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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 25, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm maryam moshiri, this is outside source. the united nations warns of a countdown to a humanitarian catastrophe in afghanistan. the bbc finds some parents so desperate they're forced to sell their children to buy food. we know there are other families here who've sold their children, and even while we've been here, another person came up to one of our team and asked if we'd like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put in words. the world food programme says millions are facing starvation in the country. also the un says the world is on
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course for a dangerous increase into richard despite all the promises made on climate change. in the uk, a rise in wages on the cards for wednesday's budget and into damped to have died in a coupjust two years after deposing the country's long—term ruler. the military have seized power again. translation: seized power again. tuna/mom- seized power again. translation: ,., seized power again. translation: , , , translation: the government consists of independent — translation: the government consists of independent national _ translation: the government consists of independent national calibre - translation: the government consists of independent national calibre will- of independent national calibre will lead the _ of independent national calibre will lead the country until elections with a — lead the country until elections with a fair— lead the country until elections with a fair representation of all the people of sudan. we start in afghanistan. the united nations says the country is on a countdown to catastrophe with millions facing starvation, with the harsh winter months still to come. the country has seen a sharp deterioration in the situation since the taliban seized power in august. international funds that propped up the economy have been stopped as the world debates how to deal
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with the taliban regime. the bbc�*s yogita limaye, cameraman sanjay ganguly and producer imogen anderson have witnessed first—hand the dire situation on the ground and have sent this report from herat, in the west of the country. we should warn you that there are distressing images in this report from the start. this is what starvation does to a country. to its tiniest lives. six—month—old usman. habib ur—rehman, born three months ago. afghanistan was barely surviving before the taliban took over, but now foreign funds which propped up this country have been frozen. putting at least a million children at risk of dying. in this ward, one in five will not make it. usman weighs less than
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half of what he should. his father among millions who have no work. usman's mother told us his twin is in a room next door. this hospital is full. some babies are already sharing a bed. while we were there, six more children were brought in. it's the only facility for hundreds of miles.
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because without foreign money, most hospitals are collapsing. doctors and nurses among masses of government workers who haven't been paid for months. a third of the country's people don't know where their next meal will come from. we travelled out of herat to a rural settlement. tens of thousands displaced from remote provinces by decades of war and severe drought. no means of income, barely any food. some days families here don't eat. they've sold whatever little they had. and now some are forced to do the unthinkable. this baby girl has been sold by her family. we're hiding their identity to protect them.
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her husband used to collect rubbish, but even that earns him nothing now. once the baby's able to walk, she'll be taken away by the man who bought her. he's paid more than half of the £400 she's been sold for. that'll get the family through a few months. they've been told the girl will be married to his child, but no—one can be sure. we know there are other families here who've sold their children,
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and even while we've been here, another person came up to one of our team and asked if we'd like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put in words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan. it cannot wait while the world debates whether or not to recognise a taliban government. nearby, aid agencies hand out parcels that might save some children from hunger. alone, they can't provide for the staggering needs. giving the taliban money without guarantees on human rights and how the funds will be used is dangerous, but afghanistan is sinking fast. millions here will not survive the winter. yogita limaye, bbc news, herat. amir abdulla is the deputy executive director at the world food programme.
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we showed him our report. this was his reaction. the recent events have exacerbated the situation. what we're getting now, we used to always have people in rural areas facing food security issues, but normally those in the urban areas were making a living and able to look after themselves and their families. it's now hitting urban centres, and the real sad truth — and it really is a sad truth — is what you've just seen won't be an isolated incident. the bbc�*s secunder kermani is in kabul with more on that un report and what can be done. afghanistan has long been a country where many struggle to survive but this is the largest number of people going hungry overwinter since the un began keeping records a decade ago. and what we've seen as well
quote
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according to this un report is hunger spreading from notjust more rural, remote areas, but also to urban areas, and that's because, yogita said in that report, so many government employees have not been paid their salaries. they were not paid in fact their salaries for the last few months of the previous government and many still have not received a salary. now they don't know when they are going to paid and people who were previously in professional or middle—class jobs are now putting themselves in desperately difficult situations. in terms of what can be done, well, the un is appealing for more funding. the world food programme has said that it may need around $220 million every month for the first few months of next yearjust to be able to get enough food to that 22 or 23 million people in afghanistan who need it. and there are bigger questions, too. the international community has not yet recognised the taliban.
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it's reluctant to engage directly with it and give them direct foreign grants, but those foreign grants previously made up for around 75% of afghanistan's public expenditure. so, in addition to that, afghanistan's foreign reserves held in america, around 9 billion of them, they are now frozen and those are questions that are still being grappled with and it does not seen yet is if anyone has an answer to how to solve them. in the meantime, of course, the people in afghanistan, the suffering continues for them. let's turn to climate change now. with just one week to go until world leaders gather for an all—important summit in glasgow, several pieces of news show how big the challenge they're facing is. that is to reverse course and reduce emissions enough to prevent the worst of global warming. all the promises so far on climate leave the world headed for a rise of 2.7 degrees, says the united nations, way above a globally agreed target. the level of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached
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a new record last year. that's from meteorologists. but first, rich countries will be three years late in meeting a promise to provide $100 billion to help developing countries deal with climate change. here's matt mcgrath on that. everybody�*s trying to get their stake before the cop starts next week, and i think the question is finance is a critical one for that meeting. rich countries promised back in 2009 that they would deliver by 2020 $100 billion a year to help developing countries to cope with the impacts of climate change and to cut their own carbon. that target has not been met. it's been slipping be for a while now and has not been met
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so in an effort to try and rally troops the uk government had put together a couple of finance ministers to come up with a plan, delivery plan and they posted today and it seems they're confident they'll be able to get to 100 billion by 2023 and a couple of years after ward beyond that. so they feel that over the five—year period from 2020—25, they'll make 100 billion worth every year but that's what they say is a good thing and many environmentalists are unhappy about that so they think it's a promise that's not been met and they feel it's literally too little, too late. there's been some reaction already on the delay. mohamed nasheed is a former president of the maldives, a country already hit by rising sea levels. he tweeted. .. he goes on... more evidence of the scale of the problem came today from the world meteorological organisation. they said the build—up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere rose to record levels last year. the stock of gases is affected by the ability of natural processes to absorb c02.
