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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 25, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. a former facebook employee tells british mps the social media giant is "unquestionably making hate worse". frances haugen said the company's algorithms will fuel sporadic episodes of violent conflict, by spreading divisive content. anger and hate is the easiest way to grow on facebook. a shocking report from afghanistan. the bbc finds some parents so desperate for food, they're prepared to sell their children. and in the uk — an increase in the national living wage will be included in the chancellor's budget announcement, wednesday. we'll look at what that means for workers and the employers.
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more than a third of the world's population are active users of facebook and its other social media products. no company in the world has such power and yet such little transparency. but things are changing. since friday, a consortium of news organizations in the united states has begun publishing a series of stories — called the facebook papers — the evidence comes from hundreds of internal company documents which have been sent to the securities and exchange commission and provided to congress, by facebook whistleblower frances haugen and her legal counsel. the evidence points directly at mark zuckerberg. time and again in these papers, company insiders say the facebook ceo chose profit over safety, compromising his own rules, with disastrous outcomes. today, ms haugen was here in the uk to give evidence
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to a parliamentary committee. she told them her former employer is "unquestionably making hate worse". the algorithms take people who have very mainstream interests interests and they push them towards extreme interests. you can be someone center left and you will be pushed to radical left. you can be a center right and pushed to radical right. you can be looking for a healthy recipes, you'll get pushed to anorexia content. there are examples in facebook�*s research of all of this. one of the things that happens with groups and networks of groups is that people see echo chambers that create social norms, so if i'm in a group that has lots of covid misinformation and i see over and over again that if someone encourages people to get vaccinated, they get completely pounced upon. they get torn apart. i learn that certain ideas are acceptable and unacceptable.
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when that context is around hate, now you're seeing a normalisation of hate, a normalisation of dehumanising others, and that is what leads to violent incidents. when i worked on counterespionage, i saw things where i was concerned about national security and i had no idea how to escalate those. because i didn't have faith in my chain of command at that point. like, they had dissolved civic integrity. i didn't see that they would take that seriously. and we were told just to accept under—resourcing. "until we bring in a counterweight," ms haugen told the committee, "things will be operated for the shareholder's interest and not for the public interest." here's a response to today's testimony from facebook�*s vice president of content policy monika bickert, speaking to the bbc a little earlier. the algorithm, it's a fancy word that people use — but basically what it is is how do we prioritise content that people will see when they go on their facebook news feed? and let me be really clear, people can always opt out of that algorithm — they can choose to just see the content in reverse chronological order. but what the algorithm does is it says, what is the most relevant content? we want to make sure that we are prioritising content that will lead to positive engagement, but we
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reduce things like click bait, sensationalist content, and we actually publish on our site a list of the types of content like that that we actively demote. lawrence lessig is a professor at harvard law school, and part of ms haugen�*s legal counsel. thank you for being with us. can we talk about the facebook papers? how much of that evidence is there still to come? is there still more to it? how would you characterise it? to be clear, all of the evidence has been handed to the sec, and the whistle—blower aid, which has been the primary legal support is rejecting documents which have been turned over to congress. and it is congress, then, which is making this document is available to journalists, and there are still a substantial bit more to come as that production continues. can substantial bit more to come as that production continues.— production continues. can you shed some liuht production continues. can you shed some light on _ production continues. can you shed some light on what _ production continues. can you shed some light on what more _ production continues. can you shed some light on what more you - production continues. can you shed
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some light on what more you think| production continues. can you shed i some light on what more you think is to come? i some light on what more you think is to come? ~ ., ., ., , to come? i think we are going to see more of the — to come? i think we are going to see more of the same, _ to come? i think we are going to see more of the same, but _ to come? i think we are going to see more of the same, but even - to come? i think we are going to see more of the same, but even more i more of the same, but even more evidence to support the claim that when facebook has a choice between making their platform is safer and making their platform is safer and making their platform more profitable, time and again at the decision from the top is to steer towards a profit and away from safety. and that is going to be absolutely clear in the stories that are coming out this week and the stories that will come as more of this becomes available.— stories that will come as more of this becomes available. when mark zuckerber: this becomes available. when mark zuckerberg appeared _ this becomes available. when mark zuckerberg appeared before - this becomes available. when mark l zuckerberg appeared before congress last year, he said that facebook removes 94% of the hate speech it binds. but in these internal documents you have released, the researchers estimate the company is removing less than 5% of hate speech on facebook and that the company knew it. do you think, as a lawyer, these documents put him in some legaljeopardy? i’zre these documents put him in some legaljeopardy?_ these documents put him in some legaljeopardy? legal 'eopardy? i've course, mark is a legaljeopardy? i've course, mark is a very smart — legaljeopardy? i've course, mark is a very smart person _ legaljeopardy? i've course, mark is a very smart person and _ legaljeopardy? i've course, mark is a very smart person and he - legaljeopardy? i've course, mark is a very smart person and he was - legaljeopardy? i've course, mark is| a very smart person and he was very precise. what he meant by 94% is
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that of the content that the machines automatically identify as troubling, 94% was removed before it was shared across the network. but that content is just a fraction, just four or 5%, of the total amount of troubling content that would be discovered if you had many more resources devoted to discovering it. therefore, what he was saying might have been technically precisely accurate, but it created a very misleading impression in people's mines, that most of it is taken care of automatically and we don't have to worry about it.— to worry about it. that is simply not true. what _ to worry about it. that is simply not true. what seems _ to worry about it. that is simply not true. what seems to - to worry about it. that is simply not true. what seems to come l to worry about it. that is simply - not true. what seems to come through from these papers, and i haven't read them all but i have got a flavour of what we are looking at, is that there were deep frustrations within the company that their own principles, their own rules that they developed in the company, were being put to one side by the team that worked on public policy, the
