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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 26, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. i'm rebecca jones. millions of people across the uk are in line for a pay rise next year, with an end to the year—long public sector pay freeze expected in tomorrow's budget. australia, one of the world's most criticised polluters, has formally adopted a target to reach net zero emissions by 2050. naturalist and broadcaster sir david attenborough warns world leaders preparing for the cop26 summit in glasgow that they must take action to tackle climate change before we run out of time. on a world scale, when is it too late? but it is difficult to see... if we don't act now,
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it will be too late. the uk's parliament standards committee says the conservative mp and former cabinet minister owen paterson repeatedly used his position as an mp to promote companies who paid him — he denies wrongdoing. and the fairy tale royal wedding injapan — but the couple celebrate without the usual pomp and circumstance. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. millions of uk public sector workers are in line for a pay rise next year after it was announced the chancellor is to end the year—long pay freeze. the move will affect at least
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1.3 million public sector workers. a temporary pause in pay progression was imposed last november because of the impact of the pandemic on the economy. ahead of tomorrow's budget, the chancellor says it is right that public sector wages go up because he says the economy is firmly back on track. those to benefit include teachers, nurses and police officers. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. millions of public sector workers have faced a pay freeze this year. the government had said there wasn't enough money to fund higher wages because of emergency spending during the pandemic. but now things are looking brighter. tomorrow, the chancellor will confirm that more than 5 million public sector workers are in line for a pay rise. we want to end low pay in government by the next election, by 2024 or so. we also, as well as giving the public sector that pay rise,
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ending the pay freeze, we are also increasing the national living wage by 6.6% to £9 50 to make sure the lowest paid in society get a pay rise. here's what we know so far. the announcement will cover a range of professions, including nurses, teachers, the armed forces. some of the changes will applyjust to england, because pay in a number of areas is controlled by scotland, wales and northern ireland. the pay freeze will officially end in april next year. but we don't know yet what the pay rises will be. independent pay review bodies will make recommendations in the new year and then we'll get a lot more detail about exactly what this means for the money in people's pockets. the government really need to make a statement and notjust say we are getting rid of the pay freeze. what they need to say is we are prepared to put a significant amount of money
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into the public sector to fund a decent pay rise that will make catch—up for the last year. the government has talked a lot recently about higher wages. the prime minister and chancellor think it is key to rebuilding the economy and to addressing fears about the cost of living. the government also confirmed yesterday that a living wage for people over 23 will go up to £9.50 an hourfrom april. that means an extra £1000 a year for people who earn the minimum wage. but prices are going up and millions are facing higher energy bills, among other pressures. taxes will also go up in a few months�* time to fund the nhs. and some have warned that these pay increases won't be quite as good as they sound when everything else is factored in. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. we will be speaking to the general secretary and chief executive of the
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royal college of nursing in the next hour, so stay with us for that. one of the world's most criticised polluters, australia, has formally adopted a net zero emissions target by 2050. many critics say that australia — which is the world's second biggest coal exporter — has been too slow on climate action despite suffering bushfires, floods and drought partly blamed on climate change. the prime minister, scott morrison, made the pledge after bargaining with mps within his government. but he said australia's plan does not include ending its massive fossil fuel sectors. australians want action on climate change, they are taking action on climate change, but they also want to protect theirjobs and their livelihoods, they also want to keep the cost of living down and they also want to protect the australian way of life, especially in rural and regional areas. here's our correspondent,
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shaimaa khalil, in sydney. i think, you know, the fact that it has taken so long, the fact that it is so close to the wire with only days before he heads to the cop26 and now he is able to take that commitment to them just shows you that this is not smooth sailing, that this is a very politically divisive issue here in australia and this has only been achieved after months of political wrangling with the government's junior coalition partner the nationals. they are the ones representing electorates in regional and rural australia, this is where the mining industry is, where many of the carbon intensive industries are, and they needed their support to be able to commit to net zero by 2050. but i think, yes, the fact that scott morrison can now stand publicly and for the first time in no uncertain terms say that australia is committed to net zero by 2050 is of course a step forward, but all the while i think it was
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interesting that he was talking about the australian way of life, that this is going to be done the australian way, addressing rural and regional australia directly and saying this will not mean closing down coal or gas production or exports, so this is going to be done through technology, not taxes. all of that shows you that there is a very fine balance to strike between the global climate responsibilities but also the political standing here. tim buckley is from the institute for energy economics and financial analysis — he joins us from sydney. welcome to bbc news. good evening from sydney. this welcome to bbc news. good evening from sydney-— from sydney. this seems like a significant _ from sydney. this seems like a significant moment, _ from sydney. this seems like a significant moment, is - from sydney. this seems like a significant moment, is it? - from sydney. this seems like a significant moment, is it? i- from sydney. this seems like a l significant moment, is it? i hate from sydney. this seems like a - significant moment, is it? i hate to be like this, _ significant moment, is it? i hate to be like this, but _ significant moment, is it? i hate to be like this, but the _ significant moment, is it? i hate to
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be like this, but the morrison - be like this, but the morrison government has announced an embarrassingly hollow plan for net zero emissions by 2050 with absolutely no credibility or actions or new policies to actually support their new claim. 50 or new policies to actually support their new claim.— their new claim. so your view is that there _ their new claim. so your view is that there is _ their new claim. so your view is that there is a _ their new claim. so your view is that there is a plan _ their new claim. so your view is that there is a plan but - their new claim. so your view is that there is a plan but no - their new claim. so your view is| that there is a plan but no detail to how it will be achieved? correct, it is predicated _ to how it will be achieved? correct, it is predicated on _ to how it will be achieved? correct, it is predicated on unspecified - it is predicated on unspecified technology breakthroughs, it relies on international upsets with no budget implications, it claims credit for actions that our state government policies have put into place under which the federal government has been actively undermining for eight years in a row. what is clearly globally needed is action this decade, tangible action, tangible investment in new technology and a break from fossil fuels and yet the morrison government only last week announced they were going to underwrite 1800 and $50 billion bailout of the australian fossil fuel industry —— a
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$250 billion bailout. unfortunately for me this is a hollow publicity stunt before cop26. but for me this is a hollow publicity stunt before cop26.— for me this is a hollow publicity stunt before cop26. but it has to be somethin: stunt before cop26. but it has to be something that _ stunt before cop26. but it has to be something that one _ stunt before cop26. but it has to be something that one of— stunt before cop26. but it has to be something that one of the _ stunt before cop26. but it has to be something that one of the world's i something that one of the world's most criticised polluters is at least adopting this net zero target by 2050, it is moving the dial? sorry, i respectfully disagree, what changes the tylers when countries like china announced net zero targets at the cabinet china, as we saw this week, endorses a 37 point action plan to drive home development of new technologies, finance and decarbonising the industry with a clear—cut all of government, industry and economy approach and it fortunately in my view australia remains a total global laggard and we are leaving it to countries like china, india and america to do the heavy lifting. as
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an australian i am unfortunately embarrassed by our country and our federal government. 15 embarrassed by our country and our federal government.— federal government. is your embarrassment _ federal government. is your embarrassment shared - federal government. is your embarrassment shared by l federal government. is your l embarrassment shared by the federal government. is your - embarrassment shared by the wider australian public or is there broadly support for scott morrison and the move? the broadly support for scott morrison and the move?— broadly support for scott morrison and the move? the vast ma'ority of australians — and the move? the vast ma'ority of australians are i and the move? the vast ma'ority of australians are adamantly _ and the move? the vast majority of australians are adamantly calling i australians are adamantly calling for aggressive action on climate change. the narrative in australia incorporateds, finance and the community is that the opportunities for australia to be a world leader are very clear, the investment, employment, the export opportunities are huge, the financial and environmental costs of not action in this is crippling to our economy and future but unfortunately the morrison government is entirely lacking, as surely as the world's biggest exporter of coking coal, the second—largest exporter of thermal coal and unfortunately the morrison
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government is doing everything it can to try to prop up and prolong the life of those fossil fuels rather than embracing the huge opportunities. tim rather than embracing the huge opportunities-— rather than embracing the huge o- ortunities. �* a , opportunities. tim buckley, we will let ou aet opportunities. tim buckley, we will let you get to _ opportunities. tim buckley, we will let you get to bed, _ opportunities. tim buckley, we will let you get to bed, many _ opportunities. tim buckley, we will let you get to bed, many thanks . opportunities. tim buckley, we willj let you get to bed, many thanks for talking to on bbc news. and we'll have more on the climate crisis later in the programme — with a warning from the veteran broadcaster, sir david attenborough, for all world leaders to act now at to the cop26 summit. let's return now to the news that the public sector pay freeze is to end in the uk — we can speak now to pat cullen, interim general secretary and chief executive of the uk's royal college of nursing. good to have you with us, welcome to bbc news. do you welcome the announcement of pay rises for public sector workers in the offing? than? sector workers in the offing? any news of a pay _ sector workers in the offing? any news of a pay rise _ sector workers in the offing? jiffy news of a pay rise for nursing staff so they can care for their patients and attract them back into the nhs and attract them back into the nhs andindeed and attract them back into the nhs and indeed social care is very welcome, but we will wait with
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caution to see what happens tomorrow. that is really important. it can't just tomorrow. that is really important. it can'tjust be another empty promise, it can'tjust be another publicity stunt headline, we need an announcement tomorrow but in fact they will treat nurses decently and indeed all health care staff aren't really show that through a significant pay rise which i think every single one of them deserves and more. ~ ,, _ every single one of them deserves and more. ~ , and more. when you say significant -a rise, and more. when you say significant pay rise. how _ and more. when you say significant pay rise, how much _ and more. when you say significant pay rise, how much do _ and more. when you say significant pay rise, how much do you - and more. when you say significant pay rise, how much do you think i pay rise, how much do you think nurses' pay should go up? £311" nurses' pay should go up? our osition nurses' pay should go up? our position with _ nurses' pay should go up? our position with our _ nurses' pay should go up? oi" position with our nearly half—million wonderful nursing staff in our membership, they have made it clear they deserve and i absolutely believe that a 12.5% pay rise. from 2010 there has been £5,000 wiped off every single nursing staff's salary, a £5,000 was taken off any of our
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salaries i think we would find it very difficult to make ends meet, thatis very difficult to make ends meet, that is what our nurses are telling us, then with the announcement that the increase in national insurance, is it any wonder thousands of nurses are leaving the health service and social care and more to come? it is a really worrying time notjust for nurses but for patients who absolutely deserve nursing staff to be there to provide the care and treatment that our population has paid for years and years, they absolutely deserted.- paid for years and years, they absolutely deserted. nurses were not included in the _ absolutely deserted. nurses were not included in the pay _ absolutely deserted. nurses were not included in the pay freeze _ absolutely deserted. nurses were not included in the pay freeze of - included in the pay freeze of november 2020, they were offered a 3% rise in the summer. i know the royal college of nursing is working to ballot for industrial action on that. what is the latest on that consultation with your members? sadly our members feel they have
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been pushed to that position. what i want to say, having led strike action in northern ireland the first time in 105 years in our wonderful college's history, every nurse moves to that position with a heavy heart, and like what they did in northern ireland, they do that because they believe the government is not listening, and it is notjust listening, and it is notjust listening to the nurses put to the patient and trying to bring the nhs back from the brink, unfortunately we have now had to move to a position where a cross scotland, wales and in england we are moving to indicative ballot with our members, scotland has already started and we will start the process in wales and england on the 4th process in wales and england on the 11th of november, that is where we will take soundings from our members, we are remember led organisation, we will be asking members very clearly what they wish to do next to try to save us from those troubles. fiat to do next to try to save us from those troubles.— to do next to try to save us from those troubles. pat cullen from the r0 al those troubles. pat cullen from the royal college _ those troubles. pat cullen from the royal college of— those troubles. pat cullen from the royal college of nursing, _ those troubles. pat cullen from the royal college of nursing, thank- those troubles. pat cullen from the |
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royal college of nursing, thank you. former uk cabinet minister 0wen paterson is facing the prospect of a 30—day suspension from parliament after he was found to have breached commons rules on lobbying. he denies any wrongdoing. 0ur political correspondent ione wells joins us now. fill us in on the background and what has emerged?— fill us in on the background and what has emerged? today are reports came out by — what has emerged? today are reports came out by the _ what has emerged? today are reports came out by the standards _ what has emerged? today are reports came out by the standards committee and parliament's standards and pa rliament�*s standards commissioner saying and parliament's standards commissioner saying the conservative and p 0wen paterson, a former cabinet minister, used his position as an mp to promote companies who pay ten. the report said he was a paid consultant to two companies and used his position as an mp to advocate for these companies to different government bodies including the food standards agency but also ministers at the department for international development. the report says he breached the aunties' code of conduct by using his parliamentary office to host about
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25 business meetings but also by writing letters relating to business interests on house of commons headed paper. the report notes that was no immediate financial benefits either of these companies gained from 0wen paterson's involvement but it said that in the longer term financial benefit could have been obtained as a result of his actions and even in the short—term those companies could have secured things like meetings they would not have otherwise had without the mp's involvement. the standards committee has recommended in line with other similar offences in line with other similar offences in the pasty be suspended from the house of commons for 30 sitting days. mps are likely to debate that. if that were to happen could potentially face a recall position which could lead to a by—election in his seats, because mps suspended officially for more than ten sitting days by the standards committee automatically face a recall
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petition. mr paterson has very strongly denied any wrongdoing and put out a very damning statement where he said he was put on skill to buy the commissioner without being spoken to and no proper investigation was undertaken, he also said he was raising very serious issues with some government bodies including what he says was the fact that milk and ham were contaminated with carcinogenic prohibited substances and he added he is not guilty and a fair process would exonerate him. he stated in his statement in response to this report that he lost his beloved wife of a0 years and claims his process was a major contributing factor. 0wen paterson spoke openly about the loss of his wife rose earlier this year, she took her own life last year. he has strongly denied the report and contended findings but to reiterate the reporters found he repeatedly used his position as an mp to try to promote these two companies and he broke the mps' code
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of conduct on numerous occasions too. ., ~' , ., of conduct on numerous occasions too. . ~ i. ., of conduct on numerous occasions too. . ~ ., ., , ., ., ~ too. thank you for that update, talk too. thank you for that update, talk to ou too. thank you for that update, talk to you later- — london's metropolitan police is to apologise to the family of two murdered sisters for failings in the way it responded when they were reported missing. an investigation by the independent office for police conduct found that mistakes were made in the case of bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death in a park in north west london in june last year. james reynolds reports. a6—year—old bibaa henry and her 27—year—old sister nicole smallman failed to return from bibaa's birthday party in fryent park in wembley injune last year. they were reported missing but, as their mother mina reflected later, the family struggled to get the police to take the case seriously. the sisters' family organised their own search party and they soon found the bodies in the park. the police watchdog now concludes that information about the sisters'
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disappearance was recorded inaccurately and that call handlers were dismissive. 0ne officer and two members of police staff will now face action. in a statement, the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick said that had police responded better, they may have prevented causing the family immeasurable pain. she added, "i am very sorry that the level of service we provided fell short." the sisters' family, here with supporters at a vigil earlier this year, has called the police's lack of initial response shameful and shocking. injuly this year, a 19—year—old, danyal hussein, was found guilty of the sisters' murders. james reynolds, bbc news. in a statement, the mother of the two women, mina smallman, responded to the metropolitan police. she said...
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there has been a sharp rise in the number of police officers and staff in england and wales who've been accused of abusing their positions for sexual purposes, according to the police watchdog. last year, the independent office for police conduct investigated 70 people — in 2016 that figure was 10. the most serious, we have serious sexual offending and at the other end, we have behaviours such as unwanted contact, excessive messaging, that sort of thing. and what this tells us is that, you know, we are seeing that and where it's been reported, we are investigating it and
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bringing sanctions for that. ajudge in the united states has ruled that prince andrew must answer questions in a civil sex assault case in the us by mid—july next year. virginia giuffre has accused the duke of york of sexually assaulting her in new york in 2001 — an allegation he's consistently denied. districtjudge lewis kaplan has said out—of—court testimony in the case must be submitted by 1athjuly 2022. let's go back to the uk's budget now — the chancellor rishi sunak will set out tomorrow how the government will spend our money, and how much will be taken in taxes. but how are businesses coping with the ongoing economic upheaval caused by the coronavirus pandemic? our business correspondent katie prescott is in bristol in western england, looking at the impact of the covid—19 on the economy there.
