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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 26, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. another day, another depressing report from the united nations on climate change. we have eight years to halve our greenhouse gas emissions, and commitments made by those gathering in glasgow this week, are a fraction of what is required. it is notjust facebook in the dock — tiktok, snapchat and youtube executives were on capitol hill today to answer uncomfortable questions on the type of content they're steering towards young people. speaking of which, youtube today censored more spurious claims by president's bolsonaro of brazil. the senate will vote this next hour on his abject handling of the covid pandemic. and in a galaxy far far away, astronomers have found what could be a planet, the first ever discovered outside our own milky way.
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hello. what is it going to take for our politicians to heed the warnings. politicians to heed the warnings? the science on climate change is u—nequivocal. and yet the studies show we are not reducing the threat. far from it. this past year — in spite of the pandemic — we have released record amounts of c02 into the atmosphere. the only thing reduced, is the time we have left to act. so ignore the fine talk and the spin, this latest report from the un environment programme, says the commitments made by governments ahead of this weekend's cop 26 summit will only reduce emissions by 7.5%. a reduction of 55% is needed by 2030, that's seven times what has been pledged at this summit to limit the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees celsius. the un secretary general antonio guterres calls it
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the "moment of truth": as world leaders prepare for cop26, this report is another thundering wake—up call. how many more do we need? the recent ipcc report already showed that unless we reduce global carbon emissions by 45% from 2010 levels by 2030, 100 months from now, we will not reach a 1.5 degree future. so, in light of that statement, what should we make of australia's contribution today. the prime minister, scott morrisson pledged today they will meet the target of net zero emmissions by 2050. australia one of the world's leading fossil fuel exporters. but in this plan there is no improved target for 2030, no in—depth modelling on how australia will get there by 2050, there are vague assurances on new technologies, offsetting, no commitment to stop exporting the fossil fuels we should be phasing out.
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how does it compare? well, australia's target for 2030, is to reduce emissions by at least 26% from 2005 levels, the government claims it's on track to reduce them by 35%. comparatively, canada — another fossil—fuel intensive economy — has promised to slash emissions by a0 to 45% over that same period. president biden goes further still pledging a us reduction of 50 to 52% by 2030. while the uk has tried to set the example, with the ambitious target 68% below 1990 levels by 2030. here's scott morrison earlier today. australians want action on climate change, they are taking action on climate change, but they also want to protect their jobs and their livelihoods, they also want to keep the cost
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of living down and they also want to protect the australian way of life, especially in rural and regional areas. reacting to scott morrison's pledge chris bowen, climate change minister for the opposition labour party tweeted: "i ve seen fortune cookies that are more detailed than the document scott morrison released today. its nota plan, its a scam." let's pick some of that apart then with sherri goodman, she is a senior fellow at the wilson centers environmental change and security program and john christensen, senior advisor at the danish climate thinktank concito and co—editor of that un environment programme report: is pretty scary will be read into it. we are missing the target by a country mile and there's hardly any prospect there were going to make it, is there? it
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prospect there were going to make it, is there?— it, is there? it does look bleak but we've made _ it, is there? it does look bleak but we've made this _ it, is there? it does look bleak but we've made this report _ it, is there? it does look bleak but we've made this report every year| it, is there? it does look bleak but i we've made this report every year in this year is the first time since the countries of qu bec with the new updated pledge and that since of adding it is a small step in the right direction. it would eventually get to 50% but the clips we get the 2030, the more difficult it becomes to implement the policies before the deadline. it is something marissa given problem and hope you get picked up. we given problem and hope you get icked u.~ ., given problem and hope you get --ickedu.~ . , ., , ., picked up. we have eight years to turn it around, _ picked up. we have eight years to turn it around, up _ picked up. we have eight years to turn it around, up to _ picked up. we have eight years to turn it around, up to 2030. - picked up. we have eight years to turn it around, up to 2030. the i turn it around, up to 2030. the science is changing rapidly, and given what we face, shouldn't we be meeting more regularly than every two to three years?— two to three years? that's one of the issues- _ two to three years? that's one of the issues. in _ two to three years? that's one of the issues. in the _ two to three years? that's one of the issues. in the paris _ two to three years? that's one of. the issues. in the paris agreement, there is a ramping up process which
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is a five year timescale and what we're seeing later on, we didn't wait five years, we can't wait five years or another ramp up. if the see what is coming and that is going to be one of the site discussions in glasgow, how to do that. but of course, developing countries, it is linked to the provisions of international climate finance and yesterday of the day before, there is a report released by germany in canada looking at the pledge of 100,000,000,000 x 2,020 and basically saying we only made 80,000,000,000 witnesses in a fine number but not sufficient. and they've made plenty of conditions on support and if that support is not received, that it becomes a problem for them to implement it. we need to look also at the financing at the
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same time. look also at the financing at the same time-— look also at the financing at the same time. ., ., ., . , same time. the two announcements toda , the same time. the two announcements today. the report — same time. the two announcements today, the report from _ same time. the two announcements today, the report from the _ same time. the two announcements today, the report from the un - same time. the two announcements| today, the report from the un talked about how far or how quickly we need to go together with the statement from the australian government really underlines how stark it is. with the way australia has set out today, and this is the urgency of the situation. element that we bring sherry .we . we have to be stepping on the solar and wind _ . we have to be stepping on the solar and wind instead of- . we have to be stepping on the solar and wind instead of the . . we have to be stepping on the | solar and wind instead of the gas . we have to be stepping on the - solar and wind instead of the gas so instead _ solar and wind instead of the gas so instead of stepping on gas, we need to ramp _ instead of stepping on gas, we need to ramp up — instead of stepping on gas, we need to ramp up our investment in renewables across the board and we need to _ renewables across the board and we need to make our societies more resilient — need to make our societies more resilient to — need to make our societies more resilient to adapt to the threats of climate _ resilient to adapt to the threats of climate change that are already here _ climate change that are already here. that is how we will protect our way — here. that is how we will protect our way of — here. that is how we will protect our way of life because climate change — our way of life because climate change does act like a threat multiplier and we are already seeing
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this extreme weather events from hurricanes — this extreme weather events from hurricanes to tropical cyclones, from _ hurricanes to tropical cyclones, from sea — hurricanes to tropical cyclones, from sea level rise come from storm surge, _ from sea level rise come from storm surge, from — from sea level rise come from storm surge, from food and water and security— surge, from food and water and security across many fragile countries _ security across many fragile countries in the world. you've educated _ countries in the world. you've educated a — countries in the world. you've educated a generation - countries in the world. you've educated a generation of - countries in the world. you've educated a generation of us l countries in the world. you've - educated a generation of us military government officials on the impact of climate change with the impact is for national security. you've talked about spending on resilience. we don't really see a lot of spending on that. we see a lot of new technologies but not on was going to happen because of the climate change were not going to stop the effects of this climate change. ilistens were not going to stop the effects of this climate change.— of this climate change. were not iioin to change within the system. the us department defence and the community outlined _ department defence and the community outlined steps that the department of defense is taking to integrate climate — of defense is taking to integrate climate change across all parts of