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team that worked with government, that was in cahoots with politicians, if you will. do you think that they ignored their own rules to suit their sponsors, to suit the politicians that they were dealing with? it is suit the politicians that they were dealing with?— dealing with? it is such a great oint. i dealing with? it is such a great point. ithink— dealing with? it is such a great point. i think that _ dealing with? it is such a great point. i think that one - dealing with? it is such a great point. i think that one of - dealing with? it is such a great point. i think that one of the l dealing with? it is such a great. point. i think that one of the most striking fact about the papers is how good it makes facebook�*s employees look. indeed, facebook would be well served byjust allowing all of the papers to be published to everybody, because in this papers you see the engineers repeatedly insisting on steps to be taken that would make the platforms safer, that would avoid the kind of misinformation and violence and in some cases death that followed from the content being spread. but time and again, the political types, public policy group, intervened in decisions about the design of the algorithm, about which repeat offenders would be kicked off the platforms and which not, and you can feel the frustration of these
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engineers that say "just let us do ourjob and we can make the platform say." but that was not what the management, including mark zuckerberg, was willing to let them do. lets dig a little deeper into some of these facebook papers. here's one email exchange in that followed the capitol siege in washington onjanuary 6th. one facebook employee wrote: we ve been fueling this fire for a long time and we shouldn t be surprised its now out of control. one of the us media outlets that has been going through the documents is the atlantic — i'm joined by its special projects editor ellen cushing. can we pick up with the company's involvement in the events around january six, the assault on the capital? what if you discovered? my
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colleague did a forensic analysis of january— colleague did a forensic analysis of january six— colleague did a forensic analysis of january six and found that facebook was really _ january six and found that facebook was really essential, crucial to it happening — was really essential, crucial to it happening from start to finish. you had people — happening from start to finish. you had people who had been radicalised on facebook, as frances haugen said today— on facebook, as frances haugen said today in— on facebook, as frances haugen said today in parliament. people who were not really _ today in parliament. people who were not really on the fringes, who spent a lot of— not really on the fringes, who spent a lot of time on facebook and became on the _ a lot of time on facebook and became on the fringes, you had events that were _ on the fringes, you had events that were organised on facebook, you had people _ were organised on facebook, you had peeple like _ were organised on facebook, you had people like ice cream men. you had a whole _ people like ice cream men. you had a whole ecosystem around the january six riot, _ whole ecosystem around the january six riot, insurrection, that was happening, facilitated by facebook. of course, — happening, facilitated by facebook. of course, people have been trying to undermine democracies for as long as democracies have existed, but they haven't had the tools to go quite _ they haven't had the tools to go quite so — they haven't had the tools to go quite so viral.— they haven't had the tools to go quite so viral. she talked in that cli that quite so viral. she talked in that clip that we _ quite so viral. she talked in that clip that we played _ quite so viral. she talked in that clip that we played at _ quite so viral. she talked in that clip that we played at the - quite so viral. she talked in that. clip that we played at the beginning about the groups. you could be from the center right or the centre—left and be on facebook, and you would find yourself channelled towards the
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hard right or the hard left. it also in their groups, it would become an echo chamber, so you would be hearing a self affirming comments in the group. so you thought, if you were spreading perhaps hateful messages, you would think other people thought like you do, correct? certainly, you were in a group of people _ certainly, you were in a group of people that were radicalised, talking — people that were radicalised, talking to each other, and we have all been _ talking to each other, and we have all been in — talking to each other, and we have all been in those environments, whatever— all been in those environments, whatever it is, and it's really easy to get— whatever it is, and it's really easy to get fired — whatever it is, and it's really easy to get fired up and to want to do something as extreme as storm the united _ something as extreme as storm the united states capitol. it interesting about the threat posed to democracy. we talked about january six, and we tend to focus on the impact here in the west. at one of the things the washington post picked up on today was that the decisions made in the nam, there was plenty of anti government rhetoric on facebook, people who are challenging the communist ruling
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party. facebook were about to be censored and so they clamped down on the free speech. the company has said that the censorship was justified to ensure our services remain available for millions of people who rely on them every day, but the washington post makes the point that some of the criticisms of the government were valid and were being censored by facebook. this is a really essential _ being censored by facebook. this is a really essential point, _ being censored by facebook. this is a really essential point, and - being censored by facebook. this is a really essential point, and this - a really essential point, and this is something that kept coming up in the document i reviewed. as toxic as facebook— the document i reviewed. as toxic as facebook can feel to those of us in the english—speaking world, it is the english—speaking world, it is the hest— the english—speaking world, it is the best version of facebook that exists _ the best version of facebook that exists it— the best version of facebook that exists it is— the best version of facebook that exists. it is the version with a lot of resources, that exists in relatively— of resources, that exists in relatively stable democracies with free internet. it is the version that— free internet. it is the version that facebook employees themselves are saying. i deliver the world we are saying. i deliver the world we are seeing — are saying. i deliver the world we are seeing evidence that facebook is being _ are seeing evidence that facebook is being used _ are seeing evidence that facebook is being used not only to undermine
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democracy— being used not only to undermine democracy but, for example, to facilitate — democracy but, for example, to facilitate violence and sexed trafficking and hate speech all around — trafficking and hate speech all around the world, from india to indonesia — around the world, from india to indonesia to vietnam to ethiopia. this is— indonesia to vietnam to ethiopia. this is really a global problem. we are ve this is really a global problem. - are very grateful for your time. and just to stress that we did ask facebook for a problem or to come on the programme, and the decline. —— for a comment. the humanitarian situation in afghanistan is quickly deteriorating. the un has warned the country is on a �*countdown to catastrophe,�* with millions facing starvation. international funds, so vital of course to the aid effort were frozen when the taliban took over in august. and as the world debates how to deal with the new regime, and how much of that money to make available, things are going from bad to worse. yogita limaye, cameraman sanjay ganguly and producer imogen anderson have witnessed, first—hand, the dire situation on the ground in herat — in the west of the country. and a warning — there are disturbing images, in this report,
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this is what starvation does to a country. to its tiniest lives. in this word, one in five will not make it. he weighs half of what he should. his father, among millions who have no work. his mother told us his twin is in a room next door.