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wejoin her now. good morning. welcome back to st nicholas market in the heart of bristol, home to lots of independent traders, everything from glassware to jewellery to greeting cards, and the businesses here, as you say, have had a really torrid time throughout the pandemic, like so many retailers, having had to close in july and government support in order to keep going, things like the furlough scheme and government loans, and what they are telling me now as they are very concerned about potential for the uk government to reintroduce restrictions on things like working from home. being in the centre of the city they are very dependent on office workers and people coming into the centre, they are very worried that could stop again. one sector very hard hit by the pandemic was the hotel sector, we cannot speak to the owner of the
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beric lodge hotel in bristol. —— we can now speak to. reflecting on the last year, what has it been like running a hotel?— last year, what has it been like running a hotel? very stressful, at the beginning _ running a hotel? very stressful, at the beginning of— running a hotel? very stressful, at the beginning of the _ running a hotel? very stressful, at the beginning of the pandemic - running a hotel? very stressful, at the beginning of the pandemic in l the beginning of the pandemic in february— the beginning of the pandemic in february when everything started to hit february when everything started to bit we _ february when everything started to hit we were losing all of our bookings— hit we were losing all of our bookings and money left right and centre _ bookings and money left right and centre because it is only me that in my hotel. — centre because it is only me that in my hotel, basically. we sat down with our— my hotel, basically. we sat down with our 29 — my hotel, basically. we sat down with our 29 star fajr said, the only way we _ with our 29 star fajr said, the only way we can— with our 29 star fajr said, the only way we can survive is if we do health— way we can survive is if we do health wages and we can survive another— health wages and we can survive another four months, we have. health wages and we can survive anotherfour months, we have. —— if we do _ anotherfour months, we have. —— if we do have — anotherfour months, we have. —— if we do have wages. another four months, we have. -- if we do have wages.— we do have wages. what was the reaction? they — we do have wages. what was the reaction? they wanted _ we do have wages. what was the reaction? they wanted to - we do have wages. what was the reaction? they wanted to do - we do have wages. what was the reaction? they wanted to do it, | we do have wages. what was the i reaction? they wanted to do it, one erson reaction? they wanted to do it, one person said. — reaction? they wanted to do it, one person said. can — reaction? they wanted to do it, one person said. can i— reaction? they wanted to do it, one person said, can i still— reaction? they wanted to do it, one person said, can i still buy - reaction? they wanted to do it, one person said, can i still buy my - person said, can i still buy my house? — person said, can i still buy my house? i_ person said, can i still buy my house? i said, yes, we will make it through— house? i said, yes, we will make it through this — house? i said, yes, we will make it through this. it was really humbling, we made it through and it has been _ humbling, we made it through and it has been a _ humbling, we made it through and it has been a massive learning curve.
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did you _ has been a massive learning curve. did you have — has been a massive learning curve. did you have to take advantage of some of the government schemes, did you furlough your staff? yes. some of the government schemes, did you furlough your staff?— you furlough your staff? yes, we did not lose any — you furlough your staff? yes, we did not lose any members _ you furlough your staff? yes, we did not lose any members of— you furlough your staff? yes, we did not lose any members of staff, - you furlough your staff? yes, we did not lose any members of staff, they| not lose any members of staff, they all came _ not lose any members of staff, they all came back as we reopened, and white _ all came back as we reopened, and while we _ all came back as we reopened, and while we were closed, we close the hotel— while we were closed, we close the hotel throughout the pandemic, five members _ hotel throughout the pandemic, five members of staff were kept on, we were talking to our customers and staff and _ were talking to our customers and staff and trying to make everybody feel reassured we were still therefore then. look up what is businesslike now? amazing, it went through— businesslike now? amazing, it went through the roof when we first opened — through the roof when we first openedin through the roof when we first opened in may. since the rise of the covid _ opened in may. since the rise of the covid cases— opened in may. since the rise of the covid cases we are seeing quite a few cancellations, mainly with afternoon teas, restaurant and room bookings _ afternoon teas, restaurant and room bookings so — afternoon teas, restaurant and room bookings so we are seeing that coming — bookings so we are seeing that coming back in again at the moment. i coming back in again at the moment. i keep— coming back in again at the moment. i keep hearing from businesses that costs are increasing, energy bills is a key one at the moment, what are you experiencing? fill"
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is a key one at the moment, what are you experiencing?_ you experiencing? our living costs have one you experiencing? our living costs have gone up _ you experiencing? our living costs have gone up by — you experiencing? our living costs have gone up by 696, _ you experiencing? our living costs have gone up by 696, metre, - you experiencing? our living costs i have gone up by 696, metre, literally have gone up by 6%, metre, literally everything _ have gone up by 6%, metre, literally everything has rocketed sky high. we are having _ everything has rocketed sky high. we are having to look at how we do everything, we are doing lots. it will be _ everything, we are doing lots. it will be quite a time for us, i think — will be quite a time for us, i think. ., ~ will be quite a time for us, i think. . ~ , ., , will be quite a time for us, i think. . ~ i. , . ., ,, think. thank you very much. perhaps one more thing _ think. thank you very much. perhaps one more thing the _ think. thank you very much. perhaps one more thing the chancellor- think. thank you very much. perhaps one more thing the chancellor will. one more thing the chancellor will be tackling in the budget tomorrow will be cost rises businesses are seeing, like energy bills. we will be hearing more from businesses in bristol throughout the day. thank ou, bristol throughout the day. thank you. katie. _ bristol throughout the day. thank you, katie. see— bristol throughout the day. thank you, katie. see you _ bristol throughout the day. thank you, katie. see you later. - senators in brazil will vote later to approve a report into president bolsonaro s handling of covid—19. the report recommends that the president be tried for a list of crimes including misuse of public funds and crimes against humanity. 0ur south america correspondent katy watson reports. it feels like the calm before the storm in brazil's capital, a chance to catch a breath ahead of another week of political drama.
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just a few days ago, the world's media descended on brasilia to hear bolsonaro being accused of serious crimes, together with nearly 70 other people. while it has captivated brazil, it has divided people too. no more than the 11 senators running the inquiry. | translation: | think the presidentj made mistakes during the pandemic where he encouraged crowds, he didn't wear a mask, he said things against vaccines, but in terms of proof, it doesn't amount to a crime. but beyond the corridors of power, life carries on. this man has been serving lunch to politicians and civil servants outside the senate fo seven years now. "it won't make any difference," he tells me. "but who am i to say anything? "the politicians are the ones with power. "we can't say anything
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because we are in brasilia. "even if the president is rubbish, we have to say he is good." the inquiry, though, has dented bolsonaro's popularity. all the polls point to that. up until now this has been a political trial, not a criminal one. if the vote passes as expected, it will be up to the federal prosecutor to take on the charges recommended by the report. but the jury is out as to whether this will have any long—term impact onjair bolsonaro in this deeply divided country. we are suffering with fake news, president bolsonaro created his own way of communicating with his electorate that gives to him the possibility to talk his own interpretation of the reality. it is a year until the presidential elections here. that is a very long time in brazilian politics. but can people here forgive and forget the pain this country has been through? katy watson, bbc news, in brasilia.
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dr christopher sabatini is a senior fellow for latin america at chatham house in london. good morning. let's pick up on what was being said about the longer term impact. if president bolsonaro is charged, water in your view happens next? it charged, water in your view happens next? , ., . ., , next? it is not clear, this will probably _ next? it is not clear, this will probably pass _ next? it is not clear, this will probably pass committee, i next? it is not clear, this will probably pass committee, asj next? it is not clear, this will - probably pass committee, as katy watson said, but will break federal prosecutor take it on? he is a supporter of bolsonaro as an ally so it is not clear he will. i am not sure the effect will be that great, as your previous report indicated this is very distant from most people's daily lives. brazilians are facing inflation which is topping out at a pretty high rates, facing economic contraction, growing levels of inequality which is more to the heart of what brazilians really care
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about, and bolsonaro is deeply polarising, his approving two approval ratings are around 20% but he has a core constituency of support, it is difficult to imagine this going anywhere, the report is clearly very damning but whether it will mean anything for his political future beyond what is already occurring is doubtful. you future beyond what is already occurring is doubtful. you seem to su: est, occurring is doubtful. you seem to suggest. please — occurring is doubtful. you seem to suggest, please correct _ occurring is doubtful. you seem to suggest, please correct me - occurring is doubtful. you seem to suggest, please correct me if- occurring is doubtful. you seem to suggest, please correct me if i - occurring is doubtful. you seem to suggest, please correct me if i amj suggest, please correct me if i am wrong, that those calling for his impeachment should not be holding their breath? i impeachment should not be holding their breath?— their breath? i would say that is riaht, i their breath? i would say that is right. i do _ their breath? i would say that is right. i do not— their breath? i would say that is right, i do not think _ their breath? i would say that is right, i do not think there - their breath? i would say that is right, i do not think there will. their breath? i would say that is| right, i do not think there will be impeachment here. the truth is that in the senate, while he has a minority can pull together allies including the president of the senate who is part of a coalition that will support bolsonaro, it is difficult to imagine the opposition rally in support within the senate to push this forward. in the lower
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house he has the majority, effectively. fits house he has the ma'ority, effectivelyfi house he has the ma'ority, effectivel . ~ , ., effectively. as you say, he has a ma'ori effectively. as you say, he has a majority and _ effectively. as you say, he has a majority and therefore _ effectively. as you say, he has a majority and therefore lots - effectively. as you say, he has a majority and therefore lots of i majority and therefore lots of support. in terms of the wider brazilian public, you mentioned his approval ratings although, but if there is, to coin a phrase, gets swept under the carpet, do you think it will go away? —— his approval ratings are low. it will go away? -- his approval ratings are low.— it will go away? -- his approval ratings are low. the other deadline is the october _ ratings are low. the other deadline is the october two _ ratings are low. the other deadline is the october two elections - ratings are low. the other deadline is the october two elections next l is the october two elections next year and of this is the build—up to that. they conceded —— conceivably put together an impeachment and a vote in time to remove him from office anyway that make sense, and would be too expensive and time—consuming? i think this concerns for many of the anti—bolsonaro voters their suspicions that he is incompetent and negligent in his role, but i do not think it convinces lots of core supporters, i think it will affect the election but in a head—to—head contest he will likely be the main
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presidential contender with the former president who is already behind by 20 percentage points. it is not clear it will change either long—term or short—term political context. long-term or short-term political context. ., ., �* context. frankie bridge feel thou~hts context. frankie bridge feel thoughts and _ context. frankie bridge feel thoughts and insights, - context. frankie bridge feel thoughts and insights, dr i thoughts and insights, dr christopher sabatini. —— thank you so much for your thoughts and insights. the headlines on bbc news... millions of people across the uk are in line for a pay rise next year, with an end to the year—long public sector pay freeze, expected in tomorrow's budget. australia, one of the world's most criticised polluters, has formally adopted a target to reach net zero emissions by 2050. naturalist and broadcaster, sir david attenborough, warns world leaders preparing for the cop26 summit in glasgow that they must take action to tackle climate change before we run out of time... on a world scale, when is it too late? but it is difficult to see... if we don't act now, it will be too late.
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the uk's parliamentary watchdog recommends a 30—day suspension for conservative mp 0wen paterson, saying he repeatedly used his position to promote companies that paid him — something mr paterson denies. and the fairytale royal wedding injapan, but the couple celebrate without the usual pomp and circumstance. i want to bring you some sad news that's just come into us here at the bbc. the former rangers, scotland and everton manager, walter smith, has died. he was 73. his death was announced by rangers football club this morning. you can see a tweet. it is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of the former manager, chairman and club legend, walter smith. he won 21 trophies
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over two separate terms at the club, making him one of their most successful managers. therefore, you can absolutely understand why they called him club legend, can't you? he also spent four years at everton and two managing the scotland team. the rangers club chairman, douglas park, has said he embodied everything that a ranger should be. he said his character and leadership was second to none and that he would live long in the memory of everyone that he worked with at the club. that news that the former rangers, scotland and everton football manager, walter smith, has died. at the age of 73. sir david attenborough has called on the world's richest nations to meet their "moral responsibility" by helping the most vulnerable survive the effects of climate change. the 95—year—old naturalist and broadcaster
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called for immediate action to address some of our biggest environmental challenges. he's been speaking to our science editor, david shukman, during the filming of a new documentary series, the green planet. this is a thermal camera. and it will tell me the difference between the surrounding temperature and the temperature in the centre of a daisy flower. the surroundings — 12 degrees. in the centre of the flower — 21. new technology to film the humble daisy. and action, david. at kew gardens in london, we had rare access behind the scenes to the making of green planet. but it looks like you get a lot of enjoyment out of... out of making these programmes. well, they're all old friends, aren't they? that's the nice thing.
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we caught up with david attenborough several times during the filming. and he seemed most passionate about the most ordinary of plants. daisies are things that you decapitate with your lawn mower sort of once a week. but, actually, they are marvellous things. and they move every day. they exploit the sunshine and open to the sunshine. the interesting thing is we now have a camera, which allows us to actually explore the surface of a plant in great detail, so it's like moving into a different landscape. suddenly, this thing is a huge great thing and you suddenly see it for what it is. i have been reporting on climate change, climate science, for nearly 20 years and i have seen some spectacular advances in understanding in that time. what most strikes you about the changes you have seen? i think the devastating fires around the world, in australia and california, all over the place.
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that has brought home the real catastrophe that happens to ordinary people in their secure home. every time i see it on television, i think suppose suddenly now, there were flames coming up, that everything, my life, in my house and everything about it going up in flames. what with that do to you? it would destroy you. when you think of the poorest countries, the people who are likely to be, who are being hardest hit by climate change, and whether their voices are going to be heard at the cop26 summit, are you worried that enough account will be taken of what they're going through? yes, i am very much so. i think it will be really catastrophic if the developed nations of the world, the more powerful nations of the world, simply ignored these problems. do we say, "oh, it's nothing to do with us" and cross our arms? we caused it.
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0ur kind of industrialisation is one of the major factors in producing this change in climate. we have a moral responsibility, even if we didn't cause it, we would have a moral responsibility to do something about thousands of men, women and children who have lost everything, lost everything. can we just go by and say, "it's no business of ours?" you have to believe there are still things to be done about it, and i believe there are. the question is, on a world scale, when is it too late? but it's difficult to see... well, if we don't act now, it will be too late. and we've been saying that for a long time and we've been saying, "what do you mean by now?" we've said, "well,
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in the next ten years" orsomething, and think, "ah, well, in ten years' time, "that's a couple of budgets away, and politicians won't do things." we have to do it now. it's been more than three months since the taliban took kabul, during which a mass release of prisoners took place across afghanistan. hundreds of female afghanjudges remain in hiding, after fleeing from the very men they sent to prison for violent crimes against women. however, in the past few weeks, there has been hope, with the successful evacuation of 26 female judges to greece. the bbcs zarghuna kargar, who herself fled afghanistan during the first taliban takeover in the 1990s, went to meet them. for their security, all the names of thejudges have been changed. translation: it was the worst moment of my life, when i looked at _ my kids whilst leaving my country, i wondered whether i would ever
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get them out of afghanistan alive. under cover of darkness, nabila stepped onto a bus. she was once one of the most influential women of our country but now she was fleeing for her life. translation: it was so hard travelling at night by bus - through the desert, especially with small children. after weeks of living in fear, finally, along with 25 other prominent women, nabila and her young family safely arrived in greece. living in small apartments across the city, the greek authorities provide all these women with food and shelter. shukria is one of the most senior among the group. for her, she says, it's like history repeating. translation: this is i the second time we have experienced a taliban takeover. i was a judge when they first came to power.