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the military from making our bases more _ the military from making our bases more resilient to sea—level rise and storm _ more resilient to sea—level rise and storm surge — more resilient to sea—level rise and storm surge to invest in new technologies understand how extreme heat is _ technologies understand how extreme heat is going to affect troops as they deploy around the world. when it comes to australia _ they deploy around the world. when it comes to australia and _ they deploy around the world. when it comes to australia and others who are dragging their heels on the targets that they're expected to make in glasgow, is it up to the chair, the uk and the united states, joe biden will be there. and even though they're dealing with close allies. iiii though they're dealing with close allies. , ., ., ., ~' though they're dealing with close allies. , ., ., ., ~ ., ., though they're dealing with close allies. , ., ., ., �* allies. if you look at what we're with the approach _ allies. if you look at what we're with the approach of— allies. if you look at what we're with the approach of the - allies. if you look at what we're with the approach of the last i with the approach of the last submission because you can wait until you are close to the deadline and we see what is there right now is giving them the right track to achieve the first time but we don't normally go in and criticise individual countries but it is
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something that needs to have some political peer pressure coming up for sure. �* ~ , for sure. and the americans will normally have _ for sure. and the americans will normally have that _ for sure. and the americans will normally have that leverage - for sure. and the americans will normally have that leverage if . for sure. and the americans will. normally have that leverage if joe normally have that leverage ifjoe biden can go to glasgow and saluted the legislation we have pushed through at the moment, he does not have that piece of paper in his hands. , , . have that piece of paper in his hands. , . ~ hands. this is a crucial week in the united states _ hands. this is a crucial week in the united states and _ hands. this is a crucial week in the united states and the _ hands. this is a crucial week in the united states and the president i hands. this is a crucial week in the united states and the president is| united states and the president is devoting _ united states and the president is devoting his attention and energy to try to _ devoting his attention and energy to try to get _ devoting his attention and energy to try to get back most important deals that wiii— try to get back most important deals that will harm him with the tools he needs— that will harm him with the tools he needs to _ that will harm him with the tools he needs to make a strong showing for american _ needs to make a strong showing for american climate ambition and glasgow — american climate ambition and glasgow. it comes down to a few members — glasgow. it comes down to a few members of congress and he's working on that— members of congress and he's working on that all— members of congress and he's working on that all the time.— on that all the time. thank you very much for being _ on that all the time. thank you very much for being with _ on that all the time. thank you very much for being with us. _ on that all the time. thank you very much for being with us. thank- on that all the time. thank you very much for being with us. thank you. | the veteran broadcaster, sir david attenborough, has echoed the warnings from the united nations. the documentary maker, is expected to address the conference in glasgow. he's been speaking to our science editor, david shukman, during the filming of a new documentary series,
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the green planet, which will be aired by the bbc next year. this is a thermal camera. and it will tell me the difference between the surrounding temperature and the temperature in the centre of a daisy flower. the surroundings — 12 degrees. in the centre of the flower — 21. new technology to film the humble daisy. and action, david. at kew gardens in london, we had rare access behind the scenes to the making of green planet. but it looks like you get a lot of enjoyment out of... out of making these programmes. well, they're all old friends, aren't they? that's the nice thing. we caught up with david attenborough several times during the filming. and he seemed most passionate about the most ordinary of plants.
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daisies are things that you decapitate with your lawn mower sort of once a week. but, actually, they are marvellous things. and they move every day. they exploit the sunshine and open to the sunshine. the interesting thing is we now have a camera, which allows us to actually explore the surface of a plant in great detail, so it's like moving into a different landscape. suddenly, this thing is a huge great thing and you suddenly see it for what it is. i have been reporting on climate change, climate science, for nearly 20 years and i have seen some spectacular advances in understanding in that time. what most strikes you about the changes you have seen? i think the devastating fires around the world, in australia and california, all over the place, that has brought home the real catastrophe that happens to ordinary people in their secure home. every time i see it on television, i think suppose suddenly now, there were flames coming up,
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that everything, my life, in my house and everything about it going up in flames. what with that do to you? it would destroy you. when you think of the poorest countries, the people who are likely to be, who are being hardest hit by climate change, and whether their voices are going to be heard at the cop26 summit, are you worried that enough account will be taken of what they're going through? yes, i am very much so. i think it will be really catastrophic if the developed nations of the world, the more powerful nations of the world, simply ignored these problems. do we say, "oh, it's nothing to do with us" and cross our arms? we caused it. 0ur kind of industrialisation is one of the major factors in producing this change in climate. we have a moral responsibility, even if we didn't cause it, we would have a moral responsibility to do something about thousands of men, women and children who have lost everything, lost everything. can we just go by and say,
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"it's no business of ours?" you have to believe there are still things to be done about it, and i believe there are. the question is, on a world scale, when is it too late? buckingham palace has announced tonight that queen elizabeth will not be attending cop26. in the statement, the palace says the queen has regretfully decided not to attend an evening reception on monday. the queen, who is ninety— five, recently spent a night in hospital, and was advised by doctors to rest, although she has since resumed light duties at windsor castle. the palace said although she was disappointed, she would use a recorded video message to address the delegates at the summit. us senators have been confronting the social media companies again about the harmful effects the content is having on children. representative from tik tok, youtube and snapchat were told by a cross party committee that their software and algorithms are continuing to steer young people
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towards inappropriate posts on eating disorders or drug taking. repeatedly the senators said their staff, while logged in as teenagers, had been able to access some of this harmful content and it hadn't taken very long. take a listen. i heard from nora in westport, who allowed her 11—year—old daughter, avery, on tiktok because she thought it was just girls dancing. avery wanted to exercise more with the shutdown of school and sports, so like most people she went online. nora told me about the rabbit hole that tiktok and youtube's algorithms pulled her daughter into. she began to see ever more extreme videos about weight loss. avery started exercising compulsively and ate only one meal a day. her body weight dropped dangerously low and she was diagnosed with anorexia. avery is now luckily in treatment, but the financial cost of care
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is an extreme burden and her education has suffered. are you going to get drugs off snapchat when you have all these kids? half the kids in america who are looking at these platforms? | i assure you, this is such a top| priority for our entire company. and, senator, it's notjustl happening on our platform, it's happening on others. how these social media platforms direct viewers to this content is of major concern to lawmakers. and all of the tech bosses agreed today there needs to be greater transparency in how the algorithms work. here's the view of the former google ceo eric schmidt speaking to the bbc earlier today. pa rt part of the problem here is the systems are ai based in database systems are ai based in database systems are ai based in database systems are driven by objectives and if your objective is to maximise revenue, you maximise attention. and to maximise attention, you maximise outrage. in seeing that cycle knows what we are all reacting to. it's not obvious at all to me how you
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stop that, except for example, by saying that you need to have a diversity of point of using your feed, maybe if you do some search ranking in that kind of thing. i'm joined now by rishi bharwani — policy director at the advocacy group accountable tech do seem to be cross party support for figuring do seem to be cross party support forfiguring out do seem to be cross party support for figuring out how these algorithms work and the tech executives say there needs to be greater transparency. are they going to provide that transparency? there's a number of options but let's step back and appreciate the confidence and the knowledge with which the committee is approaching this issue. it was long ago three years ago that we had the famous exchange between mark zuckerberg and members of the senate where he left and said senator, we sell ads. no, we have senators approaching this issue after months of research, approaching with an understanding of the business model of how the business model of the algorithms