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this hospital is full. some babies are already sharing a bed. while we were there, six more children were brought in. it is the only facility for hundreds of miles. because without foreign money, most hospitals are collapsing. doctors and nurses, among the masses of government workers who have not been paid for months. a third of the country's people don't know where their next meal will come from. we
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travelled out of herat to a rural settlement. tens of thousands displaced from remote provinces by decades of war and severe drought. no means of income, barely any food. some days, families here don't eat. they have sold whatever little they had. and now some are forced to do the unthinkable. this baby girl has been sold by her family. we are hiding their identity to protect them. her husband used to collect rubbish, but even that earned him nothing
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now. once the baby is able to walk, she will be taken away by the man who bought her. he is paid more than half of the $500 she has been sold for. that will get the family through a few months. they have been told the girl will be married to his child, but no one can be sure. we know there are other families here who have sold their children, and even while we have been here another person came up to one of our team and asked if we would like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put into words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan. it cannot wait while the world to debate whether or not
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to recognise the taliban government. nearby, aid agencies and hand out parcels that might save some children from hunger. alone, they cannot provide for the staggering needs. giving the taliban money without guarantees on human rights and how the funds will be used is dangerous. but afghanistan is sinking fast. millions here will not survive the winter. truly shocking details. plenty for the 620 truly shocking details. plenty for the g20 leaders to discuss in rome when they meet later this week. to stay with us on bbc news. what happens when you raise the minimum wage, as the british government has set out to do? we will look at the
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consequences. petrol prices in the uk have reached a record level, beating the previous high in 2012. simon williams from the rac said it's mainly due to rising oil prices. the exchange rate is weaker than it was in 2012, and actually oil is far lower than 2012. the exchange rate makes a difference. then we have got the switch to e ten petrol. 5% more for petrol now is ethanol, and ethanol is really expensive on the wholesale market. over 1000 euros a tonne. that is adding 9p a litre to the price we are paying at the pump. and then you have the duty at 58p, and the retail margin. retailers are taking more now since the pandemic. 9p a litre. and then you have vat at the end of that transaction, at 2a
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p. that gives us a record high. ahead of the british governments spending review on wednesday, we learned today of an inflation—busting increase in the national living wage. it's to rise 6.6% next april to £9.50 — that's $13 an hour. it's in line with prime minister boris johnson's recent pledging to transform the uk intoa high—wage, high—skill, high—productivity economy. but it comes, of course, at a time of rising prices, tax increases and cuts to universal credit, a state benefit to suport those out of work or on low income. so what impact will a higher minimum have on the uk economy? well, let me show you first of all how the uk compares with other leading countries. the uk's current hourly rate is £8.91, orjust
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over 12 us dollars. australia has one of the highest rates in the world, just over 20 aussie dollars an hour. approximately 15 us dollars. from july this year, germany's rate rose to 9 euros 60 an hour, or 11 dollars 15.(gfx germany's rate rose to 9 euros 60 an hour, or 11 dollars 15. snf the us federal minimum wage is $7.25, though some states have much higher rates. i'm joined now by kate nicholls, chief executive of uk hospitality and kenjacobs, chair of the university of california, berkeley center for labor research and education. i want to know how the employers feel about this. what do you think the impact will be unemployment in the impact will be unemployment in the uk? ., , the impact will be unemployment in theuk? ., , the uk? clearly, people in heapitality _ the uk? clearly, people in hospitality are _ the uk? clearly, people in hospitality are the - the uk? clearly, people in hospitality are the main i the uk? clearly, people in l hospitality are the main part the uk? clearly, people in - hospitality are the main part of our business. it is the main cost that the business has. we are nothing without our people, so this is an area where businesses have already been investing. and then you have wage rate inflation in hospitality
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running at 11—13%. this is that the upper end of what employers were expecting, but it is in line with the low pay recommendation. from that point of view, businesses have known this was coming and it was able to plan for this. however, it will see significant increases in cost, hitting at the same time we see tax increases for hospitality businesses and employers throughout the country, with changes to national insurance. this wall of costs means that it is inevitable that employers are going to be unable to absorb this, and it will inevitably be passed on to customers inevitably be passed on to customers in higher prices. three quarters of hospitality businesses think they will increase their prices as a result of this, and a further 20% saying it is going to impact hiring decisions. so it will have an impact about that a business level and at a job level. about that a business level and at a 'ob level. �* , , ., .,
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to ken, there is a labour shortage at the moment. does the prospect of higher wages mean that perhaps
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they improve earnings for workers at the bottom, and they do so without a measurable impact on employment. minimum wage increases to the size we have seen to date. overall they are working, and in fact there is a lot of good new evidence coming out from the downstream effects of raising the minimum wage. the effects are notjust innately on those workers, but we can see effects on worker health, on children public health, on things like capital recidivism and heavy and strong effects on mental health and strong effects on mental health and things like inattention to
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children. so overall evidence is very strong that minimum wages do exactly what they are supposed to. does it push up the rest of the wages? we're waiting for an announcement on public sector workers ahead of the spending review on wednesday. but it seems difficult to believe the chancellor could keep the freeze in place on public workers, does it start to push everybody up through the economy? with the evidence on raising a member wages you see pay increases go about 15% above the new minimum wage. people that were earning either right below the newman wedge orjust either right below the newman wedge or just slightly above it either right below the newman wedge orjust slightly above it do get pay increases so that they can maintain differentials, but we really don't see it spread much more beyond that. so it does not have a huge overall effect on the wage scale and the economy. but it does reduce inequality and brings people up at the bottom. and just at the note for what you said earlier, we know that
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low—wage workers have money in their pockets, they spent it in the local economy and that's also a positive for businesses especially in the restaurant industry and hospitality. just a minute left before the break, what are you looking for in the spinning review on wednesday to help small employers so they can keep people in work? small employers so they can keep peeple in work?— small employers so they can keep --eole in work? ~ . ., ., people in work? what we need to have been liven people in work? what we need to have been given the — people in work? what we need to have been given the attempts _ people in work? what we need to have been given the attempts because of. been given the attempts because of inflation _ been given the attempts because of inflation pressures we are seeing building — inflation pressures we are seeing building in the economy we would like to see — building in the economy we would like to see a breathing space given to those smaller employers, extend business _ to those smaller employers, extend business rate support with maintaining the lower rate of vat at 12 and _ maintaining the lower rate of vat at 12 and a _ maintaining the lower rate of vat at 12 and a half percent, and for the very small— 12 and a half percent, and for the very small employers increases in the employment allowance to make sure that _ the employment allowance to make sure that that increasing the minimum wage is not with tax increases _ minimum wage is not with tax increases— minimum wage is not with tax increases. , ., ., increases. very good to have you both in the _ increases. very good to have you both in the programme, - increases. very good to have you both in the programme, thank. increases. very good to have you | both in the programme, thank you very much indeed for that. to stay with us here in the programme, more to come. we are going to talk about the alec baldwin case and the sad case of the cinematographer who was a shot and killed on the set of rust
