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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 25, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines — the national living wage will increase to £9.50 per hour next april. the government insists it's enough for those struggling to meet the rising cost of living. an extra £1000 a year for people on the national living wage is a really important protection against those pressures, and it helps to make sure that every family in the country where people are in work can really see that this is a government that's on their side. the un warns millions of people in afghanistan are facing starvation this winter. the bbc has found evidence that some families are even selling their children to get money forfood. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put into words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan.
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the nhs in england is promised almost £6 billion to help clear the record backlog of people waiting for tests, scans and treatments. facebook whistle—blower frances haugen tells mps that the platform puts growth over safety. the real thing we're seeing - here is facebook accepting little, tiny additions of harm, . like when they weigh off, "how much harm is worth how much growth for us?" - and a key spending pledge to help some of the world's poorest countries cut their carbon footprint has not been met days before world leaders meet in glasgow for the cop26 climate summit.
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millions of workers are set to get a pay boost from april with a rise in the national living wage. it's due to be announced in the budget on wednesday. the rate for those aged over 23 will go up to £9.50 per hour, from the 1st of april next year. that's up from the current rate of £8.91 per hour. the above inflation rise means a full—time worker on the national living wage would see their annual incomejump by more than £1000 before tax. minimum pay rates for younger workers and those on apprenticeships are also set to go up. the government has faced pressure to help low—paid, younger workers, who are among the worst hit by the pandemic. the federation of small businesses has said that some small firms may have to close as a result of the rise. the chief secretary to the treasury, simon clarke, was asked what help will be given to businesses in this week's budget. we've always been clear
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that this is a government that backs businesses, and we recognise this is always a balancing act when striking the national living wage and making sure that it's the right thing for both employers as well as for employees. we've given an enormous amount of help to businesses over the course of the covid pandemic, and that will be a key focus of the budget and the spending review. you look at existing measures like our super deduction, help to grow start—up loans, these are all things which were intended to make sure that businesses can notjust survive but thrive, and that is obviously a very important part of the week ahead. labour have said that the increase in the national living wage is not sufficient to cope with the rising cost of living. the shadow chief secretary to the treasury is bridget phillipson. it's a distinctly underwhelming offer from the government because we know with everything getting more expensive and hand—in—hand with the cut to universal credit, the increase in national insurance people are facing, a worker receiving universal credit will still be over £800 a year worse soft even when you take this into consideration. so i think there are
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immediate steps government could be thinking right now to make life a lot easierforfamilies thinking right now to make life a lot easier for families and they are choosing not to do this and all the smoke and mirrors from the governmentjust won't smoke and mirrors from the government just won't cut smoke and mirrors from the governmentjust won't cut it. let's get more from our political correspondent ione wells. the government saying this is above inflation and really help workers and labour saying it is underwhelming. and labour saying it is underwhelmina. . �*, , ., underwhelming. that's rifles of the government _ underwhelming. that's rifles of the government has _ underwhelming. that's rifles of the government has also _ underwhelming. that's rifles of the government has also been - underwhelming. that's rifles of the government has also been facing i government has also been facing pressure — government has also been facing pressure now for some weeks to introduce — pressure now for some weeks to introduce some kind of measures to try and _ introduce some kind of measures to try and tackle the rising cost of living _ try and tackle the rising cost of living due _ try and tackle the rising cost of living due to a number of factors. put inflation putting at the price of basic— put inflation putting at the price of basic goods like some foods into the markets. also the recent cut of that £20 _ the markets. also the recent cut of that £20 uplift to universal credit and also — that £20 uplift to universal credit and also of course rising energy bills at— and also of course rising energy bills at the moment due to the rise in wholesale gas prices. so government has been facing prison for some _ government has been facing prison for some time to try and help particularly those lowest paid workers — particularly those lowest paid workers at the moment, which they hope _ workers at the moment, which they hope that— workers at the moment, which they hope that this announcement of writing — hope that this announcement of writing the living race to £9 50 will do — writing the living race to £9 50
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will do. the chancellor has said that this — will do. the chancellor has said that this pledge is part of a wider commitment to try and in low pay by the end _ commitment to try and in low pay by the end of— commitment to try and in low pay by the end of this parliamentary term. as you _ the end of this parliamentary term. as you say— the end of this parliamentary term. as you say criticism from the opposition as well there, labour's shadow— opposition as well there, labour's shadow cheese returned to the pressure — shadow cheese returned to the pressure he is said that most of this is— pressure he is said that most of this is going to be really kind of swallowed by the costs of living and that i_ swallowed by the costs of living and that i mentioned already. think of the cost _ that i mentioned already. think of the cost universal credit, like upcoming tax rises in the new year with national insurance rates are to id with national insurance rates are to go up _ with national insurance rates are to go up in _ with national insurance rates are to go up in april as well next year muh but also _ go up in april as well next year muh but also rising energy bills as weii — but also rising energy bills as well. focus from the opposition that this rise _ well. focus from the opposition that this rise will be outweighed by some of those _ this rise will be outweighed by some of those other factors. in terms of the reaction — of those other factors. in terms of the reaction for businesses themselves who say some concern there _ themselves who say some concern there from — themselves who say some concern there from small businesses about shouldering some of this cost. it has been — shouldering some of this cost. it has been welcomed by searchers like the care _ has been welcomed by searchers like the care sector and hospitality sector— the care sector and hospitality sector as _ the care sector and hospitality sector as well. they welcomed the rise in— sector as well. they welcomed the rise in wages for workers but have said that _ rise in wages for workers but have said that they may need to pass on some _ said that they may need to pass on some of— said that they may need to pass on some of the cost of increasing people — some of the cost of increasing people posit wages to consumers and that would _ people posit wages to consumers and that would mean higher prices for
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consumers — that would mean higher prices for consumers potentially coming down the road _ consumers potentially coming down the road as well. separately to all of this, _ the road as well. separately to all of this, this is of course involving paint— of this, this is of course involving paint for— of this, this is of course involving paint for the private sector and for businesses — paint for the private sector and for businesses and employers there but separately the chancellor did also hint over— separately the chancellor did also hint over the weekend that the government may be looking to lift its freeze — government may be looking to lift its freeze on public centre pay as well _ its freeze on public centre pay as well so — its freeze on public centre pay as well. so pape for some servants, teachers — well. so pape for some servants, teachers that have been frozen in li-ht teachers that have been frozen in light of— teachers that have been frozen in light of the public sector funds is being _ light of the public sector funds is being squeezed we can expect a little _ being squeezed we can expect a little bit — being squeezed we can expect a little bit more about that in the budget— little bit more about that in the budget on wednesday as well. thank ou ve budget on wednesday as well. thank you very much- _ and in the next few minutes, we'll be speaking to the resolution foundation to get their reaction about the national living wage rising from next april. the united nations says afghanistan is heading for catastrophe with millions facing starvation and the harsh winter months still to come. the world food programme has warned 22 million people, about half the population, are suffering hunger on a daily basis. and the bbc has found evidence that some families are even selling their children to make ends meet.