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beyond this platforms are incentivized to extract our personal data often times that her consent, turned around and select advertisers. this number of legislative interventions of pieces of policy and they are likely to be implemented before the end of the year and that starts with protecting her kids. there is a level of bipartisanship that we see on this issue that we, when comes to protecting our kids, that takes us a level above politics and it's very likely that we see updates of the top of the online privacy protection before the end of this year and i think we see congress hold hearings on the federal national framework to stop the extraction and exploitation of our user data because we could do that, then we can reset the incentive structure behind these algorithms and change the way they affect our communities. the argument that they made _ affect our communities. the argument that they made to _ affect our communities. the argument that they made to the _ affect our communities. the argument that they made to the parliament - affect our communities. the argument that they made to the parliament was| that they made to the parliament was that they made to the parliament was that they made to the parliament was that the company is constantly prioritising profit over safety and
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i was backed up by facebooks 3rd—quarter earnings that were released last night we saw a revenue rose 35% to $25,000,000,000. it seemed to me today that the last time we heard about profit being put over safety on such a wide scale in one industry was back in the late �*705 one industry was back in the late �*70s and early �*80s with tobacco. do you think that is a good comparison? i think it is a fair comparison but there are similarities and differences. the similarities. big techis differences. the similarities. big tech is putting big profit ahead of people and sending a addictive product to teens and seeing how the research demonstrating how product is increasingly harmful and body dysmorphia, and they're taking that out of the playbook but this is much further reaching. we never saw big tech because of genocide like
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facebook has, we have never seen big tobacco have an insurrection on the united states capitol. so the scale and scope is much different but the playbook is much the same we heard that facebook is going to do a name change that is exactly phillip morris did in 1993 were they changed their name is a big oil has done in the past decades. but the harms are much further reaching and that's the big difference. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: how astronomers have spotted the first signs of a planet beyond the milky way. we'll discuss next. water companies are to have a new legal obligation to reduce the flow of untreated sewage into rivers and beaches during wet weather, after the government bowed to growing pressure from campaigners. the environment secretary, george eustice, has announced that legislation going through parliament is to be strengthened, with a new clause to be added
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to the environment bill. this evening the lords have voted in favour of an amendment designed to curb outflows of raw sewage into rivers and coastal waters. this is what mr eustice had to say earlier. when it comes to our environmental ambitions, we are world leaders. we have removed carbon from our energy mix faster than any of the other 0ecd countries. we've had a reduction of over a0%. we're the first country in the world to set a biodiversity target, to halt the decline of biodiversity by 2030. when it comes to water quality, as i said, we are also acting. this government is the first government ever to give a clear instruction to 0fwat that we want investment to see a reduction in the use of these storm overflows. space stories have the tendancy to boggle the brain. and this no exception to that. astronomers think they have found what could be the first planet everdiscovered outside our galaxy.
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we know of 5,000 so called "exoplanets" — those worlds that are orbiting stars beyond our sun — but all of them have been located within the milky way galaxy. this saturn—sized planet discovered by nasa's chandra x—ray telescope is in the messier 51 galaxy. it is 28 million light—years away from the milky way. if i told you one light year is 5.8 trillion miles. that's a big bus ride. dr rosanne di stefano is an astrophysicist and one of the resarchers behind the study. this is quite extraordinary. what we know about this planet?— know about this planet? welcome eviction summarised _ know about this planet? welcome eviction summarised the - know about this planet? welcome eviction summarised the main - know about this planet? welcome - eviction summarised the main feature which is that it is most likely size is comparable to the size of saturn. the other thing we know about it is the system that orbits. it's an extraordinary system among all of
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those of the host planets. the system is an x—ray binary, which means that it consists of either a neutron star, which is the remnant of the fairly massive star that underwent a supernova or a black hole. and this compact remnant is in orbit with another star and still has matter, but is not fully involved in the compact object is pulling mass towards itself and as that mass goes towards it and as it falls, it picks up tremendous amounts of energy and begins to emit x—rays. this particular system admits a million times as much energy and x—ray wavelengths as the sun does across the spectrum. this lanet is sun does across the spectrum. this planet is in — sun does across the spectrum. this planet is in orbit _ sun does across the spectrum. this planet is in orbit with this extreme
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system unfortunately, it's a white orbit, comparable to neptune in the sun. and it's not directly in the the same range of the earth as the sun. to the same range of the earth as the sun. ., ., ~ , , , sun. to talking in the present tense and it is light _ sun. to talking in the present tense and it is light years _ sun. to talking in the present tense and it is light years away. _ sun. to talking in the present tense and it is light years away. do - sun. to talking in the present tense and it is light years away. do we - and it is light years away. do we know that it is still there? that is an excellent _ know that it is still there? that is an excellent point. _ know that it is still there? that is an excellent point. in _ know that it is still there? that is an excellent point. in fact, - know that it is still there? that is an excellent point. in fact, the i an excellent point. in fact, the other thing we know about the system is that when it sentenced the light that we have analysed, it was a young system. probably less than about 20,000,000 years old. in the time since then, that system may have fully evolved and the planet may now be orbiting two compact objects compressed to neutron stars or two black holes. find objects compressed to neutron stars or two black holes.— or two black holes. and what will astronomers _ or two black holes. and what will astronomers and _ or two black holes. and what will astronomers and scientist - or two black holes. and what will astronomers and scientist with i astronomers and scientist with information other we know over it is
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we have located it? what does it mean? ~ ., , ., ., we have located it? what does it mean? ., ., ., mean? were not planning to go there. sadl i'm mean? were not planning to go there. sadly l'm rrot — mean? were not planning to go there. sadly l'm rrot going — mean? were not planning to go there. sadly i'm not going with _ mean? were not planning to go there. sadly i'm not going with you. - mean? were not planning to go there. sadly i'm not going with you. it's - mean? were not planning to go there. sadly i'm not going with you. it's a - sadly i'm not going with you. it's a little hot. g0 sadly i'm not going with you. it's a little hot. ., sadly i'm not going with you. it's a little hot.- extends - sadly i'm not going with you. it's a little hot.- extends the - sadly i'm not going with you. it's a | little hot.- extends the reach little hot. go on. extends the reach of our knowledge. _ little hot. go on. extends the reach of our knowledge. so _ little hot. go on. extends the reach of our knowledge. so far, - little hot. go on. extends the reach of our knowledge. so far, all- little hot. go on. extends the reach of our knowledge. so far, all of the j of our knowledge. so far, all of the planets have discovered our axle planets have discovered our axle planets in the milky way and all of the war within a few thousand light years ahead of us. ? away from us. this more than a thousand times farther away and an entirely other stellar system. while we've known that of the stellar systems probably do have planets, it is a very different and moving thing that i have found evidence of a candidate planet in an external galaxy. ads,
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have found evidence of a candidate planet in an external galaxy. a real leasure planet in an external galaxy. a real pleasure to — planet in an external galaxy. a real pleasure to talk _ planet in an external galaxy. a real pleasure to talk to _ planet in an external galaxy. a real pleasure to talk to you. _ planet in an external galaxy. a real pleasure to talk to you. thank you | pleasure to talk to you. thank you very much for coming on. a new thing every day on this programme. stay with us. there are two main elements to the weather — rain and warmth. this was a lovely picture taken in durham. the temperature in north east england was 17 degrees this afternoon. the average this time of the year is nearer 11. it is so mild because the air is coming from the tropics. the rain is focussed mainly on that front there and that will hang around across western areas for the next few days and bring some rain to the southern uplands and the pennines. some flooding is likely. we have rain mainly affecting scotland and that will move south across northern ireland, over the irish sea and into the north—west of england. some brisk winds tonight and a lot of cloud.