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last week. but with very different methods to the ones used in rust. a mixture of sunshine and showers today, the rest of the week and may well be when you than today, the windsor south—westerly so there will be some heavy rain around for western parts of the uk. and despite streaming in from the atlantic, head of it we've had those showers and fading away, and we will keep some going for longer but then everything get swamped by the cloud coming in and this ring initially in northern ireland get wetter later in western scotland. some in the irish sea come up scotland. some in the irish sea come up though not much rain in the southwest of england. some clear skies ahead of it and eastern
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scotland, five or six degrees. this band of rain moves away from northern ireland fairly quickly. the smell of rain running eastwards and i much rain running eastwards for south come a lot of that rain has gonein south come a lot of that rain has gone in the afternoon but we are left with really cloudy skies. drizzle over western hills, eastern high ground and those temperatures 17 degrees. most of the ring on the weather front to the far northwest but as we move into wednesday that weather front starts to slide further towards the uk bringing some ran into other areas. all the while drawing in the winds from a long way south hence those higher than normal temperatures for the time of year. a lot of cloud around to begin with on wednesday, which look at this rain, mainly north wales, northwestern parts of england. make it wetter again across northern ireland, central and southern parts of scotland. some heavy rain in the hills. through the midlands towards east anglia and the southeast some
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sunshine, but torches could reach 18 degrees. no images some areas could see some heavy rain, we are focusing here on wednesday and thursday's rainfall acumen elation and as bright colours show with the heaviest rain is going to be. across the southern uplands in particular the southern uplands in particular the cumbrian fails, that could lead to some flooding as well. the rain keeps going across the northwest of england, slight than the southwest of england as it tends to clear away from northern ireland's showers wallowing on and some rain for southern and eastern parts of scotland. little bit cooler in the northwest but towards the southeast where it is dry still very mild.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. facebook whistleblower frances haugen has told british politicians that the social network is "unquestionably making hate worse". new details emerge of the fatal shooting of a crew member on a film set. legal papers reveal alec baldwin was pointing a revolver at a camera during rehearsal when it fired. a warning on climate change — the world is way off track in limiting rising temperatures says the un. and explosive allegations that the organisers of the january 6 storming of capitol hill had planning meetings with members of congress.
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we are learning much more about the events that led to the tragic death of a crew member on the set of alec baldwin's new film, rust. the affidavit released sunday reveals the actor was drawing a revolver across his body and pointing it at a camera, during rehearsal when the weapon fired. a live round struck the cinematographer halyna hutchins in the chest, it also injured the directorjoel souza. according to the affadavit, the actor was told that the prop wasn't loaded. but according to the la times, just over a week ago baldwin's stunt double accidentally fired two rounds from a prop firearm after being told that weapon was "cold", not loaded with ammunition. steve wolf is a weapons safety expert who's been asked to help police with their investigation and joins us now from boulder, colorado. it's really good to have you with us. thank you for sparing us sometime. what we learn this
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affidavit is alec baldwin pulls the weapon across his body and then points it at the camera. should that ever happen on a film set? welcome and no. it should _ ever happen on a film set? welcome and no. it should end. _ ever happen on a film set? welcome and no. it should end. we _ ever happen on a film set? welcome and no. it should end. we also - and no. it should end. we also have to stop calling a proper weapon because bullets came out of it. bullets don't go into proper weapons, that's why they are prop weapons, that's why they are prop weapons not real weapons. this is a p"°p weapons not real weapons. this is a prop weapon, you can see i hope that there are little holes back here where ammunition can be loaded, but if we look at the front of it those are not holes, those are all belongs or who knows what, but nothing can pass through here except smoke fire and noise. if we were to try to take life ammunition and put into this gun, well, not too much would happen because you can't put live ammunition into a prop gun. that is why we use proper guns. so if live ammo came out of it it was 90 prop
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gun, it was a real gun and you can see a real gun no difficulty inserting ammunition in there. so if you use a real gun and then you put real bullets in it, and then he pointed at somebody and you press the trigger and it goes bang, and you see a hole in the other person you see a hole in the other person you should not be too surprised because that's what all this equipment is designed to do. that is so instructive. _ equipment is designed to do. that is so instructive. i've _ equipment is designed to do. that is so instructive. i've never— equipment is designed to do. that is so instructive. i've never seen - equipment is designed to do. that is so instructive. i've never seen that l so instructive. i've never seen that before, did not realise that the p"°p before, did not realise that the prop guns were different. was there ever an excuse for a live round, and a gun that takes a live round to be on a film set? if a gun that takes a live round to be on a film set?— on a film set? if you are working for discovery _ on a film set? if you are working for discovery science _ on a film set? if you are working for discovery science and - on a film set? if you are working for discovery science and doing i for discovery science and doing a show about ballistics, or the impact of bullets on different materials sure. but on a theatrical release, no. no excuse for a live ammo. no excuse for a gun that can except live ammo. they should be prop guns,
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actual prop guns, not what are being called prop guns in this manner that cannot take ammunition, just of the won't go in there. but can only accept a blank. and everyone who handles the gun should be trained on gun safety, and part of gun safety is don't point guns at things you don't want to see a hole in. because that's what guns do. if he is cross drawing that gun is pointed backwards in his holster, then he is coming all the way around like this and this whole hundred and 80 degrees area is having a gun pointed at it. that means entire crew should be on the other side where they will be on the other side where they will be safe out of range. you be on the other side where they will be safe out of range.— be safe out of range. you would even, in be safe out of range. you would even. in that— be safe out of range. you would even, in that situation, - be safe out of range. you would even, in that situation, how - be safe out of range. you would even, in that situation, how if i even, in that situation, how if everybody out of the way of the ark that the gun was travelling even if it was a gun in the blank round. even with a prop gun, blanks don't have a bullet, this is the actual bullet that is in there, there is no
