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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 26, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm david eades. our top stories. afghanistan is on a countdown to catastrophe, says the un, with millions facing starvation and despair. some are even selling their babies to buy food. even while we've been here another person came up to one of our team another person came up to one of ourteam and another person came up to one of our team and asked if we would like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put in words. in sudan — at least seven people have been killed and dozens are injured — as soldiers open fire on crowds protesting against the military coup. we reject it completely. we have to go back to the constitutional document that the government to be handed to
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civilians and you should free all those detained. washington confirms its new coronavirus rules, for travel to the us — tourists will need proof they've been vaccinated, and a negative covid test. and — a royal wedding, without the pomp. japan gets ready for their princess to marry a commoner — before the couple leave for a new life in the united states. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. we start in afghanistan — with a distressing snapshot — of the unravelling humanitarian situation. the un has warned that millions are facing starvation with the situation deteriorating sharply, since the taliban seized power in august. international funds, which propped up the economy have been stopped — as the world debates how to deal with the new regime. our correspondent, yogita limaye — cameraman sanjay ganguly — and producer imogen anderson have witnessed, first—hand, the dire situation
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on the ground in herat. a warning — there are disturbing images, in this report, from the start. this is what starvation does to a country. to its tiniest lives. six—month—old usman. habib ur—rehman, born three months ago. afghanistan was barely surviving before the taliban took over, but now foreign funds which propped up this country have been frozen.
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putting at leasti million children at risk of dying. in this ward, one in five will not make it. usman weighs less than half of what he should. his father among millions who have no work. this hospital is full. some babies are already sharing a bed. while we were there, six more children were brought in. it's the only facility for hundreds of miles because, without foreign money, most hospitals are collapsing.
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doctors and nurses among masses of government workers who haven't been paid for months. a third of the country's people don't know where their next meal will come from. we travelled out of herat to a rural settlement. tens of thousands displaced from remote provinces by decades of war and severe drought. no means of income, barely any food. some days, families here don't eat. they have sold whatever little they had, and now some are forced to do the unthinkable. this baby girl has been sold by her family. we're hiding their identity to protect them.
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her husband used to collect rubbish, but even that earns him nothing now. once the baby is able to walk, she'll be taken away by the man who bought her. he's paid more than half of the £400 she's been sold for. that will get the family through a few months. they've been told the girl will be married to his child, but no one can be sure. we know there are other families here who've
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sold their children, and even while we've been here, another person came up to one of our team and asked if we would like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put in words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan. it cannot wait while the world debates whether or not to recognise a taliban government. nearby, aid agencies hand out parcels that might save some children from hunger. alone, they can't provide for the staggering needs. giving the taliban money without guarantees on human rights and how the funds
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will be used is dangerous. but afghanistan is sinking fast. millions here will not survive the winter. yogita limaye, bbc news, herat. i'm joined now by shaza moghraby from the u.n's world food progamme. we described that as a snapshot of what is going on in afghanistan right now. saying at the end there, millions will not survive. from your perspective, what is the scale of this catastrophe, she called it? . ., ., of this catastrophe, she called it? ~ ., ., ., , ., it? what we are looking at is a crisis that _ it? what we are looking at is a crisis that is _ it? what we are looking at is a crisis that is fast _ it? what we are looking at is a crisis that is fast going - it? what we are looking at is a crisis that is fast going into - crisis that is fast going into one of the largest humanitarian crises in the world. in the ten years that the un has been conducting assessments this is the first time that we see so many people suffering such acute levels and emergency levels of food insecurity so the situation is very, very critical at this stage and we have been warning about this for quite some time so the results have concerned our worst fears. we are at this
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point of no return but the situation can get even worse if we do not get the resources that we need to support the people who are in desperate need of a lie and our life—saving support. need of a lie and our life-saving support. sorry to interrupt _ life-saving support. sorry to interrupt you _ life-saving support. sorry to interrupt you but _ life-saving support. sorry to interrupt you but you - life-saving support. sorry to interrupt you but you said i life-saving support. sorry to i interrupt you but you said your worst fears have been realised. part of those fears are very simple and heretical. the funding of the readiness to funding of the readiness to fund with the taliban in control are simply not there. yes, we need to separate. we need to separate, any negotiations happening on the ground, the politics from the humanitarian. because the scale that we are looking at is really, really severe. millions of children are acutely malnourished. those babies that