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back then, first to be ousted from society were female judges. do you think the fight for equality for afghan women is over? translation: the women of afghanistan are not - the women of 20 years ago. those women who protested when the taliban first arrived, asking for their rights, asking for an education. today, every daughter of our country is on her feet. everyone i've met here reminds me of myself more than 20 years ago. how me and my family left afghanistan. but i see a clear difference among the older and the younger generation of women. the older one have seen taliban come and go before. but, for the younger one, it's still a shock and they seem more hopeless. nargis is one of the new generation of female judges. translation: there are two things which caused me the most pain. - one is the family i left behind. the other is women, - like me, who were working
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and girls who want to study. this bothers me the most. i 0n the return of women to work and all girls to school, the taliban say they are working on a plan, but need time to ensure their security. however, the women here say they do not trust the taliban. translation: now, in afghanistan, it would be impossible _ for women to progress - whilst the taliban are in power. and to hold on to all they've i achieved in the past 20 years. zarghuna kargar, bbc news, athens. and joining me now live in the studio is zarghuna kargar. great to have you with us. i wonder if you could tell me how many female judges are still in afghanistan. presumably in hiding and in fearfor their lives? presumably in hiding and in fear for their lives? ., presumably in hiding and in fear for their lives? . ., , their lives? yeah, there are still more than _ their lives? yeah, there are still more than 100 _ their lives? yeah, there are still more than 100 female - their lives? yeah, there are still more than 100 female judges, l more than 100 female judges, including senior ones, junior ones,
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with theirfamilies including senior ones, junior ones, with their families living in including senior ones, junior ones, with theirfamilies living in hiding across afghanistan. it is a heartbreaking situation for them, because they can't go out of their homes, they can't speak openly about what they did. and they are one er hunted by criminals. i was speaking to two of them that we spoke on world news a few weeks ago when they were hiding in kabul. luckily they were hiding in kabul. luckily they were evacuated last week to greece. but they are still worried about their colleagues, their friends who were... 0rfellow their colleagues, their friends who were... 0r fellow female their colleagues, their friends who were... 0rfellow femalejudges still living in fearfor were... 0rfellow femalejudges still living in fear for their life. and if they were to leave afghanistan, which i appreciate from what you've just said is a big if, what you've just said is a big if, what happens to their families? can they go with them? {line what happens to their families? can they go with them?— they go with them? one of the issues, some _ they go with them? one of the issues, some of— they go with them? one of the issues, some of the _ they go with them? one of the issues, some of the younger. they go with them? one of the - issues, some of the youngerjudges were telling me, it's very difficult for single women to leave families behind. to go abroad without their families. so, they have chosen to
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stay in afghanistan because, culturally, it is a very big deal for an afghan woman to go abroad without a man in the family. 0r without a man in the family. 0r without parents or family members. they were told that their families could not be evacuated. they stayed behind, still living in fear. but some who were with young children, young families, and their husbands, they have managed to be outside afghanistan now. i they have managed to be outside afghanistan now.— they have managed to be outside afghanistan now. i have been reading about protests _ afghanistan now. i have been reading about protests on _ afghanistan now. i have been reading about protests on the _ afghanistan now. i have been reading about protests on the streets - afghanistan now. i have been reading about protests on the streets of - about protests on the streets of kabul by women. how much difference might they make? fits kabul by women. how much difference might they make?— kabul by women. how much difference might they make? as an afghan woman, rebecca, ithink— might they make? as an afghan woman, rebecca, i think seeing _ might they make? as an afghan woman, rebecca, i think seeing them _ might they make? as an afghan woman, rebecca, i think seeing them on - might they make? as an afghan woman, rebecca, i think seeing them on the - rebecca, i think seeing them on the streetjust rebecca, i think seeing them on the street just gives you rebecca, i think seeing them on the streetjust gives you a little bit of a glimmer of hope. even though, when i see them on the street, i fearfor when i see them on the street, i fear for their security. but not much has changed so far but keeping their voice alive, keeping their faces in public, that, i think, gives a lot of hope to the ones who have left afghanistan, who are in
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afghanistan. because there should be someone who stands up for them. i know many afghan women who have left, many politicians, female politicians, they are mobilising from outside afghanistan to fight for their rights. as you heard, one of thejudges, she for their rights. as you heard, one of the judges, she said were not going to let our 20 years achievementjust go buy like that. so, they are mobilising. they are going to fight. but seeing them on the street gives some hope to women, two younger girls who were banned from school, who are going through a very dark moment of their life. clearly, you would be the first to say this is not about you but it is about the women. i know you must have known these women over the years. how difficult is this for you? it years. how difficult is this for ou? , , ., ., ., years. how difficult is this for ou? , , . you? it is very emotional. when i met them — you? it is very emotional. when i met them in _ you? it is very emotional. when i met them in greece, _ you? it is very emotional. when i met them in greece, it _ you? it is very emotional. when i met them in greece, it was - you? it is very emotional. when i met them in greece, it was a - you? it is very emotional. when i | met them in greece, it was a very emotional meeting. because especially the senior ones, in the last 20 years, i have been speaking to them on women's rights issues, they were defending rape victims, they were defending rape victims,
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they were defending women who want to divorce. there is a clear vacuum in the justice system in afghanistan for women. in the justice system in afghanistan forwomen. it in the justice system in afghanistan for women. it isjust in the justice system in afghanistan for women. it is just so heartbreaking to see them losing everything and living in very empty flats in greece.— flats in greece. we've got to leave it there, flats in greece. we've got to leave it there. l'm _ flats in greece. we've got to leave it there, i'm afraid, _ flats in greece. we've got to leave it there, i'm afraid, thank - flats in greece. we've got to leave it there, i'm afraid, thank you - flats in greece. we've got to leave it there, i'm afraid, thank you so l it there, i'm afraid, thank you so much. the uk has acknowledged that it's yet to deliver on its pledge to give £500 million to youth services in england. ministers announced the youth investment fund in 2019 and it was due to be released over five years. but so far, no money has been allocated and youth leaders are hoping for clarity in this week s spending review. jonelle awomoyi reports. youth services aim to provide an opportunity for personal development, education and socialisation. services often include providing safe and effective care and early intervention support. in croydon in south london, play place welcomes around
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65 young people every week on its community bus. paige gave me a tour of this youth club on wheels. so, can you guys give me a tour of your youth service bus? come on. this is our little kitchen area. and upstairs we have, like, a chillout area if you guys want to come up and have a look. they have a whole load of paints, pencils, papers, clay. why do you keep coming back to play place, what's the best thing about coming back to the youth club? you get to meet a lot of new people, different activities, and sometimes it'sjust good to get out of the house. we want to do a soup kitchen for our headstart project. - so we've been, like, - researching homelessness. i've been hearing it's a good place to, like, socialise and things like that. but it can be a struggle to fund these resources. a recent ymca report found that over the last eight years,
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local authority funding for youth services in england and wales has decreased by £978 million. that's down 70%. two years ago, the government announced a new 500 million youth investment fund, but the department for digital, culture, media and sport, dcms, has acknowledged the fund has not yet launched. so, no money has been allocated. i'm in knowsley, part of the liverpool city region, which is one of the uk's most deprived boroughs where these effects are being felt. if the youth club does get shut down or it goes or whatever, looking at the people that do come here will be devastated. so, where can clubs get theirfunding from? 0ur funding tends to come from local authority, who are under a lot of pressure themselves, or the community or the police. we're scrambling around, trying to get money to survive. and that isn't how it should be because we are an essential service.
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we are waiting for money from the youth investment fund. it's been promised. it hasn't been delivered. i contacted the dcms about these claims. and a spokesperson said... "during the pandemic, our priority has been to stabilise "youth charities and we've done so by distributing £15.6 "million through the youth covid support fund. "this has helped secure their future and as part of our wider support "for young people that includes the £200 million youth endowment "fund to protect those at risk of exploitation." but the government has acknowledged that the £500 million youth investment fund has not yet been launched. so, no money has been allocated. experts researching effective youth provision have expressed their concerns. 500 million is not- going to be very useful. it's going to have to be targeted. and what it will likely be spent on is those areasl of concern such as crime, mental health, _ radicalisation, and skills.
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leaders in the youth sector will be looking closely at this week's spending review, to see if young people are prioritised. jonelle awomoyi, bbc news. i want to bring you some news just coming into us here at the bbc that a search and rescue mission is taking place off the coast of essex. the home office has confirmed to bbc essexis the home office has confirmed to bbc essex is that the border force is urgently responding to an ongoing incident in the sea near the port town of harwich. the coast guard is thought to be coordinating the operation with rnli boats also said to be in attendance. as you can see in that tweet from our colleagues at bbc essex, the home office says that further details will be provided out the initial response once the
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situation has been resolved. we the initial response once the situation has been resolved. we will bring you more on that as we get it. it's estimated that tens of thousands of women in the uk are unaware they have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. research shows boys with the condition are up to four times more likely to be diagnosed in childhood, as they tend to exhibit more disruptive behaviours. but girls aren't, and that affects them as they grow up. 0ur health correspondent, anna collinson, reports. adhd is having a head that's constantly full of noise and everything comes in at the same intensity. there's a stereotype that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder only affects naughty boys. small white boys, like, just running around in class, that is literally all i knew about adhd. it's estimated that at least tens of thousands of women in the uk could have undiagnosed adhd. you know there's something, | but you don't know what it is. these women have spent much of their lives feeling misunderstood. for twiggy, something clicked
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when she read about a woman's experience on social media. she's finding it hard to focus at work, she works in a different way to everyone else. she has so many ideas but finds it hard to follow through with them. i was, like, "hold on a second!" she had to persuade her gp to refer her to a psychiatrist. when i got my diagnosis, i think i started crying. i felt really relieved and i felt happy, at the same time, because i thought to myself, "so all this time, all this time", like, "it wasn't me." because i thought to myself, "so all this time, all this time", like, "it wasn't me." experts say improving adhd diagnosis in women is vital, as the longer they go untreated, the poorer their outcomes could be. women who hide their symptoms well can also be misdiagnosed or simply missed. you learn to suppress who you are, so that you can look like a normal person. and then i had a baby and, suddenly, that extra pressure, the sleep deprivation, all the wheels fell off and when he was three years old, i had a nervous breakdown. hester and her husband have both been diagnosed with adhd
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but they say while his journey took months, hers took years of doctors not listening. he was taken seriously. he wasn't doubted. at no point did anyone say, "oh, could you just be anxious? "this sounds like anxiety or depression to me, "here, have some tablets." you had to wait decades for your diagnosis, why do you think it took so long? bluntly, it's because i was female. and i was, in fact, told that by the nurse that actually did finally do my diagnosis. you know, she said, "if you'd been a boy, "you would have probably been diagnosed when you were at school." research has found that girls tend to be missed because their symptoms are more subtle, less hyperactive, more inattentive. boys are, therefore, three to four times more likely to be diagnosed in childhood. the diagnostic gap shrinks in adulthood but experts say the gender bias remains. these women haven't woken up in their mid—aos with adhd, there have been signposts all the way along. we need to raise awareness so people know and understand that adhd
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in females presents differently. they need to know they can't look for the boisterous boys. they've got to look for something different. and that needs to be done in educational settings, across health care practitioners. while a diagnosis brings answers, it raises questions about what could have been. sheila's life was full of chaos before she found out she had adhd at 63. i get myself into situations that i shouldn't be in. - like, i have had - about six car crashes because i'm super woman behind the wheel. - she has battled depression and suicidal thoughts. her impulsive behaviour meant she struggled to work or take care of her children. i bend over backwards for my kids, but i wouldn't have done then. - it was all about me. they've turned out amazingly well. but i'm sad they've done it in spite of me and not because of me. - all the women we've spoken to say their diagnosis has improved their lives. forsome, medication and therapy has helped. for others, all they finally
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needed was answers. the adhd is very much still there, it's me, it's a part of who i am but now i'm able to manage it more. before, i was like a volcano. and now i'm more like a mountain, gentler, quieter, smoother. - and i didn't like me then, - but i'm quite fond of me now. anna collinson, bbc news. new rules for foreign travellers to the united states have been outlined by president biden — as flight restrictions lift for the first time since the pandemic and international lockdowns began, early last year. most foreign nationals travelling by air from november the 8th will have to show proof of a full vaccination against covid—19, as well as a negative test. the electric carmaker, tesla, has reached a market value of a trillion dollars. it happened yesterday — when shares climbed sharply after tesla struck a deal to sell 100,000 vehicles to the car rental firm hertz.
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it's hoped the deal will also encourage further sales to private owners. tesla is the first vehicle manufacturer and only the fifth company to reach a trillion dollar value. astronomers have found hints of what could be the first planet ever to be discovered outside our galaxy. the possible planet was located by nasa in the messier 51 galaxy, also known as the whirlpool galaxy, some 28 million light years away from earth. nearly 5,000 "exoplanets", worlds orbiting stars beyond our sun, have been found so far, but all of these have been within our own milky way galaxy. normally, it's the patient who's nervous going to the dentist — but when you're treating a 600 kilogram polar bear with toothache, it's easy to see how the tables could be turned. 3—year—old sisu lives
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at yorkshire wildlife park and needed a filling after breaking a tooth. these incredible pictures show the procedure. you're watching bbc world. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello, again. through this week, we are looking at changeable weather, depending, of course, on where you are. so, it's going to be windy at times, that wind coming up from the south—west, so it's also going to be mild for the time of year. but we are looking at some heavy rain for some of us that could well lead to some issues with flooding. now, today, we've got this weather front crossing us, bringing some rain. then hot on its heels, we've got this cold front. this is going to be with us until friday, at least. and you can see from the isobars, which are squeezed, we're also looking at windy conditions. so, through the morning and into the afternoon, we see our weather front head off towards the north sea. but a second one coming in,
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bringing more rain. quite a lot of cloud around, especially in western areas with a lot of dampness in the hills and the coasts. and gusty winds, as well, the strongest winds will be across the north and the west but gusty really wherever you are, as you can see from the numbers in the black circles. temperatures ranging from 11—17 degrees, so up a touch on yesterday. and some of us in the east will see some sunshine as we go through the day, possibly east wales, as well. as we head onto the evening and overnight, our weatherfront in the north—west starts to move across scotland, getting into northern ireland, into northern england and parts of north—west wales. still going to be a windy night, especially in the north and western areas adjacent to the irish sea with local gales. but a mild night. these temperatures would be what we would expect during the day at this time of year, rather than at night. and then in the ensuing couple of days, you can see our weather front still with us. it moves south, then it moves back north again. the isobars telling you it is still going to be windy
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as well as wet for some. and, again, there is the risk of localised flooding. so, on wednesday, here is our weather front across northern england, north wales, parts of northern ireland. through the day, it retreats northwards, getting into more of southern scotland and more of northern ireland. to the north of that, there will be some sunshine and showers. to the south, a fair bit of cloud but it will break in places and here, too, we will see some sunshine. temperatures 12—18 degrees. the average at this time of year is roughly 10—1a north to south. we will still have that rain centred across the central swathes of the uk during the course of thursday. on friday, it makes it that bit further east, friday looking quite wet and temperatures going down.
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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11: an end to the freeze on public sector pay is expected in tomorrow's budget, meaning millions of people are in line for a pay rise next year. the parliamentary watchdog recommends a 30—day suspension for conservative mp 0wen paterson, saying he repeatedly used his position to promote companies that paid him — something mr paterson denies. raw sewage was discharged into our rivers a00,000 times last year, but there's a warning clean—up measures could cost billions. the former rangers, everton and scotland manager walter smith — the second most sucessful rangers boss ever — has died at the age of 73.
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and i am here in the heart of bristol's saint nicholas markets talking to businesses about how they have heard during the pandemic and what they would like to see from tomorrow's budget. millions of public sector workers are in line for a pay rise next year, after it was announced the chancellor is to end the year—long pay freeze. the move will affect at least 1.3 million public sector workers. a temporary pause in pay progression was imposed last november because of the impact of the pandemic on the economy. ahead of tomorrow's budget, the chancellor says it is right that public sector wages go up because he says the economy is "firmly back on track." and those to benefit include teachers, nurses and police officers. here's our political correspondent nick eardley.
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millions of public sector workers have faced a pay freeze this year. the government had said there wasn't enough money to fund higher wages because of emergency spending during the pandemic. but now things are looking brighter. tomorrow, the chancellor will confirm that more than 5 million public sector workers are in line for a pay rise. we want to end low pay in government by the next election, by 202a or so. we also, as well as giving the public sector that pay rise, ending the pay freeze, we are also increasing the national living wage by 6.6% to £9.50 to make sure the lowest paid in society get a pay rise.
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here's what we know so far. the announcement will cover a range of professions, including nurses, teachers, and the armed forces. some of the changes will applyjust to england, because pay in a number of areas is controlled by scotland, wales and northern ireland. the pay freeze will officially end in april next year. but we don't know yet what the pay rises will be. independent pay review bodies will make recommendations in the new year, and then we'll get a lot more detail about exactly what this means for the money in people's pockets. the government really need to make a statement and not just say we are getting rid of the pay freeze. what they need to say is we are prepared to put a significant amount of money into the public sector to fund a decent pay rise that will make catch—up for the last year. the government has talked a lot recently about higher wages. the prime minister and chancellor think it is key to rebuilding the economy and to addressing fears
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about the cost of living. the government also confirmed yesterday that the living wage for people over 23 will go up to £9.50 an hourfrom april. that means an extra £1000 a year for people who earn the minimum wage. but prices are going up, and millions are facing higher energy bills, among other pressures. taxes will also go up in a few months' time to fund the nhs. and some have warned that these pay increases won't be quite as good as they sound when everything else is factored in. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. we asked our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, whether public sector pay would actually increase. in theory, it probably will, because that is the direction of travel the government is setting. that is all they can do at the moment, because this is the start of a big technical and political process. tomorrow, the government departments will get their spending totals
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for the next three years from the treasury, then make submissions to the independent pay review bodies with evidence, and then it will be up to those independent bodies that set the pay of teachers, police officers, prison wardens, civil servants, you name it, who will report back to the government next spring, and then it will be a political decision by the government whether to accept the recommendations, and only then there will be a headline numberfor each part of the public sector for pay to increase. then there is how that actually feels in the real world. energy bills are going up, there will be increased national insurance to pay for the nhs and social care from next april, so a quite large headline increase may not feel quite large in the real world, and the unions are making the point that the government departments tomorrow will have to be adequately funded if they are to deliver public services and higher wages for public sector workers.
