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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 25, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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more is needed. i think 1.5. so much more is needed. i think small countries like ours can lead the way and i will talk shortly about what we in scotland are doing and what more we need to do, but in the coming days the countries... welcome to view a's on bbc world, we are currently watching a speech being made by nicola sturgeon about the environment. let's return to it. and be clear in their determination to achieve net to zero. to be credible, their pledges must be backed by action. the hard fact is this, keeping 1.5 alive, which has become the strapline almost four cop 26, is vital, but it must notjust become a face—saving slogan, it must become a face—saving slogan, it must be real. both in the run—up to and at cop 26 itself, there needs to be at cop 26 itself, there needs to be a significant uplift in ambition from the world's biggest emitting countries to make that real. we must
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deliver real progress in other areas, too. climate finance is key. 12 years ago in copenhagen, developed countries promised $100 billion of climate finance every year from 2020. billion of climate finance every yearfrom 2020. in paris, that promise was repeated. here in glasgow, that promise must be delivered and the money must go where it is needed most. it must help the countries and communities now facing the worst impacts of climate change, tackle the causes of it, and also adapt to its consequences. and it must be made available in a way that does not load these countries with unsustainable debt. delivering on a 12—year—old promise is quite simply the right thing to do. failure to do so would be unconscionable. and of course, it is essential to the building of good faith between undeveloped —— developed and developing countries. i also believe that cop 26 needs to recognise much more fully the fundamental issues of
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fairness and justice that lie at the heart of the climate crisis. i mentioned scotland's industrial past earlier. that is a source of pride to us but it should also be a real cause for reflection. for a very, very long time, we have enjoyed all of the material benefits of the carbon emissions that are causing climate change, and like so many other developed nations, we have benefited much more than those countries that are now facing and experiencing the worst impacts of the climate crisis. so delivering on the climate crisis. so delivering on the $100 billion per year commitment is a necessary first step that developed countries must take towards addressing climate injustice. but we need to do more than that. most effort in developed countries is currently on mitigation, on averting the worst impacts of the crisis. increasingly and importantly, there is now a focus on adaptation, to come on
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ensuring that we can live with the changes that are inevitably to come. but there is also a need to address the loss and damage that has been and is being suffered already by communities around the world due to drought, floods, decertification, loss of life and population displacement. here, as in other areas, scotland is seeking to lead by example. our climatejustice areas, scotland is seeking to lead by example. our climate justice fund was the first in the world. we have recently ta ken was the first in the world. we have recently taken the decision to double the value of that and we are determined that it will help address loss and damage. of course, i recognise that in a global context, our fund recognise that in a global context, ourfund is recognise that in a global context, our fund is very small. but it is nevertheless important and through it, we are acknowledging head on these fundamental issues of international fairness. loss these fundamental issues of internationalfairness. loss and international fairness. loss and damage internationalfairness. loss and damage is being discussed in the second week of the cop 26 summit and thatis second week of the cop 26 summit and that is welcome but it can't simply
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be discussed. we must see progress. i know this is something i will be following closely during the summit. this could be the first ever cop that sees the world take this issue seriously and i hope it lives up to that responsibility. there is also of course an intergenerational injustice at the heart of the climate crisis, too. i am acutely aware that all of you here, students, youth parliamentarians, we'll live your lives with the climate that my and preceding generations have created. all the leaders at cop need to truly understand the concern, the entirely justified anger, that so many of you, so many young people across the world, feel. indeed, i know that in some ways what cop represents, rich countries coming together to haggle and negotiate over the future of the planet, might intensify rather than
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alleviate your anger. on the need for climate action, there is no doubt at all that your generation is far ahead of doubt at all that your generation is farahead of mine. doubt at all that your generation is far ahead of mine. i know that some of the most challenging interactions i have had on climate policy has been with young activists. i have been with young activists. i have been pushed to go much further and faster and rightly so. so for all of us in positions of leadership today, there is a really important standard that we must hold ourselves to. can we look to you and your peers in the eye and say that we are doing enough? right now, the simple answer to that question is no. we are not. so a fundamental test for success for cop 26 is that it starts to turn the no into a yes. so my pledge todayis the no into a yes. so my pledge today is that the scottish government will do everything and anything we can to ensure that cop 26 is a success. we won't be at the negotiating table directly. we are not an independent state, not yet,
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but as host country, we do have a big role to play and we also carry a big role to play and we also carry a big and very serious responsibility. i made clear to both the un and uk government that we stand ready and willing to do anything and everything we can to support the negotiations. the uk's presidency of cop 26 is a massive opportunity but also a serious responsibility. i know the prime minister and the uk government are determined to step up in the days ahead and show real commitment and leadership and the scottish government will do everything we can to help. after all, this summit will shape the future of the world we live in, so absolutely nothing, certainly no party politics, should stand in the way of us working together towards a successful outcome. one of scotland's's objectives during the summit itself is to be a bridge builder, to connect those whose voices are too rarely heard with
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those making the decisions. i quoted antonio guterres, the un secretary general, earlier, in the same speech i quoted, he talked about the need to bridge the climate divide. part of our role at this cop will be to provide the spaces and forums and support the initiatives that will allow these bridges to be built. firstly, between the developed and developing worlds. we have supported the glasgow climate dialogues which facilitate discussion between the global south and the developed world and also the global citizens assembly, to give people from around the world the opportunity to be heard on climate action. second, between young people and the leaders whose decisions will shape your future. the scottish government has funded the conference of use which starts on thursday, that will be the first major in—person event of cop 26. more than 400 young people from
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120 countries will gather to drop their demands of world leaders. i will speak at the opening event but more importantly, i will listen. will speak at the opening event but more importantly, iwill listen. i have also made a commitment to meet regularly throughout cop 26 leach with vanessa from uganda, who is the founder of use for the future afrika and the africa based ray's up movement, and hearing her view at key stages over the two weeks will be an important reality check. —— rise up movement. thirdly, we will be seeking to build a bridge between the un states in the negotiating room and the governments of cities, regions and devolved nations like ours. scotland is currently the european co—chair of what is called the under two coalition, a powerful alliance of city, regional and devolved governments from around the world. collectively, we represent almost 2 billion people and around half of the reduction in emissions
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necessary to meet the challenge of 1.5 degrees will depend on decisions taken by governments like ours. so we carry a great deal of responsibility but also a great deal of influence. we intend to use that to the full during cop 26. today, a newjust transition alliance is being established within the coalition to ensure all members can access the resources, support and information necessary to —— are necessary to deliver just transition than last week, the coalition agreed a new memorandum of understanding, committing us collectively to reaching net to zero x 2050 at the latest to do so individually as fast as possible. —— reaching net zero by 2050. scotland is committed to doing so by 2045. along with my fellow coaches from california, korea, mexico and south africa, i will be working during and after cop 26 to increase support for those commitments. the focus at cop 26
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will inevitably be on the negotiations between the big countries, the big governments at all levels have a responsibility and scotland is determined to play our full part. of course, our ability to do that depends on our own climate credibility. scotland cannot urge other countries to set and meet ambitious targets if we fail to do that ourselves. we must lead not by the strength of our rhetoric but by the strength of our rhetoric but by the power of our example. and so thatis the power of our example. and so that is the final issue i want to focus on today. in most comparisons of international climate targets, scotland does rank very well indeed. the uk committee on climate change confirmed just last year that we have the carbonised more quickly than any g20 nation —— de carbonised. we have halved our mission since 1990. we are committed to a 75% reduction by 2030 which means halving them again over the
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course of this decade. and of course, we aim to reach net zero and therefore completely end scotland's contribution to climate change by 2045 at the latest. our targets are not just amongst the most ambitious anywhere in the world. they are also amongst the toughest. for instance, we are one of very few countries to have legally binding annual targets for every year of ourjourney have legally binding annual targets for every year of our journey to net zero. we are also one of only a few to include shipping and aviation in the calculation of our emissions. and we have pledged to meet our targets through domestic effort, not by reliance on international credit trading. so we here have much to be proud of but still, we need to do much better. it is not enough to set tough targets. we must meet those targets. and despite all of our progress, we have fallen short on our last three annual milestones.