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milder than last night in the east. temperatures around 1a degrees. we have still have this zone of cloud and rain, and some rain could affect northern ireland and push into the central lowlands of scotland. towards the north—west of scotland some heavy showers, south of the rain band some sunshine and temperatures higher than today. very mild again. now that rain in the southern uplands by the end of wednesday, there could be 90 millimetres of rain, maybe double that in the the high ground in the peak district, and that is likely to lead to some flooding during wednesday. with more rain to come overnight and into thursday as that front hangs around, it could bring more rain into northern ireland and a wetter start for scotland on thursday. that rain clears from the north—west of scotland and northern ireland and showers following, more rain though for the south—west of scotland, western parts of england and into wales this
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time on thursday. but ahead of that, through the midlands and the south east, it is dry and mild. that rain is still around into friday. the details are not going to change, and we could see some rain in the east by this stage, and the heavier rain moving away and it turns more showery and western parts begin to dry off. the temperatures by the end of the week will be a little bit lower.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers here in the uk and around the world. days before the cop—26 summit, the un warns plans to cut global emissions, fall far short of what's needed to avert dangerous climate change. we have a special report from libya, where the father and mother of manchester bomber salman abedi remain under surveillance. they are both suspects in the case. a judge in new york tells prince andrew he must answer questions under oath by the middle ofjuly, in a lawsuit accusing him of sexual assault. the duke denies the allegations. and the union that would not be denied. the story of two childhood sweethearts separated because of their race, who will marry a0 years on.
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the bbc has confirmed that the parents of the manchester bomber — salman abedi — are still living in the libyan capital, tripoli. they are under surveillance by libyan authorities. both ramadan abedi and his wife samia are suspects in the case. they have not been charged with any offence. a senior m15 officer told the manchester arena inquiry yesterday that ramadan abedi was likely to have influenced his son s extremist beliefs. from tripoli, our international correspondent 0rla guerin reports. being escorted to face justice — hashim abedi, brother of the manchester bomber is brought to tripoli airport in 2019. my name is hashem, i have been captured. are you ok with me, you sure?
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british officials politely ask if they can search his belongings in these never before seen images obtained exclusively by the bbc. then he is walked out to a private plane, to be extradited to the uk. a four—hourflight to a lifetime behind bars. he remains the only person convicted for the manchester bombing and is now serving a sentence of 55 years. but what of his parents who are both suspects in the case? hello? we went to the family home on the outskirts of tripoli. it looks abandoned, but it's not. well, a neighbour hasjust confirmed to us that the abedi family
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is still using this house. crucially he says ramadan abedi and his wife, the parents of the manchester bomber, were here at the house just a few days ago. manchester police have questions for them. so does the counsel for the public inquiry in the uk, but the parents aren't talking. ismail, bbc news, can can i ask you a few questions, please? neither is ismail abedi, the bomber�*s older brother, seen here last year. he left the uk in august, whereabouts unknown. minister, nice to see you. we asked libya's foreign minister, who is british—born herself, if he too might be here. i think there is the collaboration between the general attorney office and some figures in england related to this, to this issue. we are respecting the judicial system and we don't want to interfere in this, but also we are willing to collaborate from a political
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perspective if there is anything we can do from our side. it is unclear what help if any britain is new requesting from tripoli. a security source here told us libya has no evidence against the bomber�*s parents, but he added, "we are watching the family constantly. " 0rla guerin, bbc news, tripoli. ajudge in the us has told britain's prince andrew he must answer questions in a civil sex—assault case in the us by mid—july next year. 38 year old virginia giuffre has accused the duke of sexually assaulting her in new york in 2001. he has consistently denied the allegation. let's bring in criminal defense attorney, caroline polisi. white attorney, caroline polisi. and caroline, nice to see white and caroline, nice to see it. i would this work and principal? let's suppose the lawyers agreed to the deposition. who will be asking the deposition. who will be asking the questions? what sort of setting?
