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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 26, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm maryam moshiri, this is outside source. brazilian senators are about to vote on a damning report into the government's handling of the covid—19 pandemic. the 1,200 page report recommends nine charges against presidentjair bolsonaro — including crimes against humanity. he says he's guilty of �*absolutely nothing'. also in the programme — buckingham palace has announced queen elizabeth won't be travelling to glasgow next week for a major climate summit. instead, she'll address world leaders via a recorded video message. we'll speak to our royal correspondent. sudan's most senior general says the military seized power on monday in order to avoid
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a civil war. in khartoum, shops are closed, internet lines are disrupted and some doctors are refusing to work until civilian rule is restored. and the uk government has given away to rebel demands to tighten rules on discharging sewage into british waters following an outcry on social media. we start with some news that's broken in the past hour here in the uk. the queen will not be attending the climate conference cop26. she had been due to attend the evening reception on monday. she will still deliver an address to the assembled delegates via a recorded video message. our royal correspondentjonny dymond joins me now. what have we heard? this came on the
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heels of queen — what have we heard? this came on the heels of queen returning _ what have we heard? this came on the heels of queen returning to _ what have we heard? this came on the heels of queen returning to official- heels of queen returning to official duties. she received two ambassadors today in official audiences, all be it virtual ones. one of the pictures of it showed her beaming a way. it followed of course her withdrawal from a planned trip last week to northern ireland and a brief stay in hospitalfor northern ireland and a brief stay in hospital for what the palace said were preliminary investigations. the next big thing on the agenda was the reception at cop26, the big climate change conference that the british government is hosting. but the palace put a statement saying that regretfully she has decided against attending the conference. this on the advice of her medical team. she was disappointed, but would put a message in a video form for the delegates. so, you know... a blow
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certainly for someone wh likes to carry out all her duties. its rare for a cancellation to come quite so close to an event that she confirmed and had big drawing powerfor. but it may be the combination of travel from london to glasgow, one of the further flung cities of uk and the demands of being on herfeet for an hour, an hourand demands of being on herfeet for an hour, an hour and a half, demands of being on herfeet for an hour, an hourand a half, doing demands of being on herfeet for an hour, an hour and a half, doing a major reception for world leaders, that that was judged to be a wee bit too much for the 95—year—old sovereign. it too much for the 95-year-old sovereign-— too much for the 95-year-old sovereiun. , , sovereign. it will be disappointing for those organising _ sovereign. it will be disappointing for those organising cop26. - sovereign. it will be disappointing for those organising cop26. howl sovereign. it will be disappointing i for those organising cop26. how will she be involved?— she be involved? there will be a video conference _ she be involved? there will be a video conference and _
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she be involved? there will be a video conference and the - she be involved? there will be a video conference and the prince| she be involved? there will be a l video conference and the prince of wales will be going. but she was a soft power draw for the conference. there are few world leaders who turn down the opportunity to talk to the queen, to have their photo taken and all the other people as well who are going to be at the 25,000—strong conference. so it is a blow for the organisers and for the british government and it will whatever the palace says deepen concern about her strength as she carries on in her 95th year. we strength as she carries on in her 95th year-— strength as she carries on in her 95th ear. ~ ~ ., ,, ., , 95th year. we know the queen loves all the events _ 95th year. we know the queen loves all the events she _ 95th year. we know the queen loves all the events she attends, - 95th year. we know the queen loves all the events she attends, so - 95th year. we know the queen loves all the events she attends, so she i all the events she attends, so she must have received some strong advice from her doctors. i must have received some strong advice from her doctors.- must have received some strong advice from her doctors. i think it would have _ advice from her doctors. i think it would have been _ advice from her doctors. i think it would have been firm _ advice from her doctors. i think it would have been firm advice, - advice from her doctors. i think itj would have been firm advice, you have to make advice strong to give to it the queen and expect her to obey. she is more used to being
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obeyed than obeying. we are not privy to it and the palace is very tight with information about the medical condition of members of royal family. it puts that in the drawer marked "private" and slam there is a shut. the fact she withdrew from an engagement last wednesday, the fact she went to hospital for tests and she has been taking it easy for the most recent few days and now she has cancelled attendance at what is a very big international event for her government is an indication perhaps that she is receiving now advice that she is receiving now advice that she is receiving now advice that she needs to take it easy and slow down a bit. it has been a hectic time table up until last wednesday. and now the word seems to be come on, you're 95, you need to take it easy and she seems to have listened to that.—
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let's turn now to brazil — where a group of senators are set to vote shortly on whether to approve their own report into president jair bolsonaro's handling of covid—i9. their report was published last week after nearly six months of hearings. and the findings were damning. the 1,200—page report recommended ninecriminal charges be brought againstjair bolsonaro. including crimes against humanity, misusing public funds and quackery — which is the promotion of fraudulent medical advice and practices. the report writers state that president bolsonaro's government: and that mass infection lead to huge numbers of deaths — more than 600,000 people have died in brazil since the start of the pandemic — the second highest death toll in the world, behind the us. here's the president of the senate panel, speaking earlier.