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two years ago, our emissions were 51.5% lower than in 1990. but to meet that year's annual target, they needed to be 55% lower. the law in scotland stipulates that if we miss any annual targets, we must outperform in future years to make up outperform in future years to make up for it. so this week, we will publish the catch—up plan which will highlight some of the action already announced this year, and also set out a range of additional measures, for example, to decarbonise public sector buildings, promote home upgrades and make bus travel cleaner and more accessible. many of these measures were committed to in the cooperation agreement between the scottish government and the scottish green party, an agreement which explicitly and rightly places climate policy at the heart of everything we do. and over the next three weeks, we will highlight other aspects of the work the scottish government is doing to put the climate front and centre. that will
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include mining policy, agriculture, nature restoration, wave and tidal power, and green hydrogen, and all of these, we are stepping up our ambition and our action. for example, there is a licensing round under way right now for up to ten gigawatts of offshore wind power. later this week, we will set out plans to further increase our onshore wind capacity. we will also talk as we need to do about the future of our oil and gas industry. i want to address that issue now, since it is one that rightly the scottish government... we since it is one that rightly the scottish government... we are going to leave nicola _ scottish government... we are going to leave nicola sturgeon, _ scottish government... we are going to leave nicola sturgeon, there. - scottish government... we are going to leave nicola sturgeon, there. wel to leave nicola sturgeon, there. we have been hearing from her, from the first minister of scotland, who has been calling on world leaders to take credible actions to achieve net zero on carbon emissions. her speech comes as a new report released in just the last few minutes from the un warns that levels of planet warming greenhouse gases in the
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atmosphere reached record highs again last year. world leaders will be paying close attention as they prepare to meet in glasgow in less than a week, where the cop 26 un climate change conference of course will be taking place from sunday. professor sir martin siegert is the co director of the grantham institute, which is imperial college london's hub for climate change and the environment. hejoins me from bristol. thank you forjoining us. it feels like there's a lot to discuss so let's start with nicola sturgeon's speech which i think you are listening to alongside me. she said, we need an uplift in ambition from the world's most polluting countries, pledges must be backed by action. what did you make of what she had to say?— she had to say? yes, i thought it was an excellent _ she had to say? yes, i thought it was an excellent speech - she had to say? yes, i thought it was an excellent speech and - she had to say? yes, i thought it was an excellent speech and it i she had to say? yes, i thought it was an excellent speech and it isj was an excellent speech and it is just the kind of thing we need. speeches are one thing, policies and action are another. as nicola
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sturgeon quite rightly said, even with those policy statements in scotland, they are behind where they need to be in terms of carbon dioxide reduction targets. and in many other countries, the situation is far worse. we knew from the paris climate agreement in 2015 what we needed to do. reduce greenhouse gas emissions to a level that keeps global temperatures to within1.5 degrees of what they were in 1850. all the pledges that were lined up in paris when you collectively added them together and assuming they were implemented in full, would leave temperatures, global temperatures three degrees warmer by 2100 so no where near where they need to be. in subsequent years, we have seen raised ambition and that is good, but still not enough. no where near enough to meet the 1.5 degrees target and here we are, on the next big cop target and here we are, on the next big cop meeting in glasgow, where we absolutely need to see firm action
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by all governments to increase the measures they are going to take to reduce their carbon dioxide targets, so we can get below two degrees and towards 1.5 degrees. as nicola sturgeon quite rightly said, there is a window of opportunity, the intergovernmental panel on climate change spelt out what we need to do to hit 1.5 degrees, to decarbonise globally by mid—century. this decade, 2020—2030, is critical to hitting that target and if we miss action in this decade, itjust gets far more difficult to be able to do it. so it is urgent, we need to take action right now. obviously, statements are one thing. we have got to the action and unfortunately, as you rightly said, it is a complicated spreadsheet we are talking about here but it has a very simple bottom line, and that is the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere right now. despite all you hearfrom politicians and companies and governments, the level of c02 companies and governments, the level of co2 in the atmosphere is going on the wrong direction. let’s of c02 in the atmosphere is going on the wrong direction.— the wrong direction. let's pick up on that because _
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the wrong direction. let's pick up on that because as _ the wrong direction. let's pick up on that because as i _ the wrong direction. let's pick up on that because as i say, - the wrong direction. let's pick up on that because as i say, a - the wrong direction. let's pick up| on that because as i say, a report from the un scientists has just been published and it reveals that levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached record highs in 2020, and i suppose some people listening to that might be rather surprised, given we thought economy had slowed down because of the pandemic so what is happening? indeed, well, it was and it did slow down and we emitted less but we still emitted, the problem with carbon dioxide when it gets into the atmosphere is an excess level is that it stays there. and so it gets added to with subsequent years' accumulation of carbon dioxide and thatis accumulation of carbon dioxide and that is the problem so even though we may have omitted less than the before, we still emitted carbon dioxide and it added to what was in the atmosphere from the before so it continues to go up. the only way to achieve net zero is... we are not going to bring it down, carbon dioxide is over 410 ppm, so it is unlikely to be brought down significantly by net zero, it will
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happen gradually, but it needs to be and it should be about 280 ppm so it is way above where it ordinarily, naturally would be. lit is way above where it ordinarily, naturally would be.— naturally would be. if these greenhouse _ naturally would be. if these greenhouse gas _ naturally would be. if these . greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise at current rates, what will it mean?— continue to rise at current rates, what will it mean? yes, that is the real concern- _ what will it mean? yes, that is the real concern. at _ what will it mean? yes, that is the real concern. at the _ what will it mean? yes, that is the real concern. at the moment, - what will it mean? yes, that is the real concern. at the moment, we | what will it mean? yes, that is the - real concern. at the moment, we have a level of co2 that we have not seen for about 3 million years and then, 3 million years ago, the temperature of the planet was about three degrees warmer than it is today and the sea level was somewhere between 10-20 the sea level was somewhere between 10—20 metres higher than it is today. if we just keep going with emitting carbon dioxide at the rate we seem to be doing, by the end of this century, we will be at the high hundreds, perhaps even 1000 ppm. you have got to go back about 50 million years for the last time the planet had 1000 ppm co2. then the temperatures were 10 degrees warmer on our planet and there was no ice at all. we have got a serious problem. the other thing about carbon dioxide that everyone needs to understand and nicola sturgeon referred to is that once it is in
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the atmosphere, it takes a long time for it naturally to drop out and this is why it is an intergenerational problem. we are putting the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere but it will take many decades, centuries, perhaps even millennia, for it to drop out to more normal levels. we are causing problems. it is our responsibility to do something about it. and if we don't, it will be many generations afterwards that suffer. find don't, it will be many generations afterwards that suffer.— afterwards that suffer. and of course, afterwards that suffer. and of course. we — afterwards that suffer. and of course, we know— afterwards that suffer. and of course, we know that - afterwards that suffer. and of course, we know that petrol. afterwards that suffer. and of i course, we know that petrol and diesel cars make a big contribution to this, don't we? the news came today that the average uk petrol price reached a record high of £1.42 per litre yesterday, and diesel is a little off its all—time high, according to the aa. could these high prices perhaps deter people from getting in their cars? well. high prices perhaps deter people from getting in their cars? well, i ho -e so. from getting in their cars? well, i hope so. everybody _ from getting in their cars? well, i hope so. everybody needs - from getting in their cars? well, i hope so. everybody needs to - from getting in their cars? well, i j hope so. everybody needs to take from getting in their cars? well, i l hope so. everybody needs to take a look at the numbers that nicola sturgeon referred to and that i spoke about this morning, because this is not a problem that is going to be sorted for you by government or businesses. it is something that every individual in our country and
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across the planet needs to take a personal responsibility for as well, to understand what your own individual carbon footprint is and to try to get it down as well. if we can consume less, we can travel less, you know, all the things we take for granted, if we can do less of them, the planet will be in a much better place. planet tree health is directly linked to human health is directly linked to human health as well. we would be much better off collectively if we reduce our carbon dioxide emissions. thank our carbon dioxide emissions. thank ou for our carbon dioxide emissions. thank you forjoining _ our carbon dioxide emissions. thank you forjoining us. _ and, in the run—up to the cop26 climate summit, we'll be answering some of your questions here on the bbc news channel at just after 11.30am. we'll be joined by dr kate crowley from the edinburgh climate change institute and by professor michael grubb from the institute for sustainable resources at university college london.
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get in touch using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions or email yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. the nhs in england is to receive almost £6 billion more in the budget on wednesday, in an effort to help clear the huge backlog of people waiting for tests, scans and non—urgent procedures. the extra £59 billion is part of plans to reduce the unprecedented number of people in england waiting for hospital treatment, which has been worsened by the pandemic. it will also be used for new equipment and to overhaul it systems. the money is on top of the £12 billion extra a year announced last month, which will be raised through a rise in national insurance. more details are due on wednesday, but chancellor rishi sunak described the money as "game—changing". health bodies welcomed the cash, but said staff shortages need
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to be fixed. the nhs is facing a huge backlog of non—urgent diagnostic tests and procedures. this new money, known as capital funding, that pays for equipment and infrastructure, is designed to clear by the end of this parliament most of that backlog. nearly £6 billion will be used in part to fund a big expansion of diagnostic tests. that means more ct, mri and ultrasound scans. the government aims to create 100 one—stop shop community diagnostic centres across england, including more than 40 already announced. what that really means is investment in physical things that are really going to make a difference in tackling that waiting list, things like the community diagnostic centres, buying ct scanners for example for more checkups and tests, investment in equipment, in beds, buildings, surgical hubs, and investment in it, so it will free up more time for dedicated nhs staff so they can spend even more time with patients. as part of the uk's funding
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formula for the nhs, a proportionate amount of money will also go to the health services in scotland, wales and northern ireland. health experts have welcomed the extra money, but they point to persistent problems around staffing. extra scanners are no good, if you don't have the trained staff to operate them and interpret the results. if this is new money it's truly welcome and the devil will be in the detail when it's announced on wednesday. it will help to deliver the proposals the government outlined last month. but what we've got to make sure is that we have the workforce in place to deliver the services. and we've also got to remember this isn't just about waiting lists. we have high demand in mental health, community services and in urgent and emergency care. those pressures on the nhs, being seen right across the uk, show no sign of easing. many will be looking closely at the details in wednesday's budget to see if further help is on the way.