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here's the organisation's secretary general. we have already seen some alarming indications that, for example, the amazonian rainforest ecosystem, it used to be a major sink of carbon, has become now a source of carbon, which is alarming. this is related to deforestation in the area and also the changes in local climate because of this deforestation and also higher temperatures which are favouring evaporation. let's get more on this from imogen foulkes is in geneva. this is the body that gathers - all the evidence for different met offices around the world looking at the percentages of these - greenhouse gases as carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane _ in the atmosphere,
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also in the oceans. | now, they'r at record levels again, and that is despite a year- in which practically none of us got on a plane, - many of us stopped driving our cars, we were all working from home. - and one of the problems is that we are still livingl with the greenhouse gases _ in the atmosphere that were admitted decades ago because carbon dioxide lives up there for— a really long time. ithis causes the planet to warm, i and what the wmo is saying today is we are just not on target - to limit global warming to that 1.5—2 degrees centigrade which everybody agreed i in paris, the other big climate summit six years ago. - the united nations actually says the world is currently on course for a rise of 2.7 degrees. that's after factoring in all the promises made so far by countries going into cop
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to bring their emisisons down. this is today's update from the un. the blue lines at the bottom show where emissions would need to be headed to keep temperature rises below safe levels. the red area is where the world is actually headed. that's based on all the ndcs, or nationally determined contributions as they're called, that countries have made in the run—up to glasgow. i asked david shukman, our science editor, whether the glasgow summit was bound to fail to meet the almost impossible challenge set for it. they are projecting that emissions of the gases that are heating the planet are set to rise by 16% by the end of this decade, by 2030, when the science could not be more category that to get ourselves out of the worst trouble, those emissions need to be halved by 2030. as things stand, the calculations show that as you say we are on course for a warming of 2.7 celsius above the preindustrial level. we have warmed just over 81 degrees as it is and look at the trouble we are
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in already. scientists say 2.7 might not sound very much but it takes us to a very dangerous territory indeed. it is still possible that just ahead of the cop 26 on it in the coming days, the biggest polluter in the world, china, or other billing polluting nations who have not yet reported may come up with spectacular offers that change that picture. perhaps a bit, perhaps a lot. but unless that happens, the cop 26 summit is not really going to be able to deliver the kind of transformation that many are hoping from it. . ., ., . , from it. david, climate finance very much key to _ from it. david, climate finance very much key to con — from it. david, climate finance very much key to cop 26 _ from it. david, climate finance very much key to cop 26 also. _ from it. david, climate finance very much key to cop 26 also. which - much key to cop 26 also. which countries apparently will be three years late in meeting promises to deliver money to developing nations. that also is going to put pressure on people at cop 26. it that also is going to put pressure on people at cop 26.— on people at cop 26. it is. this really goes _ on people at cop 26. it is. this really goes to _ on people at cop 26. it is. this really goes to the _ on people at cop 26. it is. this really goes to the heart - on people at cop 26. it is. this really goes to the heart of- on people at cop 26. it is. this really goes to the heart of the | really goes to the heart of the entire process because when these
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talks began back in the early �*90s, it was always made very clear that you had the industrialised world, which had started polluting soonest, added most carbon dioxide in the air, and at the main responsibility lay on the shoulders of those countries in europe, north america and so forth. and the poorest nations on earth had always said, look, if you want us to take this seriously, we need you to be cutting your emissions dramatically and you were going to have to help us. help us go green, leapfrog the fossil fuel stage of economic development, but also be able to be more resilient to resist the bigger storms, the more severe droughts and floods and sea level rise they are going to be hitting those countries hardest of all. so when people talk about the offer, this promise of $100 billion a year for these
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countries, clearly the money is incredibly important and viable but there's also a symbolic value. it's like for the poorest countries at the rich world and saying are you serious but the trouble we are in? is a matter of trust for them. when it comes to this whole process and these talks every year and glasgow being the latest of them. and i think without that trust, there is a risk of perhaps some rancour cribbing into the process and making things very difficult in glasgow. fast—moving events in sudan. doctors say at at least two people have died after the military seized power, dissolved the civilian government and arrested the prime minister in a coup. troops are on the streets of the capital and a state of emergency is now in place. the coup is led by sudan's top general. and he's spoken. translation: let's all work starting | today up until the general electionsl injuly 2023 to improve people's
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lives and ensure their safety and security, as well as creating a suitable environment for political parties in order to reach the specified date for elections when they will be more prepared. the government that consists of independent national calibre will lead the country until elections with a fair representation of all the people of sudan. here's how the events unfolded. early monday, unidentified soldiers detained the prime minister, abdallah hamdok, and four other ministers. they have been leading sudan's democratic transition since the ousting of the country's former military ruler two years ago. activists denounced it as a coup. protests in khartoum were immediate. angry crowds blocked roads by burning tyres. there were reports of clashes. over the day, hundreds joined the protests. some gathered near the army headquarters chanting slogans against the military. we're told the internet
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was shut down, making it difficult to work out exactly what was going on. we did get this footage showing troops moving into the capital. according to reports, some soldiers used live rounds against protesters. one independent union of medics said two people have died and 80 are injured. next, let's hearfrom one of the protesters who took part today. people are very angry. the immediate reaction was anger. and that's why people took to the street, like 5—6am in the morning when we heard about this. immediately, spontaneously people took to the streets. you know, now like many streets are blocked with barricades and protesters all over the place.