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a few other tidbits, i am told that they will not be a cut to the vat on energy bills, some say that would be a good way of helping people cope with the increase in gas and electricity bills over the winter. rishi sunak is not going to do that, because the treasury feels it would not be a targeted way of doing that. and also, campaigners who are asking forfuel duty to be and also, campaigners who are asking for fuel duty to be frozen for a 12th year in a row are feeling pretty confident, say they have been tipped off there will be free to fuel duty. the former uk cabinet minister 0wen paterson is facing the prospect of a 30—day suspension from parliament after he was found to have breached commons rules on lobbying. he denies any wrongdoing. toa to a report came out by the standards committee which said that
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conservative mp paid him. now, the report said he was a paid consultant to two companies, randox and linz country foods, and that he used his positions as an mp to advocate for these companies do different government bodies, including the food standards agency, but also ministers at the department for international development as well. the report says he breached the mps' code of conduct by using his parliamentary office to host business meetings but also by writing letters relating to business interest on house of commons headed paperas interest on house of commons headed paper as well. the report does note that there was no immediate financial benefit that either of these companies gained from his involvement, but it said that in the longer term financial benefit could have been obtained by these countries as a result of his actions, and even in the short term
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those companies could have secured meetings that they would not have otherwise had without the mp's involvement as well. the standards committee has recommended that, in line with other similar offences in the past, he is suspended from the house of commons for 30 sitting days. if that were to happen, he could be facing a recall petition, something that can lead to a by—election in his seat, because mps who are suspended for more than ten sitting days by the standards committee automatically phase one of those recall petitions. worth stressing that 0wen paterson has very strongly denied any wrongdoing in this case. he has put out a very damning statement, where he said that he was pronounced guilty by the commissioner without being spoken to and that no proper investigation was undertaken. in the statement, he also says that he was raising very serious issues with some of these government bodies, including what he says was the fact that milk and ham were contaminated with carcinogenic
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prohibited substances. he also added that he is not guilty and that a fair process would exonerate him. he also stated in his statement in response to this report that he lost his beloved wife of a0 years and claims that this process was a major contributing factor. he has spoken openly earlier this year about his wife, who took her own life last year. you strongly condemn the report and all of its finding, but to reiterate, the report has found he repeatedly used his position as an mp to try to promote these two companies and found he broke the code of conduct on numerous occasions too. london's metropolitan police is to apologise to the family of two murdered sisters, for failings in the way it responded when they were reported missing. an investigation by the independent office for police conduct found that mistakes were made in the case of bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death in a park in north west london in june last year. james reynolds reports.
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a6—year—old bibaa henry and her 27—year—old sister nicole smallman failed to return from bibaa's birthday party in fryent park in wembley injune last year. they were reported missing but, as their mother mina reflected later, the family struggled to get the police to take the case seriously. the sisters' family organised their own search party, and they soon found the bodies in the park. the police watchdog now concludes that information about the sisters' disappearance was recorded inaccurately and that call handlers were dismissive. 0ne officer and two members of police staff will now face action. in a statement, the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, said that, had police responded better, they may have prevented causing the family immeasurable pain. she added, "i am very sorry that the level of service we provided fell short."
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the sisters' family, here with supporters at a vigil earlier this year, has called the police's lack of initial response shameful and shocking. injuly this year, a 19—year—old, danyal hussein, was found guilty of the sisters' murders. james reynolds, bbc news. in a statement, the mother of the two women mina smallman responded to the metropolitan police. she said, "we're not the only parties who suffered mental anguish at the hands of met�*s incompetent, reprehensible and blatant disregard of agreed procedures regarding missing persons." "sorry is something you say when you comprehend the wrong you do and take full responsibility for it." "demonstrating that by taking appropriate proportionate action which to our minds is not going to happen."
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we can speak now to dal babu, former chief superintendent of the met police, and one of the country's most senior ethnic minority officers. thank you for speaking to us this morning here on bbc news. i’d thank you for speaking to us this morning here on bbc news. i'd like our morning here on bbc news. i'd like your response _ morning here on bbc news. i'd like your response most _ morning here on bbc news. i'd like your response most to _ morning here on bbc news. i'd like your response most to the - your response most to the metropolitan police, they were basically told to apologise to the family. basically told to apologise to the famil . ~ �* ., ., basically told to apologise to the famil . . �* . ., �*, ., family. well, i'm afraid there's not redeemin: family. well, i'm afraid there's not redeeming features _ family. well, i'm afraid there's not redeeming features in _ family. well, i'm afraid there's not redeeming features in this - family. well, i'm afraid there's not redeeming features in this case, i redeeming features in this case, right from the start there was huge mistakes made, and i think the family are quite right to be concerned and feel very aggrieved that the response of the metropolitan police in relation to this missing persons inquiry which then subsequently, sadly, turned into a murder.— then subsequently, sadly, turned into a murder. what were the red flats into a murder. what were the red fla . s for into a murder. what were the red flags for you _ into a murder. what were the red flags for you in — into a murder. what were the red flags for you in this _ into a murder. what were the red flags for you in this case? - into a murder. what were the red flags for you in this case? as - into a murder. what were the red flags for you in this case? as the | flags for you in this case? as the details unfolded and you see what the findings of the iopc have come back with, what concerns you the
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most? ~ ., back with, what concerns you the most? . . ., , ., most? well, i mean, i have performed the role of an — most? well, i mean, i have performed the role of an inspector _ most? well, i mean, i have performed the role of an inspector many - most? well, i mean, i have performed the role of an inspector many years - the role of an inspector many years ago, i was an inspectorfor camden for five years, and you would get missing persons reports. the red flags are that bibaa henry was a social worker where i was a borough commander, a woman with a formidable reputation, very family orientated, and basically a professional, and so i think that certainly would have led to a lot more scrutiny around what was happening, somebody being reported missing. so you have a woman reported missing, and a woman in her late 20s missing, professionals, you know, no history of them going missing, and that should have led to a very comprehensive response from the metropolitan police. loath? comprehensive response from the metropolitan police.— comprehensive response from the metropolitan police. why do those details matter, _ metropolitan police. why do those details matter, their _ metropolitan police. why do those details matter, their profession, i details matter, their profession, their racial background? i mean, it shouldn't, should it come up with
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the police? why does it matter? well, sorry, iam not the police? why does it matter? well, sorry, i am not being dismissive of people who do not come from that background, but it is important because if you have got a teenager, you know, not a woman in her a0s with a professional background, if you have a 16 or 17—year—old who might have gone to a party, then you would take that into account. it is still a high risk missing person, you have to make sure you have those resources, but some people, sadly, will go missing on a regular basis, and the police will take that into account in terms of what resources they deploy and what they will do in terms of immediate action. but when you have got somebody who has not got a history of going missing in their a0s, a professional background, and the family say this is unprecedented, i think you start putting resources in right from the start. ., , ., start. the iopc said there was no evidence of— start. the iopc said there was no evidence of racial _ start. the iopc said there was no evidence of racial bias. _ start. the iopc said there was no evidence of racial bias. what - start. the iopc said there was no evidence of racial bias. what are | evidence of racial bias. what are your thoughts on that? i
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evidence of racial bias. what are your thoughts on that?— evidence of racial bias. what are your thoughts on that? i think the iopc has your thoughts on that? i think the lopc has not _ your thoughts on that? i think the iopc has not given _ your thoughts on that? i think the iopc has not given the _ your thoughts on that? i think the iopc has not given the met - your thoughts on that? i think the iopc has not given the met policej your thoughts on that? i think the i iopc has not given the met police a clean bill of health, they have criticised the police on a number of occasions when processes and procedures were not carried out. from my perspective, ijust think, if this had been a white middle—class a2—year—old social worker who had gone missing with no history of going missing before, i do wonder whether it would have been taken more seriously. haifa. do wonder whether it would have been taken more seriously.— taken more seriously. now, i understand — taken more seriously. now, i understand that _ taken more seriously. now, i understand that you - taken more seriously. now, i understand that you held - taken more seriously. now, i understand that you held a i taken more seriously. now, i- understand that you held a view, when you are based in camden, what were yourfindings in when you are based in camden, what were your findings in the process of handling missing persons calls and cases? i handling missing persons calls and cases? ., handling missing persons calls and cases? . ., , �* handling missing persons calls and cases? . �* ., i, cases? i mean, i wasn't the catalyst ofthe cases? i mean, i wasn't the catalyst of the review. _ cases? i mean, i wasn't the catalyst of the review, the _ cases? i mean, i wasn't the catalyst of the review, the catalyst - cases? i mean, i wasn't the catalyst of the review, the catalyst was - of the review, the catalyst was someone who went missing, and the met went missing, and i was responsible for implementing some of the findings in the borough. and actually, what was very, very clear was that, sadly, many of the people who we subsequently find murdered or
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dead do get reported initially as missing people. so it is really important to have a look at this, have a senior officer, detective inspector, looking at the matter is, looking at the resources. i'm afraid we can't ignore the fact that we have lost 20,000 police officers, and in fact what the iopc report highlights is that the officer who was dealing with this was talking about unprecedented amount of work and a lack of resources. and so, you know, it is important that we do not focus on individuals — this is a process issue, and i think it is time for a review of how the police service handles missing persons. there are elements of this, for example, the report did point out that at the time the call handler referred to one of the sisters as a suspect, which in itself is deeply upsetting. 0ne suspect, which in itself is deeply upsetting. one of the recommendations is that they undertake training, for example, and a better understanding of the
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computer systems and the processes of that. shouldn't that be inherent in theirjob role? is that enough? well, and the fact that those shortcomings have been identified, i highlight the fact that this is not an isolated issue, so i think unless there is a fundamental review of how missing persons are reported and a fundamental review around the whole process, the danger is that this will happen elsewhere, and i think what we've got to avoid is having a situation where you are trying to report somebody who is missing and people not really understanding, their own organisations not understanding their own organisations and procedures, and it escaped from this report from the iopc that actions were not taken. the family do not necessarily agree with the finding that there was no racial bias. from your experience, is there an underlying racial bias
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within the met police, within police services? ., ., within the met police, within police services? . ,, , services? yeah, i think we still have a huge — services? yeah, i think we still have a huge problem - services? yeah, i think we still have a huge problem around i services? yeah, i think we still- have a huge problem around racism in the police, and i think what we have got to do is, you know, understand that it got to do is, you know, understand thatitis got to do is, you know, understand that it is notjust the police — it is a wider societal problem. but i go back to the point, you know, if this had been a a2—year—old white social worker who had never been missing before, with the police have taken it more seriously than they did a black social worker going missing, despite the family saying this is unprecedented. fiifi missing, despite the family saying this is unprecedented.— missing, despite the family saying this is unprecedented. ok, thank you ve much this is unprecedented. ok, thank you very much indeed, _ this is unprecedented. ok, thank you very much indeed, a _ this is unprecedented. ok, thank you very much indeed, a former - this is unprecedented. ok, thank you very much indeed, a former chief - very much indeed, a former chief superintendent of the metropolitan police, thank you. there has been a sharp rise in the number of police officers and staff in england and wales who've been accused of abusing their positions for sexual purposes, according to the police watchdog. last year, the independent office for police conduct investigated 70 people. in 2016, that figure was ten. the most serious, we have
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serious sexual offending and at the other end, we have behaviours such as unwanted contact, excessive messaging, that sort of thing. and what this tells us is that, you know, we are seeing that and where it's been reported, we are investigating it and bringing sanctions for that. ajudge in the united states has ruled that prince andrew must answer questions in a civil sex assault case in the us by mid—july next year. virginia giuffre has accused the duke of york of sexually assaulting her in new york in 2001— an allegation he's consistently denied. districtjudge lewis kaplan has said out—of—court testimony in the case must be submitted by 1athjuly 2022. let's go back to the budget now. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will set out tomorrow how the government will spend our money — and how much will be taken in taxes. but how are businesses coping with the ongoing economic upheaval caused by the coronavirus pandemic? our business correspondent
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katie prescott is at the st nicholas market in bristol. katie! welcome back to st nicholas market here in bristol. it is, as you can say, full of independent traders like this watch and jewellery shop. businesses here are pleased to be busy this tuesday half term day, but they have had a really tough time during the pandemic, like retailers up during the pandemic, like retailers up and down the country, having to close, having to rely on the furlough scheme, on business loans, in order to keep going. now, we can talk to one business here, there is very beautiful shop next to me selling fossils and all sorts of semiprecious stones. john, nice to see you, thank you very much for welcoming us into your shop today. if you had to reflect on the last
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couple of years and how it has been as a trader here in the centre of bristol, what has it been like for you? it bristol, what has it been like for ou? ., , bristol, what has it been like for ou? , bristol, what has it been like for ou? . , , ., , you? it has been somewhat turbulent, but we have — you? it has been somewhat turbulent, but we have rolled _ you? it has been somewhat turbulent, but we have rolled with _ you? it has been somewhat turbulent, but we have rolled with it, _ you? it has been somewhat turbulent, but we have rolled with it, just - you? it has been somewhat turbulent, but we have rolled with it, just had - but we have rolled with it, just had to evolve and move with the times, really. we find ourselves going online during the pandemic period, which really helped as well. it is not uuite which really helped as well. it is not quite the — which really helped as well. it is not quite the same _ which really helped as well. it is not quite the same as seeing everything laid out so beautifully. you cannot beat coming to handle these items in person, but we have managed to get through that, and i think we are back with a good force today, and i think the customers are very pleased to get back into the shopping areas and just have that sort of personal touch, trading, just the whole thing of retail, really. just the whole thing of retail, reall . ~ ., , , just the whole thing of retail, reall . . . , , ., really. what is the number of customers — really. what is the number of customers being _ really. what is the number of customers being lighter? - really. what is the number of customers being lighter? it l really. what is the number of| customers being lighter? it is really. what is the number of - customers being lighter? it is half term now, quite busy, it seems to
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me. , ., , term now, quite busy, it seems to me, , ., , ., term now, quite busy, it seems to me. ,., ,., ., term now, quite busy, it seems to me. customers are back out in force, it is nice to — me. customers are back out in force, it is nice to see _ me. customers are back out in force, it is nice to see them _ me. customers are back out in force, it is nice to see them supporting - it is nice to see them supporting the independence, but i'm feeling very positive about the whole thing, really. very positive about the whole thing, reall . ., . , , very positive about the whole thing, reall . ., ., , , ., really. you are selling items from all around — really. you are selling items from all around the _ really. you are selling items from all around the world. _ really. you are selling items from all around the world. as - really. you are selling items from all around the world. as the - really. you are selling items from | all around the world. as the travel ban affected you at all in terms of sourcing? it ban affected you at all in terms of sourcin: ? ., , ban affected you at all in terms of sourcin: ? ., ., , , , ., sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had to — sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had to find _ sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had to find new— sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had to find new ways _ sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had to find new ways to - sourcing? it has tremendously, yeah, i have had to find new ways to adapt. i have had to find new ways to adapt and run this particular kind of business. i am and run this particular kind of business. iam happy and run this particular kind of business. i am happy to say i am flying off for the first time in two years to india, a view tentative first steps, really. we havejust had to find new ways to work in this type of industry as well, just being a lot more resourceful as well. but i've got a team here as well to back things up as well.— things up as well. great to hear, thank you _ things up as well. great to hear, thank you very — things up as well. great to hear, thank you very much, _ things up as well. great to hear, thank you very much, john. - things up as well. great to hear, thank you very much, john. thatj things up as well. great to hear, i thank you very much, john. that is something we have been hearing from businesses all morning, the emphasis on resourcefulness, having to adapt and change how they do things has
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been so important through the pandemic. back to you. a search and rescue mission is taking place off the coast of essex. border force is urgently responding to the ongoing incident in the sea near the port town of harwich, the home office said. the coastguard is thought to be co—ordinating the operation, with rnli boats also said to be in attendance. tory mps are defending themselves from accusations they've given the green light for raw sewage to be dumped into rivers and the sea. it's after some voted not to force water companies to reduce the amount of sewage they release. water companies say the new law would have cost billions. zoe conway reports. this is untreated sewage being released into langstone harbour in hampshire. the pipe, known as an outfall,
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is seven foot wide. the footage was shot last thursday. the sewage poured out of it for a9 hours straight. i launched my drone from about 100 metres over there, and once i was flying over the top looking at the screen, i just couldn't believe what i was seeing. the general reaction from people on social media who have seen the film, they really are astonished at quite how much of this is happening, and it is happening right along our coastline. quite simply, it needs to stop. the sewage came from here, the budds farm treatment plant run by southern water. it is allowed to discharge what the company says is heavily diluted waste water into the harbour during heavy rainfall. this prevents it backing up and causing flooding. the concern is that
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not just the faecal matter that is coming out through that plant, it is full of chemicals, as well. all the chemicals we use every day that are underneath our sinks and keep them locked away from children because they are toxic, they come out here and can be toxic to our wildlife, as well. they could be changing their sex, affecting their immune system, causing cancer. there could be birds coming here to feed that are picking up these toxins, and the effects of the toxins may then be seen hundreds of thousands of miles away where they are breeding, for instance. it's not clear yet whether this a9—hour spill will be considered to be legal or not. injuly, southern water was hit with a £90 million fine after pleading guilty to thousands of illegal discharges. southern water told the bbc it's investing in infrastructure and natural projects such as enhanced weapons to reduce water run—off. no prizes for guessing what these brown spots refer to —
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places where treated and untreated effluent is released into our rivers. sewage was discharged into british waters a00,000 times last year. now it is at full whack, going straight into the river. again, you have wipes, sanitary towels. campaigners like mark barrow are speaking out. using social media to highlight what is happening in rivers in wetherby, west yorkshire. his videos are watched by thousands of people. the government says the amount of sewage in our rivers is unacceptable, and the government has a bill in parliament to address the problem, which they say will deliver progressive reductions in the harm caused by storm overflows. the trouble is, 22 conservative mps say it does not go far enough. they want the government to back this amendment. it puts a legal duty on water companies to take all reasonable steps to ensure untreated sewage is not discharged.