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bullet that is in there, there is no bullet but there is a bunch of gunpowder and a small explosive in there. so there is force that comes out, there is flame that comes out and there could be little bits of debris. but debris that might get in your high or something ? i or something. but if you have to discharge a gun towards camera you push record from a step away your shot come back, turn the camera off take the gun, clear it and put it backin take the gun, clear it and put it back in the safe. so if you follow some really simple procedures that had successfully taught five—year—olds, firearms can be handled very safely. you five-year-olds, firearms can be handled very safely.— handled very safely. you are discovering _ handled very safely. you are discovering a _ handled very safely. you are discovering a very _ handled very safely. you are discovering a very rigorous l handled very safely. you are - discovering a very rigorous process there. and i'm guessing when you are on site you are handling weapons that's how you do it. but from what we have heard in the affidavit if the assistant director who was
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handing alec baldwin a quote cold gun. with that ever happened on a set that you were working on? hot gun. with that ever happened on a set that you were working on? met a set that you were working on? not a chance. i set that you were working on? not a chance- i love _ set that you were working on? not a chance. i love the _ set that you were working on? not a chance. i love the gun, i _ set that you were working on? not a chance. i love the gun, i know- chance. i love the gun, i know what's in it i show it to the assistant director. and i verified to the assistant director that is in fact a cold gun, and i don'tjust let them pick up any reign of gun on the set and caught a cold gun when clearly it is not and clearly he had not checked it or he would not have said that. so false advertising in the most lethal way. mas said that. so false advertising in the most lethal way.— said that. so false advertising in the most lethal way. was an actor ublic the most lethal way. was an actor public responsibility _ the most lethal way. was an actor public responsibility in _ the most lethal way. was an actor public responsibility in this? - the most lethal way. was an actor public responsibility in this? with | public responsibility in this? with ou are an public responsibility in this? with you are an actor _ public responsibility in this? with you are an actor or— public responsibility in this? tn you are an actor or not and you handle a firearm have an obligation to understand the basics of it. and i don't think that's an actor considering actors are required to learn all manner of skills to perform the roles that they are performing. whether you are learning to climb a building, learning boxing, learning a foreign language correct to speak with a british accent, whatever it is you are
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learning actors have to learn things to do them properly. in gun safety is so simple and rudimentary there's no excuse that an armour should not take an actor aside fourth 30 minutes of the production, teach them gun safety, show them how to handle a gun to reward them and say you did a good job, and then stay on top of them to make sure they don't depart from what you showed them. if you do that nobody gets hurt. 30 minutes very well spent and absolutely could save lives. thank ou ve absolutely could save lives. thank you very much _ absolutely could save lives. thank you very much indeed _ absolutely could save lives. thank you very much indeed for - absolutely could save lives. thank you very much indeed for showing j absolutely could save lives. thank you very much indeed for showing us that can instructive.— that can instructive. thank you so much for having _ that can instructive. thank you so much for having me _ that can instructive. thank you so much for having me on _ that can instructive. thank you so much for having me on your- that can instructive. thank you so | much for having me on your show. ahead of the cop26 summit which begins this coming weekend, the un has warned that greenhouse gases reached record levels last year, despite the economic slowdown caused by the pandemic. the report suggests a target set by countries 6 years ago to limit the rise in the earth's temperature to 1.5 celsius is not being met. on top of that, $100 billion, pledged to the poorest countries in 2009, to help them adapt to climate change, still has not materialised.
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although the british government has won assurances from the industriazed nations that it will be on the table next year. so plenty of bumps in the road, and the british prime minister was sounding a little downbeat today, when asked about the prospects for success at this summit. is going to be very, very tough for this summit. and i'm very worried because it might go wrong. and we might not get the agreements that we need, and it's touch and go. with me is our science editor david shukman. the bottom line here is that a key pledge that was made by the developed countries, what, in 2009? still has not materialised. this developed countries, what, in 2009? still has not materialised.— still has not materialised. this is fundamental _ still has not materialised. this is fundamental stuff. _ still has not materialised. this is fundamental stuff. i— still has not materialised. this is fundamental stuff. i was - still has not materialised. this is fundamental stuff. i was there i still has not materialised. this isj fundamental stuff. i was there at the copenhagen summit in 2009, it was all— the copenhagen summit in 2009, it was all going wrong. and one of the initiatives _ was all going wrong. and one of the initiatives that kind of rekindled a
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bit of— initiatives that kind of rekindled a bit of momentum was the americans, the uk _ bit of momentum was the americans, the uk and _ bit of momentum was the americans, the uk and others saying, 100 billion— the uk and others saying, 100 billion a — the uk and others saying, 100 billion a year for the developing countries — billion a year for the developing countries will start in 2020. and this was— countries will start in 2020. and this was a — countries will start in 2020. and this was a very public declaration. and it _ this was a very public declaration. and it was — this was a very public declaration. and it was then repeated and for the developing countries many of whom are the _ developing countries many of whom are the poorest nations on earth, the ones — are the poorest nations on earth, the ones who have done the least to cause, _ the ones who have done the least to cause, change and most vulnerable to the impacts— cause, change and most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change looked at this— the impacts of climate change looked at this promise and took it seriously, and said for all the faults— seriously, and said for all the faults of— seriously, and said for all the faults of the rich world in creating climate _ faults of the rich world in creating climate change at least there is this money that will come by 2020 we will be _ this money that will come by 2020 we will be getting 100 billion a year. first last— will be getting 100 billion a year. first last year there was covid, so excuse _ first last year there was covid, so excuse was — first last year there was covid, so excuse was made for that. but here we are _ excuse was made for that. but here we are with — excuse was made for that. but here we are with a take commissioned the uk government and hosts of copper 26, they— uk government and hosts of copper 26, they have tided everything up and they— 26, they have tided everything up and they still have not reached 100 billion _ and they still have not reached 100 billion in— and they still have not reached 100 billion. in fact they reckon it's
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not likely— billion. in fact they reckon it's not likely that the 100 billion target — not likely that the 100 billion target which has this iconic stature in the _ target which has this iconic stature in the climate process won't be reached — in the climate process won't be reached for another couple of years, 2025 _ reached for another couple of years, 2025 |_ reached for another couple of years, 2023. ., �* , ., ., , 2023. i don't understand how this ha ens, 2023. i don't understand how this happens. for _ 2023. i don't understand how this happens, for emissions _ 2023. i don't understand how this happens, for emissions we - 2023. i don't understand how this happens, for emissions we have l happens, for emissions we have nationally declared contributions, why do we not have a nationally determined sum of money that they are each going to put in there so that we can take it off? the whole thing whether _ that we can take it off? the whole thing whether it's _ that we can take it off? the whole thing whether it's emissions - thing whether it's emissions reductions or finance is voluntary. that's_ reductions or finance is voluntary. that's one — reductions or finance is voluntary. that's one of the key elements of the paris — that's one of the key elements of the paris agreement. that's what made _ the paris agreement. that's what made it— the paris agreement. that's what made it possible that each country effectively brings what it can become _ effectively brings what it can become what it wants to to the party — become what it wants to to the party. there's no system, there's no declaration— party. there's no system, there's no declaration every few years, and no ratchet _ declaration every few years, and no ratchet mechanism to make the offer toughen _ ratchet mechanism to make the offer tougher. there'sjust, i guess peer pressure — tougher. there'sjust, i guess peer pressure. there was a great interest injob _ pressure. there was a great interest injob biden— pressure. there was a great interest injob biden doubling america's commitment to this cause. but that