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some of the protesters even made it all the way to the military headquarters. to protest and to make it very clear what they are after. they're not accepting this coup. they're not accepting all that was said by the general. and they will continue protesting until we have our civilian leadership. this hasn't come out of the blue. sudan's military and civilian leaders have been at odds since they began sharing power in the transitional government set up in 2019 after the overthrow of the long—serving military ruler, omar al—bashir. the transitional government, known as the sovereign council, was intended to pave the way for elections. that hasn't happened yet. tensions came to a head last month, when a coup attempt, attributed to supporters of mr bashir, was foiled. then this was khartoum last week. a pro—military sit—in was staged in front of the presidential palace. thousands took part in a counterprotest, too. will carter is the norwegian refugee council's sudan country director.
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he's in khartoum and has these concerns. what's happened in khartoum, - there was an ongoing peace process, an ongoing transition - from a military dictatorship through this transitional phase. we were about to see full. civilian democracy take on. these tensions have been building, a lot| of dissatisfaction on all sides. we're just so concerned. this was a big humanitarian situation before. _ 14 million people in need - of a humanitarian assistance. over a million refugees hosted here. and this is a country— which is struggling to move on, it was in some ways, feels like everything| is going back to square one. so, very tense, - anxious, frustration. i'm sure this is the beginningj of a very difficult seven days. so, in charge now is this man,
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general abdel fattah al—burhan. he's blaming political in—fighting for the take over. next, let's get the analysis from our senior africa correspondent anne soy, who is in nairobi in neighbouring kenya. according to the statement from the general, he said that he would form a new government made up of technocrats, a legislative council will also be appointed next month. and he says that he will stay on course towards a transition to democracy, so it is not clear whether he's coming out with completely different outfit and on what basis that would be. and it's unclear if the military have completely set aside the deal
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that was signed in 2019 after the long serving al—bashir was toppled. there has been worldwide condemnation of the coup. the african union has called for the immediate resumption of dialogue between the military and civilians. both the us and the un have expressed alarm at the events, and this is a representative from the eu. the eu is very concerned about sudan's military forces reportedly putting prime minister hamdok under house arrest, and as well as detaining other members of the civilian leadership. and we urge for their fast release. we have seen also the reports of cuts of telephone and internet in sudan. we urgently call for unrestricted means of communication to reach those in need. violence and bloodshed must be avoided at all costs. well, the prime minister and members of his cabinet are thought to be under house arrest. beverly ochieng is a sub—saharan africa conflict, security and media analyst for bbc monitoring. she's in nairobi in neighbouring kenya. what does this mean for security in this region? there are concerns that the turmoil
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in sudan _ there are concerns that the turmoil in sudan wiii — there are concerns that the turmoil in sudan will lead _ there are concerns that the turmoil in sudan will lead to _ there are concerns that the turmoil in sudan will lead to a _ there are concerns that the turmoil in sudan will lead to a widespread i in sudan will lead to a widespread insecurity— in sudan will lead to a widespread insecurity problem. _ in sudan will lead to a widespread insecurity problem. we _ in sudan will lead to a widespread insecurity problem. we have - in sudan will lead to a widespread insecurity problem. we have seen turmoil— insecurity problem. we have seen turmoil in— insecurity problem. we have seen turmoil in the _ insecurity problem. we have seen turmoil in the neighbouring - turmoil in the neighbouring countries _ turmoil in the neighbouring countries and _ turmoil in the neighbouring countries and also - turmoil in the neighbouring countries and also a - turmoil in the neighbouring countries and also a tussle | turmoil in the neighbouring - countries and also a tussle about the border— countries and also a tussle about the border between _ countries and also a tussle about the border between kenya - countries and also a tussle about the border between kenya and l the border between kenya and smallness_ the border between kenya and smallness of— the border between kenya and smallness of the _ the border between kenya and smallness of the region - the border between kenya and smallness of the region itselfl the border between kenya andl smallness of the region itself is not able — smallness of the region itself is not able to— smallness of the region itself is not able to give _ smallness of the region itself is not able to give as _ smallness of the region itself is not able to give as much - smallness of the region itself is i not able to give as much attention to both _ not able to give as much attention to both the — not able to give as much attention to both the internal— not able to give as much attention to both the internal crisis - not able to give as much attention to both the internal crisis as - not able to give as much attention to both the internal crisis as well. to both the internal crisis as well as clamp — to both the internal crisis as well as clamp down _ to both the internal crisis as well as clamp down on _ to both the internal crisis as well as clamp down on the _ to both the internal crisis as well as clamp down on the protests . to both the internal crisis as welll as clamp down on the protests or even _ as clamp down on the protests or even the — as clamp down on the protests or even the coup— as clamp down on the protests or even the coup to _ as clamp down on the protests or even the coup to cover— as clamp down on the protests or even the coup to cover that - as clamp down on the protests or even the coup to cover that has l even the coup to cover that has happened — even the coup to cover that has happened in— even the coup to cover that has happened in sudan— even the coup to cover that has happened in sudan today. - even the coup to cover that hasj happened in sudan today. what even the coup to cover that has happened in sudan today. what has been the reaction _ happened in sudan today. what has been the reaction from _ happened in sudan today. what has been the reaction from sudan's - been the reaction from sudan's neighbours so far?— been the reaction from sudan's neighbours so far? kenya issued a statement that _ neighbours so far? kenya issued a statement that is _ neighbours so far? kenya issued a statement that is watching - neighbours so far? kenya issued a statement that is watching the - statement that is watching the situation — statement that is watching the situation closely _ statement that is watching the situation closely full _ statement that is watching the situation closely full survey - statement that is watching the | situation closely full survey did mention— situation closely full survey did mention the _ situation closely full survey did mention the agreement - situation closely full survey did l mention the agreement between civilians — mention the agreement between civilians and _ mention the agreement between civilians and the _ mention the agreement between civilians and the military- mention the agreement between civilians and the military in - mention the agreement between civilians and the military in 2019. you would — civilians and the military in 2019. you would assume _ civilians and the military in 2019. you would assume that - civilians and the military in 2019. you would assume that there - civilians and the military in 2019.