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dominic hughes, bbc news. this morning the health secretary sajid javid said he is considering making it compulsory for nhs staff in england to be vaccinated against covid. a consultation has just closed and mrjavid said he'll make a final decision in a few weeks. is that something that i am minded to do? yes, i am because i think it is not only right for someone working in the nhs, because naturally, they are more likely to come into contact with covid and indeed other viruses but also for those they are caring for, you know, people who are vulnerable in hospital and i think like many other countries throughout europe that have done this, i think it is something we should actively be looking at. our political correspondent damian grammaticas is in westminster.
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tell us more about what sajid javid said and the reaction to his comments. said and the reaction to his comments-— said and the reaction to his comments. he was on all the different media _ comments. he was on all the different media shows - comments. he was on all the different media shows this i comments. he was on all the - different media shows this morning, repeating that same message, saying he was minded to, leaning towards it, he was on a pass towards doing this. so he is very clearly signalling that this is what he wants to do. he said he has had the consultation and he will now be deciding and could do so very quickly, to say that all nhs staff have to be double vaccinated. the issue i think, many people say is that there is around 100,000 out of a workforce of over a million, so sajid javid is saying 93% are vaccinated but 100,000 are not. the reaction then coming from the labour leader, sir keir starmer, is that he disagrees, he does not think it is a goodidea disagrees, he does not think it is a good idea to make it compulsory for them all to be vaccinated. this is what he said. i think we should encourage all nhs staff to _ i think we should encourage all nhs staff to he _ i think we should encourage all nhs staff to be double vaccinated and -ive staff to be double vaccinated and give them the support they need. i
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wouldn't _ give them the support they need. i wouldn't make it mandatory. i think that risks _ wouldn't make it mandatory. i think that risks lots of people losing their_ that risks lots of people losing theirioh _ that risks lots of people losing theirjob. we have got a crisis coming — theirjob. we have got a crisis coming down the track for the nhs and it_ coming down the track for the nhs and it will— coming down the track for the nhs and it will be a very difficult winteh _ and it will be a very difficult winter. the last thing we can afford is for— winter. the last thing we can afford is for thousands of people to be pushed — is for thousands of people to be pushed out of theirjobs in the nhs. what _ pushed out of theirjobs in the nhs. what keir_ pushed out of theirjobs in the nhs. what keir starmer said is that he would rather have a system where you could either be double vaccinated or choose to take three tests per week to keep up that cheque to make sure you are covid free. sajid javid said earlier, though, that what they had seen when they had done this for social care staff, who now have two, and the deadline is fast approaching, the date they all have to be done, in november, he said there had been a surge of people coming forward to getjabbed and he thought that was why this was the right approach. but sir keir starmer also said interestingly that he is now pushing for the government to bring in new measures to tackle the
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spread of covid, like mask wearing, advice to work from home, things like that, he believes the time is right to do that kind of thing. damian grammaticas in westminster, there. thank you. a coup is taking place in sudan. the armed forces ministry has said in a statement that the army has detained the civilian prime minister and taken him to an unidentified location. social media shows images of several cabinet ministers from the transitional government — the sovereign council — being arrested. internet links have also reportedly been cut. our senior africa correspondent anne soy is in neighbouring kenya. she told me it is difficult to get a clear picture of what's happening in sudan. it is not easy but we have seen some of the images that have been posted online, presumably by a sudanese who are monitoring the situation and have means to send that information out. hundreds of thousands, you
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know, many people coming out in large numbers, on the streets of sudan, to what they call resist a military takeover of government. there have been calls in mosques, because apart from the internet shutdowns, they are also experiencing a shutdown of mobile networks, and therefore, they have been using the public address systems in the mosques to mobilise people to come out in the streets, pro—democracy demonstrators, to resist attempts by the military to take over power. but the information ministry has confirmed that several members of the cabinet, including representatives of civilians in the ruling sovereign council, the equivalent of head of state, have been arrested. but so far, there has not been a statement from the military. not been a statement from the milita . , ., , , , military. sorry to interrupt but my understanding _ military. sorry to interrupt but my understanding is _ military. sorry to interrupt but my understanding is there _ military. sorry to interrupt but my understanding is there was - military. sorry to interrupt but my understanding is there was an - understanding is there was an attempted coup last month, so is there a sense this is not
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necessarily a surprise with yellow it is not a surprise but it has been building up for weeks now. it started with the attempted coup last month, which was blamed on supporters of the former long serving president omar al—bashir, who was ousted by the military after protests from pro—democracy demonstrators in 2019. after that, the military entered a power—sharing deal with civilians in that sovereign council and they were due to hand over the leadership of that sovereign council around next month although the date is disputed. but now, that is in doubt. they have been showing great reluctance to do that. the average price of petrol in the uk reached a record high yesterday, according to the aa and rac, which says the fuel cost
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142.94 pence a litre on sunday, with dieseljust a little off its all—time high price. the aa says rising costs mean poorer motorists will have to cut back on other spending just to stay on the road. let's talk to business presenter alice baxter about this. why is the price so high? it isa it is a bad day for anyone out there who has to drive a car. they are ac describing this as a dark date for drivers. filling up an average family car costs £12 more. the new record high has been reached today meaning it costs 142.90 4p a litre develop according to the rac and the aa. the last time prices hit this number was april 2012. a spokesman for the rac saying this will hit many household budgets and have knock—on implications for the wider
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economy. why is this happening? it is to do with the increase in the wholesale cost of gas which has doubled since last year which is having to be passed on to the consumer and it is to do the dishes we have had with global supply chains which has had a number of sectors including retail, food, domestic energy companies, we have seen a number of those go out of business recently and it is hurting drivers filling up at the pump. the price of unleaded has jumped drivers filling up at the pump. the price of unleaded hasjumped by drivers filling up at the pump. the price of unleaded has jumped by 28p a litre since last october meaning it costs 78.61 develop a family car and the bad news is that many experts out there are predicting that the cost could rise even further. �* . ., , that the cost could rise even further. �* . . , ., afghanistan has become the biggest crisis in the world according
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to the un. it comes as aid agencies warn of crippling food shortages with winter approaching. afghanistan was already in crisis before the takeover in august. problems by conflict have been replaced with economic inclusion. the phasing of internationalfunds has left local ngos struggling to work. i correspondent to those conditions are so dire some children are being sold. thea;r conditions are so dire some children are being sold-— conditions are so dire some children are being sold. they would face very unclear futures _ are being sold. they would face very unclear futures and _ are being sold. they would face very unclear futures and some _ are being sold. they would face very unclear futures and some of- are being sold. they would face very unclear futures and some of the - unclear futures and some of the people who buy children do so to marry them off. the generally by young girls and married them after their sons. young girls and married them after theirsons. sometimes young girls and married them after their sons. sometimes they will employ them to work in their own houses as needs or cleaners but of course there have been fears they could be sold further on and it is not a situation any family wants to find themselves in. the situation he
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across the country seems to be growing increasingly dire with reports emerging in the west of the country of eight children from one family dying from hunger and neglect with more than 22 million people assessed to be facing a caterer emergency levels of food insecurity over the coming months —— acute or severe. this has always been a country where many people struggle just to stay alive but that is the highest number recorded by the un since it began keeping records around a decade ago. parts of the country in the north and west have also been suffering from the second—rate in five years which is in part contributing to this crisis —— second drought. we are seeing a huge economic crisis across afghanistan after the taliban takeover. the foreign reserves were
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frozen, direct internationalfunding frozen, direct international funding to frozen, direct internationalfunding to the government stopped and that funding was responsible for around 75% of all expenditure in afghanistan and so as a result of that we have seen hunger spreading from more rural areas to more urban areas affecting middle—class people and that is partly because many people who are working in government roles as teachers for example are working on ministries did not even receive their salaries in the last few months of the present government and others funding has been paused while the world tries to assess how to help afghans without helping the taliban they still do not know when they are going to receive their salaries, so deeply uncertain and difficult challenging time for many afghans and there are real fears about what is going to happen as the weather gets increasingly coated in the coming months over the winter. i
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one of saudi arabia's former top intelligence officials has described the country's de—facto ruler, crown prince mohammed bin salman, as a "psychopath". sa ad al—jabri claims the crown prince suggested he could assassinate the country s former king abdullah. we can speak now to our security correspondent frank gardner. iam i am interested in your thoughts about how credible this man is. he is a controversial figure. about how credible this man is. he is a controversialfigure. he about how credible this man is. he is a controversial figure. he was at the top of the saudi intelligence, the top of the saudi intelligence, the architect of saudi arabia's counterterrorism strategy that helped defeat al-qaeda and it was the cia's main point of contact in saudi arabia —— he was. as a part of that he tipped off britain and the us about the printer ink toner cartridge bombs in 2010 when al-qaeda smuggled these bombs on board inside ink tonerfor printers,
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on to cargo planes come above one of them were stopped in dubai and one of them got to the east midlands, bound for chicago, he tipped them off as a serial numbers because they had agents inside ik two al-anda, informants. the saudi government says he is a fraudster who has embezzled money, which he denies, and that he has stolen counterterrorism funds. he said he is a discredited former official. what he is claiming in this interview is that in 2014 the current de facto ruler of saudi arabia prince salman came to his boss and offered to assassinate saudi king abdullah who was in the last year of his reign and his 80s at the time because he was concerned
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about the succession and that that branch of the family would be somehow frozen out of the succession. it does sound a very strange tale because he offered to do it allegedly using a poison ring from russia. those are his words. he allegedly said one handshake would be enough. it sounds like something out of a james bond thing, but he maintains there are two recordings secretly made, two copies of the recordings, of this conversation, which he is keeping on the same place and he has recorded a death video so that if anything happens to him more secrets will come out, he says. him more secrets will come out, he sa s. ., ., ., , him more secrets will come out, he sas. ~ , says. extraordinary story. we must leave it there _ says. extraordinary story. we must leave it there unfortunately. - the facebook whistleblower and former data scientist frances haugen is giving evidence to mps today on government plans for social media regulation.