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international aid has dried up since the taliban seized power in august while the world debates how to deal with the new regime. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye reports from afghanistan. a warning — her report contains distressing images and details from the start. this is what starvation does to a country. to its tiniest lives. six—month—old usman. habib ur—rehman, born three months ago. afghanistan was barely surviving before the taliban took over, but now foreign funds which propped up this country have been frozen. putting at least1 million children at risk of dying. in this ward, one in five will not make it.
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usman weighs less than half of what he should. his father among millions who have no work. usman's mother told us his twin is in a room next door. this hospital is full. some babies are already sharing a bed. while we were there, six more children were brought in. it's the only facility for hundreds of miles.
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because, without foreign money, most hospitals are collapsing. doctors and nurses among masses of government workers who haven't been paid for months. a third of the country's people don't know where their next meal will come from. we travelled out of herat to a rural settlement. tens of thousands displaced from remote provinces by decades of war and severe drought. no means of income, barely any food. some days families here don't eat. they have sold whatever little they had. and now some are forced to do the unthinkable. this baby girl has been sold by her family. we are hiding their
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identity to protect them. her husband used to collect rubbish, but even that earns him nothing now. once the baby's able to walk, she'll be taken away by the man who bought her. he's paid more than half of the £400 she's been sold for. that'll get the family through a few months. they've been told the girl will be married to his child,
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but no—one can be sure. we know there are other families here who've sold their children and even while we've been here, another person came up to one of our team and asked if we'd like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put in words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan. it cannot wait while the world debates whether or not to recognise a taliban government. nearby, aid agencies hand out parcels that might save some children from hunger. alone, they can't provide for the staggering needs. giving the taliban money without guarantees on human rights and how the funds will be used is dangerous, but afghanistan is sinking fast. millions here will not survive the winter. yogita limaye, bbc news, herat.
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joining me now live from herat in afghanistan is christophe garnier, the project coordinator for medecins sans frontieres. some really shocking images in that report. how bad is the situation and how much worse do you think it has gotten since the taliban took over an office 7 august? gotten since the taliban took over an office ? august?— gotten since the taliban took over an office ? august? good evening. the situation _ an office ? august? good evening. the situation is _ an office ? august? good evening. the situation is very _ an office ? august? good evening. the situation is very critical, - an office ? august? good evening. the situation is very critical, but i the situation is very critical, but i don't think it has anything to seat with the new government except the fact that the global funds has been fully frozen. afghanistan was working with 75% international support, financial support, and of course by stopping the support from one day to another, it cannot work some situation is critical that i. if nothing is done and if the
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international community does not lift this sanction, we will face catastrophic humanitarian situation. do you unders and the reluctance of the international community to pour money into afghanistan because they are worried it is just going to go straight to the taliban? are worried it isjust going to go straight to the taliban?- straight to the taliban? note, i don't understand. _ straight to the taliban? note, i don't understand. it _ straight to the taliban? note, i don't understand. it is - straight to the taliban? note, i don't understand. it is not - straight to the taliban? note, i don't understand. it is not the l don't understand. it is not the citizens to pay the price for the politics of international country so no i don't understand why. we're not the only one working with our funds and we stick to our activities but that's not the case for hundreds of different organisations who needs these funds to be able to provide these funds to be able to provide the basic care to people. find these funds to be able to provide the basic care to people. and what do ou the basic care to people. and what do you see — the basic care to people. and what do you see if _ the basic care to people. and what do you see if the _ the basic care to people. and what do you see if the principal- the basic care to people. and what do you see if the principal problem at the moment? is it hunger? is a food? now and in the coming months, the winter months, what is slowly going to get extremely cold? weill. going to get extremely cold? well, it's uuite a going to get extremely cold? well, it's quite a accumulation _ going to get extremely cold? well, it's quite a accumulation of - it's quite a accumulation of different factors like the economic
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crisis, the bank system collapsed, access to cash is very difficult for people if they get a job for the ministry of health have not been paid since from us because there is no cash any more in the country. this is a big issue. then of course the winter is coming and it will be very cold and be more cold again and i don't know how people can live the situation. ads, i don't know how people can live the situation. �* , ., ., ., ., , situation. a situation that does not seem as if anybody _ situation. a situation that does not seem as if anybody is _ situation. a situation that does not seem as if anybody is going - situation. a situation that does not seem as if anybody is going to - situation. a situation that does not seem as if anybody is going to be i seem as if anybody is going to be able to address very soon or very quickly or are you saying actually they could do if the international community woke up and helped afghanistan now? i’m community woke up and helped afghanistan now?— afghanistan now? i'm pretty confident — afghanistan now? i'm pretty confident that _ afghanistan now? i'm pretty confident that if _ afghanistan now? i'm pretty confident that if the - afghanistan now? i'm pretty- confident that if the international community decided to find solutions and decided to sit at the table and work with the authorities, they would find a solution and everything can may be not be perfect but at least much better. {lillie can may be not be perfect but at least much better.— can may be not be perfect but at least much better. one of the most harrowin: least much better. one of the most harrowing elements _ least much better. one of the most