| you would assume that there will civilians and the military in 2019. - you would assume that there will be some _ you would assume that there will be some reaction— you would assume that there will be some reaction from _ you would assume that there will be some reaction from kenya _ you would assume that there will be some reaction from kenya but - some reaction from kenya but then the international— some reaction from kenya but then the international government - the international government authority— the international government authority of _ the international government authority of which _ the international government authority of which sudan - the international government authority of which sudan is i the international government authority of which sudan is a i the international government - authority of which sudan is a chair also finds— authority of which sudan is a chair also finds itself— authority of which sudan is a chair also finds itself in _ authority of which sudan is a chair also finds itself in a _ authority of which sudan is a chair also finds itself in a bit _ authority of which sudan is a chair also finds itself in a bit of- authority of which sudan is a chair also finds itself in a bit of an - also finds itself in a bit of an opera — also finds itself in a bit of an opera position. _ also finds itself in a bit of an opera position. it— also finds itself in a bit of an opera position. it has- also finds itself in a bit of an opera position. it has to - also finds itself in a bit of an - opera position. it has to monitor events— opera position. it has to monitor events closely— opera position. it has to monitor events closely but _ opera position. it has to monitor events closely but without - opera position. it has to monitor events closely but without the l events closely but without the authority— events closely but without the authority of _ events closely but without the authority of the _ events closely but without the authority of the sudanese - events closely but without the . authority of the sudanese prime minister— authority of the sudanese prime minister who— authority of the sudanese prime minister who was— authority of the sudanese prime minister who was a _ authority of the sudanese prime minister who was a chair, - authority of the sudanese prime minister who was a chair, there i authority of the sudanese prime i minister who was a chair, there is little _ minister who was a chair, there is little they— minister who was a chair, there is little they can _ minister who was a chair, there is little they can do _ minister who was a chair, there is little they can do to _ minister who was a chair, there is little they can do to resolve - minister who was a chair, there is little they can do to resolve the l little they can do to resolve the situation — little they can do to resolve the situation. ~ ., little they can do to resolve the situation. ~ . ,, ., ., , situation. what we know about this
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to- situation. what we know about this tap general — situation. what we know about this tap general and — situation. what we know about this top general and what _ situation. what we know about this top general and what his _ situation. what we know about this | top general and what his aspirations might be? top general and what his aspirations miaht be? . ' top general and what his aspirations miaht be? ,, , ., ., might be? suffer a long time the military been _ might be? suffer a long time the military been angling _ might be? suffer a long time the military been angling to - might be? suffer a long time the military been angling to stay - might be? suffer a long time the military been angling to stay in l military been angling to stay in power — military been angling to stay in power it— military been angling to stay in power. it went _ military been angling to stay in power. it went to _ military been angling to stay in power. it went to a _ military been angling to stay in power. it went to a majority. military been angling to stay in power. it went to a majority of| military been angling to stay in . power. it went to a majority of the time _ power. it went to a majority of the time through — power. it went to a majority of the time through a _ power. it went to a majority of the time through a transition - power. it went to a majority of the time through a transition and - time through a transition and was set on _ time through a transition and was set on a _ time through a transition and was set on a 2019— time through a transition and was set on a 2019 and _ time through a transition and was set on a 2019 and also _ time through a transition and was set on a 2019 and also the - set on a 2019 and also the self—preservation. - set on a 2019 and also the self—preservation. think. set on a 2019 and also the| self—preservation. think of set on a 2019 and also the - self—preservation. think of the fact that many— self—preservation. think of the fact that many of— self—preservation. think of the fact that many of them _ self—preservation. think of the fact that many of them were _ self—preservation. think of the fact that many of them were allies - self—preservation. think of the fact that many of them were allies of. self—preservation. think of the fact. that many of them were allies of the former— that many of them were allies of the former president _ that many of them were allies of the former president who _ that many of them were allies of the former president who is _ that many of them were allies of the former president who is supposed i that many of them were allies of thej former president who is supposed to be at least _ former president who is supposed to be at least as — former president who is supposed to be at least as far _ former president who is supposed to be at least as far as _ former president who is supposed to be at least as far as reports - former president who is supposed to be at least as far as reports our- be at least as far as reports our concern — be at least as far as reports our concern extradited _ be at least as far as reports our concern extradited but - be at least as far as reports our concern extradited but there i be at least as far as reports our concern extradited but there is| be at least as far as reports ouri concern extradited but there is a possibility— concern extradited but there is a possibility that _ concern extradited but there is a possibility that some _ concern extradited but there is a possibility that some of- concern extradited but there is a possibility that some of this - concern extradited but there is a possibility that some of this is l concern extradited but there is a j possibility that some of this is to also protect— possibility that some of this is to also protect members— possibility that some of this is to also protect members of- possibility that some of this is to also protect members of the - possibility that some of this is to i also protect members of the army possibility that some of this is to - also protect members of the army who had been _ also protect members of the army who had been close — also protect members of the army who had been close to _ also protect members of the army who had been close to bashir— also protect members of the army who had been close to bashir and _ also protect members of the army who had been close to bashir and also - had been close to bashir and also other— had been close to bashir and also other political— had been close to bashir and also other political power— had been close to bashir and also other political powerjostling. - had been close to bashir and also| other political powerjostling. find other political power 'ostling. and how are other political power 'ostling. and how the h other political powerjostling. how are the protesters other political powerjostling.