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does not _ commitment to this cause. but that does not go — commitment to this cause. but that does not go far enough, it does not close _ does not go far enough, it does not close the _ does not go far enough, it does not close the gap. i think there's some optimism _ close the gap. i think there's some optimism that by 2023 the 100 billion— optimism that by 2023 the 100 billion target will have been reached _ billion target will have been reached and that the following two years. _ reached and that the following two years, because thinking of a five-year— years, because thinking of a five—year period. over a five—year period _ five—year period. over a five—year period of— five—year period. over a five—year period of to — five—year period. over a five—year period of to 25 the average will be 100 billion. that's the reassurance they're _ 100 billion. that's the reassurance they're trying to offer the developing countries. it they're trying to offer the developing countries. they're trying to offer the develoin: countries. ., , ., developing countries. it does not... it's all developing countries. it does not... it's all about _ developing countries. it does not... it's all about confidence _ developing countries. it does not... it's all about confidence building. i it's all about confidence building. its trust. you have the actual numbers _ its trust. you have the actual numbers and what you can do with those _ numbers and what you can do with those dollars and how you can help the poorest countries go green, how they can _ the poorest countries go green, how they can protect themselves against bigger— they can protect themselves against bigger storms and sea level rise and all the _ bigger storms and sea level rise and all the rest — bigger storms and sea level rise and all the rest of it. but then i think you have — all the rest of it. but then i think you have touched on, if you are a more _ you have touched on, if you are a more fundamental thing, trust in this process. if more fundamental thing, trust in this process-— more fundamental thing, trust in this process. if we can't do this... will the richest _ this process. if we can't do this... will the richest nations _ this process. if we can't do this... will the richest nations really - this process. if we can't do this... will the richest nations really cut| will the richest nations really cut their— will the richest nations really cut their emissions as they say they're going _ their emissions as they say they're going to _ their emissions as they say they're going to with their net zero targets? _ going to with their net zero targets? of course they don't come we are _ targets? of course they don't come we are heading for even higher
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temperatures than forecast which is even worse — temperatures than forecast which is even worse for the poorest nations. ithink— even worse for the poorest nations. i think we _ even worse for the poorest nations. i think we will get into the cup 26 process— i think we will get into the cup 26 process next weekend in glasgow with a bit of— process next weekend in glasgow with a bit of a _ process next weekend in glasgow with a bit of a cloud over the process. already — a bit of a cloud over the process. already plenty of worries, but now this is— already plenty of worries, but now this is not — already plenty of worries, but now this is not going to help.— this is not going to help. that's what the prime _ this is not going to help. that's what the prime minister - this is not going to help. that's what the prime minister was i what the prime minister was reflecting today, and he also said we have a part to play in this climate challenge. we all do a bit of recycling and this is but the prime minister said today about recycling plastics. the issue with plastics is that it's not, recycling isn't the answer. of got to be honest with you. recycling isjust, you know, you are not going to like this, it does not begin to address the problem. in the recycling logo to date there was a jaws on the floor. abshd in the recycling logo to date there was a jaws on the floor. was a “aws on the floor. and leaving aside was a jaws on the floor. and leaving aside the point _ was a jaws on the floor. and leaving aside the point that _ was a jaws on the floor. and leaving aside the point that it _ was a jaws on the floor. and leaving aside the point that it flies - was a jaws on the floor. and leaving aside the point that it flies in the i aside the point that it flies in the face of— aside the point that it flies in the face of his— aside the point that it flies in the face of his own government's
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policies — face of his own government's policies which is to encourage recycling, _ policies which is to encourage recycling, this is break it down. people — recycling, this is break it down. people have always said the very first thing — people have always said the very first thing that must be done to tackle _ first thing that must be done to tackle the plastic pollution crisis is a use — tackle the plastic pollution crisis is a use less plastic. if you use less— is a use less plastic. if you use less plastic— is a use less plastic. if you use less plastic there is less demand for the _ less plastic there is less demand for the stuff so fewer of the ingredients are made, less oil dug out of— ingredients are made, less oil dug out of the — ingredients are made, less oil dug out of the ground to make the plastic— out of the ground to make the plastic in— out of the ground to make the plastic in the first place. the whole — plastic in the first place. the whole chain of production would slow down and _ whole chain of production would slow down and be diminished. in that sense _ down and be diminished. in that sense he's— down and be diminished. in that sense he's absolutely right. he's also right— sense he's absolutely right. he's also right that some forms of plastic— also right that some forms of plastic are either difficult or practically impossible to recycle. some _ practically impossible to recycle. some types have a value. the classic sort of— some types have a value. the classic sort of drinks — some types have a value. the classic sort of drinks bottles made of the particular— sort of drinks bottles made of the particular type of plastic are more easy to _ particular type of plastic are more easy to recycle. and if you convert collect _ easy to recycle. and if you convert collect them in the right way in the industry— collect them in the right way in the industry can find a use for them. you tend — industry can find a use for them. you tend not to get the same recycling _ you tend not to get the same recycling rates and effectiveness as
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you do _ recycling rates and effectiveness as you do with aluminium cans for example — you do with aluminium cans for example. they are the industry finds it really— example. they are the industry finds it really easy to reuse that aluminium, produce new cans and they like it— aluminium, produce new cans and they like it because it's cheaper than buying — like it because it's cheaper than buying raw aluminium. there are problems— buying raw aluminium. there are problems which he identified with some _ problems which he identified with some elements of plastic recycling. the worry— some elements of plastic recycling. the worry amongst recycling experts i'ii l ht the worry amongst recycling experts night would be, he has he just said is not _ night would be, he has he just said is not worth— night would be, he has he just said is not worth doing anything about your recycling? has he just told people. — your recycling? has he just told people, welcoming you might as well check— people, welcoming you might as well check it— people, welcoming you might as well check it out? god people, welcoming you might as well check it out?— people, welcoming you might as well check it out?_ that's i check it out? god for bed. that's the worry that — check it out? god for bed. that's the worry that might _ check it out? god for bed. that's the worry that might be - check it out? god for bed. that's the worry that might be the i check it out? god for bed. that's l the worry that might be the effect. levity— the worry that might be the effect. levity see — the worry that might be the effect. levity see you thank you. of course its notjust government's struggling to make sufficient progress. the soft drinks industry produces a70 billion plastic bottles every year, designed to be used just once and then thrown away. and around a quarter of them are made by one company: coca—cola.