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we cannot have sewage discharged into our seas, our seas being unclean and unhealthy to swim in as a result, and people's lives being blighted, because whenever they worry about heavy rainfall, they worry about sewage coming into their households. i want to work with the government to fix this problem, but ultimately, for my constituents, who have to live with this, because we are a coastal constituency, i have to put them before what the government may be telling me i should do. for the last few days, anger has been mounting at the government's position. they have been protesting on the streets in margate in kent, and they have taken to the beaches in nearby whitstable. what everyone agrees on is that britain's victorian water system needs rescuing, but it will cost billions and billions to do so. zoe conway, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. some of us are in for a wet
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couple of days with the risk of localised flooding. what's happening today is we have got one weather front pushing eastwards, a second one coming in hot on its heels, it is going to be a windy day with local gales across the north—west and a fair bit of cloud around, producing some dank conditions in the west. but later it should brighten up in north east scotland, parts of eastern england and also east wales, with temperatures a little bit higher than they were yesterday. this evening and overnight, our weather front sinks southwards, taking its rain with it. still windy across the west of scotland, areas adjacent to the irish sea, but it is not going to be a cold night. temperatures falling away to between ten and about 15 degrees. tomorrow, then, we pick up this band of rain extending across northern england, parts of wales and northern ireland, and through the day it moves northwards once again. for the rest of scotland, it is a mixture of sunshine and showers, and for the south, breaking up variable amounts of cloud,
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... an end to the freeze on public sector pay is expected in tomorrow's budget, meaning millions of people are in line for a pay rise next year. the parliamentary watchdog recommends a 30—day suspension, for conservative mp, 0wen paterson, saying he repeatedly used his position to promote companies that paid him, something mr paterson denies. raw sewage was discharged into our rivers a00,000 times last year, but there's a warning clean up measures could cost billions. ahead of the cop26 summit in glasgow next week, sir david attenborough, warns world leaders that they must
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not wait any longer to take action on climate change. what do you mean by now? in the next ten years. ten years' time is a couple of budgets away and politicians won't do things. we have to do it now. the former rangers, everton and scotland manager, walter smith, the second most sucessful rangers boss ever, has died at the age of 73. sport and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. we start with the sad news that former scotland, rangers and everton manager walter smith has died at the age of 73. smith won 21 trophies over two spells at ibrox, making him the second most successful rangers manager ever. his last title win was in his second spell in 2011.
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he also had four years at everton and two as scotland manager, before going back to rangers. his death comes in the same year rangers won their first top—flight title since smith's final season. 0ur scotland sports correspondent chris mclaughlin joins us now. just how much of an impact did walter smith have on scottish football? i think sometimes when public figures died, the shock of it sometimes makes people overplay the significance of certain people in theirfield. that cannot significance of certain people in their field. that cannot be said for walter smith. he was genuinely a giant figure in scottish. we are already seeing tributes pouring in from across the game, from the first minister nicola sturgeon, describing him as a fantastic ambassador, a giant of scottish. and he really was. he was also a man who crossed
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the footballing divide here in glasgow. he was a great friend of the former celtic manager, tommy burns. in fact, the former celtic manager, tommy burns. infact, he the former celtic manager, tommy burns. in fact, he was pallbearer at his funeral when he died. he was respected across football, notjust in scotland, you mentioned his time at everton as well. he was respected across the uk in terms of football and beyond as well. there are two words always mentioned in regards to walter smith and that is dignity and class. something that the rangers chairman douglas park mentioned this morning. saying that he embodied everything about being a rangers and i think his loss will be deeply felt by the club and scottish football across the game in scotland and beyond. across the game in scotland and be ond. ., ., across the game in scotland and be ond. ., ,, i. across the game in scotland and be ond. ., ,, . despite mounting pressure, it looks increasingly likely that 0le gunnar solskjaer will remain in charge of manchester united for saturday s trip to tottenham. solskjaer has come under intense
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scrutiny from fans and the media after his side's humilating 5—0 defeat to liverpool at old trafford on sunday. former chelsea boss antonio conte and zinedine zidane are among the names being suggested as a possible replacement. but cristiano ronaldo has insisted the whole team are to blame and said, "it s up to us to deliver." the t20 world cup continues today, pakistan play new zealand in the late match, but south africa are underway against holders west indies in dubai. south africa without quinton de kock "makes himself unavailable." we're not sure of the details as to why. the west indies batting first are currently a7—0 after eight overs. well, yesterday scotland were hammered by afghanistan in their super 12 opener. our sports correspondent
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joe wilson reports. there has never been a more significant occasion for scotland's cricketers. to get here has demanded dedication, inspiration, qualification. they have now earned games against some of the worlds highest ranked nations, and that includes afghanistan. for afghanistan's men's team, at least, cricket has meant global connections and rapid rise. the future is seriously uncertain. sharjah, the batters enjoyed themselves here. but there is mark watt to spoil the fun. he's gone, scotland are never down for long. neither, however, was the ball. 11 sixes in afghanistan's 190. scotland, follow that. sadly, they couldn't. tough enough facing afghanistan's spin bowlers, but then the wicket keeper holds a catch like this. the match became afghanistan's occasion. 60 all out.
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0uch. well, that is world cup cricket. joe wilson, bbc news. we've got some world—class players on our team, but given more opportunity, given more time in the middle under the pressure like we had this evening, i have no doubt that the performance will keep being more consistent, i think it's a game of cricket where things turn pretty quickly. you know, character is defined by how you come back from something like this. that's all the sport for now. you can find more tributes to the former scotland, rangers and everton manager walter smith who's died at the age of 73. as we've been hearing, the government will face renewed pressure today, to stop untreated sewage being released into rivers.
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last week, an amendment to the environment bill, that would have put a legal duty on water companies to end the practice, was defeated in the commons. this afternoon, the measure will be voted on by the house of lords. the government believes forcing water companies to take action let's speak to the conservative mp for ludlow, philip dunne. he's also the chairman of the environmental audit committee. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. first off, this amendment is going back into the bill. how are you hoping it is going to be pushed through the commons eventually? fits through the commons eventually? is you have said in your introduction, the amendment would be debated in the amendment would be debated in the lords again this afternoon and the lords again this afternoon and the environment minister will discuss it and i would expect that it will then be voted on and sent back to the commons through the
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procedure we have in concluding legislation, where amendments are prepared by the lords, sent to the comments, if the commons disagree they go back to the lords and normally get dealt with finally on the second occasion. we don't know when that will be but it's likely to be next week i would think. i'm sure the government is keen to get this on the statute book while the cop26 conference is going on in glasgow, because it's such an important piece of environmental legislation and i would hope that the government, if they do get back from the lords, well wish will wish to move one step further and move one step further on the bill which are very good news in terms of reducing the impact of water company pollution of rivers through sewage spills which is the purpose of my private members bill last year, which was the inspiration for many of these measures and this amendment in particular. the for many of these measures and this amendment in particular.— amendment in particular. the bill was voted against _
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amendment in particular. the bill was voted against 265, _ amendment in particular. the bill was voted against 265, 202. - amendment in particular. the bill was voted against 265, 202. one| amendment in particular. the bill. was voted against 265, 202. one of the argument was that it would cost billions. some of the figures we're looking at, how did in 50, between 150 £650 billion do you how mps came up 150 £650 billion do you how mps came up with those figures? this 150 £650 billion do you how mps came up with those figures?— up with those figures? this was admitted by _ up with those figures? this was admitted by the _ up with those figures? this was admitted by the minister - up with those figures? this was admitted by the minister to - up with those figures? this was admitted by the minister to be l up with those figures? this was | admitted by the minister to be a very preliminary estimate and part of the bill includes a clause for the government, defra to work with the government, defra to work with the water companies and the regulators, environment agency in particular, to make a proper estimate of what it would cost to separate the surface and foul water sewage drainage systems we have in this country, which is the root cause of the problem. there's roughly 600,000 kilometres of sewers and, or drains, underneath streets and, or drains, underneath streets and across the fields. these are carrying two types of water. surface
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water run—off from roads and houses, and patios and so on, and the foul water, which is the technical expression for the sewage drains that go into the water treatment plants. the problem is that for many years, water developers had been connecting, they have a right to connecting, they have a right to connect to the closest passing dream, and quite often, surface water drains have been connected into the foul drains which are sending a lot of extra water which doesn't need to be treated... sorry... doesn't need to be treated... sor ., �* , doesn't need to be treated... sor . �*, ., doesn't need to be treated... sorry- - -_ doesn't need to be treated... sor ., ., ., sorry... that's going to cost a lot and take decades _ sorry... that's going to cost a lot and take decades to _ sorry... that's going to cost a lot and take decades to separate. i sorry... that's going to cost a lot i and take decades to separate. sorry tented u - , and take decades to separate. sorry tented up. to _ and take decades to separate. sorry tented up, to the _ and take decades to separate. sorry tented up, to the figures _ and take decades to separate. sorry tented up, to the figures are is that we don't know, but it would cost multiple billions and would take many many years. i will give you one example which we do know about which
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is thames water have undertaken the largest single capital investment in the sewage network in london, called the sewage network in london, called the tideway tunnel. it's going to cost a.6 billion and it will lead to a reduction in the volume of legally discharged sewage into the thames from 39 million tonnes to two. that will be paid for by a neck to £19 per household on customer bills in london. of this bill would be that there is a legal duty put on the water companies to reduce the harm of sewage being released. why was that voted against? why did they not want to put legal duty on the water companies?— to put legal duty on the water com anies? ., ., , ., companies? there are other duties on the water companies _ companies? there are other duties on the water companies in _ companies? there are other duties on the water companies in the _ the water companies in the environment bill which are very welcome. for example, to report on water quality, above and below,
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upstream and downstream any and that would provide proper transparency so we know what condition of our water in our rivers are which we don't know at present. this duty was originally drafted as part of my private members bill and it would have imposed legal duty on water companies which potentially could be interpreted by a judge at if they had not acted reasonably in the case of a particular spill, that it might have required them to resolve all spills at once. i don't think that's ever likely to happen. because this is going to take a very long time and anyjudge would be likely to recognise that. but we have seen increasing court actions imposing very large fines on water companies, including the £90 million on southern water this summer. i think that has to be a balance, recognising that it's not going to be possible to fix this problem overnight and that's really what the
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government was concerned about and therefore what i'm trying to do is to work with the government and other colleagues in parliament to try to come up with something which maintains a duty on water companies but wouldn't necessarily allow to be interpreted as all having to be done overnight, because that's clearly not possible. overnight, because that's clearly not possible-— overnight, because that's clearly not ossible. ., ,, , ., , . not possible. thank you very much for explaining- _ not possible. thank you very much for explaining. thank _ not possible. thank you very much for explaining. thank you. - one of the world's most criticised polluters, australia, has formally adopted a net zero emissions target by 2050. many critics say that australia, which is the world's second biggest coal exporter, has been too slow on climate action despite suffering bushfires, floods and drought partly blamed on climate change. the prime minister, scott morrison, made the pledge after bargaining the prime minister, scott morrison, made the pledge after bargaining with mps within his government. but he said australia's plan does not include ending its massive fossil fuel sectors.
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australians want action on climate change, they are taking action on climate change, but they also want to protect theirjobs and their livelihoods, they also want to keep the cost of living down and they also want to protect the australian way of life, especially in rural and regional areas. on sunday, world leaders will start gathering in glasgow for cop26, the crucial un climate change conference. representatives of religious faiths across the uk have signed a declearation ahead of the conference, calling for people to be advocates forjustice on the issue of climate change. let's find out more and speak to graham usher, the bishop of norwich, and the church of england's lead on environment. what is the church of england hoping
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will be achieved through cop? the church has a voice, particularly the worlds poorest people in telling stories, amplifying stories from the poorest parts of the world where people are already affected in their daily lives by climate change. we also need to get our own house in order. as church of england and look to be next. we have set a very ambitious target of being zero x 2030, which means every church community across the church of england is looking at how it can move to renewable energy supplies, reduce the amount of energy use,. about 5% our churches are already net zero and i want to encourage that. it net zero and i want to encourage that. ,., , ~' net zero and i want to encourage that. , ,, ., that. it sounds like you are practising _
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that. it sounds like you are practising what _ that. it sounds like you are practising what you - that. it sounds like you are | practising what you preach. that. it sounds like you are i practising what you preach. when that. it sounds like you are _ practising what you preach. when you see advocates were change, what are you asking people physically to do? we are keen to see as an outcome from cop26, this major gathering of world leaders, is see them do more, do more quickly, do more generously, and do more together. what do i mean by that? to do more, be bolder in their ambitions, the commitments of every nation of the world to contribute to this major challenge, this planetary faces. to do that quickly, than many want to, we need to really keep the pace up, because every year that goes by with emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere brings this crisis to an ever greater magnitude. it was concerning to see the announcement yesterday that the $100 billion fund
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for adaptation isn't going to be reached until 2023. there needs to be funding from the wealthier countries for those that are already affected by loss and damage. finally, more together. more to support the poorest people in the world. the purest communities that cannot afford to make adaptations and whenever there's a major weather events, they cannot then rebuild their communities and are left even more poor. their communities and are left even more poor-— their communities and are left even more oor. . more poor. what has struck me as you were talking. — more poor. what has struck me as you were talking. it's _ more poor. what has struck me as you were talking, it's the _ more poor. what has struck me as you were talking, it's the young _ more poor. what has struck me as you were talking, it's the young that i were talking, it's the young that are really leading that it's fair to say leading the fight on climate change. and yet, congregations these days are older. how are you planning on engaging the young? brute days are older. how are you planning on engaging the young?— on engaging the young? we are enrurain on engaging the young? we are engaging the — on engaging the young? we are engaging the young _ on engaging the young? we are engaging the young and - on engaging the young? we are engaging the young and i i on engaging the young? we are engaging the young and i keepl engaging the young and i keep hearing wonderful stories from young people across the church of england, indeed across faith communities really passionate about this whole
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area. there are many examples where it's affecting their mental health about what their future lives will entail. a group of young people have been walking across this country, the g7 summit in cornwall injune and walking with their voice of protest and concern, lament and a call to action, in a really across the country. theyjust crossed into scotland a couple of weeks ago, and will be arriving in glasgow on saturday. a tributary of that came across norfolk, great yarmouth, carrying water in old bottled water that had been washed up on the shore, young people from across norfolk with a concern that the leaders of the world really hear their call forjustice and change, their call for justice and change, action, their call forjustice and change, action, for bold generous action.
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thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. thank you. the uk has acknowledged that it's yet to deliver on its pledge to give £500 million to youth services in england. ministers announced the youth investment fund in 2019 and it was due to be released over five years. but so far, no money has been allocated, and youth leaders are hoping for clarity in this week s spending review. jonelle awomoyi reports. youth services aim to provide an opportunity for personal development, education and socialisation. services often include providing safe and effective care and early intervention support. in croydon, in south london, play place welcomes around 65 young people every week on its community bus. paige gave me a tour of this youth club on wheels. so, can you guys give me a tour of your youth service bus?
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come on. this is our little kitchen area. and upstairs we have, like, a chillout area, if you guys want to come up and have a look? they have a whole load of paints, pencils, papers, clay. why do you keep coming back to play place, what's the best thing about coming back to the youth club? you get to meet a lot of new people, different activities, and sometimes it'sjust good to get out of the house. we want to do a soup kitchen for our headstart project. i so we've been, like, - researching homelessness. i've been hearing it's a good place to, like, socialise and things like that. but it can be a struggle to fund these resources. a recent ymca report found that over the last eight years, local authority funding for youth services in england and wales has decreased by £978 million. that's down 70%. two years ago, the government
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announced a new 500 million youth investment fund, but the department for digital, culture, media and sport, dcms, has acknowledged the fund has not yet launched. so no money has been allocated. i'm in knowsley, part of the liverpool city region, which is one of the uk's most deprived boroughs, where these effects are being felt. if the youth club does get shut down, or it goes or whatever, looking at the people that do come here will be devastated. so, where can clubs get theirfunding from? 0ur funding tends to come from local authority, who are under a lot of pressure themselves, orthe community or the police. we're scrambling around, trying to get money to survive. and that isn't how it should be, because we are an essential service. we are waiting for money from the youth investment fund. it's been promised. it hasn't been delivered. i contacted the dcms about these claims. and a spokesperson said...