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she worked at facebook for two years, and met the campaigner ian russell, whose14—year—old daughter molly took her own life after viewing disturbing content on instagram — which is owned by facebook. angus crawford reports. she is the former facebook insider who revealed its most closely—guarded secrets. 14—year—old molly russell... he is the father who lost his daughter to suicide. now campaigning to protect other children online. nice to meet you. so lovely to meet you. here, meeting for the first time. so what do you think the impact of molly's story was on instagram as a platform and how it approaches safety? facebook is full of kind, conscientious, well—meaning people. the real question is around can we as a public change the incentives such that it makes more sense for facebook to invest more money in safety on instagram? and so i am sure that molly's experience caused them to look at these questions more.
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so one of the things that lead us to find out more about molly was some notes that she left, that were found after she died and in one of them, she wrote, "i keep a lot to myself and it keeps building up inside. you get addicted to it and you don't even realise you have spun out of control, you are living in a trap, in a circle." what is so dangerous about having children under the age of 16, under the age of 18, using systems like instagram is that facebook�*s own research shows that a startlingly high fraction of them exhibit what is known as problematic use which means that they can't regulate their own usage of the product. it is kind of like cigarettes in that way. and they know it is hurting their physical health, their school work or their employment. facebook says it has never allowed content that promotes or encourages suicide or self—harm and it works with experts to continually update its policies.
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as time goes on, as a parent bereaved by the suicide of his 14—year—old, i look at a huge corporation with massive resources and say, "there must be more you can be doing." unquestionably, facebook could be investing more resources in making the platform safer. they have made a series of choices to prioritise profits over people. what do you think regulators can do to persuade those big tech companies to behave differently? there's no company in the world that has as much power as facebook and as little transparency. in a statement, facebook said, "our deepest sympathies are with the russell family. as a company, we have invested $13 billion on safety and security since 2016, and have more than 40,000 people working in this area". the whistle—blower and the campaigner, working to make social media a safer place. angus crawford, bbc news. well i'm joined now by andy burrows, head of policy for child safety
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online at the nspcc. good to have you with us. i wonder what you and the nspcc have found in terms of what risks you think young people face if they use facebook products. we people face if they use facebook roducts. ~ ., ,, ., ., ., , products. we have known for many ears that products. we have known for many years that the _ products. we have known for many years that the harm _ products. we have known for many years that the harm is _ products. we have known for many years that the harm is that - products. we have known for manyj years that the harm is that children and young people face on facebook sites have been growing in scale and complexity. we are talking about harm to their well—being as a result of things like suicide and self—harm content being pushed the children through algorithms, as we saw they are through the tragic case of molly russell, and we are also very concerned about the way in which facebook sites enable sexual abuse. today we're releasing the figures that show that every single week are 24 defences, 24 grooming offences, that take place on facebook services. facebook really has not
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done enough to ensure that its sites are fundamentally safe by design. children have been traded off against wider commercial motivations.— against wider commercial motivations. , motivations. facebook says it has invested $13 _ motivations. facebook says it has invested $13 billion _ motivations. facebook says it has invested $13 billion since - motivations. facebook says it has invested $13 billion since 2016 - motivations. facebook says it has| invested $13 billion since 2016 and safety and security and set up an external oversight board and has 40,000 people working on this. you also cannot help thinking it is not billion facebook�*s commercial interest to have this kind of unwanted publicity so it is not ignoring the problem, is it? it is ignoring the problem, is it? it is not ignoring _ ignoring the problem, is it? it is not ignoring the _ ignoring the problem, is it? it 3 not ignoring the problem but it simply has not done enough. $13 billion sounds like a lot of money but it is 4% of their turnover during the period for which they are quoting those figures. the steps facebook have taken have far too often been piecemeal, reacting, in response to personal tragedies or negative media coverage. what we
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have not seen with facebook or other platforms as them being on the front certainly keen to identify and respond to this rather than chasing after it has happened. it is that failure to really anticipate and put child safety front and centre where as a global organisation we do not think facebook has done enough. the nspcc of organised a coalition of 60 child protection activists and academics across the world asking facebook to do more. facebook are not ones that we can recognise is doing enough. share not ones that we can recognise is doing enough-— not ones that we can recognise is doing enough. are you saying that the government _ doing enough. are you saying that the government regulation - doing enough. are you saying that the government regulation is - doing enough. are you saying that i the government regulation is needed to do things that you are seeing facebook are not doing willingly and can uk regulation really make any difference to the global company? lll<
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difference to the global company? ills; regulation can absolutely be a game changer to protect children from inherently avoidable harm and abuse on facebook sites. we see companies will not do this for themselves but the uk has one of the largest markets for facebook so if we see the political will translate into effective regulation with the forthcoming online safety bill it where they can significantly offer new protections to children. as it stands the draft legislation is currently being scrutinised before parliament and is not strong enough, we need to see it go further to place more rigorous requirements on the tech firms to protect children to ensure they are sites are fundamentally safe by design, but if the political will is there to strengthen the pelvis can be a landmark opportunity to protect children from risk that could and should have been addressed many years ago. we should have been addressed many ears auo. ~ , .,
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a vigil has been held overnight for the cinematographer halyna hutchins, who was accidentally shot dead by the hollywood actor alec baldwin on a movie set last week. her image was beamed onto a building as friends and colleagues gathered to pay their respects to ms hutchins, who was 42 and a mother of one. climate protesters insulate britain have blocked a major road near liverpool street in east london. in a statement, the campaign group says 61 protesters have blocked three locations across the city of london demanding the government to do more on the climate crisis. police say they are on the scene to deal with the demonstrators. the actorjames michael tyler, who played gunther in the tv series friends, has died at the age of 59. he was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in 2018 and had campaigned to raise awareness of the disease. here's our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba. its focus was on six friends, but a seventh character also
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made a big impression. have you seen chandler? i thought you were chandler. gunther�*s infatuation... this is a "getting rid of everything rachel ever touched" sale. i will take it all. ..a recurring theme. and as friends' popularity grew, so did the role originally credited simply as "coffee guy." gunther, six glasses. six, you want me tojoin you? oh, i thoughtjoey was here. five is good. but, of course, he had one storyline everyone remembers. the arc where he was obsessed with rachel, loved her, hated ross, the writers could have had that for two episodes but they kept it going for ten years. rachel? yeah? when's your birthday? 5 may, why? i'm just making a list of people's birthdays. 0h, mine's december... yeah, whatever. i've finished it, i did it all by myself! and there's nobody to hug. it was so important to fans,
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the show felt they had to resolve it in friends' final episode. ijust have to tell you... ..i love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. there were other small roles like an arts journalist in sabrina the teenage witch. was bird on stoop a visual metaphor for man's isolation in a soulless, technology driven world? a therapist on medical show scrubs. i think you pretend everything's ok even though deep down inside, a lot of things are not. and he was reunited with friends cast mate matt leblanc in the bbc sitcom episodes. seriously? is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be friends. to ill to appear in person, hejoined the show�*s reunion special remotely. it was the most memorable ten years of my life, honestly.