- how are the protesters mobilising right now? how are the protesters mobilising riaht now? , ., ., , how are the protesters mobilising riahtnow? ,~ ., , ., right now? they are not using social media despite _ right now? they are not using social media despite the _ right now? they are not using social media despite the restrictions. - right now? they are not using social media despite the restrictions. thel media despite the restrictions. the sudanese _ media despite the restrictions. the sudanese professional— media despite the restrictions. the sudanese professional association | sudanese professional association which _ sudanese professional association which had — sudanese professional association which had held — sudanese professional association which had held lead _ sudanese professional association which had held lead to _ sudanese professional association which had held lead to omar- sudanese professional association which had held lead to omar al. which had held lead to omar al bashir— which had held lead to omar al bashir posit _ which had held lead to omar al bashir posit removal— which had held lead to omar al bashir posit removal has - which had held lead to omar al bashir posit removal has calledj bashir posit removal has called supporters— bashir posit removal has called supporters alter— bashir posit removal has called supporters alter media - bashir posit removal has called supporters alter media and - bashir posit removal has calledl supporters alter media and also other— supporters alter media and also other activists _ supporters alter media and also other activists continue - supporters alter media and also other activists continue to - supporters alter media and also other activists continue to call. supporters alter media and also. other activists continue to call on the public— other activists continue to call on the public to— other activists continue to call on the public to go— other activists continue to call on the public to go off _ other activists continue to call on the public to go off and - other activists continue to call on the public to go off and protest l the public to go off and protest using _ the public to go off and protest using twitter _ the public to go off and protest using twitter and _ the public to go off and protest
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using twitter and facebook. i the public to go off and protest. using twitter and facebook. 0k, beverl , using twitter and facebook. 0k, beverly, thank _ using twitter and facebook. 0k, beverly, thank you _ using twitter and facebook. beverly, thank you very much using twitter and facebook.“ beverly, thank you very much indeed. more coming up in a few moments. you are watching os on bbc news. hello there. today has been a mixture of sunshine and showers. through the rest of the week, it may well be a bit winder than today. but the winds are south—westerly, so it's going to be very mild for the time of year. but there will be some heavy rain around for some western parts of the uk. now, the rainmaker is looming large on the satellite picture. this cloud streaming in from the atlantic. ahead of it, we've had those showers. a lot of those will be fading away. we'll keep some going for longer, mainly across the western side of scotland. but then everything gets swamped by the cloud coming in and this rained initially in northern ireland. iy gets wetter later in western scotland. some rain over the irish sea into western parts of england and wales, though not much rain in the south west of england. ahead of it, some clear skies for a good while across eastern england, eastern scotland. temperatures could be
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down to 5—6 degrees. now, this band of rain moves away from northern ireland fairly quickly. we've got a spell of rain running eastwards across scotland and northern england, not much rain running eastwards futher south. a lot of that rain has gone in the afternoon, but we're left with fairly cloudy skies, a bit of drizzle over some western hills. get to the east of high ground, you could see some sunshine coming through helped by those south—westerly winds. and those temperatures widely 17 degrees, quite a bit warmer than today across the northern half of the uk. by the end of the day, most of the rain is on that weather front in the far north west, but as we move into wednesday, that weather front starts to slide further towards the uk, bringing some rain into other areas. and all the while, we're drawing in the winds from a long way south, hence those higher than normal temperatures for the time of year. a lot of cloud around to begin with on wednesday. we've still got this rain mainly north wales, north—western parts of england. it may well get wetter again across northern ireland, central, southern parts of scotland, some heavy rain in the hills. through the midlands thwards east anglia and the south east, some sunshine, and in those south—westerly winds, the temperatures could reach 18 degrees.
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now, i mentioned some areas could see some heavy rain, and we're focusing here on wednesday and thursday's rainfall accumulation. and those bright colours show where with the heaviest rain is going to be. across the southern uplands and particularly into the cumbrian fells. that could lead to some flooding as well. the rain keeps going across the north west of england. slides into wales, the south west of england as it tends to clear away from northern ireland. some showers following on and some rain still for some southern and eastern parts of scotland. turns a little bit cooler in the north west, but towards the south east where it's dry, it's still very mild.
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hello, i'm maryam moshiri. this is outside source. the united nations warns of a countdown to a humanitarian catastrophe in afghanistan. the bbc finds some parents so desperate they're forced to sell their children to buy food. we know there are other families here who've sold their children, and even while we've been here, another person came up to one of our team and asked if we'd like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put in words. millions are said to be facing starvation as afghanistan slips further into crisis. also in the programme, the un says the world is on course for a dangerous increase in temperature — despite all the promises made on climate change.
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in the uk, a rise in the minimum wage is on the cards for wednesday's budget. and we'll be live in romania, where there's a curfew, as they battle with one of europe's worst outbreaks of coronavirus. here in the uk, the chancellor is expected to announce an increase in the national living wage to £9.50 an hour in his budget on wednesday. the current rate — which applies to workers aged 23 and over — is £8.91. the change will affect millions of low—paid workers, but labour said much of the increase will be swallowed up by tax rises and cuts to universal credit. here's our political correspondent alex forsyth. behind the treasury's closed doors, the budget plans are being drawn up. but while the official announcement�*s still days away,
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details of spending plans have started to emerge. today, news of a wage rise for some of the lowest—paid. the cost of living is a really important issue. the key thing is that today's announcement, an extra £1,000 a year for people on the national living wage, is a really important protection against those pressures, and it helps to make sure that every family in the country where people are in work can really see that this is a government that's on their side. people working in retail or hospitality, care or maintenance, are among those who are likely going to benefit. those aged 23 or over will see wages rise to £9.50 from april, with increases for younger workers, too, welcomed by some in birmingham today. it's good news for everyone, especially people that works in care work and cleaning jobs and things like that. it's a shame it's not more, but it is going to help, yeah. i think it's good, to be honest, - because with that money adding up, it's going to do a lot for a lot of people. minimum wage has to always