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well, presumably, virginia giuffre's lawyers would be the one asking the question in a regular civil deposition session. it is not in court, as you noted, it is really noteworthy, i would say, christian, that prince andrew has even played ball at all in this case. just a few months ago, remember, his lawyers were stonewalling as unison's lawyers described it. they weren't even accepting service at the complaint. and now you see today and that this ruling, the opposing counsel desire getting along and they have agreed to this discovery deadline. you are right, that disclosure of that deadline will be next summer. at the most committed indicates that potentially prints and your kids sit for a deposition. i don't know if we will get that far, but it has larger implications not only for the case at hand, but for the doj's investigation here in
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the united states with respect to the united states with respect to the large airjeffrey epstein criminal conspiracy, so this is huge news. . ., , ., news. would there be some legal 'eo ard news. would there be some legal jeopardy in _ news. would there be some legal jeopardy in getting _ news. would there be some legal jeopardy in getting that _ news. would there be some legal. jeopardy in getting that deposition? absolutely. if his attorneys, i would instruct him to invoke his fifth amendment right against self—incrimination after that disastrous public interview he did when he publicly declared that he would co—operate with authorities on this soil. of course, he never did, because he got good legal advice. i would just note that you can on invoke your rights if you have a reasonable fear of potential criminal charges being brought against you, which he really does over here. the last time i was on this programme, christian with you, you can authorities had announced that they were closing the investigation into prince andrew. that is definitely not the case over here. the only way he could be for us to testify in this civil case
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would be if, you know, doj officials in this country were to grant him immunity or said something to the effect of we are never going to criminally prosecute you for potential crimes. 0therwise, criminally prosecute you for potential crimes. otherwise, he can certainly invoke his fifth amendment right. his certainly invoke his fifth amendment riiht. , ., , , certainly invoke his fifth amendment riiht. , , ., certainly invoke his fifth amendment riht. , , ., ., certainly invoke his fifth amendment riiht. , , ., ., . right. his lawyers have now received a co of right. his lawyers have now received a copy of it — right. his lawyers have now received a copy of it the _ right. his lawyers have now received a copy of it the 2009 _ right. his lawyers have now received a copy of it the 2009 settlement - a copy of it the 2009 settlement that she signed with jeffrey a copy of it the 2009 settlement that she signed withjeffrey epstein which they believe will end this lawsuit certainly that's the public statement they made very recently, and presumably, if they are making depositions, then his lawyers will get the opportunity to interview her in the same setting, right? absolutely. 0nce in the same setting, right? absolutely. once the discovery process begins, you are right, each side will get a number of both document requests and things of that nature, but also, yes, absolutely, depositions, that potentially could be expert depositions. this is a long road. the discovery phase of a civil trial is long and painful in some instances, but it is designed
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to really discover evidence, so, yes, that is absolutely right. it is tip for tat in that regard. depositions must be in byjuly, we are making kerrigan that prince andrew denies the allegations and has not been charged with any crime. carolyn, lovely to see you and thank you for being with us you too. the islamic state group in afghanistan could have the ability to carry out international attacks within six months, according to us intelligence. and pentagon official has told congress not only could islamic state soon have the capability, they also have the intention to strike the united states. that assessment comes less than three months after the taliban took control of kabul, the afghan capital, and it echoes concerns expressed by other officers in the highest ranks of the us military. 0ur correspondent barbara plett usherjoins us live from washington quite a sober assessment of this of the security risk.— the security risk. yes, that is ri . ht. the security risk. yes, that is right- and — the security risk. yes, that is right- and it _ the security risk. yes, that is right. and it is _ the security risk. yes, that is right. and it is something - the security risk. yes, that is. right. and it is something that the security risk. yes, that is - right. and it is something that we have been hearing since the us withdrew from afghanistan. the time
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it might take for extremist or terrorist groups to rebuild themselves broadly speaking the timeline has been six months to a year, perhaps two years if you're talking about al qaeda. if you're talking about al qaeda. if you're talking about al qaeda. if you're talking about is islamic state prices k, less than that, and this is of course a big concern for the rest, but also a problem for the taliban because they promised that they would not allow afghanistan to be used as a base for terrorist groups to strike other countries, so the question is do they have the ability to keep that promise? that is an open question, really come at the moment committed themselves are the moment committed themselves are the targets of isis k attacks because the two groups are enemies with al qaeda, it's different, of course can as you know, they had ties with al qaeda, that's why the us intervened militarily, but if al qaeda was going to begin to resume attacks again outside of afghanistan, that would be putting the taliban in a really difficult position. the taliban in a really difficult osition. ., , , ., , ., position. there has been a surge of attacks also — position. there has been a surge of attacks also in _ position. there has been a surge of attacks also in afghanistan, - position. there has been a surge of attacks also in afghanistan, but - position. there has been a surge of attacks also in afghanistan, but in l attacks also in afghanistan, but in uganda, the congo, and areas of the
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world where america has interests, barbara. . , world where america has interests, barbara. ., , ., ., barbara. that is the argument of the administration. _ barbara. that is the argument of the administration. they _ barbara. that is the argument of the administration. they have _ barbara. that is the argument of the administration. they have said - barbara. that is the argument of the administration. they have said that i administration. they have said that the terrorist threat against us targets and other areas are happening not so much in afghanistan, but in places in africa and the middle east, so they want to broaden their counterterrorism capabilities command that is why they said they wanted to draw it down in afghanistan, but it has to be said that in those other areas, they do have capabilities that are much closer to the areas of threat. in afghanistan now, they are not based there, no eyes or ears on the ground committed on equipment on the ground, they do have the ability to fly and drones for military bases in the golf, drones that could strike targets, but that is quite a distance away. they don't have any near country bases where they could take quick action. they have been asking neighbouring countries whether they could host troops for counterterrorism purposes, but that
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has not been agreed. {lilia counterterrorism purposes, but that has not been agreed.— has not been agreed. 0k, barbara, 'oinin: us has not been agreed. 0k, barbara, joining us from _ has not been agreed. 0k, barbara, joining us from washington. - has not been agreed. 0k, barbara, joining us from washington. thank| joining us from washington. thank you very much. in brazil senators are about to vote on whether the country's president, jair bolsonaro, should face criminal charges over his handling of the coronvirus pandemic. a sentate commission spent six months compiling a report, which recommended the president face multiple charges, including crimes against humanity, for the way he'd downplayed the threat, while ignoring expert advice on how to contain it. the 11 senators who took part in the enquiry are expected to approve the recommendations of the report. earlier today the senators called on brazil's supreme court to suspend president bolsonaro indefinitely from social media — after youtube and facebook removed a video in which he claimed that covid—19 vaccines were linked with developing aids. needless to say that is not true. needless to say that is not true. i'm joined now by the bbc�*s south america correspondent katy watson in brasilia. let's talk about the boat in the next hour. if it is past, is there
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any guarantee that it would lead to criminal charges? 50 any guarantee that it would lead to criminal charges?— any guarantee that it would lead to criminal charges? so this has been a ve loni criminal charges? so this has been a very long day- _ criminal charges? so this has been a very long day. people _ criminal charges? so this has been a very long day. people have - criminal charges? so this has been a | very long day. people have been here for eight hours and they are not expecting about for another couple of hours yet. now, this is a political trial, of hours yet. now, this is a politicaltrial, not of hours yet. now, this is a political trial, not a criminal one. the report, once the vote is passed command it's expected to pass, that means tomorrow it will go to the federal prosecutor who will then decide if there is enough evidence to further these charges. it's really hard to know, i mean, jr paulson has a year left before the next presidential election. it will be a slow process. he has certain present net privileges because he's president, that's right has to go to the prosecutors and then the sipping great if she he is to be tried for any of these crimes. very few people here seem to think that anyjustice will be done, that we will still see him in power. talk of impeachment, people think that is likely. ——