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i could not have imagined a better experience. all these guys, it was just a joy to work with them. i felt very special. the world's biggest tv show would never have been quite what it was without james michael tyler's gunther. the friends cast have been leading tributes to the actor. jennifer aniston, who played rachel, the object of gunther�*s unrequited love, said the show wouldn't have been the same without him. there was this message from matt leblanc, who played joey. "we had a lot of laughs, buddy. you will be missed". and courteney cox, who played monica, said she was grateful
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to have known him. many councils aren't paying homecare companies enough to cover basic costs — like travel between clients. that's according to a new report by an industry body, which calculated an average hourly shortfall of £3 per carer. councils say they don't have enough money to pay companies more. last week the government announced £162 million of new funding for adult social care. our social affairs editor, alison holt, reports. for 16 years denise has been driving around south yorkshire caring for people in their own homes, whatever the weather. doing myjob is great reward, great satisfaction. every day is different. you meet different people in different circumstances. her company looks after people paid for by the local authority but many companies say it doesn't include the cost of care including travel time. you recruit people but when they go out there and they realise that you are getting up at five in the morning and sometimes you won't get home until 11 at night
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and you might nip home forfive or ten minutes the money does not be level with the job for what you do. and then theyjust go elsewhere where it is more money and it is not unsociable hours. how have your interviews gone this week? i have had a few not turn up. they have had to hand back some council contracts because they cannot recruit enough staff. they want to be able to offer more pay. we are about 25% underfunded. that would address the conditions we need to look at for our amazing care workers and it would mean we could invest in our office teams, give them more support for the work they are doing and look at other methods. we are miles away in terms of the rates being paid. the association representing uk homecare companies calculates the minimum cost of an hour of home care is £21.43. that covers the minimum wage,
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pensions, travel time, training, backroom staff and investment. on average uk councils pay £18.45 an hour. the people who suffer are the staff and the people they support because it is very difficult to pay them any more than the national legal minimum wage and sometimes they may not even receive that for working when travel time is not properly covered by that amount. councils say they hope government reforms will improve the fees they pay for the support needed by people who are older or disabled, but they are not sure the promised money will go far enough. alison holt, bbc news.
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phone networks have agreed to automatically block internet calls from oversees that appear to be from uk numbers. the watchdog ofcom says the move is intended to stop millions of scam calls made by criminals based abroad. it comes after phone companies were criticised by the national crime agency for failing to tackle a huge rise in scam calls and texts over the past year. with a week to go until the cop26 global climate summit opens in glasgow, a family of eight year old triplets have been chosen to represent the uk at the event. they've been regular litter pickers for the last two years. our correspondent phil mackie went to meet them.them. meet britain's youngest official environmental champions, out on their regular after—school litter pick. i'm mbetmi. i'm waimi. and i'm yimi. and we are the one—step greener ambassadors! i here i've got a packet of blueberries, i think. i don't know what it is. but who just leaves it here? they've been doing this since they were six,
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after being inspired at primary school, where they learned about waste and recycling. we've got a plastic bottle. encouraged by their parents, they decided to go out and do something about it. i've got a bag or something. i don't know what it is, but they could have just put it in the recycling bin. nottingham city council gave them their litter picking kit and their work has been recognised by the government. it's not just about them being nominated as cop26 ambassadors, but it's also the inspiration behind it. i hope this will inspire more people to think that if six years old could think about their planet, and for two years they've doing what they are doing, i hope they will continue to inspire more people. but obviously i'm very, very happy and proud of them. thank you. this is not a drill. we are living in the beginning of a mass extinction. esther has helped them spread the message through their own youtube channel. we are talking about a very
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important part about recycling. we've been keeping these boxes for 18 months. back out on the litter pick the bag is filling up. obviously these people who are gathering together in glasgow, they are going to be making really important decisions. what things would you like them to do? how can they make the world better? the three rs — reduce, reuse, recycle. first, i think they should start teaching climate change in school, so when they grow up they can change the world. and we need everybody to do the three rs. i honestlyjust think everybody should try their hardest - to help this environment. time to put the cat in the bag or the bin. sadly, it's a never—ending task. at least today's work is done. phil mackie, bbc news, nottingham. from today, people driving older,
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more polluting vehicles in london have to pay a daily charge of £12.50. the capital's ultra low emission zone is being expanded to all areas within the north and south circular roads around the city's outskirts. it's part of efforts to improve air quality. diesel cars registered before september 2015 are most likely to be liable for the extra fee. two million more people in the uk will be invited to get their third covid jabs this week. the over—50s, healthcare workers and people with underlying health conditions are currently eligible for a booster — provided it has been six months since their second injection. the government believes that increasing vaccination rates is the key to avoiding new restrictions. archaeologists have discovered the world's oldest known animal cave painting in indonesia. a panel showing wild pigs believed to have been made 45,500 years ago was found in a cave in a remote valley on the island of sulawesi.
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previously, rock art found in european sites were considered to be the world's oldest narrative artworks. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. yesterday, temperatures were widely 16 degrees or higher. today, it is going to feel cooler but it will be short lived because temperatures pick up again tomorrow. we have also got sunshine and showers today and breezy conditions. what is happening is we have a weather front coming in from the atlantic and it is going to be slowly moving eastwards through the day, enhancing those showers. one look at the isobars tells you it is going to be breezy, especially in the north. later, this weather front, a warm front, will be coming our way, bringing some persistent rain. today, a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine
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but equally, there will be a lot of showers, heaviest with the odd rumble of thunder across north—west scotland, and the same potentially across the south—east of england. but on the breeze, some of those showers getting over towards yorkshire and also lincolnshire. these white circles represent the average wind speeds so you can see strongest across the north west. temperature wise today, looking widely at 11 to about 14 degrees. locally, we could still hit 16 around the london area. through this evening and overnight, we will eventually see those showers ease. there will be a lot of clear skies for a time. but then, as the warm front comes in from the atlantic, the cloud is going to build ahead of it and we will see the rain arrive, accompanied by strengthening winds. temperatures falling away to between six and 12 degrees. not particularly cold for the time of year. if we pick up this weather front here, it is going to move across us during the course of tuesday. look at the isobars. another breezy day. then this second one comes in behind and this one is what we call a waving weather front,
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so it is going to have rain on it and it may wave a bit further north or a bit further south with that rain but the rain will be persistent. the first one comes in, this is the warm front, introducing all this rain. there will be a fair bit of cloud around as well, the brightest skies in the south—east and, for a time, around the moray firth. and then the second one, the waving one comes in, bringing more rain across north—west scotland and gusty winds, and temperatures up to about 17 degrees. temperatures across the board tomorrow will be higher than they are going to be today. eventually, that rain moves over towards the east. it will be heavy and persistent, particularly so across snowdonia, the cumbrian fells and western parts of scotland, and slowly, the temperatures start to decline.
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the headlines at 11:00am: a six billion pound budget boost for the nhs in england to tackle the huge backlog in people waiting for tests, scans and surgery. meanwhile, the health secretary sajid javid says he's leaning towards making vaccinations mandatory for all nhs staff in england nhs white petrol prices hit a record high — the average family car now costs £15 access is access is necessary. more to fill up
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compared to a year ago. levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached record highs again last year — the new warning from the un comes with one week to go before key climate talks in glasgow. we'll be answering your questions on the climate at eleven thirty. james michael tyler — who became famous playing gunther in friends — has died aged 59. the nhs in england is to receive almost six billion pounds in the budget on wednesday, in an effort to help clear the huge backlog of people waiting for tests, scans and non—urgent operations. the extra 5 point 9 billion pounds is part of plans to reduce the unprecedented number of people in england waiting for hospital
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treatment, which has been worsened by the pandemic. it will also be used for new equipment and to overhaul it systems. the money is on top of the 12 billion pounds extra a year announced last month, which will be raised through a rise in national insurance. more details are due on wednesday, but the chancellor rishi sunak described the money as "game—changing". health bodies have welcomed the extra cash, but said staff shortages need to be fixed. our health correspondent dominic hughes has this report. the nhs is facing a huge backlog of non—urgent diagnostic tests and procedures. this new money, known as capital funding, that pays for equipment and infrastructure, is designed to clear by the end of this parliament most of that backlog. nearly £6 billion will be used in part to fund a big expansion
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of diagnostic tests. that means more ct, mri and ultrasound scans. the government aims to create 100 one—stop shop community diagnostic centres across england, including more than 40 already announced. what that really means is investment in physical things that are really going to make a difference in tackling that waiting list, things like the community diagnostic centres, buying ct scanners for example for more checkups and tests, investment in equipment, in beds, buildings, surgical hubs, and investment in it, so it will free up more time for dedicated nhs staff so they can spend even more time with patients. as part of the uk's funding formula for the nhs, a proportionate amount of money will also go to the health services in scotland, wales and northern ireland. health experts have welcomed the extra money, but they point to persistent problems around staffing. extra scanners are no good, if you don't have the trained staff to operate them and interpret the results.