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but the government has acknowledged that the £500 million youth investment fund has not yet been launched. so, no money has been allocated. so no money has been allocated. experts researching effective youth provision have expressed their concerns. 500 million is not- going to be very useful. it's going to have to be targeted. and what it will likely be spent on is those areasl of concern such as crime, mental health, _ radicalisation, and skills. leaders in the youth sector will be looking closely at this week's spending review, to see if young people are prioritised.
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jonelle awomoyi, bbc news. for the past week, the government has come under more and more pressure to move to plan b of its covid winter restrictions for england. plan b includes things like a return to compulsory face coverings and working from home, and bringing in mandatory covid passports. but the government has resisted, and that could be because cases and deaths are about to fall dramatically. health correspondent nick triggle is with me now. what does the modelling show? there's a variety of models that feed into government but the one that getting the attention is from london school of hygiene and tropical medicine and as the chart shows, daily infections, the coming weeks and months could see a really significant drop in infection levels, possibly down to a few
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thousand a day and then as this chart shows, that will then translate to many fewer deaths than we are currently seeing, maybe a tenfold dropped. but we need a lot to go right to get to where this model is suggesting we could get to. it requires good uptake of the boosters, a degree of cautious behaviour during winter, so limiting socialising and mixing to some degree and then not having too much waning of immunity after vaccination. it's certainly perhaps one of the more optimistic model that he been fed to government. what's also interesting is the university groups that do this for ministers, they are also pointing to the most realistic scenario being some scale of drop, in that infection levels will actually be lower in winter than they have been than in autumn but it's not clear when this might happen. it could
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take a few more weeks and there is still a lot of uncertainty about how big those drops might be. share still a lot of uncertainty about how big those drops might be. are those the reasons — big those drops might be. are those the reasons as _ big those drops might be. are those the reasons as to _ big those drops might be. are those the reasons as to why _ big those drops might be. are those the reasons as to why we'll - big those drops might be. are those the reasons as to why we'll get i the reasons as to why we'll get those drops and the general trend? i think to fully understand why this might happen, it does seem to conflict with a lot of what we were hearing last week, you have to look at where the infections have been in the population over recent weeks and months. the high rates have been really driven by young people recently. we are about to see a chart that shows in the past week nearly half of cases have been in the under 20s, over the summer there was a lot of infection rates in the old teenagers, since school went back that's translated into younger teenage rates of infection being higher. the thinking is because there has been so much infection, natural immunity acquired and plus with a lot of vaccination that has been done in these age groups, they
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may be close to herd immunity. what that will mean is we have seen a little bit of spill—over from these age groups into older people who are more at risk of serious illness. that would stop if infection rates drop in these age groups. on top of that, the booster vaccines are being rolled out and if there is good uptake, that will help drive down infections and serious illness even further. we infections and serious illness even further. . ., �* ., ., further. we don't need a plan b? that's been _ further. we don't need a plan b? that's been the _ further. we don't need a plan b? that's been the big _ further. we don't need a plan b? that's been the big debate, i further. we don't need a plan b? l that's been the big debate, hasn't it? over the last week. a lot of scientists have fed into this modelling are still concerned, it could take a few weeks for the drops to start having an impact and then that take some time to translate into fewer hospital admissions and what they see as nhs has so little headroom, it's in such a precarious position, that plan b might still be needed as a precautionary measure but they also want to see other things, biggerfocus and emphasis on
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the 5 million adults who are yet to get a first dose of the vaccine, they see that could make a big difference and a focus on plan b detracts from that very important issue too. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. we have a weather front pushing east and the second coming hot on its heels. when they with localjails across the north west and a fair bit of cloud around producing tank conditions later in the west. brightening in the north—west scotland, parts of eastern england and wales with temperatures higher than yesterday. through this evening, the weather front sinks south, taking the rain with it. still windy across the west of scotland, areas adjacent to the irish sea, but it won't be a cold night. falling away to between ten
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and 15. tomorrow we pick up this band of rain, extending across northern england, parts of wales and northern england, parts of wales and northern ireland, lecture of sunshine and showers and further south, variable mix of cloud, sunshine and highs of 18.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: millions of people are in line for a pay rise next year, with an end to the year—long public sector pay freeze expected in tomorrow's budget. the parliamentary watchdog recommends a 30—day suspension for conservative mp 0wen paterson, saying he repeatedly used his position to promote companies that paid him — something mr paterson denies. the government faces renewed pressure to stop untreated sewage being released into rivers, as the house of lords considers proposals to put a legal duty on water companies to end the practice. the former rangers, everton and scotland manager walter smith — who was the second most sucessful rangers boss ever — has died at the age of 73.
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iam in i am in the heart of bristol city centre speaking to businesses and traders here at saint nicholas's market about how they fared during the pandemic and what they would like to see from the chancellor in tomorrow's budget. many public sector workers are in line for a pay rise next year, after it was announced the chancellor is to end the year—long pay freeze. the move is expected to cover several million public sector workers. a temporary pause in pay progression was imposed last november, because of the impact of the pandemic on the economy. ahead of tomorrow's budget, the chancellor says it is right that public sector wages go up
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because he says the economy is "firmly back on track". and those to benefit include teachers, nurses and police officers. here's our political correspondent nick eardley. millions of public sector workers have faced a pay freeze this year. the government had said there wasn't enough money to fund higher wages because of emergency spending during the pandemic. but now things are looking brighter. tomorrow, the chancellor will confirm that more than 5 million public sector workers are in line for a pay rise. we want to end low pay in government by the next election, by 202a or so. we also, as well as giving the public sector that pay rise, ending the pay freeze, we are also increasing the national living wage by 6.6% to £9.50 to make sure the lowest paid in society get a pay rise.
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here's what we know so far. the announcement will cover a range of professions, including nurses, teachers, and the armed forces. some of the changes will applyjust to england, because pay in a number of areas is controlled by scotland, wales and northern ireland. the pay freeze will officially end in april next year. but we don't know yet what the pay rises will be. independent pay review bodies will make recommendations in the new year, and then we'll get a lot more detail about exactly what this means for the money in people's pockets. the government really need to make a statement and notjust say we are getting rid of the pay freeze. what they need to say is we are prepared to put a significant amount of money into the public sector to fund a decent pay rise that will make catch—up for the last year. the government has talked a lot recently about higher wages. the prime minister and chancellor think it is key to rebuilding the economy and to addressing fears
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about the cost of living. the government also confirmed yesterday that the living wage for people over 23 will go up to £9.50 an hourfrom april. that means an extra £1000 a year for people who earn the minimum wage. but prices are going up, and millions are facing higher energy bills, among other pressures. taxes will also go up in a few months' time to fund the nhs. and some have warned that these pay increases won't be quite as good as they sound when everything else is factored in. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. we're joined now byjonathan cribb, senior research economist at the institute of fiscal studies. for the morning, jonathan. so we are hearing all these headline figures, but what is the reality behind them? the reality is that the government has basically gone back to its
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policy pre—pandemic, which is to listen to the advice of the independent pay review bodies when setting pay for millions of public sector workers. while there was a kind of reasonable argument to hold down public sector pay growth during the kind of main part of the pandemic itself, when there were lots of problems in the labour market for private sector workers, it seems a fairly sensible and not overwhelmingly surprising move for the government that will clearly lead to some increases in public sector pay. lead to some increases in public sector pay-— lead to some increases in public sector a. ., . , sector pay. ok, there are concerns now about _ sector pay. ok, there are concerns now about inflation, _ sector pay. ok, there are concerns now about inflation, real— sector pay. ok, there are concerns now about inflation, real concerns. are they justified? now about inflation, real concerns. are theyjustified? so now about inflation, real concerns. are theyjustified? 50 i now about inflation, real concerns. are they justified?— are they 'ustified? so i am not the kind of are theyjustified? so i am not the kind of particular _ are theyjustified? so i am not the kind of particular expert _ are theyjustified? so i am not the kind of particular expert on -
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kind of particular expert on inflation budged up basically, jonathan, in real terms, you get this pay rise, in real terms, what will it mean when people get their pay packets at the end of the month? well, fundamentally, if you are a teacher or a prison officer, you know, what matters to you, as you have now identified, is not what the number an have now identified, is not what the numbe ., , ., have now identified, is not what the numbe ., ,, have now identified, is not what the numbe ., , , number on your pay packet is, but how much — number on your pay packet is, but how much that _ number on your pay packet is, but how much that buys _ number on your pay packet is, but how much that buys you. - number on your pay packet is, but how much that buys you. how i number on your pay packet is, but i how much that buys you. how much is it going up relative to inflation. now, it is definitely the case that inflation has been rising over recent months, and that erodes the real value of people's wages. i think, in general, though, the government in the pay review bodies will look more at what is happening to private sector wages and the difficulties of recruiting and retaining public sector workers, rather than just inflation itself when setting public sector pay. lital’heh when setting public sector pay. when this hrase when setting public sector pay. when this phrase was _ when setting public sector pay. when this phrase was first _
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when setting public sector pay. when this phrase was first put _ when setting public sector pay. when this phrase was first put in, - when setting public sector pay. when this phrase was first put in, part of the reason was that rishi sunak did not want to widen the gap between private sector and the public sector wages. well there realistically, help? —— will this, realistically, help? —— will this, realistically, help? —— will this, realistically, help? abs, realistically, help? -- will this, realistically, help?— realistically, help? a clear justification _ realistically, help? a clear justification for _ realistically, help? a clear justification for what i realistically, help? a clear justification for what they | realistically, help? a clear i justification for what they called the perry pause was that during the great recession, public sector pay outperformed private sector pay, and then the coalition government spent a number of years on pay restraint to kind of get that gap back down. i think what the government wanted to do this time was to kind of prevent the gap opening up in the first place. you know, it looked likely that it has succeeded in that, although we don't have hard data, and fundamentally this decision
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today just and fundamentally this decision todayjust means that the government can consider all of the evidence about the effects of pay and where it might be most needed for public services when deciding how much people should be paid.— people should be paid. jonathan cribb of the _ people should be paid. jonathan cribb of the ifs, _ people should be paid. jonathan cribb of the ifs, thank - people should be paid. jonathan cribb of the ifs, thank you i people should be paid. jonathan cribb of the ifs, thank you very | cribb of the ifs, thank you very much indeed. the former cabinet minister 0wen paterson is facing the prospect of a 30—day suspension from parliament after he was found to have breached commons rules on lobbying. he denies any wrongdoing. 0ur political correspondent ione wells has more. well, today a report came out by the standards committee and parliament's standards committee and parliament's standard commissioner which said that 0wen paterson had used his position as an mp to promote companies who paid him. now, the report said he was a paid consultant to two companies, randox and lynn's country foods, and that he used his positions as an mp to advocate for these
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companies do different government bodies, including the food standards agency, but also ministers at the department for international development as well. the report says he breached the mps' code of conduct by using his parliamentary office to host business meetings, but also by writing letters relating to business interests on house of commons headed paper as well. the report does note that there was no immediate financial benefit that either of these companies gained from his involvement, but it said that in the longer term financial benefit could have been obtained by these countries as a result of his actions, and even in the short term those companies could have secured meetings that they would not have otherwise had without the mp's involvement as well. now, the standards committee has recommended that, in line with other similar offences in the past, he is suspended from the house of commons for 30 sitting days. if that were to happen, he could be facing a recall petition,
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something that can lead to a by—election in his seat, because mps who are suspended for more than ten sitting days by the standards committee automatically face one of those recall petitions. worth stressing that 0wen paterson has very strongly denied any wrongdoing in this case. he has put out a very damning statement, where he said that he was pronounced guilty by the commission without being spoken to and that no proper investigation was undertaken. in the statement, he also says that he was raising very serious issues with some of these government bodies, including what he says was the fact that milk and ham were contaminated with carcinogenic prohibited substances. he also added that he is not guilty and that a fair process would exonerate him. he also stated in his statement in response to this report that he lost his beloved wife of a0 years and claims that this process was a major contributing factor.
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he had spoken openly earlier this year about the loss of his wife, who took her own life last year. he strongly condemns the report and all of its finding, and all of its findings, but to reiterate, the report has found he repeatedly used his position as an mp to try to promote these two companies and found he broke the code of conduct on numerous occasions too. london's metropolitan police is to apologise to the family of two murdered sisters for failings in the way it responded when they were reported missing. an investigation by the independent office for police conduct found that mistakes were made in the case of bibaa henry and nicole smallman, who were stabbed to death in a park in north west london in june last year. james reynolds reports. a6—year—old bibaa henry and her 27—year—old sister, nicole smallman, failed to return from bibaa's birthday party in fryent park in wembley injune last year. they were reported missing, but as their mother mina reflected later, the family struggled to get the police to take the case seriously.
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the sisters' family organised their own search party, and they soon found the bodies in the park. the police watchdog now concludes that information about the sisters' disappearance was recorded inaccurately and that call handlers were dismissive. 0ne officer and two members of police staff will now face action. in a statement, the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, said that, had police responded better, they may have prevented causing the family immeasurable pain. she added, "i am very sorry that the level of service we provided fell short." the sisters' family, here with supporters at a vigil earlier this year, has called the police's lack of initial response shameful and shocking. injuly this year, a 19—year—old, danyal hussein, was found guilty of the sisters' murders. james reynolds, bbc news.
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in a statement, the mother of the two women, mina smallman, responded to the metropolitan police. there has been a sharp rise in the number of police officers and staff in england and wales who've been accused of abusing their positions for sexual purposes — that's according to the police watchdog. last year, the independent office for police conduct investigated 70 people. in 2016, that figure was ten. the most serious, we have serious sexual offending, and at the other end, we have behaviours such as unwanted contact, excessive messaging,
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that sort of thing. and what this tells us is that, you know, we are seeing that and where it's been reported, we are investigating it and bringing sanctions for that. you're watching bbc news. ajudge in the united states has ruled that prince andrew must answer questions in a civil sex assault case in the us by mid—july next year. virginia giuffre has accused the duke of york of sexually assaulting her in new york in 2001— an allegation he's consistently denied. districtjudge lewis kaplan has said out—of—court testimony in the case must be submitted by 1athjuly 2022. a search and rescue mission is taking place off the coast of essex. border force is urgently responding to the ongoing incident in the sea near the port town of harwich,
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the home office said. the coastguard is thought to be co—ordinating the operation, with rnli boats also said to be in attendance. the headlines on bbc news: the freeze on public sector wages is set to end, with the chancellor expected to confirm in tomorrow's budget that millions of workers will get a pay rise next spring the conservative mp and former cabinet minister 0wen paterson faces a potential 30—day suspension from parliament for breaching commons rules on lobbying — something he denies. the mother of two sisters who were murdered in london last year has dismissed an apology from the metropolitan police for the way it responded when they were reported missing. let's speak to the labour's financial secretary to the treasury,
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james murray. hello, thank you forjoining us on bbc news. what does labour make, then, of the phrase being lifted come april, and a change in the living wage?— come april, and a change in the living wage? come april, and a change in the livin: wane? ., , ., ., ., living wage? there has been a lot of announcements _ living wage? there has been a lot of announcements about _ living wage? there has been a lot of announcements about these - living wage? there has been a lot of announcements about these budget| living wage? there has been a lot of i announcements about these budget by press release, and my colleague has an urgent question to get some of the details out of government, because the truth is, when you are looking at what they are saying about the national living wage, it will be £1000 per year less in people's pockets than our plan, and a lot of money will be swallowed up by rising energy costs, cuts to universal credit and so on. so the truth is becoming very clear about what the government are saying about
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the minimum wage, someone on the national minimum wage, because of cuts to universal credit, will be £800 worse off, despite the increase that the government are talking about. and alongside that, the decision the government has taken to reverse its freeze on public sector pay to reverse its freeze on public sector pay t° pay reverse its freeze on public sector pay to pay for front line key workers means they can finally get around the table and agree a fair pay increase for those public sector workers, many of whom have been the real heroes of the pandemic. holst. workers, many of whom have been the real heroes of the pandemic.— real heroes of the pandemic. now, i understand — real heroes of the pandemic. now, i understand that _ real heroes of the pandemic. now, i understand that there _ real heroes of the pandemic. now, i understand that there was _ real heroes of the pandemic. now, i understand that there was figures i understand that there was figures and details will not really become clear until the new year, because this has to go through the independent review bodies. what are you saying should have been the figure that public sector workers would have been receiving? lthieiiii. would have been receiving? well, what a responsible _ would have been receiving? -ii what a responsible government would do is sit down with the pay review bodies, with trade unions, with workers, and work out what a fair pay settlement is. the government last year had to be dragged kicking and screaming to the pay review
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bodies. they decided instead to freeze public sector pay, and what we are saying is now they have finally decided to reverse the decision about freezing pay for front line workers, they can now sit down with the pay review bodies... but that is partly what the process is going to entail, isn't it, with the review bodies? it is going to entail, isn't it, with the review bodies?— is going to entail, isn't it, with the review bodies? it was wrong, what they decided _ the review bodies? it was wrong, what they decided to _ the review bodies? it was wrong, what they decided to do - the review bodies? it was wrong, what they decided to do last i the review bodies? it was wrong, | what they decided to do last year, and that has an ongoing impact, it is damaging and unsustainable, and they are now saying they will not freeze it this year, which means they can sit down with the pay review bodies and work out what a fair settlement is. it is really important to say that alongside power, we talked about the national minimum wage, it is important to the government does a lot more to improve conditions for workers. what we say should be the case is that the government should ban the practice of zero—hours contracts, fire and rehire tactics, damaging to so many workers, and having their
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agreements across the economy would be making sure that the conditions of all workers are improved. the nurses' body. — of all workers are improved. the nurses' body, the rcn, are asking for a 12% pay rise, because a lot of these sectors have got a figure in mind. would you, labour, support that figure? i mind. would you, labour, support that figure?— mind. would you, labour, support that fiuure? . ., ., ., , that figure? i am not going to pluck a fiaure that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out — that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out of— that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out of the. .. _ that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out of the. .. that _ that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out of the. .. that is - that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out of the. .. that is not i that figure? i am not going to pluck a figure out of the. .. that is not a l a figure out of the. .. that is not a fiaure a figure out of the. .. that is not a figure being _ a figure out of the. .. that is not a figure being plucked _ a figure out of the. .. that is not a figure being plucked out - a figure out of the. .. that is not a figure being plucked out of i a figure out of the. .. that is not a figure being plucked out of the i a figure out of the. .. that is not a l figure being plucked out of the air. that is not plucked out of the air. that is not plucked out of the air. that is not plucked out of the air. that is coming from the rcn. i am sor , i that is coming from the rcn. i am sorry. i am — that is coming from the rcn. i am sorry. i am not— that is coming from the rcn. i am sorry, i am not going _ that is coming from the rcn. i am sorry, i am not going to _ that is coming from the rcn. i —n sorry, i am not going to take a figure out of the air. what we believe a responsible government should do is sit down with the pay review bodies, talk to trade unions and workers, and make sure we get a fair pay for —— fair pay settlement for everyone on the front line. they were government has reversed their position on the pay freeze, they have finally realised how damaging and unsustainable it was, they now have a chance to sit down and get that fair pay. have a chance to sit down and get that fair pay-— have a chance to sit down and get that fair pay. thank you very much for our that fair pay. thank you very much
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for your time. _ that fair pay. thank you very much for your time, thank _ that fair pay. thank you very much for your time, thank you. - sport, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. tributes have been pouring in for the former scotland, rangers and everton manager walter smith, who's died at the age of 73. smith won 21 trophies over two spells at ibrox, making him the second most successful rangers manager ever. his last title win was in his second spell in 2011. he also had four years at everton and two as scotland manager, before going back to rangers. his death comes in the same year rangers won their first top—flight title since smith's final season. chris mclaughlin has been gauging reaction. he was genuinely a giant figure in scottish football. we're already seeing tributes pouring in from across the game, from the first minister, nicola sturgeon, describing him as a fantastic ambassador, a giant of scottish football. and he really was.