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harrowing elements in _ least much better. one of the most harrowing elements in that - least much better. one of the most harrowing elements in that report l harrowing elements in that report and i don't know if you were able to hear it was that some families appear to be selling their own children in orderjust to get by, to make ends meet. i children in orderjust to get by, to make ends meet.— children in orderjust to get by, to make ends meet. i have heard the same story. _ make ends meet. i have heard the same story. but — make ends meet. i have heard the same story, but it's _ make ends meet. i have heard the same story, but it's not _ make ends meet. i have heard the j same story, but it's not something make ends meet. i have heard the l same story, but it's not something i have seen. we are here to people are generally not speaking about this exceptin generally not speaking about this except in the interview so i don't really have so much information regarding this issue.— regarding this issue. thank you an a regarding this issue. thank you anyway for _ regarding this issue. thank you anyway for talking _ regarding this issue. thank you anyway for talking to _ regarding this issue. thank you anyway for talking to us - regarding this issue. thank you anyway for talking to us and . regarding this issue. thank you i anyway for talking to us and giving us your perspective from afghanistan. thank you very much for your time. afghanistan. thank you very much for our time. ., ~ afghanistan. thank you very much for our time. ., ,, i. let's take a look now at the latest coronavirus data for the uk. more than 36,500 new cases have been recorded in the past 2a hours. a further 38 people have died within 28 days of testing positive for covid—19. and those figures don't include cases and deaths reported in wales, because of a technical problem at public health wales. meanwhile, more than 79% of the uk population aged 12 and over have now
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had two coronavirus vaccinations. it could soon be compulsory for nhs staff in england to be vaccinated for coronavirus. the health seceratry, sajid javid, says he's "leaning towards" such a policy, though no final decision has been taken. it comes as the government announces an extra £5.9 billion for the nhs in england, with the money being used to help clear the backlog of people waiting for tests and scans, and to buy equipment and improve it. i'm joined by professor neil mortensen, president of the royal college of surgeons in england. thank you so much for being with us. first of all that cash injection, almost £6 billion, how crucial is that going to be in clearing that record backlog? taste
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that going to be in clearing that record backlog?— record backlog? we are really leased. record backlog? we are really pleased- lt — record backlog? we are really pleased. it is _ record backlog? we are really pleased. it is great _ record backlog? we are really pleased. it is great news. - record backlog? we are really pleased. it is great news. 1.5| pleased. it is great news. 1.5 billion of that has been earmarked for particular elite surgical capacity, surgical hubs we have been calling for sincejune. these are dedicated surgical facilities where patients can be sure to have a surgery without cancellation. we want to see those throughout the country. we are really pleased with this announcement, but of course we will await to hear more detail in due course. will await to hear more detail in due course-— will await to hear more detail in due course. �* , ., ,, ., , _ due course. and 'ust talk to us by the backlog — due course. and 'ust talk to us by the backlog as _ due course. and just talk to us by the backlog as you _ due course. and just talk to us by the backlog as you see _ due course. and just talk to us by the backlog as you see it. - due course. and just talk to us by the backlog as you see it. how i due course. and just talk to us by. the backlog as you see it. how bad is itjust in terms of routine tests and scans and routine procedures and treatments and so on?— and scans and routine procedures and treatments and so on? welcome a 5.7 million is a — treatments and so on? welcome a 5.7 million is a record, _ treatments and so on? welcome a 5.7 million is a record, so _ treatments and so on? welcome a 5.7 million is a record, so it _ treatments and so on? welcome a 5.7 million is a record, so it does - treatments and so on? welcome a 5.7 million is a record, so it does not - million is a record, so it does not get any worse than that. to give you an idea as far as surgery is concerned, patients waiting more than two years, there are now 975,000. 2,000 of those, this is
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more than two years waiting for orthopaedic procedure, perhaps a hip orthopaedic procedure, perhaps a hip or knee operation, under 25,020 for general surgery which includes gallstones for example and 1,000 waiting for ent procedures. so that gives you an idea of the scale of the problem and it will take a massive effort to begin to make inroads into it.— massive effort to begin to make inroads into it. you say it does not aet an inroads into it. you say it does not get any worse _ inroads into it. you say it does not get any worse and _ inroads into it. you say it does not get any worse and that _ inroads into it. you say it does not get any worse and that but - inroads into it. you say it does not get any worse and that but there l get any worse and that but there have been predictions that could get a lot worse. ~ have been predictions that could get a lot worse-— a lot worse. well, you are right in this nearly _ a lot worse. well, you are right in this nearly 6 _ a lot worse. well, you are right in this nearly 6 billion _ a lot worse. well, you are right in this nearly 6 billion is _ a lot worse. well, you are right in this nearly 6 billion is money - a lot worse. well, you are right in this nearly 6 billion is money for. this nearly 6 billion is money for diagnostic hubs, which we welcome. 100 are in the country. it is going to be really good to have a new scanners to be able to make a diagnosis sooner, but of course if the diagnosis is made sooner, you are to be able to do so think about it so unique capacity to deal with the diagnosis. it is certainly true that if you have a scan in a timely fashion, your problem will not be as bad. it may mean less if you have a
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surgery to solve the problem but nonetheless it's going to mean more capacity. flan nonetheless it's going to mean more ca -aci . ., nonetheless it's going to mean more caaci . ., nonetheless it's going to mean more ca-aci . . ., i. nonetheless it's going to mean more caaci . ., , nonetheless it's going to mean more ca-aci . . , , capacity. can i ask you but this idea of compulsory _ capacity. can i ask you but this | idea of compulsory vaccinations capacity. can i ask you but this - idea of compulsory vaccinations for nhs staff in england? what do you think of that? notjust researchers but clearly for all the staff in the national health service, should it be compulsory commission to be mandatory?— be compulsory commission to be mandato ? . �* , ., ,, ., mandatory? we've been talking about that in the surgical— mandatory? we've been talking about that in the surgical community - mandatory? we've been talking about that in the surgical community since l that in the surgical community since christmas time when vaccination came in. i think we are still on the view that it will be better to persuade rather than compel. after the same it's a relatively small proportion of surgical staff who have not been double vaccinated. we think around 95% have been double vaccinated already. i was or is there to hear that in france, for example, talking to a colleague in the day came vaccination is mandatory and interestingly even vaccination is mandatory for planet surgery
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patients. so i can see where the secretary of state is coming from. i still think there is more room to persuade people rather than compel people at the moment we agree with all the other wrought medical colleges and the academy of rural medical colleges that we should as far as we can possibly do so, we should try and redouble our efforts around persuasion.— around persuasion. good to talk to ou. around persuasion. good to talk to you- thank — around persuasion. good to talk to you- thank you _ around persuasion. good to talk to you. thank you so _ around persuasion. good to talk to you. thank you so much, - around persuasion. good to talk to| you. thank you so much, president around persuasion. good to talk to i you. thank you so much, president of the royal college of surgeons in england. the royal college of surgeons in encland. ., ~ the royal college of surgeons in encland. ., ,, i. facebook will fuel more episodes of violent unrest around the world because of the way its algorithms are designed to promote divisive content, according to a former employee and whistleblower. speaking to mps and peers this afternoon, frances haugen said the company saw online safety as a "cost centre", even though she believes regulation would make facebook more successful.