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if this is new money it's truly welcome and the devil will be in the detail when it's announced on wednesday. it will help to deliver the proposals the government outlined last month. but what we've got to make sure is that we have the workforce in place to deliver the services. and we've also got to remember this isn't just about waiting lists. we have high demand in mental health, community services and in urgent and emergency care. those pressures on the nhs, being seen right across the uk, show no sign of easing. many will be looking closely at the details in wednesday's budget to see if further help is on the way. dominic hughes, bbc news. this morning the health secretary said he was leaning towards making it compulsory for nhs staff in england to be vaccinated against covid. a consultation has just closed and sajid javid said he'll make a final decision in the coming weeks. is in the coming weeks. that something that i am mir to is that something that i am minded to do? yes, i am. is that something that i am minded to do? yes, iam. i is that something that i am minded to do? yes, i am. i think it is not only right for someone working in
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the nhs because naturally there are more likely to come into contact with covid and indeed other viruses but also for those they are caring for. we are people vulnerable in hospital and just like many other countries throughout europe have done this i think it is something that we should actively be looking at. that we should actively be looking at. our political correspondent damian grammaticas is at westminster. he was questioned several times this morning and was very clear every time. he said this is what he is minded to do. the direction is going and having received the results of the consultation that has been going on and he pointed out it has already been happening in social care sector. the deadline for all staff is coming up on november 11 then he said there had been a surge of people coming forward to get vaccinated in the social care sector and there are at only 30,000 are so
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unvaccinated. many would have legitimate reasons. in the health service similar sort of size workforce. 100,000 still to be vaccinated. the concern is if you force people to do it, would they rather quit theirjobs? what force people to do it, would they rather quit their jobs? what the opposition leader said today was that he feared that in this was his response when he asked should it be compulsory. response when he asked should it be compulsory-— compulsory. think we should encourage — compulsory. think we should encourage all _ compulsory. think we should encourage all nhs _ compulsory. think we should encourage all nhs staff- compulsory. think we should encourage all nhs staff to i compulsory. think we should| encourage all nhs staff to be compulsory. think we should - encourage all nhs staff to be double vaccinated and give them the support that they— vaccinated and give them the support that they need. i wouldn't make it mandatory — that they need. i wouldn't make it mandatory. i think that risks lots of people — mandatory. i think that risks lots of people losing theirjob. we got a crisis _ of people losing theirjob. we got a crisis coming up and it will be a very. _ crisis coming up and it will be a very. very— crisis coming up and it will be a very, very difficult winter. the last thing _ very, very difficult winter. the last thing we can afford is for thousands of people to be pushed out of their— thousands of people to be pushed out of theirjobs in the nhs. he thousands of people to be pushed out of theirjobs in the nhs.— of their “obs in the nhs. he said he would of theirjobs in the nhs. he said he would rather _ of theirjobs in the nhs. he said he would rather have _ of theirjobs in the nhs. he said he would rather have a _ of theirjobs in the nhs. he said he would rather have a system - of theirjobs in the nhs. he said he would rather have a system wherel of theirjobs in the nhs. he said he i would rather have a system where you encouraged to be vaccinated or to take three tests, those quick test you can do every week, if you work in the health service. one issue, he
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came out quite clearly saying he thinks the time is right now to bring in new measures to control the spread of covid. he said that should include things like compulsory mask wearing on public transport and enclosed interior spaces. guidance to work from home. the government position repeated by mrjavad today is that it is not yet time to do that. . ~ is that it is not yet time to do that. . ,, , ., thank you. i'm joined now by siva anandaciva, chief analyst at the king's fund, a health policy think tank: when you look at the pressures that nhs services are under it is right to look at every thing you can do to reduce that pressure and we have seen the vaccination programme can be effective but i think that point that was made in your earlier part
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of the programme, if you have to make vaccination compulsory thing that does come with risks. it is far better to try and explain the benefits of a vaccination programme both to the people who will be vaccinated and the wider population tried to win the hearts and minds i think that is what previous experience has shown. you think that is what previous experience has shown. think that is what previous exerience has shown. ., ., ,, ., experience has shown. you talk about losin: staff experience has shown. you talk about losing staff on — experience has shown. you talk about losing staff on top _ experience has shown. you talk about losing staff on top of _ experience has shown. you talk about losing staff on top of the _ experience has shown. you talk about losing staff on top of the situation - losing staff on top of the situation where there is already a staff shortage. you might guess, yes. i think that would be one of the risks you would have to try to avoid and you would have to try to avoid and you can do that through communication and explanation of benefits of the vaccination programme. benefits of the vaccination programme-— benefits of the vaccination rouramme. , ., ., programme. lets turn to what the government _ programme. lets turn to what the government is _ programme. lets turn to what the government is going _ programme. lets turn to what the government is going to _ programme. lets turn to what the government is going to be - programme. lets turn to what the - government is going to be announcing to try to fix what has happened as a result of covid in terms of backlog. £5.9 billion for the nhs. it is broken down bluntly into the largest
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chunk going on diagnostic services. money is being spent on improving broadband and digital patient records. money for increased bed capacity. when you look at the situation with the staff shortages how do see this money actually how far will it go? what will the impact of it be? well, the 5.9 billion announced today will definitely help tackle the backlog. new facilities like hubs we could have 45 operating theatres dedicated to tackling waiting this, new equipment like scanners because we know the uk would compare to other countries is under resourced equipment like that, all of that can create a key role in tackling back rugs but without wanting to some of the broken records and repeat too much of what your programme has already identified, the real game changer would be a workforce plan. the
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government has set out how much funding it is willing to put into the service and it is wanting to boost activity. the thing that connects those two would be a workforce plan that translates extra funding into more staff because without more surgeons, radiographers, radiologists, it's hard to see how this equipment is going to make the difference that patients need. haifa going to make the difference that patients need.— patients need. how would you auanti patients need. how would you quantify what _ patients need. how would you quantify what is _ patients need. how would you quantify what is needed - patients need. how would you quantify what is needed in - patients need. how would you i quantify what is needed in terms patients need. how would you - quantify what is needed in terms of the workforce, in terms of the numbers?— the workforce, in terms of the numbers? ~' ~ ., ., ., , numbers? think we know already the nhs went into _ numbers? think we know already the nhs went into covid _ numbers? think we know already the nhs went into covid with _ numbers? think we know already the nhs went into covid with 100,000 i nhs went into covid with 100,000 vacancies so the first thing would be on a recruitment plan to fill those gaps and then you got to look at expanding the workforce to meet new demand and that includes a focus on those professions that are critical and just to pick one professional group, you have anaesthetists who are absolutely crucial to delivering surgical care and treatment and operating
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treatments but also playing a critical role in the treatment of patients with covid and monitoring intensive care so this is what eyes are turning towards the spending review to see how this funding that is being pledged will translate over the next few years into more staff. over the next few years into more staff. two million more people will be invited to get their third covid jabs this week. the over—50s, healthcare workers and people with underlying health conditions are currently eligible for a booster — provided it has been six months since their second injection. the government believes that increasing vaccination rates is the key to avoiding new restrictions. the average price of petrol in the uk has reached a record high.that�*s according to the aa and the rac, which say the fuel cost 142.94 pence a litre on sunday, with dieseljust a little off its all—time high price. the aa says rising costs mean poorer motorists will have to cut back
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on other spending just to stay on the road. let's get the latest from our business presenter, alice baxter. tell us more about the reasons behind this and how long petrol prices are likely to be here for? good morning. a dark day for anyone out there who has to drive a car. the rac is calling this a dark day for drivers. it is now thought on average it costs £15 more to fill up average it costs £15 more to fill up a normal sized family car. that record number today. 142.9 2p a litre. the highest level to date. fuel prices were last around that level at around april 2012. i was seeing the spike in prices? a huge part of it is to do with this increase in wholesale cost of oil. it has doubled since last year. that
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coupled with albums in the global supply chain, all of which has had a huge impact on the number of sectors that we have spoken about from food to retail to energy. but now it is really hurting people in the pocket when it turn comes to prices at the pump. the price of petrol has dropped by 28p a litre since last october. it now costs 78 p to four family car. they go on to say this led many household budgets and have a knock—on implication of the wider economy and the really bad news is according to many analysts and experts out there these price rises are set to continue. the un says greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere reached record levels last year, despite many countries being in lockdown during the pandemic.