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nearly four years ago, facing growing criticism, coca cola came up with a plan to tackle their plastic pollution problem. but an investigation by bbc panorama reveals that they are struggling to make the progress required to meet their promises. and in some places, particularly in some of the world's poorer nations, things are getting much worse. our correspondent sofia bettiza has the story. here is a refreshment you can enjoy quickly and conveniently. in the 1950s, coca—cola was sold in glass bottles. the company would collect them, wash them and reuse them. these lighter plastic bottles take lbs off your shopping load. by the 70s, coke was promoting plastic. single use plastic is a massive money saver for many companies, including coca—cola. they use incredibly cheap plastic to make that packaging, they put it on the market and then it isjob done, it's gone. in the last three years alone, 156 billion of coca—cola's plastic bottles have been littered, burned or dumped. but coke knew it had an image problem, so announced a plan to recycle more bottles called
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world without waste. but if you look at the small print, there is an omission. their bottles are only recyclable where infrastructure exists. this is the pacific island of samoa. in february, coke stopped producing glass bottles here and started this is the pacific island of samoa. in february, coke stopped producing glass bottles here and started shipping in thousands of plastic bottles. the population here in samoa is only 200,000. we don't generate enough waste to have a recycling facility for plastic bottles here on the island. coca—cola has set up a scheme to pay people $1 for every kilo of plastic bottles they collect. but, so far, none has been exported for recycling. halfway across the globe from samoa is uganda. here, not enough bottles are being collected to meet coca—cola's recycling
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promises. coca—cola says they will collect one bottle for each bottle they sell in uganda. but they can never do that. they can ever achieve it. in the capital, kampala, the recycling system largely depends on informal waste pickers. most of them are single mothers with their children, earning around $1 per day. the whole bottled drinks sector has a recycling problem. but coca—cola is the by far biggest company, selling 3500 plastic bottles every second. and nearly four years after making the world without waste pledge,
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our investigation has revealed that coca—cola is struggling to make the headway required to meet their green goals. coca—cola is an absolute master of greenwashing. greenwashing is pretending something is green when actually it is anything but green. and evidence from break free from plastic suggest that more plastic coke packaging is littered than any other brand. coca—cola say they are making good progress but have a long way to go. they are campaigning to encourage recycling in samoa and that they are working hard to help waste pickers. but if the biggest global plastic polluter doesn't reach its targets, the world's poorest will suffer even more. stay with us on bbc news, still to come... claims that members of congress were involved in planning pro—trump rallies onjanuary 6th. we'll talk live to the journalist
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who broke the story. here in the uk, the government says it will spend just short of £6 billion in an attempt to clear the record nhs backlog of people waiting for treatment, tests and scans. more than five million people are waiting for hospital treatment in england. here's our medical editor fergus walsh. early diagnosis is a key part of improving health outcomes, but the pandemic has seen growing backlog of patients waiting for mri, ct, ultrasound other checks. at least 100 one—stop shop community diagnostic centres are to be set up across england. which includes 44 already announced. the extra £59 billion for the health service in england may be spread over three years. the full details will be in wednesday's budget. that is in addition to £12 billion for uk health spending
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announced last month. that will be funded by a new national insurance charge. health analysts say the nhs needs a huge increase in modern, high—tech scanners. compared to a country like germany, we have only a third of the number of mri scanners they do for their size and population, which means that despite the government's additional investment, there is an awful lot of ground to make—up. and a record 5.7 million people are waiting for hospital treatment in england, like david warren, who has been on the list for bowel surgery for over a year. the longer it goes on, _ the more resigns you get to the fact that it is not going to happen. and it can get depressing. your life is on hold. waiting lists are rising by around 100,000 patients a month. and despite all the extra funding, they are set to get worse before they get better.
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fergus walsh, bbc news. some of the organisers for the pro—trump rallies that took place in washington onjanuary 6th, have begun communicating with congressional investigators about what happened when the former president's supporters stormed the us capitol. they have also spoken extensively to rolling stone magazine and have detailed explosive allegations that multiple members of congress were involved in planning both trump's efforts to overturn the election defeat and the protest that would turn violent. let's speak to hunter walker, the journalist who first broke the story in rolling stone. so how would you characterise these meetings and what their purpose so how would you characterise these meetings and what their purpose was?