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translation: the repeated and flagrant potentially criminal conduct of the president of the republic poses a serious harm to the guarantee of public safety. president bolsonaro has condemned the inquiry from the outset — calling it a politically motivated move to oust him by the senate, which is controlled by the opposition. he says he is "guilty of absolutely nothing". our correspondent katy watson is there. we are expecting the vote soon. what do we think the outcome will be? well this started about five hours ago and in fact they have just been on a lunch break. and probably another three hours before we might see a vote. it has gone on longer than we expected. it is expected to pass, that is why they have spent the last week trying to work out the detail, to make sure the seven senators who are... anti—government,
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they will you know, they will be in agreement and they can vote and get this over the line. at that point, it is in the hands of the federal prosecutor and he will look at the recommendations of the long list of crimes and decide whether to take them further. so this is a still very much in the kind of preamble discussing the finer details of the report and still a while from a vote. , . , , ., , report and still a while from a vote. , . , , ., , , ., vote. very early stages, but what could this mane _ vote. very early stages, but what could this mane for _ vote. very early stages, but what could this mane for bols -- - vote. very early stages, but whatj could this mane for bols -- mean vote. very early stages, but what - could this mane for bols -- mean for could this mane for bols —— mean for jair bolsonaro. could he end up
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being jailed? fist jair bolsonaro. could he end up being jailed?— jair bolsonaro. could he end up being jailed? jair bolsonaro. could he end up bein: “ailed? �* ., , being “ailed? at the moment he is the being jailed? at the moment he is the president _ being jailed? at the moment he is the president and _ being jailed? at the moment he is the president and he _ being jailed? at the moment he is the president and he has - being jailed? at the moment he is the president and he has some . the president and he has some protection. so what, the report will have to go to the federal prosecutor and he will decide whether or not any of the charges will be looked at. it is not expected that jair bolsonaro will go to prison while he is in power. he has a year until the presidential elections and whether he will run again. this report, this inquiry revealed scandal after scandal and shone a light on the activities of government during the pandemic and it has dented his popularity, whether he will be able to run in the elections and whether he will be able to win them, it is really very early days. a year is a long time in brazilian politics. but he is not going anywhere any time soon and there is not enough support for impeachment. at the moment, it is a lot of kind of bureaucracy, but he doesn't look good in the eyes of brazilians. stay there katy, because earlier the senators called for the high court to suspend president bolsonaro from social media. that request comes after facebook and youtube removed this video he posted on monday. in it he can be seen reading a fake scientific study,
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that had been widely shared by anti—vaccine conspiracy theorists on social media — suggesting coronavirus vaccines could cause aids. facebook said it removed the content as, "its policies don't allow claims that covid—i9 vaccines kill or seriously harm people". youtube suspended his account for a week. back to katie watson, what is the reaction from jair bolsonaro to that move from social media giants? weill. move from social media giants? well, jair move from social media giants? well, jair bolsonaro — move from social media giants? well, jair bolsonaro says _ move from social media giants? well, jair bolsonaro says he _ move from social media giants? well, jair bolsonaro says he is _ move from social media giants? well, jair bolsonaro says he is not _ move from social media giants? -ii jair bolsonaro says he is not guilty of anything. it is a request from the parliamentary inquiry, it is not a legal... it is not a legal inquiry, it is a purely investigative inquiry and the idea they could take this to the supreme court, this is early stages, it is not the first time it has happened.