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the un world meteorological organisation said concentrations of co2 rose at faster rates in 2020 than at any point in the previous decade. it says that if carbon emmisisons continue to rise at current rates, then the increase in global tempratures would exceed a 1.5 degree limit. well, scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has been speaking about climate this morning in glasgow, which is hosting world leaders at the cop26 summit next week. she called the international community to take "credible actions" to achieve net zero on carbon emissions. i want to set out what in my view this summit must achieve in terms of hard commitments on reducing emissions and climate finance and also crucially on promoting both international and intergenerational fairness. i will talk about the part scotland will seek to play during the summit itself by encouraging
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dialogue and bridging what has been called the climate gap in perspectives on climate change. and i will end by reflecting on the importance of scotland truly leading by example. reading in actions not just in words. and also doing so and some of the more difficult decisions countries like ours face in making that transition to a net zero future. first and foremost, what must the summit achieve? above all, it must secure to emission reductions that are capable of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees. at the very least it must achieve near—term commitments that keep that objective well and truly alive in the longer term. the recent report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change could not have been clearer about the necessity of this. compared to preindustrial times global temperatures have already risen by more than one degree on average. the
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impacts of this are no longer distant or theoretical. they are being experienced by many people across the world right now. just this year wildfires in greece, massive flooding in nigeria and uganda, food crisis in madagascar. we won't escape the impacts here in our own country. we won't escape the impacts here in our own country. and, in the run up to the cop26 climate summit, we'll be answering some of your questions, here on the bbc news channel atjust after half past eleven. we'll bejoined by doctor kate crowley from the edinburgh climate change institute and by professor michael grubb from the institute for sustainable resources at university college london. get in touch using the hashtag bbc your questions or email yourquestions@bbc. co. uk.
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climate protesters insulate britain have blocked a major road near liverpool street in east london. in a statement the campaign group says 61 protestors have blocked three locations across the city of london demanding the government to do more on the climate crisis. police say they are on the scene to deal with the demonstrators. the headlines on bbc news. (oov)a six billion pound budget boost for the nhs in england a six billion pound budget boost for the nhs in england to tackle the huge backlog in people waiting for tests, scans and surgery. the health secretary sajjid javid says he's heading towards making vaccinations mandatory for all nhs staff in england petrol prices hit a record high — the average family car now costs £15 more to fill up compared to a year ago a coup is taking place in sudan. the armed forces ministry has said in a statement that the army has detained the civilian prime minister prime minister and taken him to an unidentified location. social media show images of several cabinet ministers from the transitional government — the sovereign council — being arrested. internet links have also
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reportedly been cut. our senior africa correspondent anne soy is in neighbouring kenya. she said it is difficult to get a clear picture of what's happening in sudan. it is not easy but we have seen images online, presumably from the police. hundreds of thousands, many people coming out in large numbers on the streets of sudan to what they can't resist a military takeover of our government. there have been calls in mosques because apart from international shutdown they are experiencing a shutdown of mobile networks. and therefore they have been using the public address systems to mobilise pro—democracy demonstrators to resist attempts by
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the military to take over power but the military to take over power but the information ministry has confirmed that several members of cabinet, including representatives of civilians in the ruling southern council which is the equivalent of head of state have been arrested. but so far there has not been a statement from the military. but so far there has not been a statement from the military. police are continuing to question eight men who were arrested on suspicion of murder after the deaths of two teenage boys in brentwood in essex. a third person was found injured at an address in the town. thomas magill has this report. a normally quiet street, now at the centre of a double murder investigation. when police turned up here, they found three boys injured. despite efforts of the emergency services, two of the teenage boys have now died. another remains in hospital. this afternoon, friends and family of the victims turned up to lay flowers and comfort each other. essex police have described this as a tragic incident involving a large—scale response.
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as part of the investigation eight people have been arrested on suspicion of murder in the early hours of this morning here in brentwood. others with information are being urged to come forward. this is being described as a fast paced investigation. police believe those involved may be known to each other. although we are keeping very much an open mind and we will explore all the possible lines of enquiry, we do think they knew each other, so we think this was an isolated incident. a book of condolence has been opened at a local church. the town's mp is reassuring residence that brentwood is saved. we are extremely lucky that this sort of thing doesn't happen very often here. but to lose two young boys in one evening has really left everyone very upset indeed. i understand that a lot of people will be shocked. but i hope they will be reassured by the fact the police have said there will be an enhanced police presence in the town
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in the coming days. forensic postmortems will now be carried out to establish how the teenage boys were killed and how two lives were so tragically cut short. (pres)london's pollution charge has been extended today, london's pollution charge has been extended today, to include the whole area inside the north and south circular roads. the owners of older petrol or diesel cars which produce the most emissions will have to pay 12 pounds 50 a day to enter the ultra low emission zone. although that only applies to 1 out of 5 cars, it could affect tens of thousands of motorists. bbc london's tom edwards has more details... a radical change to london's roads as one of the largest pollution—charging schemes in the world comes into force. the extended ultra low emission zone. all this scaffolding company in harefield in north—west london, while they welcome the scheme, in uncertain times they think it should be delayed. what impact will it have on you? it is going to cost £2500 a week
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and on top of that we are committed to £350,000 worth of expenditure on new vehicles and loss of value on existing vehicles that we are having to dispose of. the principle is the polluter pays. the original zone covered just central london. the expansion means it will be 18 times larger. if you own a diesel car made before september 2015 or a petrol car or vehicle and it was made before 2006 you will have to pay £12 a day to drive in the zone. the best thing to do is go on the tfl website and check your registration and see if it meets the emission standard. if you do not pay you could get a £100 fine. the existing zone in
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central london has cut pollution. ruth's son has been in to hospital 12 times with breathing difficulties. she thinks the scheme should be covering the whole of london. the ultra low emission zone is going to reduce the traffic and the amount of harmful pollutants in the air so for him i am massively relieved and for others like him — there are countless children, one in ten in london, have asthma. the mayor is not ruling out further measures in outer london for pollution hotspots. cities across the world will be looking at what happens here closely. tom edwards, bbc news. tom edwards with that report. phone networks have agreed to automatically block internet calls from oversees that appear to be from uk numbers. the watchdog ofcom says the move is intended to stop millions of scam calls made by criminals based abroad. it comes after phone companies were criticised by the national crime agency for failing to tackle a huge rise in scam calls
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and texts over the past year. one of saudi arabia's former top intelligence officials has described the country's de—facto ruler, crown prince mohammed bin salman, as a "psychopath". sa ad al—jabri claims the crown prince suggested he could assassinate the country s former king abdullah. our security correspondent, frank gardner gave us this update. the saudi government says it has embezzled money, which he denies. and that he is still on counterterrorism funds. and they have said he is a discredited former official. what he is claiming is that in 2014 the current de facto ruler, the crown prince, came to his
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boss. and offered to assassinate saudi king who was in the last year of his reign. he was in his 80s at the time. because he was concerned about the succession. and that branch of the family would be somehow frozen out of the succession. it's a very strange tale because he offered to do it allegedly using a poisoned ring from russia. those are his words. he told him allegedly one handshake will be enough. it sounds like something out of ajames enough. it sounds like something out of a james bond thing but he maintains that there are two recordings secretly made, two copies, of this conversation. which is giving in a safe place. and he is recorded on video so that if
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anything happens to him more secrets will come out, he says. there's been a warning that many councils aren't paying homecare companies enough to cover basic costs such as travel between clients. it comes from a new report by the homecare association — which calculated an average hourly shortfall of three pounds per carer. councils say they don't have enough money to pay companies more. last week the government announced 162 million pounds of new funding for adult social care. our social affairs editor, alison holt reports. (tx next) for 16 years denise has been driving around south yorkshire caring for people in their own homes, whatever the weather. doing myjob is great reward, great satisfaction. every day is different. you meet different people in different circumstances. her company looks after people paid for by the local authority but many companies say it doesn't include the cost of care including travel time. you recruit people but when they go
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out there and they realise that you are getting up at five in the morning and sometimes you won't get home until 11 at night and you might nip home forfive or ten minutes the money does not be level with the job for what you do. and then theyjust go elsewhere where it is more money and it is not unsociable hours. how have your interviews gone this week? i have had a few not turn up. they have had to hand back some council contracts because they cannot recruit enough staff. they want to be able to offer more pay. we are about 25% underfunded. that would address the conditions we need to look at for our amazing care workers and it would mean we could invest in our office teams, give them more support for the work they are doing and look
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at other methods. we are miles away in terms of the rates being paid. the association representing uk homecare companies calculates the minimum cost of an hour of home care is £21.43. that covers the minimum wage, pensions, travel time, training, backroom staff and investment. on average uk councils pay £18 an hour. the people who suffer are the staff and the people they support because it is very difficult to pay them any more than the national legal minimum wage and sometimes they may not even receive that for working when travel time is not properly covered by that amount. council say they hope government reforms will improve the fees they pay for the support needed by people who are older or disabled, but they are not sure the promised money will go far enough. alison holt, bbc news. more now on london's pollution charge being extended today to include the whole area inside the north and