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giving evidence to a parliamentary committee which is scrutinising planned legislation to regulate social media companies in the uk, she said that facebook�*s algorithms were having a direct impact on pushing individuals towards extremism. part of what is dangerous about groups is that we talk about sometimes this idea of is this an individual problem or is this a societal problem? one of the things that happens in aggregate is the algorithms take people who have very mainstream interests, and they push them towards extremist interests. you can be someone centre—left and you'll get pushed to radical left, you can be centre—right and get pushed to pushed to radical right. you be looking for healthy recipes and be pushed to anorexia content. they are examples on facebook�*s research of all this. one of the things that happens with groups and
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networks of groups is people see echo chambers that create social norms. so if i'm in a group that has lots of covid misinformation and i see over and over again that someone gives covid vaccine things that encourage people to get vaccinated, they get completely pounced upon. they get torn apart. i learned that certain ideas are suitable and unsuitable. when that context is around hate, now you see a normalisation of hate, normalisation of dehumanising others and that's what leads to violent incidents. joining me now is monika bickert, facebook�*s vice president of content policy. she said that it is leading to hate and that is quite a damning indictment.— and that is quite a damning indictment. . , ., ., ., indictment. that is not true at all. you're the — indictment. that is not true at all. you're the first _ indictment. that is not true at all. you're the first company - indictment. that is not true at all. you're the first company to - you're the first company to published stats about how much hate speech _ published stats about how much hate speech is _ published stats about how much hate speech is on service. this is how much _ speech is on service. this is how much art — speech is on service. this is how much art service is missing. we see the prevalence of hate speech on facebook— the prevalence of hate speech on facebook is less than one fifth of a
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%. facebook is less than one fifth of a % that— facebook is less than one fifth of a % that is— facebook is less than one fifth of a %. that is less than 0.05%. that's a result— %. that is less than 0.05%. that's a result of— %. that is less than 0.05%. that's a result of the — %. that is less than 0.05%. that's a result of the progress we have made in finding _ result of the progress we have made in finding and removing that kind of content _ in finding and removing that kind of content. ,, ., ,., in finding and removing that kind of content. ,, ., , in finding and removing that kind of content. ,, ., �* content. she also says you're -aushin content. she also says you're pushing people _ content. she also says you're pushing people down - content. she also says you're pushing people down rabbit l content. she also says you're - pushing people down rabbit holes, hurting the most vulnerable amongst us. so if you are centre—right, it was you towards the far right, centre left with a view to the far left. ., �* , centre left with a view to the far left. . �* , ., left. that's not right either. the algorithm. _ left. that's not right either. the algorithm, it's _ left. that's not right either. the algorithm, it's a _ left. that's not right either. the algorithm, it's a fancy _ left. that's not right either. the algorithm, it's a fancy word - left. that's not right either. the j algorithm, it's a fancy word that people — algorithm, it's a fancy word that people use but basically what it is is how— people use but basically what it is is how do— people use but basically what it is is how do we prioritise content that people _ is how do we prioritise content that people will— is how do we prioritise content that people will see when they go on their— people will see when they go on their facebook news feed. and let me be really— their facebook news feed. and let me be really clear people can always opt out _ be really clear people can always opt out of — be really clear people can always opt out of that anger them. they can choose _ opt out of that anger them. they can choose to _ opt out of that anger them. they can choose tojust see opt out of that anger them. they can choose to just see the content in reverse — choose to just see the content in reverse chronological order but what the under _ reverse chronological order but what the under the is it says what is the most _ the under the is it says what is the most relevant content. we want to make — most relevant content. we want to make sure _ most relevant content. we want to make sure that we are prioritising content _ make sure that we are prioritising content that will lead to positive engagement that we reduce things like click— engagement that we reduce things like click bait, sensationalist content _ like click bait, sensationalist content and we actually publish on
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our site _ content and we actually publish on our site a — content and we actually publish on our site a list of the types of content _ our site a list of the types of content like that that we actively demote — content like that that we actively demote. and that's in addition to what _ demote. and that's in addition to what we — demote. and that's in addition to what we do to try to combat misinformation on our site. we work with more _ misinformation on our site. we work with more than 80 independent fact checking _ with more than 80 independent fact checking organisations around the world _ checking organisations around the world to _ checking organisations around the world to identify content on our site that — world to identify content on our site that is false and to reduce its distribution and the people know that it's — distribution and the people know that it's false.— distribution and the people know that it's false. when she is talking about facebook's _ that it's false. when she is talking about facebook's instagram, - that it's false. when she is talking | about facebook's instagram, which facebook owns, she says your own research described instagram as an addict�*s narrative so that kids on instagram said this makes me unhappy but i don't have the ability to control my use of it. so in other words children using instagram end “p words children using instagram end up being addicted to it in quite a dangerous way. that is your own research. is that true? that dangerous way. that is your own research. is that true?— dangerous way. that is your own research. is that true? that is not an accurate _ research. is that true? that is not an accurate characterisation - research. is that true? that is not an accurate characterisation of. research. is that true? that is not| an accurate characterisation of our research _ an accurate characterisation of our research but first i want to just if the size — research but first i want to just if the size there is only one reason that a _ the size there is only one reason that a company would do research like this —
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that a company would do research like this. and that is to understand potential— like this. and that is to understand potential bad experiences so that we can get— potential bad experiences so that we can get better. so the fact that we are doing — can get better. so the fact that we are doing this research is a good thing _ are doing this research is a good thing and — are doing this research is a good thing and a _ are doing this research is a good thing and a responsible thing but we take it _ thing and a responsible thing but we take it a _ thing and a responsible thing but we take it a step further and when we see in— take it a step further and when we see in the — take it a step further and when we see in the result of that research that there — see in the result of that research that there are potential bad experiences, we build tools to mitigate — experiences, we build tools to mitigate those. so for instance our research _ mitigate those. so for instance our research is — mitigate those. so for instance our research is a — mitigate those. so for instance our research is a reason why we now do things— research is a reason why we now do things like — research is a reason why we now do things like hide the light count on images _ things like hide the light count on images or— things like hide the light count on images or instagram images for people — images or instagram images for people or— images or instagram images for people or we build a new tool called take a _ people or we build a new tool called take a break that will encourage people — take a break that will encourage people to — take a break that will encourage people to limit the amount of time that they— people to limit the amount of time that they are spending on the app. but you _ that they are spending on the app. but you do— that they are spending on the app. but you do the research but then you hide from the world the research results that you don't like or that don't suit your narrative. trio. don't suit your narrative. no, that's not _ don't suit your narrative. no, that's not right. _ don't suit your narrative. no, that's not right. we - don't suit your narrative. no, that's not right. we have a research team _ that's not right. we have a research team of— that's not right. we have a research team of over — that's not right. we have a research team of over1,000 that's not right. we have a research team of over 1,000 people. we work on peer—reviewed research articles that go— on peer—reviewed research articles that go through an ethical review process— that go through an ethical review process and we publish our research