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are fighting life—threatening illnesses are probably doing so an empty stomach so we cannot afford to wait any longer and with winter fast approaching we need to have the funds as urgently as possible. in terms of what those _ urgently as possible. in terms of what those funds _ urgently as possible. in terms of what those funds are. - urgently as possible. in termsj of what those funds are. what is the number? what do you need to avert this catastrophe? we need about — to avert this catastrophe? - need about $210 million every single month in order to reach the 23 million people in afghanistan.— the 23 million people in afuhanistan. . , ., , afghanistan. that is a huge sum of money desperately _ afghanistan. that is a huge sum of money desperately needed, l of money desperately needed, clearly, for now, thank you very much indeed. clearly, for now, thank you very much indeed. the australian prime minister, scott morrison, says he will confirm at next weekend's climate summit that australia intends to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
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but mr morrison refused to strengthen emissions reduction targets for 2030. he said he would work to keep australia's coal mines open. australia is one of the world's largest coal and gas exporters and has long resisted adopting a carbon—neutral target. let's take you to canberra now where australian prime minister scott morrison is speaking. the united states has suspended a big aid package to sudan amid worldwide condemnation of the military coup there. the seven hundred million dollar economic support fund was intended to help sudan's transition to democracy. crowds of people remain on the streets to protest against the coup. seven people are known to have been killed and dozens injured in clashes with the security forces, while troops are reported to be going from house to house to arrest protst organisers. anne soy reports. keeping the flames of democracy alive. it is here on the streets of
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sudan cities they were fanned, and the people are back trying to stop the military extinguishing them. they shared power with the army and there was the promise of elections, so the coup is seen as a betrayal. translation: we re'ect it completely. * we have to go back to the constitutional document. the government should be handed to civilians and you should free all those you detained. thousands heeded the call to defend democracy and some are paying a heavy price. but many of these images were blocked on state media. they played patriotic songs all day instead, breaking only to bring this announcement by the head of the ruling council. translation: first, a state of emergency is declared - all over the country. protesters believe the military possible actions today, including putting the prime minister under house
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arrest, speak far louder than their words. many, including aid agencies in the country, are concerned about what happens now. we're just so concerned. this was a big humanitarian situation before, with 14- million people in need - of humanitarian assistance. there are over a million refugees hosted here, i and yet this country- is struggling to move on, and it was in some ways, i it feels like everything has gone back to square one. it's just two years since the streets last looked like this, with long—term leader al—bashir being overthrown. it was hoped there would be some stability, but today, that hope seems shattered. anne soy, bbc news. let s get some of the day s other news. the egyptian president, abdel fattah al sisi, has ended the state of emergency that had been in force in egypt since april twenty seventeen. in a facebook post, mr al sisi
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said he would not be extending the measure because egypt had become — as he put it — an oasis of security and stability. the electric carmaker, tesla, reached a market value of one trillion dollars on monday. it's the first vehicle manufacturer and only the fifth company to do so. tesla shares climbed sharply after it struck a deal to sell one hundred thousand vehicles to the car rental firm hertz. facebook has removed a video by brazilian presidentjair bolsonaro from its platforms because he made false claims suggesting coronavirus vaccines could cause aids. in this video — president bolsonaro can be seen reading from a fake scientific study, which has been widely circulated amongst conspiracy theorists on social media. new covid rules are coming soon for travellers to the us — most people will need proof of vaccination ——
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but bans on non—us citizens arriving from many countries will end. our north america correspondent peter bowes sent us this update. this is a major change in policy by the united states announced a few weeks ago but the biden administration is now providing some more details. it means that foreign nationals, those non—us citizens will be once again able to travel into the united states if they are fully vaccinated. they must�*ve received one of the vaccines authorised by the world health organization or the food and drug administration here in the united states. and they have to test negative in the three days, 72 hours before they travel. one exception is that this not apply to children under the age of 18. in some parts of the world not available for that age group for young people under the age of 18 may not be eligible yet
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and one significant changes that the us citizens if they come back to the united states they do not have to be vaccinated but they have to test negative within 2a hours. 24—hour is before they board a flight. previously it was three days so there is actually a tightening of restrictions there and perhaps another message from the biden administration to all americans wherever they are that they should get the vaccination. once people arrive in the united states there are no further restrictions, there is no quarantine, there will be some collecting of information, contact information for tracing purposes by the airline when people get to this country and it will be the responsibility of the airlines to police the situation. forthose of the airlines to police the situation. for those airlines, clearly good news. they have wanted for many months and it is good news from business in this country and for the tourism industry.