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increase, to be honest. - but for hetty, who runs a brownie business in gloucester that we visited at the start of the pandemic, it's an extra challenge after a tough time and could mean costs are passed on to customers. it will mean we will have to increase our product prices. and it does make it difficult for when i want to reward my team for their hard work by giving them pay rises, and it still feels like a pay rise for something great they've done rather than because the government's told me i have to. with the economy moving again after covid, there has been pressure on the government to help those struggling with rising bills and rising prices. part of its answer is pay going up. the government says it wants to move to a high—wage economy, where people earn more to help with household budgets. as well as today's announcement, the chancellor has hinted that public sector workers could be in line for a pay rise, too. but critics say it isn't enough,
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given that some support put in place through the pandemic has ended and people are facing tax rises, too. what the government have announced today is going to be swallowed up by the tax rises they've already announced, by that big cut to universal credit and because people are already seeing big increases in the cost of living, so it'sjust more smoke and mirrors for the government. there will be more to come from the treasury on wednesday, when the chancellor will set out not just who might benefit from this budget but how he plans to keep the books balanced. let's turn to coronavirus now and start here in the uk. cases are high, hospitalisations and deaths have been rising. last week, there was an average of 45,100 new cases reported per day. as you can see here, that is heading towards the winter peak from last december. but the health secretary sajid javid
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says there is no need for further restrictions like mandatory mask wearing, work from home orders and vaccine passports — what the government has dubbed "plan b — just yet. i think, at this point, in terms of those actions that we set out under plan b, we don't feel we've reached that point. but, that said, we have seen case numbers, they rose sharply over the last few days, and they're now, some of them are heading down, but they will keep going up and down. what it shows us is the pandemic is still there. there's still a lot of virus around. we, of course, are in a much better place today than we were at any time during this pandemic. well, despite the reassurance from the health secretary, there is concern about what high case numbers could mean for christmas plans. here's the health secretary again on that. i don't think any sensible health secretary across the world would want to predict exactly where we are going to be in three months�* time or six months�* time, not least because there's always the risk sadly of a new variant that
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could be more dangerous. but what we do know, what we do know about this virus is that the best things that we can do to protect ourselves are to get vaccinated, to take sensible precautions. and so for all those people like me that are hoping and planning for a normal christmas, which i do, by the way, think that's where we'll be, we'll have a normal christmas, if we want that, let's just keep playing our part. part of that reasoning could be linked to new modelling that predicts cases will plummet in the coming months — even without the implementation of "plan b" measures. the telegraph published this article overnight, revealing that modelling from the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine and the government's own internal modelling both suggest a huge drop in cases to around 5,000 new infections in the days before christmas. that's nine times less than the current average rate of daily cases. so that's the government's position — no plan b, yet. but others see things differently. here's professor peter openshaw,
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immunologist at imperial college london and a member of the uk vaccine network, speaking to radio 4's today programme. i don't think it's a binary "go for plan b or do nothing". it's very clear that the measures that are included in plan b are sort of sensible and not very disruptive. it's not problematic, i think, to give clear leadership about the use of face masks and working at home, if you can, is also not particularly disruptive for many people. and those measures are likely to need to lead to a pretty good reduction in the really unacceptable number of cases that we've got at the moment. to china now. it's dealing with a growing covid outbreak in the north of the country by introducing tough new measures. so far, authorities have reported more than 133 cases across 11 provinces and the government is starting to tighten restrictions on movement
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before it hits major cities, like the capital beijing. anyone arriving to beijing from districts that have even a single covid case won't be allowed to enter the city. and those living near areas with infections will need to be tested before they travel to the capital. and the beijing marathon — planned for the end of this month — has been suspended indefinitely. it was expected to have 30,000 competitors and thousands of spectators. but with so few cases compared to other countries like the uk, why the massive crackdown? here's our correspondent stephen mcdonell in beijing to explain. in just over three months, this city will be hosting the winter olympics, and the plan right now is to have local residents filling the stands. so you can imagine it is adding an extra degree of pressure on officials to yet again rein
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in the coronavirus in china. other countries, they've gone to a living with covid strategy now, but not this country and certainly not in this city. right now, officials are still opting for a plan which is back to zero, covid elimination. and every time there's been an outbreak, using contact tracing, using strict, very localised lockdowns and certain other targeted measures, chinese officials have been able to rein it in. and it looks like that's what they are going to try again now. for those who want to come to china to visit family and friends, to study, to take in the sights, many analysts will be saying to them,
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"don't plan on doing that for at least another yearata minimum," because in october next year, the communist party will be holding its once a year congress, a very important political meeting, which is when the president will go beyond his second term, and the chances of anything being eased on the covid front between now and then is probably pretty slim. and who knows how long it will go after that? now to romania, where new restrictions came into place on monday as the government attempts to combat a record number in covid cases and deaths, leaving the hospitals at breaking point. facemasks are now mandatory in public places, there is a night curfew of 10pm and covid green passes are now required for entry to most public venues. but despite the desperate situation in the hospitals, vaccination rates are low and there were protests against the new restrictions on the weekend. my colleague kasia madera is in bucharest for us. our people complying with restrictions there? ~ . ., , restrictions there? actually, given that there were _ restrictions there? actually, given that there were protests, - restrictions there? actually, given l that there were protests, thousands of people on the streets protesting against any increase in restrictions, overall, yes, people are generally complying. but i
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thought it was people on the streets outside, wearing their masks, those that were not wearing masks were approached by police officers and had that kind of international sign of "what's going on here, where's your mask?" you mentioned about 20 minutes local time, anyone who cannot prove they are double vaccinated left until 5am and restaurants as well — this is russ on this been close now for about 45 minutes, restaurants having to close their doors at nine o'clock now, so, yes, they are complying and it is arguing unsurprising. romania has a really intense wake up, with those highest new infection rates since the pandemic began, also with the highest death rates, remaining now experiencing around 500, over 500 daily deaths. a grim situation for this country.