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in those _ process and we publish our research in those instances. so when the past year alone _ in those instances. so when the past year alone we put out more than 400 peer—reviewed research articles. now of course _ peer—reviewed research articles. now of course we — peer—reviewed research articles. now of course we also do smaller surveys to still— of course we also do smaller surveys to still go— of course we also do smaller surveys to still go to — of course we also do smaller surveys to still go to the ethical review process— to still go to the ethical review process but smaller surveys that are not intended for publication and you have to _ not intended for publication and you have to at _ not intended for publication and you have to at the beginning of the ethical— have to at the beginning of the ethical review process decide what your audience will be for publication in the process can be faster— publication in the process can be faster or— publication in the process can be faster or slower and different depending on that. so some of the research _ depending on that. so some of the research that was not released is because — research that was not released is because it — research that was not released is because it was never intended the release _ because it was never intended the release. these were intended to be smaller— release. these were intended to be smaller surveys of the sort that i'm sure the _ smaller surveys of the sort that i'm sure the bc— smaller surveys of the sort that i'm sure the bc and other news organisations and companies around the world _ organisations and companies around the world do to understand their products— the world do to understand their products and their audiences. anyone listenin: to products and their audiences. anyone listening to you _ products and their audiences. anyone listening to you will— products and their audiences. anyone listening to you will think _ products and their audiences. anyone listening to you will think every - listening to you will think every answer you give is incredibly defensive, that every allegation she has come up with you just say no, that's not true. why notjust say actually yes, some of that is true and we need to make ourselves better and we need to make ourselves better and need to make ourselves safer with mac i will tell you i work on
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these issues. i with mac i will tell you i work on these issues.— with mac i will tell you i work on these issues. i work on safety and security at — these issues. i work on safety and security at facebook _ these issues. i work on safety and security at facebook and - these issues. i work on safety and security at facebook and have - these issues. i work on safety and security at facebook and have for| security at facebook and have for almost _ security at facebook and have for almost nine years now. and so it is important — almost nine years now. and so it is important to — almost nine years now. and so it is important to me that we set the record _ important to me that we set the record straight about how much we prioritise _ record straight about how much we prioritise society in this company but my— prioritise society in this company but my background is in criminal prosecution. people who work on these _ prosecution. people who work on theseissues prosecution. people who work on these issues at facebook have similar— these issues at facebook have similar backgrounds and law enforcement, government, child safety— enforcement, government, child safety and so forth. so i do want that out— safety and so forth. so i do want that out there. but there is one thing _ that out there. but there is one thing that— that out there. but there is one thing that we do all agree on, and that is— thing that we do all agree on, and that is that — thing that we do all agree on, and that is that we want regulation for the tech _ that is that we want regulation for the tech industry. we are pleased that the _ the tech industry. we are pleased that the uk is one of the countries leading _ that the uk is one of the countries leading the way on this and we have been engaged with regulatory authorities there and will continue to do— authorities there and will continue to do so — authorities there and will continue to do so. �* ., . , authorities there and will continue todoso.�* . . , ., to do so. and when frances haugen makes these _ to do so. and when frances haugen makes these allegations, _ to do so. and when frances haugen makes these allegations, tell - to do so. and when frances haugen makes these allegations, tell us - to do so. and when frances haugen| makes these allegations, tell us why we should not believe her. i watched her testimony today to mps and she seemed articulate, she seemed intelligent, she seemed compelling and what she said. and she had a
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high—ranking job with you. and that she has decided to come out and tell the world what she thinks is really going on at facebook. what the world what she thinks is really going on at facebook.— going on at facebook. what i can tell ou going on at facebook. what i can tell you is _ going on at facebook. what i can tell you is l _ going on at facebook. what i can tell you is i work _ going on at facebook. what i can tell you is i work on _ going on at facebook. what i can tell you is i work on these - tell you is i work on these issues. safety— tell you is i work on these issues. safety and — tell you is i work on these issues. safety and security is the spirit... that— safety and security is the spirit... that was— safety and security is the spirit... that was not my question month. my question was why should we not believe her. i question was why should we not believe her-— question was why should we not believe her. ., . , .,, ., believe her. i would occur people to look at the — believe her. i would occur people to look at the numbers _ believe her. i would occur people to look at the numbers we _ believe her. i would occur people to look at the numbers we actually - believe her. i would occur people to look at the numbers we actually put out and _ look at the numbers we actually put out and we — look at the numbers we actually put out and we have published some of the documents that the former employee has pointed to the people can look— employee has pointed to the people can look at those for themselves. but we _ can look at those for themselves. but we put — can look at those for themselves. but we put out a quarterly report where — but we put out a quarterly report where we _ but we put out a quarterly report where we actually show our progress in the _ where we actually show our progress in the amount of content we miss in different— in the amount of content we miss in different areas of abuse. everything from hate _ different areas of abuse. everything from hate speech to threats to violent — from hate speech to threats to violent incidents and excitements so i violent incidents and excitements so i would _ violent incidents and excitements so i would encourage people to look at what the _ i would encourage people to look at what the actual facts are and hopefully they can seasoning this is where _ hopefully they can seasoning this is where the _ hopefully they can seasoning this is where the company prioritise. let's be honest— where the company prioritise. let's be honest it — where the company prioritise. let's be honest it is in our financial interest— be honest it is in our financial interest to _ be honest it is in our financial interest to make sure that people have a _ interest to make sure that people have a good experience on our site.
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and that _ have a good experience on our site. and that means creating a safe environment.— and that means creating a safe environment. ., ,, , ., . environment. ok, thank you, vice president of _ environment. ok, thank you, vice president of content _ environment. ok, thank you, vice president of content policy - environment. ok, thank you, vice president of content policy at - president of content policy at facebook, thank you for your time. thank you. let's get more now on our top story that the national living wage is to increase by twice the current rate of inflation in what the chancellor has called a move to help end low pay by the end of this parliament. we can speak to nye cominetti from the resolution foundation. they're a research organisation who say their goal is to improve outcomes for people on low and modest incomes. thank you very much for being with us. what do you make of this rise in the national living wage that has been announced and what part of the budget, we are told with mac it's definitely good news. i budget, we are told with mac it's definitely good news.— definitely good news. i think it's aood to definitely good news. i think it's good to think — definitely good news. i think it's good to think about _ definitely good news. i think it's good to think about what's - definitely good news. i think it's good to think about what's been happening over the past year. low—paid workers that really bore the brunt of the crisis both in employment terms and they were more likely to lose theirjobs or be furloughed but also in health terms is said that they are more likely to face a health consequence of the
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pandemic. so i think it's good that workers will be seeing a good wager next april so we don't quite know what inflation will beep when this happens but it's either going to be around 4%, so it should be a fairly decent move towards a pay increase but if you also say which of the game of the context of what is happening to income to the moment. so as we speak, people are seeing at £1000 cut in their incomes and nothing the government alternative to draw a comparison between his minimum—wage rise and the cut to incomes that there is benefit to receiving and having the key point to remember is even you are in your gross pay because it by £1000 a year is roughly what will happen if you are a full—time worker on minimum wage, actually your take—home pay will go by nearly as much. to have the pounds will take into account what you have type taxes and if it was are also really good news minimum wage increases happening it is not compensate for the cut to
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incomes many families will be experiencing right now. find incomes many families will be experiencing right now. and you say it's aood experiencing right now. and you say it's good news _ experiencing right now. and you say it's good news and _ experiencing right now. and you say it's good news and clearly _ experiencing right now. and you say it's good news and clearly it - experiencing right now. and you say it's good news and clearly it is - it's good news and clearly it is good news for workers but for businesses who have got to pay this rise, it can be a real problem and we been talking to some today who have already said it might mean laying off staff and it might mean reducing the hours that they can give to staff to work.— give to staff to work. there are alwa s give to staff to work. there are always trade-offs _ give to staff to work. there are always trade-offs with - give to staff to work. there are | always trade-offs with minimum give to staff to work. there are - always trade-offs with minimum wage always trade—offs with minimum wage policy and as you say when you increase it, the immediate benefit is that workers on minimum wage make more and 2 million workers will see a pay rise next april so that's obviously the good side but on the negative side, businesses will face lower profits and in case of a businesses cannot adjust, maybe they have really tight margins and they cannot pass on those wage costs into prices, then some businesses will be squeezed. the broad lesson of minimum wage policy over the last 20 years is that it's been by far and away a net positive so yes there