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opposition politicians have called for this in the past, wanting to take down some of his posts or stop him from saying the things he does. it is still early days and it is pure lay recommendation from the inquiry. pure lay recommendation from the inuui . ., ~ ,, let's turn to sudan. the country's top general who led monday's coup has defended the military takeover as neccessary to �*prevent a civil war�*. general abdel fattah al burhan has spoken to journalists, 2a hours after he dissolved the civilian government, declared a state of emergency and arrested the civilian prime minister. here's what else he said. translation: the prime minister was staying at his home, but we were afraid he would be harmed. he is now staying with me at my home. we were sitting together yesterday evening and he is carrying on with his life normally. he will return home when the crisis is over and all threats are gone. but for now he is staying
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with me at my home. on monday the general announced the end of a power—sharing deal with civilian leaders, who'd been leading sudan's democratic transition since the ousting of omar al bashir in 2019. thousands took to the streets to demand a return to civilian rule. protesters burned tyres and blocking roads. we're told ten people died when soldiers opened fire. despite the unrest, the protests continued for a second day. this was khartoum earlier. as you can see, it's quieter. shops are closed. phone and internet lines are severely disrupted. central bank staff have reportedly gone on strike, and across the country doctors are said to be refusing to work in military run hospitals except in emergencies. international flights have been suspended until at least saturday. the bbc spoke to an activist in khartoum who described the scene where she is. what's actually happening is that
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the army is controlling the bridges and the army the neighbourhood around it, like our neighbourhood, closer to the army headquarters, beside the bridges, the bridges are open for people to pass, but you get harassed, beaten, sometimes like we have two people that... they have, they dropped their hands while passing the bridge. the streets are really locked with barricades. thousands of people are still on the streets. sudan's civilian leaders and their military counterparts have been at odds since sudan's previous military leader, omar al—bashir was overthrown two years ago. their power—sharing agreement was designed to steer sudan towards democracy, — but that's proven fragile. there have been a number of failed coup attempts previously — the most recent was just over a month ago. last week sudan's prime minister warned
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of a �*dangerous crisis�*. regardless, some in sudan doubt the coup will succeed. here�*s the director of the human rights group, justice africa sudan. we have been in military rule 5a years out of our 65 years of independence. the military rules have actually run sudan down in the last 65 years. this is why i don�*t think we want to repeat that. democracy given the chance to revive and survive in sudan. that is why my generation have seen what freedom means, it means economy, good education and health and no corruption and they cannot accept to go back again to the same old regime of corruption, dictator, torture, they are determined that they will fight back and they start the
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fighting before even general burhan and now his statement. and the fighting will continue. there�*s been widespread international condemnation. the us has suspended a $700 million aid package — demanding the civilian government is restored, without preconditions. here�*s national security adviser, jake sullivan. we have made clear that we are deeply alarmed. secretary blinken put out a strong statement. and there have been the arrest of multiple civilians and the arrest of the prime minister. we believe it is undermines the country�*s transition to democratic rule and reject the assertion that it is within the military authority. these actions are unacceptable and contravene the constitution and the aspiration of sudanese people. general burhan had
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a lengthy military career under omar al bashir and many in sudan fear a return to brutal, autocratic rule. the general has powerful connections. analysts point to ties to saudi arabia, the united arab emirates and egypt. sally nabil is in cairo, she gave me an update of the situation where she is a short while ago. egypt has been pretty cautious when it comes to reactions with sudan. the ministry of foreign affairs released a short statement saying it supports the stability of sudan and calls on all parties to be committed to self—restraint. it does not describe what happened as a coup and did not explain what it means by stability, does it mean siding with the army generals, or supporting the protesters who are calling for a
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democratic transition to civilian rule. and in fact, egypt is viewed in sudan as a strong supporter of the military leaders. that is what i heard from many sudanese people when i was there in khartoum after the former president bashir left power. it is viewed as a strong backer of the army generals. perhaps this is why the egyptian were cautious with the wording of the statement they issued yesterday. so they are just waiting to see how things are going to go and which party is going to have the upper hand. halal to go and which party is going to have the upper hand.— to go and which party is going to have the upper hand. how real is the threat that other _ have the upper hand. how real is the threat that other powerful _ have the upper hand. how real is the threat that other powerful backers i threat that other powerful backers in the region might end up having to p"°p in the region might end up having to prop him up? in the region might end up having to prep him up?— prop him up? actually that is a re prop him up? actually that is a pretty complicated _ prop him up? actually that is a pretty complicated question, l prop him up? actually that is a - pretty complicated question, because regional players, they do have... they do have a role in what�*s happening in sudan, according to
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some experts i have been talking to. we can see that in the reactions coming from the gulf area, like saudi arabia and the united arab emirates. they have said, we support also the stability of sudan and we side with the sudanese people. but they did not refer to what happened as a coup, they did not criticise the army generals and generally speaking egypt and some gulf monarchs like saudi arabia are seen as strong backers of the army generals. on the other hand we have another reaction from turkey, that said it is pretty worried about what is happening and yesterday the ministry of foreign affairs said it is concerned about the coup attempt in sudan from. the reactions we can, some sort of tell... what kind of
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party is the regional key players are supporting. the un environment programme has said that the world is on track for a catastrophic rise in temparatures if current commitments to reduce carbon emissions are not increased. the report warns that the world is on course to warm by around 2.7 degrees centigrade. which the un says would be �*catastrophic�*. pledges made for cuts to carbon emissions by 2030 would only result in a 7.5% reduction of emissions. a reduction of 55% would be needed to limit the temparature rise to that important 1.5 degree aim. even to limit the temparature rise to within two degrees a reduction of 30% is needed. now, next week global leaders will meet in glasgow to discuss how to tackle climate change. here�*s the un secretary—general speaking at the launch of the report. the clock is ticking. the emissions
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gap is the result of a leadership 93p- gap is the result of a leadership gap. but leaders can still make this a turning point within our future, instead of a tipping point to climate catastrophe. the year of half measures and dollar promises must end. the time for closing this leadership gap must begin in glasgow. here�*s our environment correspondent matt mcgrath. every year this report shows the gap between the ambitions and the reality. the scientists say that to keep this 1. 5 degree threshold alive, emissions have to go down by half in nine years. the reports and the plans when they�*re added up say we will cut emissions by about 7.5%.