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daily deaths. a grim situation for this country-— this country. and, kasia, low vaccine upticks _ this country. and, kasia, low vaccine upticks as _ this country. and, kasia, low vaccine upticks as well- this country. and, kasia, low vaccine upticks as well not i this country. and, kasia, low- vaccine upticks as well not helping things? vaccine upticks as well not helping thins? .. , vaccine upticks as well not helping thins? , ., vaccine upticks as well not helping thins? , . ,., vaccine upticks as well not helping thins? , ., ,, a things? exactly that. if you thick about it, romania _ things? exactly that. if you thick about it, romania has _ things? exactly that. if you thick about it, romania has the - things? exactly that. if you thickl about it, romania has the second lowest vaccination uptake among adults, its adult population, only 35% of the adult population is double vaccinated. before you ask, it is full gary a... a really low uptake and it is the usual excuse of this information, this information, but also rumania has had its own collocations here... it lost a vote of no—confidence. right now you have an interim government struggle to cope with getting consistent messages across as to what people should be doing, so a bit of confusion, but given this kind of grim awakening that they've experienced over the past few days,
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hopefully the vaccination uptake will increase.— hopefully the vaccination uptake will increase. kasia, very briefly, it is notjust _ will increase. kasia, very briefly, it is notjust romania, _ will increase. kasia, very briefly, it is notjust romania, poland . will increase. kasia, very briefly, it is notjust romania, poland is| it is notjust romania, poland is also struggling. pail it is notjust romania, poland is also struggling-— also struggling. poll that also struggling. — also struggling. poll that also struggling. but _ also struggling. poll that also struggling, but actually - also struggling. poll that also l struggling, but actually poland also struggling. poll that also - struggling, but actually poland has been one of those countries taking from romania. poland has been taking in the desperately sick into their hospitals. today, the polish prime minister said that he will be sending a medical delegation to romania to help out, but yeah, it comes at the same time as poland's numbers are also increasing, so a difficult situation across this region in eastern europe. kasia madera in _ region in eastern europe. kasia madera in bucharest, - region in eastern europe. kasia madera in bucharest, thank- region in eastern europe. kasia madera in bucharest, thank you. stay with us on outside source. still to come, here in the uk, a facebook whistle—blower tells mps "we are subsidising hate".
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russian gas company gazprom will suspend exports to neighbouring moldova if a new contract is not signed. moldova relies on russian gas, but recent price hikes of more than 40% have made it unattainable for europe's poorest country and moldova has now declared a state of emergency. the bbc�*s steve rosenberg has more. moldova gets 100% of its gas from russia, but the contract to supply that gas ended at the end of last month. gazprom raised the price, reduced supplies by a third, and new terms have yet to be agreed between russia and moldova. and as you say, moldova has introduced a state of emergency to free up additional money to help try to find additional sources elsewhere. now, gazprom says this is not about politics, this is simply business, that moldova must pay its way and must settle a $700 million debt and must sign a new contract and that gazprom's
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patience is running out. gazprom claims is offered moldova a good deal with a discount. the moldovan government says, no, it has not, the deal on the table is not good for citizens of moldova, that the price the company is asking is higher than international markets. and many people here in moldova interpret what is happening as political pressure on moldova. keep in mind that moldova was once in russia's orbit, in russia's sphere of influence, but now has a pro—europe, pro—eu leadership. and, as i say, many analysts here believe this is an attempt by russia to put pressure on moldova, a country which wants to establish closer ties with europe. the problem is — is that possible? is that realistic? because 100% of the gas is coming from russia, moldova's own gas company, the main shareholder is russia's gas company, and moldova gets more than 80% of its electricity from a power station owned by russia. you see the difficulty.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story: the united nations warns of a countdown to a humanitarian catastrophe in afghanistan, with millions facing starvation. more than a third of the world's population are active users of facebook and its other social media products. yet the global tech giant has been facing serious allegations about its impact on individuals and wider society. here in the uk, a former facebook manager turned whistle—blower told a committee of mps that platforms like facebook were "literally subsidising hate". here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. facebook, a corporate giant used by 2.9 billion people,
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an empire which includes instagram, whatsapp and the virtual reality business oculus. but now that empire stands accused of putting profits before people. frances, we're delighted you've been able to make this trip to be in london and give evidence to us. at westminster this afternoon, francis haugen, the whistle—blower who's made that charge, told mps and peers what she learned inside the company. she said events like january's storming of the us congress were made more likely because of the way facebook was designed. the algorithms take people who have very mainstream interests, and they push them towards extreme interests. you can be someone centre—left, and you'll get pushed to radical left. you can be centre—right, and you'll get pushed to radical right. you can be looking for healthy recipes, you'll get pushed to anorexia content. she described how instagram facilitated bullying which would follow children home from school, so that it would be with them day and night. and she put much of the blame on facebook�*s founder. you know, mark zuckerberg has unilateral control over
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3 billion people, right? there's no will at the top to make sure the systems are run in a safe way. frances haugen's testimony comes just as politicians here seem united on the need to rein in facebook and other online giants. but exactly how a new law would work, well, that's farfrom clear. the whistle—blower told the committe what was needed from facebook was complete transparency about its inner workings. tonight, the social media giant had this response. i would encourage people to look at what the actual facts are, - and hopefully they can see that this is something to this _ company prioritises. and let's be honest, - it's in our financial interest to make sure that people have a good experience on our site. _ frances haugen has now taken her allegations about her former employer to politicians in westminster and washington. but while facebook�*s reputation has certainly been damaged, so far its finances remain very healthy. rory cellan—jones, bbc news.
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a former high ranking saudi intelligence official has accused the country's de facto ruler, crown prince mohammed bin salman, of plotting to assassinate him and of boasting he could kill the kingdom's ruler at the time, king abdullah. this is saad aljabri. he now lives in exile in canada, where he has lived since 2017. he was a high—ranking official in the saudi intellgence service and served as a key link between saudi arabia and western intelligence services. but he fled the country in 2017 and has been accused of corruption by the kingdom. here he is talking about the crown prince in a wide ranging interview with the american news network cbs. i am here to sound the alarm about a psychopath killer in the middle east with infinite resources who poses a threat to his people,
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to the americans and to the planet. a psychopath with no empathy, doesn't feel emotion, never learns from his experience and we have witnessed atrocities and crimes committed by this killer. so let's take you through some of the claims that were made throughout the interview. saad aljabri claimed that he received a warning from within the intelligence community that he was going to be assassinated. this was when journalist jamal khashoggi had disappeared — before it was revealed that he'd in fact been murdered.