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will be some industries which will feel the squeeze but overall we are seeing really sharp increases in wages for lowest earners of the republic medic effects ofjobs or businesses that some expected when we first were talking about this policy 20 years ago. {lilia we first were talking about this policy 20 years ago.— policy 20 years ago. ok, thank you very much- — let's see what's going on in the road of sport. chetan has all the details. hello, good evening. scotland's cricketers are going to have to pull need a miracle if they're to avoid losing their first match of the super 12's at the t20 world cup. chasing 191 to beat afghanistan, they've collapsed in sharjah. having felt the full strength of afghanistan's batting line up after losing
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the toss and fielding. najibullah top scored, hammering three sixes in his 59 as his side racked up 190—4. scotland, who started their chase well, lost captain kyle coetzer for ten. mujeeb with the wicket — three more for him have swiftly followed. they just got another since theyjust got another since i sat down here. staying with cricket, there's a big boost for england as they prepare for the ashes. ben stokes has been added to the squad that'll head to australia next month ahead of december�*s first test. the all—rounder�*s been given the all clear after a second operation on a fractured finger. he's also been taking time out to prioritise his mental health. speaking to naga munchetty on bbc radio 5 live, former england opener michael carberry says stokes can expect the usual hostile reception from australia when he arrives there. he will be confident not only in the crowd, nowadays, as people tend to do, they hang out on social media, they think there are but clever, and will pop in there as well, so i
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think for me my only advice would be, as much as he can, try and channel his energies when he is on the pitch. he certainly doesn't need me to tell him that. off the pitch, i think it is about the england squad trying to get, i suppose, to help them avoid certain situations and just basically have as good a tour as he can, and obviously if someone like him has a great tour, i think england's chances are very, very good. unvaccinated tennis players are set to be allowed to compete at the australian open but will face two weeks of quarantine and regular testing, according to a letter given to wta players. australian ministers had said players withoutjabs would not be able to enter the country for the tournament. but the wta players' council says it's been told all competitors will be able to go to melbourne injanuary. a number of players — including 35% of those on the men's atp tour —
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remain unvaccinated. novak djokovic, the men's world number one and nine—time australian open champion, said last week he didn't want to reveal his vaccination status. 0le gunnar solskjaer called it the darkest day of his managerial career. manchester united's 5—0 defeat at home to liverpool in the premier league is a result that's piled more pressure on the united boss who's lost three of his last four league games. after the match, he signed autographs at old trafford, though thousands left the ground well before the final whistle. despite questions around his future, solskjaer says he's come too far to give up now. we've been getting the thoughts of united fans. i think he has to go, the only thing i can say. i i think he has to go, the only thing i can sa . ~ , i think he has to go, the only thing i can sa . ~' , , i can say. i think he just needs i can say. i think he 'ust needs that chance. h i can say. i think he 'ust needs that chance. 1h i can say. i think he 'ust needs that chance. i really]— i can say. i think he just needs that chance. i really do. - i can say. i think he just needs that chance. i really do. i - i can say. i think he just needs that chance. i really do. i love| that chance. i really do. i love him, _ that chance. i really do. i love him. i— that chance. i really do. i love him, i always did. that chance. i really do. i love him, ialways did. he that chance. i really do. i love him, i always did. he was the best. no trophies — him, i always did. he was the best. no trophies. we need somebody with
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something _ no trophies. we need somebody with something behind _ no trophies. we need somebody with something behind him, _ no trophies. we need somebody with something behind him, better- something behind him, better trophies _ something behind him, better trophies. he's— something behind him, better trophies. he's got _ something behind him, better trophies. he's got to - something behind him, better trophies. he's got to go. - something behind him, better trophies. he's got to go. he's| something behind him, better. trophies. he's got to go. he's a nice _ trophies. he's got to go. he's a nice guy, — trophies. he's got to go. he's a nice guy, but _ trophies. he's got to go. he's a nice guy, but probably- trophies. he's got to go. he's a nice guy, but probably not- trophies. he's got to go. he's a nice guy, but probably not the. trophies. he's got to go. he's a - nice guy, but probably not the right man for— nice guy, but probably not the right man for that — nice guy, but probably not the right man for thatjob. _ nice guy, but probably not the right man for that job. he _ nice guy, but probably not the right man for that job.— man for that 'ob. he needs to put his foot man for that job. he needs to put his foot down _ man for that job. he needs to put his foot down on _ man for that job. he needs to put his foot down on his _ man for that job. he needs to put his foot down on his guys - man for that job. he needs to put his foot down on his guys and tell them what to do. i don't the keys to any of that. them what to do. i don't the keys to any of that-— any of that. have not really got an 0 -tion at any of that. have not really got an option at the _ any of that. have not really got an option at the minute, _ any of that. have not really got an option at the minute, because - any of that. have not really got an option at the minute, because all| option at the minute, because all the managers are kind of taken. he is a good _ the managers are kind of taken. he is a good presence, it was a good idea at— is a good presence, it was a good idea at the — is a good presence, it was a good idea at the time, but he's not really— idea at the time, but he's not really had _ idea at the time, but he's not really had any managerial experience, has he? the thoughts thereof manchester united fans. just keeping an eye on this cricket, it has all gone wrong for scotland. they have lost another wicket in the eighth over, ben, as they try to chase 159 against afghanistan. there is life commentary on five live extra. gavin will round up everything on sportsday at 6:30 p.m., but that's all for now.
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thank you, chetan, very much indeed. a key spending pledge to help some of the world's poorest countries cut their carbon footprint has not been met, days before world leaders are due to meet in glasgow for the cop26 climate summit. the richest nations had promised to raise $100 billion dollars a year for developing countries by 2020, but this won't be achieved until 2023 at the earliest. let's get more from our environment correspondent matt mcgrath. this was a key pledge. i think it was discussed at the g7 summit in cornwall, and it is not the backdrop to cut 26 for the failure to emerge? —— cock 26. right, this figure has been hanging over the climate talks for years now. the richer countries promised they would make good now. the uk government, which is running the cop26 talks, today have released a report showing a delivery plan, how
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to get to this figure, and they say they are confident they can get there by 2023 and over 100 billion x 2024 and 2025, and so you taken altogether, it will roughly absorb 100 billion a year over the five—year period. that's what they say... it is unfortunate they could not make it this year, but they say it is a good idea. however, campaigners are not happy with that. they think it is too little, too late, i think it is an issue of trust, and this is difficult situation going into two weeks of tough negotiations to have filled this promise and not to have the money delivered before the nations arrive in glasgow next week. but! arrive in glasgow next week. and what probably — arrive in glasgow next week. and what probably are the chances of substantial success and progress at cop26 in glasgow? we know for example some of the key leaders are not going to be there even, the chinese president amongst others. how important is that? important, the leaders — how important is that? important, the leaders are _ how important is that? important,
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the leaders are obviously - the leaders are obviously important, and they set the tone, if you like... there are 120 coming, so is a fairly good turnout from the rest of the world. i think the difficulty for the uk is, what is success? they have since existed to keep the global temperature goal, threshold, of 1.5 celsius alive. if you add up all the reports multi—countries and what they are planning to do, it is not anywhere near that, so they have set themselves a monument to task. it would be i think a miracle in some ways if they were able to get something, to keep that figure alive by the end of the cop, and i think there will be lots of other things along the way, but that key figure is going be difficult for them to achieve and i think people mayjudge achieve and i think people mayjudge a failure if there's not a clear pathway to that title in the two,. act, a miracle needed in glasgow. matt mcgrath, environment analyst.