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that includes things that haven�*t been put to the un. it underlines the challenge that world leaders will face when they arrive in glasgow in five days. there is always hope and i think there is some hope in the report, pointing to the fact that long—term strategy, net zero goals, like we heard from australia, that these actually do give hope and the report says that if countries live up to the promise on net zero we will have warming this century, but not as bad as what we are facing. so, let�*s take a closer look at that announcement from australia that matt mcgrath mentioned. it has received a lot of criticism. the prime minister scott morrison pledged net zero carbon emissions by 2050. net zero means not adding
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to the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. australia�*s 2030 commitment will remain at 26% cut on 2005 emissions. it is currently on track for a 30—35% reduction according to the government. so still below what the un has recommended today. here�*s the prime minister scott morrisson. we believe we will achieve 35% reduction. the actions of australia speak louder than the words of others and there will be other countries that turn up in glasgow and say they have targets and ambitions, but you won�*t find the same plan, you won�*t find the same detailed plan that we are releasing today. what you need, i always said we would not commit to this unless we would not commit to this unless we had a plan to achieve it and that is what we are delivering. so let�*s take a look at some of those claims
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made there canada, japan, new zealand, south korea, the uk, the us, the european union and china have all already set net zero targets. on future climate commitments, australia is far less ambitious than comparable countries. —— these graphs compiled by the guardian compares the rate of emissions reductions. and as you can see from this graph australia has the highest co2 emmissions per person. and among developed countries, all except new zealand have significantly more ambitious emissions reduction targets for 2030. new zealand has promised a new goal at or before glasgow. kelly o�*shanassy is the chief executive officer of the australian conservation foundation — a non partisan environmental organisation. we have happy that we have a net zero target, we have been trying to get this for decades, a lot of politics got in the way. so that a good thing. but there was not much else other than that announcement,
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there is no real plan, it is more of a pamphlet than a plan. there is no decent target for 2030 and we know what matters is to cut emissions this decade, because global warming is real, damage is here now, particularly in australia, where we are facing terrible droughts. we need to get serious this decade. and the prime minister has insisted that this plan will not harm the coal industry or the economy so here�*s what they are proposing. australia will invest 15 billion dollars in �*low—emissions technologies�* over the next twenty years. those will include carbon capture in soil, lower solar energy costs, and developing greener industries. but australia will also use more gas, at least in the short term. and there�*s no plan to limit fossil fuels. sophie marjanac is an environmental lawyer.
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it isa it is a mixture of other policies that have been shown to to be inadequate. the plan doesn�*t contain any plan to wind down the coal, oil and gas sectors. in fact it said there will be no change to its policies in respect to those sectors that we know, and as science tells us, are critical to achieving climate action.— us, are critical to achieving climate action. ., ., climate action. more to come and we will have a special— climate action. more to come and we will have a special report _ climate action. more to come and we will have a special report on - climate action. more to come and we will have a special report on what - will have a special report on what india is planning ahead of cop26 and the news that the queen will not be attending the event in a statement, she said she had decided not to attend an evening reception scheduled at the summit next monday. the queen, who is 95, recently spent a night in hospital and was advised by doctors to rest. the palace said
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although she was disappointed, she would use a video message to address the delegates. more coming up in a moment. stay with us. there are two main elements to the weather — rain and warmth. this was a lovely picture taken in durham. the temperature in north—east england was 17 degrees this afternoon. the average for this time of the year is nearer 11. it is mild, because the air is coming from the tropics. the rain is focussed mainly on that front there and that will hang around across western areas for the next few days and bring some rain to the he southern uplands and the pennines. some flooding is likely. we have rain mainly affected scotland and that will move south across northern ireland, over the irish sea and into
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the north—west of england. some brisk winds tonight and a lot of cloud. milderthan brisk winds tonight and a lot of cloud. milder than last night in the east. . temperatures around 1a degrees. we have still have this zone of cloud and rain and some rain could affect northern ireland and push into the value lowlands of scotland. towards the north—west of scotland. towards the north—west of scotland some heavy showers, south of the rain band some sunshine and temperatures higher than today. very mild again. now that rain in the southern uplands by the end of wednesday there could be 90 millimetres of rain, maybe double that in the the high ground in the peak district and that is likely to lead to some flooding during wednesday. with more rain to come overnight and into thursday as that front hangs around it could bring more rain into northern ireland and a wetter start for scotland on thursday. that rain clears from the
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north—west of scotland and northern ireland and showers following, more rain though for the south—west of scotland, western parts of england and into wales this time on thursday. but ahead of that through the midlands and the south—east it is dry and mild. that rain is still around into friday. the details are not going to change and we could see some rain in the east by this stage and the heavier rain moving away and it turns more showery and western parts begin to dry off. the temperatures by the end of the week will be a bit lower.