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he was also a man who crossed the footballing divide here in glasgow. he was a great friend of the former celtic manager tommy burns. in fact, he was a pallbearer at his funeral when he died. he was respected across football, notjust in scotland, you mentioned his time at everton as well. he was respected across the uk in terms of football and beyond as well. the former players and former managers have been paying tribute to him on social media.
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and at training today, rangers held a minute's silence in memory of their former manager and chairman. walter smith, who has died at the age of 73. we will have more later. some news concerning the queen, at 95, she has carried out a virtual audience at our windsor castle home. so this is herfirst audience at our windsor castle home. so this is her first public engagement since she spent that night in hospitalfor night in hospital for investigations, night in hospitalfor investigations, preliminary investigations. let's get more on the budget and look at how businesses are coping
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with the ongoing economic upheaval caused by the coronavirus pandemic. our business correspondent katie prescottjoins us from bristol. first, iam first, i am at saint nicholas's market in the centre of bristol, it is lunchtime, and there are queues building for all of the food stalls in the market. having said that, if you lookjust along here, you can see a number of stores that are still closed, and that is a nice car, people tell me, of the pandemic, retailers which have had to close in the businesses have not reopened. —— and that is a scar. but it is notjust retailers that suffered, so did english language tuition, and we can talk to val hennessy, who runs an english language teaching school in bristol, i imagine that was incredibly difficult in a pandemic when people were not travelling. it difficult in a pandemic when people were not travelling.— were not travelling. it was almost impossible. _ were not travelling. it was almost impossible. we — were not travelling. it was almost impossible, we had _ were not travelling. it was almost impossible, we had to _ were not travelling. it was almost impossible, we had to close i were not travelling. it was almost. impossible, we had to close before the official— impossible, we had to close before the official lockdown because nobody was travelling to the uk to learn
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english. — was travelling to the uk to learn english, so we didn't have any students — english, so we didn't have any students to teach, and we had to -ive students to teach, and we had to give massive amounts of refunds to people _ give massive amounts of refunds to people who had booked courses with us. ., y ., , people who had booked courses with us. ., , ., , we people who had booked courses with us-_ we moved! us. how did you survive? we moved our teaching — us. how did you survive? we moved our teaching online _ us. how did you survive? we moved our teaching online where _ us. how did you survive? we moved our teaching online where we i us. how did you survive? we moved our teaching online where we could, but the _ our teaching online where we could, but the vast — our teaching online where we could, but the vast majority of people do not want — but the vast majority of people do not want online teaching, they want face to _ not want online teaching, they want face to face. we have reduced staff numbers, _ face to face. we have reduced staff numbers, and wejust face to face. we have reduced staff numbers, and we just came to agreements with landlords and creditors, and we ran up debts, and there _ creditors, and we ran up debts, and there are— creditors, and we ran up debts, and there are things we haven't paid. we used the _ there are things we haven't paid. we used the furlough scheme, which was -reat used the furlough scheme, which was great for— used the furlough scheme, which was great for employees but did nothing for the _ great for employees but did nothing for the business. who great for employees but did nothing for the business.— for the business. who do you owe money to? _ for the business. who do you owe money to? to _ for the business. who do you owe money to? to the _ for the business. who do you owe money to? to the landlord i for the business. who do you owe money to? to the landlord for - for the business. who do you owe | money to? to the landlord for one buildin: , money to? to the landlord for one building. we _ money to? to the landlord for one building, we owe _ money to? to the landlord for one building, we owe money _ money to? to the landlord for one building, we owe money to - money to? to the landlord for one i building, we owe money to hmrc, money to? to the landlord for one - building, we owe money to hmrc, and we are _ building, we owe money to hmrc, and we are the _ building, we owe money to hmrc, and we are the bounceback loan, which we hevent— we are the bounceback loan, which we haven't even _ we are the bounceback loan, which we haven't even started to repay, and we are _ haven't even started to repay, and we are quite a lot of money to bristol— we are quite a lot of money to bristol city council for business rates — bristol city council for business rates. 50 — bristol city council for business rates. ., ., ., rates. so looking ahead to the budaet rates. so looking ahead to the budget tomorrow, _ rates. so looking ahead to the budget tomorrow, is - rates. so looking ahead to the budget tomorrow, is there - rates. so looking ahead to the - budget tomorrow, is there anything particular you would like to see from the chancellor?— particular you would like to see from the chancellor? yes, i'd like to see a clear—
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from the chancellor? yes, i'd like to see a clear indication _ from the chancellor? yes, i'd like to see a clear indication that - to see a clear indication that business _ to see a clear indication that business rates relief for 20—21 and 21-22 _ business rates relief for 20—21 and 21-22 can— business rates relief for 20—21 and 21—22 can be given to language schools — 21-22 can be given to language schools. �* , ,, 21-22 can be given to language schools. �* , ., ., 21-22 can be given to language schools. , ., ., ., 21-22 can be given to language schools. �* , ., ., ., schools. because you have had to pay them during — schools. because you have had to pay them during the _ schools. because you have had to pay them during the pandemic. _ schools. because you have had to pay them during the pandemic. in - schools. because you have had to pay them during the pandemic. in actual. them during the pandemic. in actual fact, we them during the pandemic. in actual fact. we just — them during the pandemic. in actual fact, we just couldn't _ them during the pandemic. in actual fact, we just couldn't buy _ them during the pandemic. in actual fact, we just couldn't buy them, - them during the pandemic. in actual fact, we just couldn't buy them, we | fact, we just couldn't buy them, we still cannot — fact, we just couldn't buy them, we still cannot pay them, and bristol city council have been very understanding. however, that will not continue forever, and they feel the government has not been clear enough _ the government has not been clear enough that they can extend a relief to business schools. some councils have, _ to business schools. some councils have, the _ to business schools. some councils have, the vast majority have not. what are — have, the vast majority have not. what are the main challenges you are facing looking to the next year? brexit aside, the main challenges will be _ brexit aside, the main challenges will be trying to rebuild confidence and trying — will be trying to rebuild confidence and trying to get back the level of staffing _ and trying to get back the level of staffing that we had before. we also need to _ staffing that we had before. we also need to start paying down the debt, so with— need to start paying down the debt, so with inflation rising and wages are rising. — so with inflation rising and wages are rising, we are going to be on a knife _ are rising, we are going to be on a knife edge — are rising, we are going to be on a knife edge for at least another 18 months — knife edge for at least another 18 months. the first upturn we are likely— months. the first upturn we are likely to —
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months. the first upturn we are likely to see in anything at all in the english language centre is going to be in— the english language centre is going to be in the summer of 2022. so it would _ to be in the summer of 2022. so it would be _ to be in the summer of 2022. so it would be very useful, if we could see an _ would be very useful, if we could see an extension to the scheme that was in _ see an extension to the scheme that was in use _ see an extension to the scheme that was in use in— see an extension to the scheme that was in use in europe before brexit. thank— was in use in europe before brexit. thank you — was in use in europe before brexit. thank you very much, val hennessy. that is a message we are hearing from businesses in bristol, that they feel they are starting to get back on their feet, as you can see, some businesses doing a roaring trade, but things are still difficult, they are seeing rising energy costs, and i would like to see more on that from the chancellor in moral�*s budget. {lilla see more on that from the chancellor in moral's budget.— in moral's budget. 0k, thank you very much _ in moral's budget. 0k, thank you very much indeed, _ in moral's budget. 0k, thank you very much indeed, katie - in moral's budget. 0k, thank you very much indeed, katie price - in moral's budget. 0k, thank you| very much indeed, katie price got there. a man has pleaded guilty to stalking by sending intimidating comments to former bbc breakfast presenter louise minchin and her adult daughter on instagram. 44—year—old carl davies was due to stand trial but changed his plea to guilty on both charges. the judge told the court the most likely sentence was one of immediate imprisonment. mr davies will be sentenced
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in december. astronomers have found hints of what could be the first planet ever to be discovered outside our galaxy. the possible planet was located by nasa in the messier 51 galaxy, also known as the whirlpool galaxy, some 28 million light—years away from earth. nearly 5,000 exoplanets, worlds orbiting stars beyond our sun, have been found so far, but all of these have been within our own milky way galaxy. that's exciting. we are going to find out how the weather is looking, i think it is looking quite autumnal, nick. absolutely, the winds are blowing, rain is falling in some areas, but in others the rest of the week is looking mainly dry, with some sunshine in a few spots, mild to
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very mild. let's look at where the rain is falling heaviest this afternoon, north—west scotland, gales with the rain here, and generally across western parts, the cloud might be thick enough for light rain or drizzle. other powers, dry, may be a little bit of sunshine to the east and north—east of high ground. as we go through tonight, the rain is on the move south across more of scotland, northern ireland, cumbria, the lake district, turning white. eitherside cumbria, the lake district, turning white. either side of the weather front, temperatures closer to where we might expect them to be by day at this time of year. very wet tomorrow across southern and south—west scotland, north—west england, especially cumbria, eastern parts of northern ireland, pushing into north—west wales. away from here, one or two showers, but this zone will stay very wet for wednesday and thursday, perhaps even into friday, with rain totals mounting, along with rain totals mounting, along with the risk of flooding and destruction as a result. that's the
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forecast.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. millions of people are in line for a pay rise next year, with an end to the year—long public sector pay freeze expected in tomorrow's budget.
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the parliamentary watchdog recommends a 30—day suspension, for conservative mp, owen paterson, saying he repeatedly used his position to promote companies that paid him, something mr paterson denies. the government faces renewed pressure to stop untreated sewage being released into rivers, as the house of lords considers proposals to put a legal duty on water companies to end the practice. the former rangers, everton and scotland manager, walter smith, the second most sucessful rangers boss ever, has died at the age of 73. let's cross live to the house of commons, where labour is asking an urgent question about "all the provisions in the upcoming budget that have been made public in advance of the chancellor's statement."