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stay with us on bbc news, still to come: more revelations about the person who handed actor, alec baldwin a loaded gun — prior to a fatal shooting on a film set. indira gandhi, ruler of the world's largest democracy, died today. only yesterday, she had spoken of dying in the service of her country and said, "i would be proud of it. "every drop of my blood will contribute to the "growth of this nation." after 46 years of unhappiness, these two countries have concluded a chapter of history. no more suspicion, no more fear, no more uncertainty of what each day might bring. booster ignition and lift off. of discovery with a crew of six astronaut heroes and one american legend. - this is beautiful.
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a milestone in human history. born today, this girl in india is the seven billionth person on the planet. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. the un warns of a countdown to catastrophy in afghanistan — with millions of people facing starvation and despair. washington confirms its new coronavirus rules, for travel to the us — tourists will need proof they've been vaccinated, and a negative covid test. more details have emerged about the events that led to the tragic death of a crew member on the set of alec baldwin's new film, rust. an affidavit released on sunday
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reveals the actor was drawing a revolver across his body and pointing it at a camera, during rehearsal when the weapon fired. a live round struck the cinematographer halyna hutchins in the chest, it also injured the directorjoel souza. according to the affadavit, the actor was told that the prop wasn't loaded. but according to the la times, just over a week ago baldwin's stunt double accidentally fired two rounds from a prop firearm after being told that weapon was "cold", not loaded with ammunition. film director bandar albuliwi has started a petition calling for real firearms to be banned from film sets, whilst state senator david cortese is pushing legislation to ban guns on film sets and bothjoin me now. thank you for your time. i wanted to start with you. how signature is coming in and i suppose, first of why did you
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feel the need to do this? how are you? _ feel the need to do this? how are you? thank _ feel the need to do this? how are you? thank you _ feel the need to do this? how are you? thank you so - feel the need to do this? firm are you? thank you so much for having me, actually. i began a petition shortly after i discovered that halyna hutchins was murdered on that set. within the hour ijust felt was murdered on that set. within the hour i just felt a need to make some change so i went to change dot org and i decided to start a petition and basically ijust decided to start a petition and basically i just wrote decided to start a petition and basically ijust wrote down everything that i know is wrong with the industry, whether it is the career working conditions. we have crewmembers doing 1a or 16 hour days. sometimes that a day off. on top of that we are asking them top of that we are asking them to go to work where there is guns being fired at them? these crewmembers make movies like the matrix but they will live in the matrix. you need to understand that. they cannot slow down a bullet and they can't just slow down a bullet and they can'tjust dodge it at the last minute. so is a real change needs to happen. i understand that. needs to happen. i understand that- this _ needs to happen. i understand that. this is — needs to happen. i understand that. this is a _ needs to happen. i understand that. this is a rare _ that. this is a rare occurrence, it is worth saying
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that standards vary somewhat across the film industry. i don't think this is a rare occurrence. i mean this has happened multiple times. i mean, it has happened over 50 times and all that you remember to are not working on a film with alec baldwin where it is an a—list celebrity. these are people working 1a an a—list celebrity. these are people working 1416 hour days and the policy behind the wheel because of their exhaustion and the end up killing themselves. so these crew working conditions have been going on forever and it is time for change. forever and it is time for change-— forever and it is time for chance. ., ., , , change. you are picking up the baton there. _ change. you are picking up the baton there. how— change. you are picking up the baton there. how quickly - change. you are picking up the baton there. how quickly do i change. you are picking up the. baton there. how quickly do you think you could get something through? some sort of legislation to ensure dot—mac most people would accept this is absolute madness would not happen again. let is absolute madness would not happen again-— is absolute madness would not happen again. let me extend my condolences _ happen again. let me extend my condolences to _ happen again. let me extend my condolences to halyna _ happen again. let me extend my condolences to halyna hutchins. condolences to halyna hutchins and herfamily and loved ones and herfamily and loved ones and friends. in terms of turnaround, we requested first thing this morning, it was the