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hello, i�*m maryam moshiri, this is outside source. buckingham palace has announced queen elizabeth won�*t be travelling to glasgow next week for a major climate summit on the advice of her doctors. instead, she�*ll address world leaders via a recorded video message. we�*ll be live from windsor. brazilian senators are about to vote on a damning report into the government�*s handling of the covid—19 pandemic. the report recommends nine charges against presidentjair bolsonaro, including crimes against humanity. he says he�*s guilty of "absolutely nothing". sudan�*s most senior general says the military seized power on monday in order to avoid a civil war. and we hearfrom afghanistan�*s female judges who�*ve fled the taliban fighters they once prosecuted.
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translation: as i looked at my kids leaving the country, i felt so hopeless, wondering if i would get them out of afghanistan alive. in the wake of the taliban takeover, hundreds of female judges are known to be in hiding across afghanistan. they are fleeing from the very men theyjailed after a mass prisoner release took place across the country. but after months of living in fear, 26 women have recently been evacuated to greece. for their safety, all of their names have been changed. this report is by the bbc�*s zarguna kargar, derek evans and claire press. translation: it was - the worst moment of my life - when i looked at my kids whilst leaving our country, i was so hopeless. i wondered whether i would ever get them out of afghanistan alive. under cover of darkness,
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nabila stepped onto a bus. she was once one of the most influential women of our country, but now she was fleeing for her life. translation: it was so hard travelling at night by bus - through the desert, especially with small children. we travelled for so many nights towards an unknown destination without any glimmer of hope. after weeks of living in fear and moving from one place to another, finally, along with 25 other prominent women, nabila and her young family safely arrived in greece. living in small apartments across the city, every day the greek authorities provide them with food. but after 20 years as a busy working mother, confined to this flat, nabila spends her days reflecting on all the cases she fought
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and the women she defended. translation: there were many rape . cases, especially against women. . there were murder cases where women had been heinously killed by their husbands. do you think there is a vacuum in the legal system for women? translation: now there is no support, be it cultural, legal or medical. women are left at home, struggling with all of these problems. for the most seniorjudges here in greece, they say it�*s like history repeating. with more than 30 years of experience, shukria has witnessed the rise of the taliban before in the mid—1990s. translation: this is the second time we have experienced a taliban takeover. i was a judge when they first came to power. back then, first to be ousted
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from society were female judges. do you think the fight for equality for afghan women is over? translation: the women of afghanistan _ are not the women of 20 years ago. those women who protested when the taliban first arrived, asking for their rights, asking for an education. today, every daughter of our country is on her feet. everyone i�*ve met here reminds me of myself more than 20 years ago. how me and my family left afghanistan. but i see a clear difference among the older and the younger generation of women. the older ones have seen taliban come and go before. but for the younger one, it�*s still a shock and they seem more hopeless. nargis is one of the new generation of female judges. for the last two years, she served in a family court. translation: there are two things which caused me the most pain. -
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one is the family i left behind. the other is women, like me, who were working, _ and girls who want to study. this bothers me the most. on the return of women to work and all girls to school, the taliban say they are working on a plan, but need time to ensure their security. however, the women here say they do not trust the taliban. they say they will keep on fighting for their own freedom and the rights of all women in afghanistan. translation: now, in afghanistan, i it would be impossible for women i to progress whilst - the taliban are in power and to hold on to all they've . achieved in the past 20 years. zarghuna kargar, bbc news, athens. let�*s return to our top story.