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this will be regarding the details emerging about the budget. to give you a quick idea of labour's position on what we have heard so far, is that they are criticising the pay freeze that was announced last year, affecting so many front—line workers. more details on that when bridget philipson appears. one of the world's most criticised polluters, australia, has formally adopted a net zero emissions target by 2050. many critics say that australia, which is the world's second biggest
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coal exporter, has been too slow on climate action, despite suffering bushfires, floods and drought, partly blamed on climate change. the prime minister, scott morrison, made the pledge after bargaining with mps within his government. but he said australia's plan does not include ending its massive fossil fuel sectors. australians want action on climate change, they are taking action on climate change, but they also want to protect theirjobs and their livelihoods, they also want to keep the cost of living down and they also want to protect the australian way of life, especially in rural and regional areas. here's our correspondent, shaimaa khalil in sydney. i think, you know, the fact that it has taken so long, the fact that it is so close to the wire with only days before he heads to the cop26 and now he is able to take that commitment to them just shows you that this is not smooth sailing, that this is a very politically
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divisive issue here in australia and this has only been achieved after months of political wrangling with the government's junior coalition partner the nationals. we coalition partner the nationals. are taking new stra house we are taking new straight to the house of commons. sir lindsay hoyle, speaker of the house is speaking and about information regarding the budget being leaked to the media. the governmentjust doesn't have to take my— the governmentjust doesn't have to take my word for it. it's all ministerial code says so. when parliament is in session, the most important — parliament is in session, the most important announcements of government policy should be made in the first— government policy should be made in the first instance in this parliament, this house. as i said yesterday. — parliament, this house. as i said yesterday. i_ parliament, this house. as i said yesterday, i do not have to give a reason _ yesterday, i do not have to give a reason for — yesterday, i do not have to give a reason for my decisions about urgent question— reason for my decisions about urgent question applications, but in this case: _ question applications, but in this case, i_ question applications, but in this case, i want the house and especially the government, to be clear— especially the government, to be clear that — especially the government, to be clear that if the government continues to treat this house in the discourteous manner, i will do everything in my power to ensure ministers — everything in my power to ensure ministers are called here at the earliest — ministers are called here at the earliest opportunity to explain
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themselves. i personally have nothing — themselves. i personally have nothing against the minister, i feel sorry— nothing against the minister, i feel sorry for— nothing against the minister, i feel sorry for the person who has to answer— sorry for the person who has to answer at — sorry for the person who has to answer at this dispatch box, but once _ answer at this dispatch box, but once again, this house will not be taken _ once again, this house will not be taken for— once again, this house will not be taken for granted. it's not right for everybody to be briefed. it's not more — for everybody to be briefed. it's not more important to go on the news in the _ not more important to go on the news in the morning, it's more important to come _ in the morning, it's more important to come here. let's get this message across _ to come here. let's get this message across is— to come here. let's get this message across. is there any elected members that represent this united kingdom, its not _ that represent this united kingdom, its not done through sky tv. let's io its not done through sky tv. let's go to— its not done through sky tv. let's go to calling bridget phillipson urgent — go to calling bridget phillipson urgent question.— go to calling bridget phillipson urgent question. thank you, mr seaker. urgent question. thank you, mr speaker- to _ urgent question. thank you, mr speaker. to ask— urgent question. thank you, mr speaker. to ask the _ urgent question. thank you, mr speaker. to ask the chancellorl urgent question. thank you, mr i speaker. to ask the chancellor of the exchequer for details on the statement of all of the provisions in the upcoming budget that had been made public in advance of the chancels made public in advance of the chancel�*s statement. made public in advance of the chancel's statement.- made public in advance of the chancel's statement. thank you. let me start by — chancel's statement. thank you. let me start by saying — chancel's statement. thank you. let me start by saying that _ chancel's statement. thank you. let me start by saying that i _ chancel's statement. thank you. let me start by saying that i have - chancel's statement. thank you. let me start by saying that i have the i me start by saying that i have the deepest respect for you, this house and all its processes. it's a pleasure to be with you this afternoon. the ability to scrutinise the budget is crucial which is why
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we have five days a parliamentary debate and why the chancellor will be appearing in front of two selected committees next week. he will announce a budget tomorrow that delivers a stronger budget for the british people investing in public services, levelling up, delivering on growth and jobs with a pay rise for 7 million people, 5 million in the public sector, 2 million in an increase in the national living wage. there i will summarise some of the announcement we have made with the announcement we have made with the caveat that the bulk will be delivered by the chancellor himself at this despatch box tomorrow. importantly that includes all market sensitive information. part of the government's objective in specific aspect of the budget in advance is to help communicate to the public what we're doing with their hardened money. we believe there is merit to be clear and accurate information. let me turn very briefly to just a few of the measures we have
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announced. an increase in the national living wage from £8 91 to £9 50 an hour remaining thousand pounds a year for £9 50 an hour remaining thousand pounds a yearfor a £9 50 an hour remaining thousand pounds a year for a full—time worker. £3 billion worth of investment for high wage, high skill economy, and a quadrupling of the numbers of skills boot camps. a multi—billion pound overhaul of public transport to help level of community is across england with transport settlements were city regions increase to 5.7 billion allocated directly to cities and part of the spending review, £5.9 billion dealfor the nhs part of the spending review, £5.9 billion deal for the nhs to tackle the backlog of nonemergency procedures and modernise digital technology with at least 100 community diagnostic centres to help clear most test backlogs by the end of this parliament. these are just a few measures the chancellor will outline tomorrow as the government continues its work on delivering a stronger economy for the british people. stronger economy for the british --eole. ,, . ., , . people. shadow minister bridget
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philli son. people. shadow minister bridget phillipson. thank _ people. shadow minister bridget phillipson. thank you _ people. shadow minister bridget phillipson. thank you and - people. shadow minister bridget phillipson. thank you and thank| people. shadow minister bridget. phillipson. thank you and thank you for granting — phillipson. thank you and thank you for granting this _ phillipson. thank you and thank you for granting this urgent _ phillipson. thank you and thank you for granting this urgent question. i for granting this urgent question. we face an urgent cost of living crisis. prices are up in our shops and petrol pumps and heating bills. families and businesses are waiting and hoping for the chancellor to take reaction they need and our country desperately needs. but the chancellor hasn't even delivered his budget yet and it's already falling apart. in recent days, we have had thousands of words about what the chancellor plans to do. but the silence is deafening on the soaring bills and rising prices facing families and businesses. today i asked the minister five things. and i ask him to answer them clearly and simply. not in press releases but to this house. first, will hejustify properly withholding from parliament decisions that he had his colleagues have given to the press? second, he just stood there and said that he
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believes in clear and accurate information. so on that basis, will he confirm that he understands that for full—time worker on the minimum wage in receipt of universal credit, a rise to £9 50 an hour will place far less than the next thousand times in their pocket? third, will he confirm that the public sector pay rises ministers told newspapers about yesterday will be real terms pay rises, as his ministerial colleague was unable to do so on the television this morning? porth, will he follow labour's lead and confirm today now that he is with us that he will be cutting vat on domestic heating bills to zero for six months and finally, well he back britain's high street firms business rates and replace them with a better system fast? he can tell the newspapers it's time for him to tell this
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house. . .. it's time for him to tell this house. ., ~' ,, ~ it's time for him to tell this house. ., ,, ~ .,~ house. thank you, mr speaker. obviously _ house. thank you, mr speaker. obviously it's _ house. thank you, mr speaker. obviously it's very _ house. thank you, mr speaker. obviously it's very important i house. thank you, mr speaker. | obviously it's very important we consider all the measures being trialled in the round. what i would say is clearly the wider announcements to be made or entirely accurate. the national living wage is rising by £1000 a year, that takes the benefit for a full—time worker on the national living wage since 2016 to £5,000. that's a substantial increase. it beggars belief that the labour party stand here saying 6.6% increase in the national living wage somehow isn't enough and it needs to be considered in conjunction with all the other announcements being made including £500 million household support fund, including the energy price cap, including the energy price cap, including all the action we have taken to freeze full duty, keep bills low, we are acutely conscious of the pressures that face households and that's something we take action to modify. on public sector pay, she asked about that, we
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will be returning and i'm delighted to to the normal processes that adjust for public sector pay in light of all the pressures that exist and it will be for the relevant pay review bodies to discuss in conjunction with government in the normal way. i won't pre—empt that work but we will be working closely with them to make sure that what is announced as right. the chancellor will have further details in his speech. when it comes to the cost of energy we have the energy price cap which is protecting households up to £1 a year of their bill. that's the right thing to do, it's something we all recognise as a priority for our constituents and when it comes to business rates, we have the upshot of the review that been conducted of how we can get the future of this right. the labour party have committed to abolishing business rates and have done so without any clear idea of how they would do that. the disconnect between what they have committed to unfunded is somewhere in the region of 400 billion committed to with 5 billion
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savings to pay for it. that's not a responsible way to run the economy. what you will hear tomorrow is a clear plan to make sure we can balance the books but also take our economy forward in a way which works for the benefit of communities and thatis for the benefit of communities and that is a priority which the chancellor and myself. this is not the first government _ chancellor and myself. this is not the first government that - chancellor and myself. this is not the first government that has i chancellor and myself. this is not i the first government that has wanted more than one days newsletter budget but the right way to do it is all ministers observed complete budget secrecy, the chancellor announces the tax changes and block totals on spending and then in the days that follow, cabinet ministers come to this house to announce the details spending plans and subject them to scrutiny. if that was right for all previous governments, why isn't it right for this one? i previous governments, why isn't it right for this one?— right for this one? i thank him for his question _ right for this one? i thank him for his question and _ right for this one? i thank him for his question and actually - right for this one? i thank him for his question and actually i - his question and actually i completely share with him his assessment of the importance of this house and that something which both
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the chancellor and i are acutely aware of. in 2013, the then chancellor george osborne asked for a review into the practice of the release of budget information under embargo on budget day and he set out a series of recommendations. his central conclusion was that the treasury should introduce a ban on the police if the core of the budget, the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscaljudgment budget, the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgment and individual tax rates, reliefs and allowances. we have observed that structure in full and that something i am obviously totally committed to continuing to do.— i am obviously totally committed to continuing to do._ thank| continuing to do. judgment. thank ou ve continuing to do. judgment. thank you very much. — continuing to do. judgment. thank you very much. mr— continuing to do. judgment. thank you very much, mr speaker. i i continuing to do. judgment. thank| you very much, mr speaker. i don't no whether to congratulate the speaker on his promotion to give the budget a day early though he has not given us in this house and apology. he should not be announcing things on twitter, we should be waiting for the budget to see the full detail. this has been going on since september. this is not new, this has
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been daily announcements trip feeding the entire budget ahead of time and of course the government holds all the cards on this along with the or because we cannot tell that detail actually is and for scotland, we cannot tell what he barnett consequentials if indeed there are any will be. we know it's going to be in the budget speech, we note what's not going to be in, because the government has not done things like carbon capture and storage in scotland and of course none of this is what the government and the chancellor should be doing in their budget speech. they should be stating the £20 universal credit cut, scrapping the national insurance tax onjobs, cut, scrapping the national insurance tax on jobs, tackling the spiralling cost of living crisis and the should be supporting hospitality and tourism with a vat cut to see them through these winter months and into next year. mr speaker, if they cannot be responsible with the powers that they hold and cannot be trusted to give us the actual truth
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on budget day, tomorrow, all of the financial powers i colicky and should be given to the scottish parliament so that we can make the decisions that right for i thank her for i thank herfor her i thank her for her remarks. i thank herfor her remarks. i think actually we are much stronger as one united kingdom. it's the only to reaffirm we are expected to have the fastest growth in the g7 this year and next and that's something we are achieving is one country together. she asks about the barnett consequentials and those have been set up clearly. i can assure her that we consider these very closely and will be in a position due to give good news for scotland as part of a strong united kingdom tomorrow. i had productive conversations with the scottish finance minister about the scottish finance minister about the future framework. i can't commit i speak to her in accordance with the regular conventions tomorrow. studio: that was simon clark, the conservative chief secretary and
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what has essentially been following is some disquiet, a lot of disquiet within the house of commons. it started with some lindsay hoyle who again being very critical of the budget briefing this that have been given a of tomorrow's statement from the chancellor rishi sunak. he was angry yesterday as well saying it was not acceptable to brief the media ahead of mps about the budget also that ministers used to walk if they briefed about our budget. so labour's shadow chief secretary to the treasury also posed an urgent question, again the criticism was mainly on how the budget briefings have been handled, the question was, "will you please make a statement on the details of all the provisions in the details of all the provisions in the upcoming budget that had been made public? in advance of the
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chancellor's statement." sirjohn redwood conservative also laying out how the protocol, the etiquette of the budget, should be handled and not having media briefings ahead of what we are expecting to hear on wednesday. this he is saying there should be further details tomorrow. the headlines on bbc news... the freeze on public sector wages is set to end, with the chancellor expected to confirm in tomorrow's budget that millions of workers will get a pay rise next spring. the conservative mp and former cabinet minister, owen paterson, faces a potential thirty day suspension from parliament for breaching commons rules on lobbying, something he denies. one of the world's biggest exporters of fossil fuels, australia, has formally adopted a target to reach net
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zero emissions by 2050. conservative mps are defending themselves from accusations they've given the green light for raw sewage to be dumped into rivers and the sea. it's after some voted not to force water companies to reduce the amount of sewage they release. water companies say the new law would have cost billions. zoe conway reports. this is untreated sewage being released into langstone harbour in hampshire. the pipe, known as an outfall, is seven foot wide. the footage was shot last thursday. the sewage poured out of it for 49 hours straight. i launched my drone from about 100 metres over there, and once i was flying over the top looking at the screen, i just couldn't believe what i was seeing. the general reaction
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from people on social media who have seen the film, they really are astonished at quite how much of this is happening, and it is happening right along our coastline. quite simply, it needs to stop. the sewage came from here, the budds farm treatment plant run by southern water. it is allowed to discharge what the company says is heavily diluted waste water into the harbour during heavy rainfall. this prevents it backing up and causing flooding. the concern is that notjust the faecal matter that is coming out through that sewage treatment plant, it is full of chemicals, as well. all the chemicals we use every day that are underneath our sinks and keep them locked away from children because they are toxic, they come out here and can be toxic to our wildlife, as well. they could be changing their sex,
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affecting their immune system, causing cancer. there could be birds coming here to feed that are picking up these toxins, and the effects of the toxins may then be seen hundreds of thousands of miles away where they are breeding, for instance. it's not clear yet whether this 49—hour spill will be considered to be legal or not. injuly, southern water was hit with a £90 million fine after pleading guilty to thousands of illegal discharges. southern water told the bbc it's investing in infrastructure and natural projects such as enhanced weapons to reduce water run—off. no prizes for guessing what these brown spots refer to — places where treated and untreated effluent is released into our rivers. sewage was discharged into british waters 400,000 times last year. now it is at full whack, i going straight into the river. again, you have wipes, sanitary towels. - campaigners like mark
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barrow are speaking out. using social media to highlight what is happening in rivers in wetherby, west yorkshire. his videos are watched by thousands of people. the government says the amount of sewage in our rivers is unacceptable, and the government has a bill in parliament to address the problem, which they say will deliver progressive reductions in the harm caused by storm overflows. the trouble is, 22 conservative mps say it does not go far enough. they want the government to back this amendment. it puts a legal duty on water companies to take all reasonable steps to ensure untreated sewage is not discharged. we cannot have sewage discharged into our seas, our seas being unclean and unhealthy to swim in as a result, and people's lives being blighted, because whenever they worry about heavy rainfall, they worry about sewage coming into their households. i want to work with the government to fix this problem, but ultimately, for my constituents, who have to live with this, because we are a coastal
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constituency, i have to put them before what the government may be telling me i should do. for the last few days, anger has been mounting at the government's position. they have been protesting on the streets in margate in kent, and they have taken to the beaches in nearby whitstable. what everyone agrees on is that britain's victorian water system needs rescuing, but it will cost billions and billions to do so. zoe conway, bbc news. it's estimated that tens of thousands of women in the uk are unaware they have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. research shows boys with the condition are up to four times more likely to be diagnosed in childhood, as they tend to exhibit more disruptive behaviours. but girls aren't, and that affects them as they grow up. our health correspondent anna collinson reports. adhd is having a head that's constantly full of noise and everything comes
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in at the same intensity. there's a stereotype that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder only affects naughty boys. small white boys, like, just running around in class, that is literally all i knew about adhd. it's estimated that at least tens of thousands of women in the uk could have undiagnosed adhd. you know there's something, | but you don't know what it is. these women have spent much of their lives feeling misunderstood. for twiggy, something clicked when she read about a woman's experience on social media. she's finding it hard to focus at work, she works in a different way to everyone else. so many ideas, but finds it hard to follow through with them. i was, like, "hold on a second!" she had to persuade her gp to refer her to a psychiatrist. when i got my diagnosis, i think i started crying. i felt really relieved and i felt happy, at the same time, because i thought to myself,
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"so all this time, all this time," like, "it wasn't me." experts say improving adhd diagnosis in women is vital, as the longer they go untreated, the poorer their outcomes could be. women who hide their symptoms well can also be misdiagnosed or simply missed. you learn to suppress who you are, so that you can look like a normal person. and then i had a baby and, suddenly, that extra pressure, the sleep deprivation, all the wheels fell off and when he was three years old, i had a nervous breakdown. hester and her husband have both been diagnosed with adhd but they say while his journey took months, hers took years of doctors not listening. he was taken seriously. he wasn't doubted. at no point did anyone say, "oh, could you just be anxious? "this sounds like anxiety or depression to me, "here, have some tablets." you had to wait decades for your diagnosis, why do you think it took so long? bluntly, it's because i was female. and i was, in fact, told that by the nurse that actually did finally do my diagnosis. you know, she said, "if you'd been a boy,
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"you would have probably been diagnosed when you were at school." research has found that girls tend to be missed because their symptoms are more subtle, less hyperactive, more inattentive. boys are, therefore, three to four times more likely to be diagnosed in childhood. the diagnostic gap shrinks in adulthood but experts say the gender bias remains. these women haven't woken up in their mid—40s with adhd, there have been signposts all the way along. we need to raise awareness so people know and understand that adhd in females presents differently. they need to know they can't look for the boisterous boys. they've got to look for something different. and that needs to be done in educational settings, across health care practitioners. while a diagnosis brings answers, it raises questions about what could have been. sheila's life was full of chaos before she found out she had adhd at 63. i get myself into situations that i shouldn't be in. i like, i have had about six car crashes because i'm super.
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woman behind the wheel. she has battled depression and suicidal thoughts. her impulsive behaviour meant she struggled to work or take care of her children. i bend over backwards for my kids, but i wouldn't have done then. i it was all about me. they've turned out amazingly well. but i'm sad they've done it in spite of me and not because of me. i all the women we've spoken to say their diagnosis has improved their lives. forsome, medication and therapy has helped. for others, all they finally needed was answers. the adhd is very much still there, it's me, it's a part of who i am but now i'm able to manage it more. before, i was like a volcano. and now i'm more like a mountain, gentler, quieter, smoother. - and i didn't like me then, i but i'm quite fond of me now. anna collinson, bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. the weather so far gives an indication of what to expect for the rest of the week. big variations in rainfall. rain for several days to come with as others will stay dry, a bit of sunshine occasionally. we have no pressure to the west and from it a weather front which will spend the next several days giving parts of the uk rain totals mounting. central and eastern parts of england will stay largely dry. rain or dry without your from this direction well above—average for the time of year. there's a lot of cloud out there today. the heaviest most persistent rain in north—west scotland, gales, blustery elsewhere, generally across the western side may encounter light rain or drizzle. brighter spells to the north—east and temperature is just nudging the high teens in some
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spots. it stays windy, the rain pushing further south discussed scotland northern ireland, turning wet in cumbria and the lake district. it will be mainly dry and temperatures close to ethanol would be rain clears. it will sit through the day. southern south—west parts. eastern counties of northern ireland the very wet day. as the day goes on, more north—west wales starts to get into that rain. either side, we expect things to stay largely dry. cloud around, sunny spells here and there, blustery, windiest, get to see sunshine, 18 or
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19. further rain overnight into thursday. thursday to friday, parts of cumbria and the lake district, parts of wales, may be closer to 200 millimetres in the wettest parts of cumbria. risk of flooding increasing. friday the weather begins to push east. low pressure close by for a
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millions of workers are set to get an increase in their wages as the government ends its public sector pay freeze. police, teachers, nurses and members of the armed forces are among those in line for a pay rise next year. what the chancellor has done, though, is he has indicated to the pay review body that willingness to end the pay freeze, so that gives them, i think, a good platform now to assess what is the appropriate measure. so with no guarantees that any pay rises will be higher than inflation, we'll be asking how much better off workers may be. also this lunchtime... the former cabinet minister owen paterson faces suspension from parliament after he's found to have breached commons rules on lobbying. the metropolitan police apologises
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to the family of two murdered sisters for the way it responded when they were reported missing.

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