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beginning of our work week this morning and we requested our legal counsel, we cold legislative council in california. that will lead to something coming back to us that we believe before the end of this week. the voting session takes up in the senate in january. january three. but in january. january three. but in the meanwhile, we intend to hold informational hearings, fact—finding hearings which i can do as the chair of the senate laboured appointment committee, where we will bring in workers from the film industry here in california as well as employers. and talk to them, ask them what is going on, as the hard questions we need to ask to inform the greater detail on this bill. would you foresee a relatively straightforward journey here or would you be ready for significant opposition to it? i
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don't think there is going to be opposition. we have the utmost respect for, here in california, for the union organisation that represents most of these workers. i spoke with airbase president this morning and reassured him that we are interested in protecting workers and that is what we're doing here. these are workforce protections first and foremost. in this day and age, having a firearm that has a live firing pin in it and that can fire ammunition that is lithe and can kill somebody should be unacceptable to everyone in the state of california and the workforce here. i hope employers come along as well. there are many, many other ways to stage what they want to stage without having live firearms out there on crowded sets. i firearms out there on crowded sets. .. . , firearms out there on crowded sets. ~ . , , sets. i think many people, most --eole sets. i think many people, most people would — sets. i think many people, most people would recognise - sets. i think many people, most people would recognise that - people would recognise that surely must be the case. i get the impression from what you have said that you see this, in
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a way, as indicative of perhaps deep—seated issues within your industry? {iii deep-seated issues within your indust ? , , industry? of course. this has been going — industry? of course. this has been going on _ industry? of course. this has been going on for— industry? of course. this has been going on for ages. - industry? of course. this has been going on for ages. and | been going on for ages. and hollywood basically has been an open wound. hollywood has been putting little band—aids on this winter when the wood needed actual stitches were debelieved at that. do needed actual stitches were debelieved at that.- debelieved at that. do you think, because _ debelieved at that. do you think, because we're - debelieved at that. do you l think, because we're looking debelieved at that. do you - think, because we're looking at a much bigger picture, in a way, haven't we? when you are talking about many of the regulations by which the industry is run can you see the sorts of changes that you want coming in? you may guess what at first and foremost, i want to make sure there are not real live firearms on movie sets. that needs to be passed. i mean, that bill needs to be proposed. and on top of that i want our crewmembers, are below the line crewmembers to be able to go home every single night to go home every single night to theirfamilies and to go home every single night to their families and not get murdered on set because there is a live gun shooting at them. i want to make sure they're not working 1a or 18 hour days
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without a day off sometimes. that is what i am looking for. just extending beyond this single particular issue, do there is more ground for you to cover in terms of the conditions under which people work in the film industry? it is an interesting question and in california there was labour strikes as recently as a few days ago. two weeks ago without the industry would go on strike and it didn't. halyna hutchins was still alive then and what we knew is that there were labour conditions, much like you heard aboutjust now, that have existed. workforce conditions that have been oppressive for people, dangerous for people. high risk for people. and previous to this happening we had already made a decision to hold hearings to try to get to the bottom of that so, yes, i do think more will come. i do think more will come. i do think there may be multiple piece of legislation and more