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nicola sturgeon has said that the scottish government will be a bridge builder at the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow next week. scotland's first minister said she wanted to create spaces, initiatives and forums for non—governmental bodies to talk to countries at the conference. she also acknowledged the scottish government had missed annual targets three years running and would publish a catch—up plan. i know that the prime minister and the uk government are determined to step up in the days ahead and show real commitment and leadership. and the scottish government will do everything we can to help. after all, this summit will shape the future of the world we live in. so absolutely nothing, certainly not party politics, should stand in the way of us working together towards a successful outcome. one of scotland's objectives during the summit itself is to be a bridge builder, to connect those whose voices are too rarely heard with those making the decisions. nicola sturgeon there, first minister of scotland. and downing street has released
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a recording of the prime minister taking questions from schoolchildren on climate change this morning. he told them of his concerns about the forthcoming cop26 summit in glasgow. it's going to be very, very tough, this summit, and i'm very worried because it might go wrong. and we might not get the agreements that we need, and it's touch and go. it's very, very difficult, but i think it can be done. and i think if you look at what the uk has done, we've cut our own c02 emissions massively. touch and go, says the prime minister. the bbc will be bringing you full coverage of the un climate change conference cop26 in glasgow next week. from flooding to heatwaves, the world is experiencing more extreme and unpredictable weather. but what exactly is the difference between weather and climate? here's our reality check correspondent chris morris. 0na on a cold or wet summer's day, it is not that uncommon to hear someone say, so much for global warming! but
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as our planet heats up and it really is heating up, it is important to understand the difference between weather and climate. the weather is what is happening right now and how it is likely to vary over the coming hours, days and weeks. forecasters take a look at things like temperature, air pressure, wind direction and humidity for a particular region. they are open together into a model which tries to tell us what we want to know — what's the weather like? so will it stay sunny today? how hot is it going to be? when is he going to rain? is he going to blow a deal tomorrow? what are the chances of a white christmas? of course forecasters don't always get it quite right in the weather is consul he changing, but in general short—term forecasts are pretty accurate for the week ahead. longer range seasonal forecasts, are weak particularly expecting a hot summer or a cold winter, more likely to get things a bit wrong, but they are
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still dealing with the weather and not the climate. because the climate is measured and analysed over a much longer period of time. it is usually at least 30 years, but he can stretch over centuries or even millions of years. put simply, the claimant is the average for the weather that happens. so average temperatures, average rainfall, average amounts of sunshine. and climate scientists look at long—term trends to work out how the climate is changing. now, we know there are different climatic zones on the earth — there is tropical heat at one extreme and the furloughs and pulls at the other — but they are all affected by the global climate, and the trend at the moment is clear. 0ur planet is getting hotter and hotter. have a look at this chart. it shows the change in global surface temperature compared to mid 20th century levels. you can clearly see the upward trend, especially over the last 20 years. you may think, that does not look like much,
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but it is having a big impact on life on this planet. fuelling extreme weather events, melting sea ice, rising sea levels, long—term changes in living conditions, for humans animals and plants. , for example, at what has been happening to arctic sea ice. recently ed islamist level on satellite —— at its lowest level. a change in the weather means a day to day shift from rain to sunshine and back again, climate change means global warming. and that's a huge challenge we only to confront. chris morris reporting. our latest headlines on bbc news: the national living wage is set to rise to £9.50 per hour in this week's budget. the un warns millions of people in afghanistan are facing starvation this winter, as the bbc has found evidence that some families are even selling their children to get money forfood. facebook whistleblower frances haugen tells mps
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who are planning social media legislation that facebook repeatedly prioritiesd growth over safety. there has been world wide condemnation of the coup in sudan. earlier, the head of sudan's sovereign council announced that the country's government has been dissolved and has declared a state of emergency. speaking on state television, lieutenant general abdel fattah al—burhan said elections would be held in 2023. earlier today, military officers arrested government officials including the prime minister. 0ur senior africa correspondent anne soy is in neighbouring kenya. she said it's difficult to get a clear picture of what's happening in sudan. it is not easy, but we have seen some of the images that have been
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posted online, presumably by sudanese who are monitoring the situation and have mean to send that information out. hundreds of thousands, many people coming out in large numbers, on the streets of sudan to what they call resist a military takeover of government. there have been calls in mosques, because apart from jeanette shutdowns, they are also spirited and a shutdown of mobile networks, and a shutdown of mobile networks, and therefore they have been using mosques to mobilise people to come out in the streets, pro—democracy demonstrators, to resist attempts by the military to take over power. in the military to take over power. in the last hour, the general abdel fattah al—burhan has spoken, and he has said that he has dissolved that body that he heads as well as government, which is civilian lead. the military arrested the prime
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minister abdalla hamdok. they are holding him and his wife and an undisclosed location. they also arrested several cabinet members and the civilian member of the sovereign counsel. there is indeed so much tension, peoplejust try counsel. there is indeed so much tension, people just try to make sense of what has happened. a statement from the prime minister's office came earlier and warned against tearing to shreds the accord that, the deal that has enabled the military and civilians to share power, and so we are waiting to see what happens. already the united states has spoken, the embassy in sudan has said those who are disrupting the process, the road map to democracy must stand down. anne soy reporting. a senior m15 officer has apologised to families bereaved by the manchester arena attack in 2017. the apology is believed to be the first made directly
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by an officer from the security service, since the bombing in which 22 people were killed by salman abedi. the officer, who is giving evidence anonymously, also conceded that the security service had missed an opportunity to question abedi on his return to the uk from libya, four days before the attack. petrol prices have reached their highest ever price. motoring organisations say the average price paid for a litre of petrol is now nearly £1.43, beating the previous record set in 2012. diesel prices remain a little below its all—time high. analysts say its due in part to a doubling of the oil price since last year. the rac�*s fuel spokesperson, simon williams, explained why petrol prices were rising. it isa it is a combination of factors. not least the price of oil. oil has doubled in the last 12 months post up
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-- $13 —— $13 before the pandemic, we're now up to $85. fuel is traded down after the exchange rate is weaker thanit after the exchange rate is weaker than it was in 2012, and oil is actually far lower than 2012. the exchange rate makes a difference. then we have got the switch to e ten petrol, 5% more for petrol now. ethanol is really expensive on the whole. that is adding 9p a litre to the price we are paying at the pump, and then you have a duty at 58 billion and you've got retail margin, and the retailer have been taking more margin, they are taking around 9p a litre, and then obviously you've got vat. at then obviously you've got vat. at the end of that transaction. that gives us a price of 142. one of saudi arabia's former top
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intelligence officials has described the country's de—facto ruler, crown prince mohammed bin salman, as a "psychopath". sa'ad al—jabri claims the crown prince suggested he could assassinate the country s former king abdullah. here's our security correspondent, frank gardner. two men at war with each other. 0n the left, saudi arabia's all—powerful crown prince, mohammad bin salman. 0n the right, dr saad al—jabri, the former saudi number two in intelligence. he fled to canada after the crown prince seized powerfour years ago. he says he was targeted by a hit squad. i am here to sound the alarm about a psychopath killer a psychopath with no empathy, doesn't feel emotion, never learned from his experience. and we have witnessed atrocities and crimes committed by this killer.