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unlikely. there are already several impeachment beds in, but it doesn't look like there is support for them. so it's a question, really come up when you go now. certainly in terms of popularity, this inquiry has hit him, everyone has agreed on that. what about the verdict of the brazilian public. as you say, he goes to devote to this time next year from goes to devote to this time next yearfrom 0ctober goes to devote to this time next year from october next year, but effect has this had on his popularity?— effect has this had on his --oulari ? ~ ., popularity? while, whoever you asked, whether _ popularity? while, whoever you asked, whether you _ popularity? while, whoever you asked, whether you are - popularity? while, whoever you asked, whether you are a - popularity? while, whoever you - asked, whether you are a supporter of paulson are a big critic everyone agrees that this is an inquiry that is taking on the government hard. —— bolsonaro. it's been six months of hearings and a lot of people already knew that there were controversies surrounding the way he handled the pandemic, but the scale of the scandals and it's been a scandal after scandal, revelation after revelation, that certainly gripped people here in brazil. there are plenty of people who feel that, you know, this is not a criminal trial, this is a political trial, but actually, it hasn't been thorough
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enough. they haven't looked at the roles and responsibility of the states. it's notjust the federal government to is to blame, and that is something that bolsonaro maintains, that he has done nothing wrong, that the federal government to but it could but certainly, the report command we are talking more than 1,000 pages, a huge document, certainly that paints a picture of the government and president who could have done a lot more. i know ou will could have done a lot more. i know you will bring _ could have done a lot more. i know you will bring us — could have done a lot more. i know you will bring us the _ could have done a lot more. i know you will bring us the result - could have done a lot more. i know you will bring us the result of - you will bring us the result of that boat as and when it comes, but for the moment, thank you very much for that. stay with us on bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the star—crossed teenagers, forced apart by racism, who are now tying the knot almost a0 years on. we'll talk to them both live. millions of public sector workers will get a pay rise next year — the government says it will lift the pay freeze introduced last november and teachers and members of the armed forces are among those who will benefit. the increase won't be known until next spring and depends on recommendations from independent
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pay review bodies. the government won't confirm whether the pay rises will be above inflation. christina mcanea from unison says she is waiting to hear more from tomorrow's budget. i think the key thing for me and for our unison members is — and i'm sure for other workers across the economy is — it's all very well saying that you are lifting the pay fees, —— it's all very well saying that you are lifting the pay freeze, but unless you put actual additional money into government departments that currently keep up services, it will be, you know, in effect, a pay freeze, because there will be no additional money for them to pay for any pay rises and wages, so there has to be actual money into the department budget to back up the idea that they can actually pay more money, so i think the detail will be, we will have to see the detail tomorrow to see what
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the government actually puts and, but let's just say given the way that we are at the moment and, you know, we had ten years of austerity and pay fees is since the conservatives took over in 2010. it's had a drastic impact on our public services and public sector workers, and let's hope tomorrow the government actually comes through and delivers some real change. i have to say, given the history, i am not holding my breath. we heard the announcement last week for care workers, for example, 165,000,000 put in, which is a drop in the ocean, but at least it meant something, but actually, none of that is going to the care workers, not a penny is going to the characters. —— none of that is going to the care workers, not a penny is going to the care workers. so, you know, all that's happening to characters at the moment as they are seeing a rise in their national insurance contributions, so, i'm not holding my breath, i do hope the government follows through. japan's princess mako has married a commoner — and left the royal family. there was no shinto ceremony or big reception
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for the niece of the emperor. instead, she and herfianc went to the equivalent of the tokyo register office. the marriage was delayed by almost four years amid intense scrutiny and criticism of the match which took a mental toll on the princess. from tokyo here's rupert wingfield—hayes. no grand wedding ceremony, no cheering crowds, just a very formal goodbye from princess mako to her parents. at first, her sister does the same, but then she steps forward for a very un—japanese hug. it was the most touching moment in what has been a strange day. a few minutes later the now former princess was sitting before the media with her new husband, kei komuro. ever since their engagement, mr komuro's humble origins have been the target of japanese tabloids. in tokyo, around 100 protesters gathered today, still demanding the marriage be called off. "we're marching today, because we don't want the imperial
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family to be involved in crimes," this woman says. the main accusation is that mr komuro's widowed mother owes £25,000 to a former lover. but the media frenzy has even extending to him daring to wear his hair in a pony tail. in britain, the fact that princess catherine is descended from coal miners is no longer a barrier to her one day becoming queen, but when it comes to the family that live in the palace behind my here, attitudes are still incredibly conservative, and a surprisingly large number ofjapanese people appear to have looked at mr komuro and his family background and decide he is just not suitable to marry a princess. but such attitudes could be driving the japanese imperial family towards extinction. princess mako's departure today leaves the family withjust 17 members, only four of whom are male. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo.
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love conquers all. that brings us to our next story. story. penny umbers and mark bethel were teenage sweethearts. they met in the late 1970's at trent college in nottingham, where mark had travelled from his home in the bahamas. but the blossoming romance ended prematurely. their parents disapproved of the relationship — penny is white, mark is black and neitherfamily would countenance a mixed race marriage. but now, after almost a0 years apart, they are getting married, after being happily reunited through facebook. theyjoin me now, penny from bromsgrove near birmingham and mark from nassau in the bahamas. it is likely to have you with us, such a happy story. a sad story in one way, but a happy ending, and i do like a happy ending, so let me take you all the way back to the 19705, take you all the way back to the 1970s, penny, first of all, you are 16, market 17. you are there in nottingham and then you travelled to london, you rekindle this romance in
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college. how close are you at that point? college. how close are you at that oint? ~ , . w college. how close are you at that oint? ~ , . ~ point? well, we were very close. we made arrangements _ point? well, we were very close. we made arrangements to _ point? well, we were very close. we made arrangements to live - point? well, we were very close. we | made arrangements to live together, hopefully, in london and we both chose london especially to be together. chose london especially to be toiether. ,, , ., ., , together. suddenly out of the blue, mark tells you _ together. suddenly out of the blue, mark tells you that _ together. suddenly out of the blue, mark tells you that it's _ together. suddenly out of the blue, mark tells you that it's over, - together. suddenly out of the blue, mark tells you that it's over, he - mark tells you that it's over, he can see you anymore. did you know all those years back why he had ended the relationship?- all those years back why he had ended the relationship? now, i had absolutely no _ ended the relationship? now, i had absolutely no idea. _ ended the relationship? now, i had absolutely no idea. i _ ended the relationship? now, i had absolutely no idea. i presume - ended the relationship? now, i had absolutely no idea. i presume he i absolutely no idea. i presume he didn't like me anymore, and i can really get my head around it are my heart around it. 50 really get my head around it are my heart around it.— heart around it. so what did that mean? how _ heart around it. so what did that mean? how did _ heart around it. so what did that mean? how did things _ heart around it. so what did that mean? how did things transpire | heart around it. so what did that i mean? how did things transpire for you after that point? gas. mean? how did things transpire for you after that point?— you after that point? gas, when i found it devastating _ you after that point? gas, when i found it devastating to _ you after that point? gas, when i found it devastating to him - you after that point? gas, when i found it devastating to him i was| found it devastating to him i was totally heartbroken. i gave up my degree, i tried to carry on, but in the end gran —— in the end, i gave up my the end gran —— in the end, i gave up my degree and tried to commit suicide and didn't really recover very well.