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focus in my office and this particular piece of legislation to deal specifically with keeping live ammunition and live firearms off of those sets. thank you both very much indeed. i'm sorry we have got to leave it down thank you very much for your time. a controversial engagement will become a controversial marriage later on tuesday as princess mako, the eldest niece of japan's emperor marries her common partner, kei komuro. the ceremony will be followed by a press conference later to confirm a union many japanese have felt to be inappropriate. shihoko goto is from the wilson centre in washington. she has more details on this different royal wedding! this is not the wedding of which fairy tales are made however, it is going to be inspirational nonetheless. you have to remember that the japanese royal lineage requires not only women to, they cannot succeed the throne. it also, evenif succeed the throne. it also, even if they are members of the
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imperial household, once they marry they actually had to leave the family. it marry they actually had to leave the family.- marry they actually had to leave the family. it is going to be a challenging - leave the family. it is going to be a challenging one - leave the family. it is going l to be a challenging one think that couple. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ hello there. after a day of sunshine and showers on monday, the weather on tuesday is going to look very different, and here's why. this cloud here in the atlantic is pushing in from the west, and that's bringing with it some outbreaks of rain. ahead of that, though, with some clearer skies, it will be a bit cooler across eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. but out to the west, it's milder to start the day with this rain around. some quite heavy rain, too. that rain shouldn't last too long. in northern ireland, we'll see a a spell of rain pushing eastwards through the morning across scotland and northern england, but the rain further south tends to become light and patchy. most of that rain will have cleared in the afternoon, leaving some drizzle around some western hills, but to the east of high ground, perhaps some sunshine,
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many places becoming dry in the afternoon. strong south—westerly winds, very mild day — temperatures widely16—17 celsius, quite a bit warmer than it was on monday for the northern half of the uk. but there's still some rain in the far northwest. that's on that weather front there, and that is going to move its way southwards overnight and into wednesday. it's going to hang around across some different parts of the uk during the day. all the while, though, we're pulling in air from a long way south, which is why it's so mild for late october. but there's some rain around, which is going to be quite heavy over some of the hills. that rain mainly affecting north wales, northwest england, could push back into parts of northern ireland, more especially into southern scotland. to the northwest, there will be some sunshine for a while and some showers, and to the south of our rain band, it should be brightening up.
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a little bit of sunshine coming through, still quite windy, but very mild. temperatures getting up to 18 celsius. now, looking at the rain fall accumulation during wednesday and thursday, i want to highlight the areas that will see the heaviest of the rain. these are these bright colours here. it looks like it's going to be particularly wet in the southern uplands, but also into cumbria, and that could lead to some flooding. because that rain is still around on thursday, it may turn a bit drier across some northwestern parts of scotland and also northern ireland, as the rain
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: the un has warned of a countdown to catastrophe in afghanistan, with millions facing starvation. hospitals are already seeing increased levels of malnutrition. aid agencies say the situation has deteriorated sharply since the taliban seized power in august. some families have become so desperate for money, they've sold their children. the united states has suspended a $700 million aid package to sudan after a military coup. at least seven people have been killed and dozens were injured when soldiers opened fire on crowds protesting against the takeover and demanding the restoration of civilian rule. the united states has confirmed its new requirements forforeign nationals travelling to the us by air. the rules, effective from november 8th, will require travellers to show proof of a full covid vaccination. now on bbc news, we take a look at life at 50 degrees.

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