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the queen will not be attending the climate conference, cop26. she had been due to attend the evening reception on monday. she will still deliver an address to the assembled delegates via a recorded video message. helena wilkinson is in windsor. the queen has been advised by her doctors to rest as much as possible at windsor castle.— at windsor castle. yes, that's ri . ht, at windsor castle. yes, that's right. we _ at windsor castle. yes, that's right. we had _ at windsor castle. yes, that's right, we had that _ at windsor castle. yes, that's l right, we had that confirmation at windsor castle. yes, that's - right, we had that confirmation from buckingham palace in the last hour and a half or so, confirming that her majesty will not, as you say, be attending the climate summit cop26. she had been due to travel and host an evening on monday with delegates there. it would have been a huge event and probably quite exhausting for the queen, given that she has spent, or last wednesday spent, a night in hospital, and she has taken the advice by doctors that have given her that advised that she needs to continue to rest. we had
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the statement which said that the queen, her majesty had regretfully decided that she will no longer travel to glasgow to attend the evening reception on monday, and i think it is possible, the queen regretfully has decided, so the event would have been something she would have been absolutely wanted to attend. his son, prince charles, is going, we know her grandson, prince william, will be there, but clearly the queen is now following continuing to follow doctors�* advice that she needs to carry on getting some rest. as i say, she did spend a night in hospital in central on wednesday, for what were described as preliminary investigations. we didn�*t have any more information from the palace about exactly what those tests were concerned with, and i suspect we wouldn�*t have got any more detail anyway because of course there is that tricky balance in terms of privacy of the queen in
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terms of privacy of the queen in terms of privacy of the queen in terms of her medical details and also balancing that with the public interest in the health of the monarch. so we know from the palace that the queen will no longer to travel to glasgow for cop26. she was meant to be housed in that event on monday. the queen is said to be regretfully deciding not to go to glasgow and also her majesty is said to be disappointed. she will, however, maryam, take part in a different way, a pre—recorded video message that will be played to delegates at the climate summit conference next week. but the queen continuing to rest, we did see her earlier on today at windsor castle, and the good news is that she was carrying out her first official engagements. she had virtual meetings at windsor castle, and if you saw the pictures, the queen was looking very well, smiling, clearly pleased to be getting back to work,
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getting back to her duties. but obviously following this news this evening, she clearly needs further rest. . ., ~ , ., evening, she clearly needs further rest. . . ~' , ., , evening, she clearly needs further rest. . ., ~ , ., , . rest. helena, thank you very much. helena wilkinson _ rest. helena, thank you very much. helena wilkinson in _ rest. helena, thank you very much. helena wilkinson in windsor. - when world leaders gather for that crucial climate summit in glasgow next month, the focus will be on the world�*s biggest polluters to offer greater commitments to limit global warming. a few of them will be particularly closely watched. that�*s because four territories are responsible for more than half of the world�*s emissions — china, the united states, europe and india. india produces more than 6% of co2. in the latest in his series of climate profiles, my colleague ros atkins looks at what india is doing about it. time is running out to cut emissions, and all of the biggest emitters have a role to play in responding to this. with a population of 1.4 billion, india�*s next move matters. we need such action at high speed, on a large scale, and with a global scope.
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we in india are doing our part. that may be, but since 1990 india�*s emissions have risen sharply. that�*s directly related to the transformation of its economy. india still has 100 million people do not have access to electricity. and we're talking about still a quarter of people are facing poverty. so in that situation, with a lot of infrastructure still to be built, the development deficit is huge, which means emissions are going to increase. and they have done. india is one of the biggest emitters. but look at its emissions per person, and you get a different story. india�*s per capita co2 emissions are 1.9 tonnes per person. compare that to 7.1 for china or 5.5 tonnes for the uk. now, unlike the eu and the us,
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india doesn�*t have targets to reduce its overall emissions. instead, its target for 2030 is relative. it�*s committed to slow the increase in emissions linked to economic growth. and because india�*s economy is growing, that target means india�*s co2 emissions will grow too. now, the blue line here shows india�*s on course to emit less than its target. climate analysts, though, want india to do more. they say it must follow this yellow track to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees. but there�*s resistance to take on more. the indian ministerfor climate change said recently, "we should not be shifting goalposts and setting new benchmarks for global climate ambition." now, there may be a desire for consistency. but the government is aware setting harder targets will be, well, harder. this is why. india�*s coal belt helps power this vast nation. more than two thirds of the country�*s energy production still depends on it. such is the demand that the country�*s planning on building
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or expanding dozens of mines in the coming years and also plans to import coal. and the demand that rajini vaidyanathan describes connects to india�*s economic development. to some, this is non—negotiable. india cannot live without coal. our country is a developing country. coal is one of the major resources for the indians. if we stop the coal production under pressure of the world community, then how can we maintain our livelihoods? the answer may lie in moving from one abundant resource to another, from coal to sunshine. it is cheaper to build a solarfarm in india than anywhere else on the planet. india wants 40% of its electricity capacity from non—fossil fuels by 2030, its expanding output to a50 gigawatts. but it has a long way to go. now at present only, 100 gigawatts
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of installed renewable energy is being produced in the country, and definitely it is much behind the targets and the need. india argues it can only hit these targets with financial support from developed countries. let�*s hear from the campaigner harjeet singh again. finance is absolutely key. this is where we don't see the international community really coming forward. the numbers you see are not real numbers. we are stuck with that $100 billion. but we know we need trillions of dollars. where is that kind of money? it's not coming through. and while the developing and developed world manoeuvre over funding, 2030 remains a key year. by then, india wants to radically increase its carbon sink to absorb more co2. india aims to plant ten billion trees to do this. and for all its undoubted challenges, some, including the us, see india as an example of how the developing world can address poverty and climate change.