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suicide and didn't really recover ve well. . �* , . suicide and didn't really recover ve well. ., �*, ., ~ very well. that's dreadful. mark, let me turn _ very well. that's dreadful. mark, let me turn to _ very well. that's dreadful. mark, let me turn to you. _ very well. that's dreadful. mark, let me turn to you. what - very well. that's dreadful. mark, let me turn to you. what sort i very well. that's dreadful. mark, let me turn to you. what sort of| let me turn to you. what sort of pressure for you coming under at that point from penny's father? pretty extreme. for many years, i knew — pretty extreme. for many years, i knew the _ pretty extreme. for many years, i knew the cultural aspects, and it wasjustm — knew the cultural aspects, and it wasjust... i'm trying to find the right— wasjust... i'm trying to find the right words _ wasjust... i'm trying to find the right words. it was... i never thought. _ right words. it was... i never thought, because my love was so intense _ thought, because my love was so intense for— thought, because my love was so intense for penny when we got together, _ intense for penny when we got together, i didn't see the complications, the obstacles, i didn't — complications, the obstacles, i didn't. ~ ., , ., didn't. where your family opposed to it as well? me _ didn't. where your family opposed to it as well? me back— didn't. where your family opposed to it as well? me back to _ didn't. where your family opposed to it as well? me back to you, _ didn't. where your family opposed to it as well? me back to you, so - didn't. where your family opposed to it as well? me back to you, so we i it as well? me back to you, so we can see that lovely face that penny is in love with. they got up and i can see you now. where your family opposed to it as well? i can see you now. where your family opposed to it as well?—
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opposed to it as well? i don't think... know, _ opposed to it as well? i don't think... know, but— opposed to it as well? i don't think... know, but i - opposed to it as well? i don't think... know, but i was- opposed to it as well? i don'tj think... know, but i was such opposed to it as well? i don't i think... know, but i was such an independent individual all, think... know, but i was such an independent individualall, i think... know, but i was such an independent individual all, i never saw colour, — independent individual all, i never saw colour, ijust saw a woman whom i saw colour, ijust saw a woman whom i loved _ saw colour, i 'ust saw a woman whom i loved. �* ., , ., i loved. and how did you find your? how did this _ i loved. and how did you find your? how did this all _ i loved. and how did you find your? how did this all come _ i loved. and how did you find your? how did this all come about? i i loved. and how did you find your? how did this all come about? 40 i how did this all come about? a0 years goes by. penny has had two marriages that failed and then you are both single, what happens? meiji. are both single, what happens? well, thank god, thank _ are both single, what happens? well, thank god, thank god _ are both single, what happens? well, thank god, thank god for _ are both single, what happens? well, thank god, thank god for facebook and all— thank god, thank god for facebook and all of— thank god, thank god for facebook and all of these mediated —— media social— and all of these mediated —— media social media — and all of these mediated —— media social media eighth think it out to people. _ social media eighth think it out to people, and that is how it came about — people, and that is how it came about i— people, and that is how it came about. i searched for years, for years — about. i searched for years, for ears. ., ., , ., . ., about. i searched for years, for years. you had searched for her for ears and years. you had searched for her for years and then _ years. you had searched for her for years and then he _ years. you had searched for her for years and then he found _ years. you had searched for her for years and then he found you. i years. you had searched for her for years and then he found you. we . years. you had searched for her for. years and then he found you. we were in the middle of lockdown, the dark days of lockdown and then suddenly this guy, this blast from the past p°p5 up this guy, this blast from the past pops up on your timeline. what did you think? pops up on your timeline. what did ou think? _,, pops up on your timeline. what did ou think? ,.,, ., , you think? gosh, i nearly, well, i practically _ you think? gosh, i nearly, well, i practically had — you think? gosh, i nearly, well, i practically had a _ you think? gosh, i nearly, well, i practically had a heart _ you think? gosh, i nearly, well, i
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practically had a heart attack. i l practically had a heart attack. i was absolutely over the moon, he never ever thought i would hear from him again, when i saw his name, i just, i was absolutely so happy. i cried. �* ., cried. and he raced out there. i can see the pictures. _ cried. and he raced out there. i can see the pictures. he _ cried. and he raced out there. i can see the pictures. he went - cried. and he raced out there. i can see the pictures. he went straight i see the pictures. he went straight to the bahamas, did you? trio. see the pictures. he went straight to the bahamas, did you? no, no, i couldn't get— to the bahamas, did you? no, no, i couldn't get out _ to the bahamas, did you? no, no, i couldn't get out there _ to the bahamas, did you? no, no, i couldn't get out there fire, gas, i couldn't get out there fire, gas, nearly two years because of the pandemic that stop us getting together, we talked nearly every day, but actually getting together wasn't until thisjune. i5 day, but actually getting together wasn't until thisjune. is at day, but actually getting together wasn't until this june.— wasn't until this june. is at 'ust the same? fl wasn't until this june. is at 'ust the same? it fl wasn't until this june. is at 'ust the same? it is i wasn't until this june. is at 'ust the same? it isjust i wasn't until this june. is at 'ust the same? it is just the i wasn't until this june. is atjust the same? it isjust the same. | wasn't until this june. is atjust i the same? it isjust the same. it's the same? it is 'ust the same. it's amazini. the same? it is 'ust the same. it's amazing. even — the same? it isjust the same. it's amazing. even though _ the same? it isjust the same. it's amazing. even though we - the same? it isjust the same. it's amazing. even though we are i the same? it isjust the same. it's amazing. even though we are old. j amazing. even though we are old. just the same time you see, just the same. you haven't aged a bit. just the same- — same. you haven't aged a bit. just the same- do _ same. you haven't aged a bit. just the same. do you _ same. you haven't aged a bit. just the same. do you creek _ same. you haven't aged a bit. just the same. do you creek a - same. you haven't aged a bit. just the same. do you creek a bit i same. you haven't aged a bit. just i the same. do you creek a bit more? yes! is a the same. do you creek a bit more? yes! is a lovely _ the same. do you creek a bit more? yes! is a lovely story, _ the same. do you creek a bit more? yes! is a lovely story, so, _ the same. do you creek a bit more? yes! is a lovely story, so, he - the same. do you creek a bit more? yes! is a lovely story, so, he went i yes! is a lovely story, so, he went to the bahamas _ yes! is a lovely story, so, he went to the bahamas -- _ yes! is a lovely story, so, he went to the bahamas -- bahamas i yes! is a lovely story, so, he went i to the bahamas -- bahamas command to the bahamas —— bahamas command the second time you went back to the bahamas, ma ) the second time you went back to the bahamas, ma) he proposed as soon as
