanity will be presented to the international criminal court. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @bbcdavideades. hello there. it is going to stay very mild over the next few days. but there is more rain in the forecast, and the rain is moving southwards at the moment. so, the wetter weather in the next few days more likely to be in the southern uplands of scotland, cumbria in northwest england, and by thursday, for western parts of wales, and some flooding is likely as well. the main focus of the rain is on the weather front there, and ahead it, we are drawing up the winds all the way from the tropics over the azores and into the uk, which is why it is so unusually mild. in northern ireland on tuesday, temperatures reach 17 celsius ahead of the rain — it's normally around 11 or 12 celsius at best at this time of the year. these are the temperatures we're starting with on wednesday morning — a very mild 15 or 16 celsius.
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but this is where the rain is, and it's not going to shift position through much of the day. we've got rain threatening to come back into eastern northern ireland, up towards the central belt of scotland. most of the rain in southern scotland, northwest england, especially cumbria and into northwest wales. north of that rain band, some sunshine, a few sharp showers. south of the rain band, like tuesday, a lot of cloud around, a bit of sunshine from time to time, those temperatures could be even higher around 18 celsius. but that rain is going to be continuing throughout the day across southern scotland, northwest england. by the end of the day, 90mm possible in the southern uplands, maybe double that over the high ground in cumbria, which is why we are going to see some impact, and that wet weather continues overnight as well. that stream of warm wet weather coming in on that weather front, the position of that rain will fluctuate a little. we may start to see a few changes on thursday. scotland and northern ireland brightening up a bit more with some showers. these could be quite heavy, mind you. still got that rain across parts of southern scotland, northern england, wales, and southwest england this time. but ahead through the midlands,
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east anglia, the southeast, still dry and bright, and temperatures hitting 17. but the wetter weather continues overnight, those weather fronts are still in the scene, perhaps forming an area of low pressure. now, i think the details may change as we head into friday, getting rather more messy. looks on the whole like it's going to be a day of sunshine or longer spells of rain. it may start to brighten up across more of the country, western areas turning a bit drier. but some of that rain pushing into the eastern side of england this time, and temperatures won't be quite as high. they will begin to fall away from the northwest.
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a this is bbc news, the headlines: a brazilian senate inquiry has given final approval to a report recommending presidentjair bolsonaro faces a series of criminal indictments over his handling of the world's second highest covid death toll, and the misuse of public funds. the vote, by the 11—member committee, passed 7 to a. new details have emerged about the fatal shooting on an alec baldwin film set. a us district attorney investigating the incident says a real gun, nota prop, was involved, and that "an enormous amount of bullets" were recovered. the prosecuter also stressed that "criminal charges aren't ruled out."
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the united states has revoked china telecom's licence to operate in the country, citing "national security" concerns over beijing 5 ownership and control of the company. now on bbc news, panorama. the soft drinks industry produces a70 billion plastic bottles every year, designed to be used just once and then thrown away. a quarter of them are made by one company, coca—cola. nearly half of coke's bottles end up burned, dumped or littered. the problem has gotten so bad, and the problem is now visual. in the face of public backlash, coke have come up with a bold plan to tackle their plastic pollution problem. simply put, we want to get to a world without waste, so we want to collect back from the marketplace
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every bottle and can, or the equivalent of every

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