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here�*s john kerry again. india is a world leader in demonstrating economic development and clean energy is not a zero—sum choice, one or the other. you can do them both at the same time. perhaps this is right. if the world could match india�*s emissions per person, global emissions would be far lower. but there are tensions in india�*s approach that remain unresolved. this is prime minister narendra modi again. our lifestyle is still rooted in sustainable traditional practices. a guiding philosophy of back to basic must be an important pillar. the problem is that as developing countries lift their people out of poverty, back to basics is rarely part of it. as people gain wealth, they travel more, buy more, consume more. and the economies that create their wealth are industrialising. all of this creates emissions.
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if india can develop and cut emissions, it will create a blueprint for many countries. but it�*s not there yet. let�*s turn to the ongoing debate about how social media companies deal with hate and misinformation on their platforms. frances haugen, known as the facebook whistle—blower, has told inquiries in the us and now in the uk that facebook prioritises its profits over the safety of the public, suggesting that it allows hate and misinformation to spread on its platforms because it leads to higher engagement and as a result, more revenue. facebook has denied those claims, pointing to the billions it�*s invested into combatting hate speech and misinformation. well, eric schmidt is a former ceo of google, and he told the bbc that tech companies are very aware of the amount of harmful content on their platforms. so the first thing to know about the
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big tech companies is that they will measure everything, so i was not surprised about the leaks and so forth from facebook. i was not, of course, at facebook, but this is stuff that they should have dealt with, and the problem now is governments are going to try to regulate this. part of the problem is that the systems are ai praised and driven by objectives, and if your objective is to maximise revenue and attention, you maximise outrage, and i think you are seeing that cycle, and that is what we are all reacting to. it is not at all obvious to me how you stop that, except, for example, by saying that you need a diversity of points of views in your feed, you need a diversity of points of views in yourfeed, maybe you need a diversity of points of views in your feed, maybe you could do search ranking and those kinds of things. facebook are not the only company being grilled by politicians. the heads of snapchat, tiktok and youtube faced questioning today in the us by a senate panel on child safety. it�*s the first time tiktok, which is particularly popular
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among younger users, has testified on capitol hill. here�*s some of what michael beckerman, tiktok�*s head of public policy in the americas, had to say. when it comes to protecting minors, we work to create age—appropriate experiences for teens throughout their development. we have proactively built privacy and safety protections with this in mind. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom.
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in the uk, millions of public sector workers will get a pay rise next year. the government says it will lift the pay freeze introduced last november. nurses, teachers and the armed forces are among those who will benefit. here�*s our political editor, laura kuenssberg. it is nearly budget time and there are plenty of vows and pledges around. before he is even back on the steps with the red box tomorrow, the chancellor has already come up with a long list of what sound like goodies. after the shock of the pandemic it seems the economy is returning to something like normal with more vigour than expected. but the politician who wants the red box for labour says check the terms and conditions. will these pay rises much the rising cost of living with inflation, which look set to reach four or even 5%? and second, where does this money come from? will it come from the departmental budgets, or will the chancellor pay for new money to pay for this welcome increase
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in public sector pay? the cash for extra wages will come out of each department�*s pot of money, rather than any extra from number 11, and the size of any wage rise is not set yet. the pay review bodies for nurses, police and teachers will go away and consider over the next few months what is the appropriate recommendations to government. they will then recommend it to the chancellor, and he will announce that early next year. we will not know for months how much extra teachers, firefighters, nurses or anyone else whose wages are paid by the taxpayer will actually get. and we will not know until tomorrow how much in total the chancellor wants to spend on the different parts of the public sector, whether that is education, defence, care or anything else. so much of what we have heard so far from the chancellor is political signalling, and it is the small print when he is but the chancellor has chosen to warm up for
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his big day with a canine audience. he may encounter a less relaxed one in the morning. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story: buckingham palace has announced queen elizabeth won�*t be travelling to glasgow next week for a major climate summit on the advice of her doctors. here in the uk, the government has announced a climbdown in the face of a rebellion by its own mps on the subject of sewage. it�*s going to strengthen rules discouraging water companies from pumping sewage into seas and rivers, after more than 20 conservatives backed an amendment challenging the government�*s original plan. here�*s the environment secretary, george eustice. in light of the amendment debated last week, we will statutory footing, so there will be a
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statutory requirement on water companies to create those progressive lines and use of storm overflows. we listened to the debate in parliament, so we will write what is already government policy into the statutes to give people that they seek. this is what campaigners were worried about — untreated sewage being released into british waters, a threat to wildlife and humans. these pictures of langstone harbour in hampshire gained huge traction online. chris pearsal filmed the footage. i launched my drone from about 100 metres over there, and once i was flying over the top looking at the screen, i just couldn�*t believe what i was seeing. the general reaction from people on social media who�*ve seen the film now, they really are astonished at quite how much of this is happening, and it is happening right along our coastline. and quite simply, it needs to stop. conservative philip dunne, who chairs the environmental audit
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committee, was one of those who rebelled against the government. here he is giving his reasons. we do know it would cost multi billions and take many, many years. thing there has to be a balance, recognising that it�*s not going to be possible to fix this problem overnight and that�*s really what the government was concerned about and therefore what i�*m trying to do is to work with the government and other colleagues in parliament to try to come up with something which maintains a duty on water companies, but wouldn�*t necessarily allow it to be interpreted as all having to be done overnight. well, since the government announced its change of heart, the opposition labour party has had this to say. have you seen that the government has u—turned on their decision to allow raw sewage to be discharged into the nation�*s rivers? it looks to me like it�*s the health of conservative party polling, not the health of our rivers, that has been at the front and centre of government ministers as they have u—turned today.