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it's important to note that we have already seen some indications that the multiple republican members of congress were involved to some degree in the events of january six and it lead up. multiple members were speakers at this wild protest rally at the election ? build speakers. there were also two members of congress, mo brooks and mattison call thorne who spoke alongside president trump on this main road where both brooks and a trump used violent rhetoric and encourage supporters to march towards the capital. these two sources have alleged to me really provides further detail about the role members of congress allegedly played. they said essentially there were quote unquote dozens of briefings between these members and rally organisers. where the essentially first off solicited and traded back and forth legend
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evidence. this must�*ve been baseless because numerous state and federal officials including tribes own appointees have confirmed there's no major issue with the election. also strategizing about the objections that would be presented to the vote on the house floor, and according to these two sources the members of congress helped advise them on which states they should hold events in to pressure vulnerable senators to join this push. since you can't have an objection to the electoral vote without a senator on.- without a senator on. does explicitly — without a senator on. does explicitly tied _ without a senator on. does explicitly tied to _ without a senator on. does explicitly tied to members| without a senator on. does i explicitly tied to members of congress to the decision to storm the capital?— the capital? know, in fact. and i should note _ the capital? know, in fact. and i should note that _ the capital? know, in fact. and i should note that when _ the capital? know, in fact. and i should note that when i - the capital? know, in fact. and i should note that when i did i the capital? know, in fact. and i should note that when i did this| should note that when i did this story a spokesperson for one of the members talked to me and, and unnamed house republicans staff or talk to me and they seem to confirm there was some degree of planning and coordination, but both of these
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sources and these two house figures who spoke to me framed as something where they were just planning to kind of object to the vote, which is something democrats did to trump. and they're going to stage this big show. everyone, and of course they have a lot of self—interest in doing so, but everyone is saying we did not plan for this to be violent, and blaming it on certain bad actors who kind of took this to the next degree. kind of took this to the next de . ree. , , , kind of took this to the next decree. , , , , degree. just very quickly because we are almost out _ degree. just very quickly because we are almost out of— degree. just very quickly because we are almost out of time, _ degree. just very quickly because we are almost out of time, politics i degree. just very quickly because we are almost out of time, politics and l are almost out of time, politics and are almost out of time, politics and a blanket pardon, why? this are almost out of time, politics and a blanket pardon, why?— a blanket pardon, why? this was a ardon a blanket pardon, why? this was a pardon allegedly — a blanket pardon, why? this was a pardon allegedly offered _ a blanket pardon, why? this was a pardon allegedly offered to - a blanket pardon, why? this was a pardon allegedly offered to these l pardon allegedly offered to these two sources, he implied he got it straight from the oval and it was for an unrelated legal matter. that would be encouraging them to do the protests. fish would be encouraging them to do the rotests. �* , ,., protests. an interesting report, eo - le protests. an interesting report, people should _ protests. an interesting report, people should have _ protests. an interesting report, people should have a _ protests. an interesting report, people should have a look- protests. an interesting report, people should have a look in i protests. an interesting report, i people should have a look in rolling stone, which we can do more on it. thank you very much indeed for that. we will be back at the same time tomorrow. if you are watching here in the uk at the ten o'clock news is
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right around the corner. and laura is here for world news america. stay with us for that. hello there. it may well be quite mild out there at the moment, but we've got some contrasting weather conditions to come over the next few days, particularly when it comes to rainfall. now, this graphic shows rainfall accumulation throughout the week, so you can see very little across eastern england, but for north wales, north—west england and parts of western scotland, we may well see rainfall accumulation in excess of 100 millimetres before the week is through. and this is partly to do with the position of the jet stream. we've got quite an undulation in the jet stream and that's going to drive in areas of low pressure off the atlantic, sitting into the far north—west.
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we will remain on the south side of the jet, so still a relatively mild side, but this weather front pretty much grinds to a halt, bringing pulses of wet weather like a conveyor belt over the next few days. to the south of that front, that's where the mildest of the weather is likely to be, with temperatures way above the average for the end of october. so that means that on tuesday you can see where the rain is, particularly across scotland, slowly easing away from northern england and north wales. quite a lot of cloud on tuesday with that south—westerly feed, but temperatures may well peak at 17 degrees — that's 63 fahrenheit. as we move out of tuesday into wednesday, our front is still there, so plenty of isobars on the chart, so we'll have gale—force gusts of wind on exposed coasts. and the rain will sink out of scotland, albeit briefly, into the north of england, so areas like the lake district, parts of lancashire could really see some potentially heavy downpours. to the south of that, we'll have more in the way of sunshine, and it will be a slightly better day for the far north—east of scotland, so temperatures, again, mid to high teens not out of the question, may be peaking at 19 celsius. our weather front then just drift its way back north. it's a little bit like flicking
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a skipping rope, we'll have pulses of energy going from north to south, so it moves across the borders back into scotland by thursday. again some heavy rain throughout the day. but to the east of the pennines, down into east anglia and south—east england should stay largely fine and dry, and hopefully some brighter, drier interludes to the far north—west of scotland as well. but still mild for the final few days of october. now, as we move out of thursday into friday, still plenty of wet weather out to the west, but it does look as though that weather front starts to show its hand across south—east england, so there will be some light, patchy rain by then as it clears away. some outbreaks of rain still continuing to the north and west, and here on those exposed coasts, still some heavier bursts from time to time. little bit fresher, with the wind direction easing just a touch, 11 to 16 degrees the high. into the weekend, low pressure sitting up into the far north—west, circulating around that low, plenty of frequent showers. so it's a case of showers or longer spells of rain pretty much anywhere
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as we head into the weekend, and we will start to see those temperatures falling away. now we're actually going to see temperatures falling away a little further as we move towards the early half of november, and that's because the jet stream then dips to the south of the uk, so we're on the north side of the jet, the cooler source, and that means the wind direction is going to change once again. with low pressure anchored into scandinavia, we'll need to say goodbye to the yellow and the russet tones as they drift off to europe, and we see a north—westerly wind pushing much cooler air across the country. so for the first few days of november, there's the potential for temperatures to be down just below where they should be.
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tonight at ten — the unfolding catastrophe in afghanistan, where a shortage of food and aid is causing terrible suffering. the united nations says the situation is fast becoming the biggest humanitarian crisis in the world. we report on the families forced to take desperate measures, including selling their babies to buy food. another person came up to one of our team and asked if we'd like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put in words. the situation in afghanistan has become markedly worse in the two months since the taliban seized power. also tonight... millions of workers stand to benefit from a rise in the national living wage to £9.50 an hour. we report from burnley on the efforts to deal

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