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the saudi embassy in washington has dismissed the claims saying saad al—jabri stole millions of dollars from the government, which he denies. in saudi arabia, two of dr saad's children have been seized from their homes when they were still teenagers. they're now in prison, accused of financial crimes, which the family denies. it says the crown prince has also gone after dr saad's son—in—law. the first night he was kidnapped, he received more than 100 lashes, he was tortured. he was beaten on his back, on his legs. he was being told that he was being detained and tortured as a proxy for his father—in—law, meaning my dad. they even asked him a question — "who do think we should arrest and torture so dr saad can come back to the kingdom?" back in 2010, dr saad al—jabri tipped off western intelligence about an al-qaeda bomb plot. explosives had been smuggled inside printer ink toner cartridges on planes bound for chicago.
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the cia says his help saved lives. now dr saad wants the us government to pressure the saudis to release his children. i have to speak out. i am appealing to the american people and to the american administration to help me to release those children and to restore their life. crown prince mohammad bin salman is currently on a mission to rehabilitate his global image after being accused of ordering the murder ofjournalist jamal khashoggi three years ago. his public investment fund has bought a majority stake in newcastle united, something welcomed by the fans and condemned by his critics. today's allegations will only add to the controversy that surrounds the west's dealings with saudi arabia. frank gardner, bbc news. stars of the show friends have paid tribute to the actor james michael tyler, who played gunther in the long running comedy. he's died at the age of 59
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after being diagnosed with prostate cancer. jennifer aniston, who played rachel, the object of gunther�*s unrequited love in the show, said the programme would not have been the same without him. here's our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. its focus was on six friends, but a seventh character also made a big impression. this is a "getting rid of everything rachel ever touched" sale. i will take it all. and as friends' popularity grew, so did the role originally credited simply as "coffee guy." gunther, six glasses. six, you want me tojoin you? oh, i thoughtjoey was here. five is good. but, of course, he had one storyline everyone remembers. rachel? yeah? when's your birthday? 5th may, why? i'm just making a list of people's birthdays. 0h, mine's december... yeah, whatever. i finished it, i did it all by myself! and there's nobody to hug. it was so important to fans, the show felt they had to resolve it
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in friends' final episode. ijust have to tell you... ..i love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. over the years, there were a few other small roles. and he was reunited with friends cast mate matt leblanc in bbc�*s sitcom episodes. seriously? is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be friends. too ill to appear in person, hejoined the show�*s reunion special remotely. it was the most memorable ten years of my life, honestly. i could not have imagined a better experience. all these guys, it was just a joy to work with them. i felt very special. the world's biggest tv show would never have been quite what it was without james michael tyler's gunther.
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in a moment, it will be time for the bbc news at six with fiona bruce. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hi, darren. hello there, good evening- _ hi, darren. hello there, good evening- lt— hi, darren. hello there, good evening. it has _ hi, darren. hello there, good evening. it has been - hi, darren. hello there, good evening. it has been a - hi, darren. hello there, good evening. it has been a day . hi, darren. hello there, good evening. it has been a day of| evening. it has been a day of sunshine and showers, a few heavy ones around as well, but i think through the rest of the week, the winds may be stronger than they were today. they are going to be in from the southwest, so that will bring with it some very mild air for the time of year, but again some heavy rain across parts of the uk. let's have a look at what is heading our belay. this is the rain bearing cloud that is going to be streaming in from the atlantic and is will you sit around the uk over the next couple of days. ahead of that, we have had some showers. these are the showers of the past few hours and those are still around over parts of the uk, the heavier ones across parts of scotland. those will linger well into this evening. many of the
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showers elsewhere will fade away. and then we've got all that cloud coming in from the atlantic. swamping the scene. rain over the irish sea into western part of england and wales. ahead of it, some clever spells for a while. to produce good to .25 or six degrees. tomorrow, that bantering assumes a way for more than ireland. —— soon moved away from northern ireland. not much rain for the south, and most of the ring below cleared by the afternoon, leaving us with a lot of cloud, little drizzle over western hills. did to the east of high ground, there could be some sunshine coming through. temperatures widely 16, sunshine coming through. temperatures widely16, 17. warmer thanit temperatures widely16, 17. warmer than it was today for the northern half of the uk for the by the end of the day, the most of the rain is sitting in the far northwest on that weather front. sitting in the far northwest on that weatherfront. as sitting in the far northwest on that weather front. as a sitting in the far northwest on that weatherfront. as a move sitting in the far northwest on that weather front. as a move things on into wednesday, that weather front text rain further into the uk, and all the while we're still drawing our airfrom a all the while we're still drawing ourairfrom a long all the while we're still drawing our airfrom a long way all the while we're still drawing our air from a long way south, hence those high temperatures for this time of the. but we've still got
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cloud around, we still got rain, and some of the heavier rain mainly affecting north wales. some heavy rain over the hills. midlands, much of the south—east, east anglia dry, some sunshine, and temperatures going up to 18 on wednesday. i said some places will get some heavy rain. this is the rainfall acumen elation wednesday and into thursday. the bright colours showing we are expecting the heaviest of the rate in that period, a particular focus there on dumfries and galloway and also in cumbria and can to some flooding. the wet weather continues across that part of england and wales. we get some showers, still some rain for southern and eastern parts of scotland, turns a bit cooler in the northwest of the uk, but towards the southeast, where it is still dry with some sunshine, those temperatures are still at around 18 celsius. bye for now.
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afghanistan faces catastrophe, according to the un, forcing its people to desperate measures. this baby has just been sold, so that her parents can feed the rest of their children. another person came up to one of our team and asked if we'd like to buy the child. the desperation and the urgency of this situation is hard to put in words. the un says help is needed now, but international aid has been stopped, as the world debates how to deal with the taliban. also tonight... an increase in the national living wage to £9.50 an hour is included in the chancellor's budget on wednesday. a warning on climate change — the world is way off track in limiting rising temperatures, says the un. following the work of one pastor in burnley, trying to help
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the increasing number of people desperate for help

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