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jamal khashoggi was the washington postjournalist who was murdered inside the saudi embassy in turkey. here's saad aljabri talking about that warning. and the warning i received, don't be in a proximity of any saudi mission in canada. don't go to the consulate. don't go to the embassy. i said, "why?" they said, "they dismembered the guy, they killed him. you are on the top of the list." some details of this plot have already been reported, but this is the first time that mr aljabri has spoken publicly about his split with the crown prince. in the programme, the former acting cia director mike morrell spoke about how dr aljrabi had saved the lives of many americans. intelligence from mr aljabri had led to the interception of bombs that had been planted by al-qaeda in 2010 on two planes intended for america. he said there were other examples, but they were still classified, and described mr aljabri as "honourable". he hasn't spoken about his break from the kingdom before. here's our security correspondent frank gardner on why saad aljabri is speaking out now. saad aljabri, this former intelligence official, is living in exile in canada, and two of his children have been seized by the authorities
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in saudi arabia, accused of financial crimes which they totally deny. they were 17 and 18 when they were taken, and they're currently in prison. and his message is, "look," to the us government, "i helped save you from terrorist acts." he, for example, gave the tip—off about the printer ink tone cartridge bombs that were heading to chicago in 2010. he said, "now it's your turn," he's saying, "help me get my children out of custody, and so they can live normal lives." saad aljabri also claimed he has a 2014 recording of the crown prince boasting it would be easy to kill the sitting king at that time — king abdullah. that would the pave the way for his own father, now king salman, to ascend to the throne. let's take a listen to that part of the interview. he told him, "i want to assassinate king abdullah. i get a poison ring from russia.
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it's enough for me just to shake hands with him, and he will be done." a poison ring from russia? that's what he said. whether he's just bragging, but he said that, and we took it seriously. does this video - recording still exist? yes. i know where it is now. i know there are two copies of that. i know where they are. now, as we've heard, the claims made in the interview are explosive and potentially damaging to the kingdom of saudi arabia. here's frank gardner again with their reaction. the saudi embassy in washington was contacted by cbs, the programme—makers, and their response was, "this is a discredited former official who has embezzled money and he carried out financial fraud." in other words, they've dismissed it.
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stars of the show friends have paid tribute to the actor james michael tyler, who played gunther and who has died at the age of 59 after being diagnosed with prostate cancer. lizo mzimba reports. its focus was on six friends, but a seventh character also made a big impression. this is a "getting rid of everything rachel ever touched" sale. i will take it all. and as friends�* popularity grew, so did the role originally called "coffee guy." gunther, six glasses. six, you want me tojoin you? oh, i thoughtjoey was here. five is good. but, of course, he had one storyline everyone remembers. rachel? yeah? when�*s your birthday? 5th may, why? i�*m just making a list of people�*s birthdays. 0h, mine's december... yeah, whatever. i finished it, i did it all by myself! and there's nobody to hug. it was so important to fans, the show felt they had to resolve it in friends�* final episode.
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ijust have to tell you... ..i love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. over the years, there were a few other small roles. and he was reunited with friends cast mate matt leblanc in bbc�*s sitcom episodes. seriously? is that the best you�*ve got? but his legacy will always be friends. too ill to appear in person, hejoined the show�*s reunion special remotely. it was the most memorable ten years of my life, honestly. i could not have imagined a better experience. all these guys, it was just a joy to work with them. i felt very special. the world�*s biggest tv show would never have been quite what it was without james michael tyler�*s gunther.
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you�*ve been watching outside source. thanks for your company. bye—bye. hello there. today has been a mixture of sunshine and showers. through the rest of the week, it may well be a bit windier than today. but the winds are south—westerly, so it�*s going to be very mild for the time of year. but there will be some heavy rain around for some western parts of the uk. now, the rainmaker is looming large on the satellite picture. this cloud streaming in from the atlantic. ahead of it, we�*ve had those showers. a lot of those will be fading away. we�*ll keep some going for longer, mainly across the western side of scotland. but then everything gets swamped by the cloud coming in and this rain initially in northern ireland. it gets wetter later in western scotland. some rain over the irish sea into western parts of england and wales, though not much rain in the south west of england. ahead of it, some clearer skies for a good while across eastern england, eastern scotland.
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temperatures could be down to 5—6 degrees. now, this band of rain moves away from northern ireland fairly quickly. we�*ve got a spell of rain running eastwards across scotland, northern england, not much rain running eastwards futher south. a lot of that rain has gone in the afternoon, but we�*re left with fairly cloudy skies, a bit of drizzle over some western hills. get to the east of high ground, you could see some sunshine coming through helped by those south—westerly winds. and those temperatures widely 17 degrees, quite a bit warmer than today across the northern half of the uk. by the end of the day, most of the rain is on that weather front in the far north west, but as we move into wednesday, that weather front starts to slide further towards the uk, bringing some rain into other areas. and all the while, we�*re drawing in the winds from a long way south, hence those higher than normal temperatures for the time of year. a lot of cloud around to begin with on wednesday. we�*ve still got this rain, mainly north wales, north—western parts of england. it may well get wetter again across northern ireland, central, southern parts of scotland, some heavy rain in the hills. through the midlands towards east anglia and the south east, some sunshine, and in those south—westerly winds, the temperatures could reach 18 degrees.
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now, i mentioned some areas could see some heavy rain, and we�*re focusing here on wednesday and thursday�*s rainfall accumulation. and those bright colours show where the heaviest rain is going to be, across the southern uplands and particularly into the cumbrian fells. that could lead to some flooding as well. the rain keeps going across the north west of england. slides into wales, the south west of england as it tends to clear away from northern ireland. some showers following on and some rain still for some southern and eastern parts of scotland. turns a little bit cooler in the north west, but towards the south east where it�*s dry, it�*s still very mild.
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this is bbc news. i�*m ben mundy. the headlines at 8... the national living wage will increase to £9.50 per hour next april, with the government insisting it�*s enough for those struggling to meet the rising cost of living. an extra £1,000 a year for people on the national living wage is a really important protection against those pressures, and it helps to make sure that every family in the country where people are in work can really see that this is a government that's on their side. the un warns millions of people in afghanistan are facing starvation this winter — the bbc has found evidence that some families are even selling their children to get money forfood. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put in words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan.
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facebook whistle—blower, frances haugen, tells mps that the platform puts growth over safety.

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