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she came off the plane? meiji. she came off the plane? well, not iuite, i she came off the plane? well, not quite. i got _ she came off the plane? well, not quite. i got her— she came off the plane? well, not quite, i got her home. _ she came off the plane? well, not quite, i got her home. i _ she came off the plane? well, not quite, i got her home. i had i she came off the plane? well, not quite, i got her home. i had to i she came off the plane? well, not i quite, i got her home. i had to have the right— quite, i got her home. i had to have the right environment. did quite, i got her home. i had to have the right environment.— the right environment. did you get down on one _ the right environment. did you get down on one knee? _ the right environment. did you get down on one knee? i _ the right environment. did you get down on one knee? i did. - the right environment. did you get down on one knee? i did. you i the right environment. did you get down on one knee? i did. you old | down on one knee? i did. you old romantic- — down on one knee? i did. you old romantic- so _ down on one knee? i did. you old romantic. so it _ down on one knee? i did. you old romantic. so it is _ down on one knee? i did. you old romantic. so it is the _ down on one knee? i did. you old romantic. so it is the happy day, penny? romantic. so it is the happy day, penn ? ~ ., , ., romantic. so it is the happy day, penn? ., penny? we are planning it. i don't know. no definite _ penny? we are planning it. i don't know. no definite date _ penny? we are planning it. i don't know. no definite date yet, i know. no definite date yet, hopefully quite soon. pare know. no definite date yet, hopefully quite soon. are we doing it in the bahamas? _ hopefully quite soon. are we doing it in the bahamas? well, - hopefully quite soon. are we doing it in the bahamas? well, no, i hopefully quite soon. are we doing it in the bahamas? well, no, we . it in the bahamas? well, no, we are t in: to it in the bahamas? well, no, we are trying to go — it in the bahamas? well, no, we are trying to go to _ it in the bahamas? well, no, we are trying to go to a _ it in the bahamas? well, no, we are trying to go to a destination - trying to go to a destination wedding, maybe south africa. i think .ive wedding, maybe south africa. i think give over. _ wedding, maybe south africa. i think give over, we are all coming to the bahamas! — give over, we are all coming to the bahamas! l — give over, we are all coming to the bahamas! ., �* ., bahamas! i don't need two invitations. _ bahamas! i don't need two invitations. i— bahamas! i don't need two invitations. iwill_ bahamas! i don't need two invitations. i will the i bahamas! i don't need two invitations. i will the bossl bahamas! i don't need two i invitations. i will the boss and bahamas! i don't need two - invitations. i will the boss and see what she says. mark, penny, many, many congratulations and a happy ending to a story that we loved. thank you very much for coming on and being good sports about it. thank you. you connect thank you.
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and i thank you very much. thank you very much for watching. we will be back at the same time tomorrow. will see you then. hello. 0ur weather pattern has become established across the uk, which will bring big variations in rain totals from northwest to southeast. some areas over the next several days will see rain, quite a bit of that time, whereas others will stay dry and even get to see some sunshine. so what is going on? low—pressure to the northwest of us has brought on by their friend has brought a weather front wriggling around for parts of scotland, northern ireland, northwest england and wales. for the next several days, rain totals mounting with the risk of flooding and disruption. central and eastern parts of england ahead of that will stay largely dry, even a bit of sunshine. for all of us, with the air coming from this direction, it is going to be mild, in fact temperatures well above where
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we might expect them to be at this time of year. now, the impact of this weather system very clear on rain totals for the next couple of days,a very wet southwest scotland, cumbria, the lake district, increasingly so and west wales, especially into snodonia. some areas could end up with 100— 200 mm of rain without risk of flooding before all is said and done by the end of the week. now, wednesday's picture brings this weather front then with the rain into parts of northern ireland, northwest england, cumbria, the lake district, southern scotland just fringing more into northwest wales as the day goes on. elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland, some sunny spells, a few showers across much of central and eastern england, it's dry. and look at that temperatures, 18, even 19 celsius, after a very mild start to the day. and looking to thursday, how the weather front is still across many of these same areas, perhaps for a time impacting more of northern ireland and scotland, where as still, toward central and eastern england, it's dry, it looks like it will be turning wetter across more of wales on thursday and indeed across parts of south west england. it's windy with all of this as well, some gales through the irish sea. it's still very mild. now, by friday, it looks
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as if this weather system and the weather front is gradually going to slip its way further east. it brings a chance of some rain into those parts of eastern england which have been dry until then. as it does so, it could well see another spell of rain into northern ireland and scotland. there will be a few showers elsewhere. 0verall, it's turning a bit brighter after a good deal of cloud so far in the week. and temperatures are just edging down a couple of degrees. it is a messy looking picture going into next weekend. we have the area of low pressure and it will begin to just move more broadly across the uk. it does bring a chance of more of us seeing some rain. probably on saturday, after perhaps an early spell of rain across parts of eastern england, in the form of showers. sunshine and showers, some of these can be quite heavy on saturday. and as for temperatures, we are talking mid to low teens, so not as high as they have been. the nights will be a bit that cooler as well.
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now, it could be that for part two of the weekend on sunday, we have an area of low pressure which could bring some rather more wet and windy weather, some uncertainty about how much that low—pressure system will develop. it does look very unsettled on sunday, but there is a potential for some heavy rain and some stronger winds in places as well. now, going into next week, that area of low pressure carried within a dip in the jet stream will be right across the uk for a time before slipping away eastwards. it's clear at this stage while on the colder side of the jet stream, and as a low pressure begins to pull away easter aids we are drying and some cooler air. and that will bring a change in how things deal out there. an uneven by their pattern right now turning more widely unsettled this weekend, but importantly, cooler next week.
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tonight at ten — the queen's doctors advise her not to travel to the global climate summit in glasgow. the 95 year—old monarch, who spent time in hospital last week, has been advised to rest at windsor castle. in glasgow, final preparations are being made for the gathering of many prominent figures and the message is clear. well, if we don't act now, it will be too late. we'll be speaking to sir david attenborough about what's at stake at the cop26 summit. also tonight... a pay rise for public sector workers, but the detail won't be known until next year. experts say there are signs that numbers of new covid cases are beginning to even out and dropping slightly in england.

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