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you can read more about this story and more on our website at bbc.com/news. japan�*s princess mako has married a commoner and left the royal family. there was no shinto ceremony or big reception for the niece of the emperor. instead, she and herfiance went to the equivalent of the tokyo register office. the marriage was delayed by almost four years amid intense scrutiny and criticism of the match which took a mental toll on the princess. from tokyo, here�*s rupert wingfield—hayes. no grand wedding ceremony, no cheering crowds, just a very formal goodbye from princess mako to her parents. at first, her sister does the same, but then she steps forward
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for a very un—japanese hug. it was the most touching moment in what has been a strange day. a few minutes later, the now former princess was sitting before the media with her new husband, kei komuro. ever since their engagement, mr komuro�*s humble origins have been the target of japanese tabloids. in tokyo, around 100 protesters gathered today, still demanding the marriage be called off. "we�*re marching today because we don�*t want the imperial family to be involved in crimes," this woman says. the main accusation is that mr komuro�*s widowed mother owes £25,000 to a former lover. but the media frenzy has even extended to him daring to wear his hair ina pony tail. in britain, the fact that princess catherine is descended from coal miners is no longer a barrier to her one day becoming queen,
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but when it comes to the family that live in the palace behind my here, attitudes are still incredibly conservative, and a surprisingly large number ofjapanese people appear to have looked at mr komuro and his family background and decided he isjust not suitable to marry a princess. but such attitudes could be driving the japanese imperialfamily towards extinction. princess mako�*s departure today leaves the family withjust 17 members — only four of whom are male. let�*s just recap the news that�*s broken this evening. the queen will not be attending the cop26 climate summit. in a statement, queen elizabeth said she�*d regretfully decided not to attend an evening reception scheduled at the glasgow event next monday. the queen, who�*s 95, recently spent a night in hospital, and was advised by doctors to rest, although she�*s since resumed light duties at windsor castle.
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you are watching bbc news, thank you so much for your company. bye—bye from me. there are two main elements to the weather — rain and warmth. this was a lovely picture taken in durham. the temperature in north east england was 17 degrees this afternoon. the average this time of the year is nearer 11. it is so mild because the air is coming from the tropics. the rain is focussed mainly on that front there and that will hang around across western areas for the next few days and bring some rain to the southern uplands and the pennines. some flooding is likely. we have rain mainly affecting scotland and that will move south across northern ireland, over the irish sea and into the north—west of england. some brisk winds tonight
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and a lot of cloud. milder than last night in the east. temperatures around 1a degrees. we have still have this zone of cloud and rain, and some rain could affect northern ireland and push into the central lowlands of scotland. towards the north—west of scotland some heavy showers, south of the rain band some sunshine and temperatures higher than today. very mild again. now that rain in the southern uplands by the end of wednesday, there could be 90 millimetres of rain, maybe double that in the the high ground in the peak district, and that is likely to lead to some flooding during wednesday. with more rain to come overnight and into thursday as that front hangs around, it could bring more rain into northern ireland and a wetter start for scotland on thursday. that rain clears from the north—west of scotland and northern ireland and showers following, more rain though for the south—west of scotland, western parts of england and into wales this time on thursday.
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but ahead of that, through the midlands and the south east, it is dry and mild. that rain is still around into friday. the details are not going to change, and we could see some rain in the east by this stage, and the heavier rain moving away and it turns more showery and western parts begin to dry off. the temperatures by the end of the week will be a little bit lower.
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this is bbc news. i�*m ben mundy. the headlines at eight... a virtual audience today for the queen — but the palace announces she will not attend the global climate summit in glasgow. water companies will have to reduce the flow of raw sewage into rivers and beaches after the government bows to growing pressure from campaigners. another stark warning ahead of the climate change summit in glasgow — the un says current global plans to cut emissions fall short of what�*s needed. cheering. and one of the great managers in scottish football — walter smith — has died at the age of 73. and coming up in half an hour, we ve got a special programme looking at the impact of covid on businesses.

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