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south circular roads. the mayor of london has been attending an event to launch the new zone at the queen elizabeth park in stratford ? an area which will be covered by the expanded ulez — hejoins me now.. thank you forjoining us. we have been hearing today that the price of petrol has gone up to record levels. now in london in that area where the ultra low emission zone is expanded, about one in five zone are going to be facing the cost of £12 50 to take their car on anyjourney whether it is school, supermarket, hospital at any time of day. what would you say to people who are facing those costs and worrying about how they're going to be able to manage it? this policy seeking to address the queen challenges of the air pollution crisis and climate emergency. what
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we do know is they are in london is toxic and you can't see it but it is an invisible killer. every year more than 4000 people die prematurely because of the toxic air. there are children who have stunted lungs for ever. because of the toxic air. and there are adults with a whole host of health issues from asthma to cancer, heart disease to dementia, because of the toxic air. and it is the poorest londoners least car or suffer the worst consequences so this policy is about improving the quality of urban london and the good news is we introduce the scheme in 2019 in central london on the first two years before the pandemic we managed to produce the toxic and the scent of a city by almost a half. i want i want to reduce some comments from viewers with concerns. samantha says have you given any thoughts to
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paramedics and hospital staff who have to get to work during the zone in unsociable hours when transport for london does not operate? what about all of the key workers we clapped for during the pandemic. many are behind me and they are grateful about our policy because they treat those who have suffered they treat those who have suffered the consequences of air pollution. i have those who work in the nhs and are in the fire service, the police, and many others. they come on a daily basis, deal with children who cannot breathe because of this toxic air. the coroner concluded that air pollution was a material contributor to losing her life in london. we had tfl response for the scheme. what they are doing is making sure there are 100 night buses running through the night. i am grateful to our
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public service. they are calling out for us to take action. i want london to be a world leader. the area covered by this expanded zone, 4 million people are benefiting from the expansion. that is double the size of paris, eight times the size of manchester. i am incredibly proud of manchester. i am incredibly proud of that. ., . of manchester. i am incredibly proud of that. ,, ., ., , ., of that. suzanne has written in to see our of that. suzanne has written in to see your scheme _ of that. suzanne has written in to see your scheme offers _ of that. suzanne has written in to see your scheme offers zero - of that. suzanne has written in to i see your scheme offers zero support for badge users, unless they are travelling to hospital. why have you not offered exemptions for those with disabilities? you mentioned an extension for a night buses but that might not be a help for someone who needs a specially adapted vehicle to get around. we needs a specially adapted vehicle to net around. ~ ., .,, ., ., get around. we have. those who are disabled, get around. we have. those who are disabled. who _ get around. we have. those who are disabled, who have _ get around. we have. those who are disabled, who have a _ get around. we have. those who are disabled, who have a specially - disabled, who have a specially adapted vehicle, do not play. we have made sure there is a scrappage scheme to help those who are disabled. that is to move to a compliant vehicle. we have made sure there is a grace period. we have made sure that black taxis, which
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are wheelchair accessible, do not pay the emission zone. those that are wheelchair accessible do not pay the fee. we have made sure we are helping those who are disabled who have to come into the area. it is disabled londoners who suffer the worst consequences from this toxic air. i am determined to improve this invisible killer. haifa air. i am determined to improve this invisible killer.— invisible killer. how much do you intend to raise _ invisible killer. how much do you intend to raise and _ invisible killer. how much do you intend to raise and what - invisible killer. how much do you intend to raise and what will- invisible killer. how much do you intend to raise and what will the | intend to raise and what will the money be spent on?— intend to raise and what will the money be spent on? initially, it is costin: money be spent on? initially, it is costing us — money be spent on? initially, it is costing us far _ money be spent on? initially, it is costing us far more _ money be spent on? initially, it is costing us far more because - money be spent on? initially, it is costing us far more because of. money be spent on? initially, it is| costing us far more because of the costing us far more because of the cost in relation to the cameras, the signage and so forth. what we do know from the zone in london is the number of vehicles that were compliant, the amount of money raised, went down. it is not about raising money, it is about cleaning the air in central london. when i first announces policy, only 39% of the vehicles were compliant. it is now more than 87%. what we are encouraging people to do is rather
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than drive in a noncompliant vehicle and pay money, to walk, cycle or use public transport. they have got to have a vehicle, make sure it is compliant vehicle.— have a vehicle, make sure it is compliant vehicle. thank you very much for dining _ compliant vehicle. thank you very much for dining that _ compliant vehicle. thank you very much for dining that might - compliant vehicle. thank you very much for dining that might joining much for dining that mightjoining us. —— thank you very much from joining us. now for sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. we start with good news for england cricket fans — ben stokes has been added to the ashes squad that'll head to australia next month. the allrounder�*s been given the all clear by his consulatant following a second operation on a fractured finger. he's also been taking time out to prioritise his mental health. i've been speaking to our sports corrspondentjoe wilson who says stokes all round presence will be important for the side. it is not just it is notjust a question of the runs he can score or the wickets you can take or even the catches he can hold. it is really his influence and his position, his charisma, the respect he will immediately enforce when it comes to the australian team. australia will see england
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completely differently with ben stokes in it. i think that is crucial. ~ ~ ., ., stokes in it. i think that is crucial. ~ ., ., ., �* crucial. we know how important ben stokes is to — crucial. we know how important ben stokes is to england. _ crucial. we know how important ben stokes is to england. presumably i crucial. we know how important ben j stokes is to england. presumably he is coming back now because he feels 100% ready to go again?— 100% ready to go again? crucially, i think, to elements _ 100% ready to go again? crucially, i think, to elements in _ 100% ready to go again? crucially, i think, to elements in the _ 100% ready to go again? crucially, i think, to elements in the statement that were released from england today. they say they are going to treat it cost cautiously with his comeback. they will allow one month before he play before the ashes. ben stokes says he is looking forward to seeing his mates and being on the field with him. if you can feel that joy field with him. if you can feel that joy again about being part of the team, part of england, part of cricket, then, for me, that is the most important factor in this whole thing. the pressure is growing on ole gunnar solskjaer this morning after manchester united's shocking 5—0 defeat to liverpool at old trafford. the united boss has called it his darkest day but says he's
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come too far to give up now. for liverpool it was unforgettable — 4—0 up at half time, mo salah scoring in a tenth consectutive match, as boos rang out at half time. salah wasn't finished though, completing his hattrick in the second half before paul pogba was sent off for united in what was their biggest defeat to liverpool since 1895 and lewis hamilton says the formula one season looks very tough going forwards after max verstappen held him off on the last lap to win the united states grand prix and extend his lead in the formula one title race. the battle intensified as hamilton came to within a second of verstappen, but he just couldn't get past the dutchman on the final lap. the red bull driver increases his advantage in the championship to 12 points with five races remaining. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. on wednesday — the chancellor will set out his tax and spending plans. but as ever, he's got to tread a pretty fine line. he's got to deliver on his party's
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election promises, pay some of the bill from covid and now deal with the impact of rising prices. so what could the chancellor's budget — mean for our personal budgets? what will the decisions made in westminster mean for our own finances? our business presenter ben thompson has been back to his hometown of burnley — one of the places counting on tory promises to �*level up' — to find out what they want from the chancellor this week. burnley, a town of nearly 90,000. it is where i was born and grew up. it is where i was born and grew up. it has been a labour stronghold for more than a century. at the last election, its town put its face in tory promises to level up, to create jobs, opportunity and growth. this week, we will find out how the chancellor plans to do that. i have come home to find out what people here i hoping for. levelling up here
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means something very different. this firm makes audio equipment for the music and movie industry. it is made in burnley, but made famous in hollywood. its boss said the chancellorjust needs to make it easier for businesses to operate. without imposing big ideas from westminster.— without imposing big ideas from westminster. ~ . ., westminster. well, i mean, we are already doing _ westminster. well, i mean, we are already doing our _ westminster. well, i mean, we are already doing our own _ westminster. well, i mean, we are already doing our own levelling - westminster. well, i mean, we are already doing our own levelling up| already doing our own levelling up over the past ten years we have moved from a difficult time into quite a estate. what we want to do is get any help carrying on what we are doing, rather than have the government parachuting a political idea on our heads. it is support for what we are doing and have been able to do it better and faster. music used to pay _ to do it better and faster. music used to pay the _ to do it better and faster. music used to pay the bills _ to do it better and faster. music used to pay the bills for - to do it better and faster. music. used to pay the bills for anything, too. he lost hisjob used to pay the bills for anything, too. he lost his job as a dj used to pay the bills for anything, too. he lost hisjob as a dj in the pandemic. like many, he is feeling
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the impact of rising prices, made worst by cuts in universal credit. he wants a chancellor to do more to help young people find meaningful work. this month, we were paid on universal credit and was left £7 per month. now, yes, iam a self—employed business owner. only this week has business started to pick back up. even now, that is not enough income to say, we can afford to do this, we can afford to do that. i am to do this, we can afford to do that. iam making to do this, we can afford to do that. i am making asking to show interest in what people actually want to do injobs. there are interest in what people actually want to do in jobs. there are other pressures, too. soaring energy bills and rising crisis means the cost of living is going up for everyone. incomes are being squeezed and so can the chancellor deliver anything to ease our personal budget, too? we to ease our personal budget, too? , need to better pay. if we don't get better pay, people are going to struggle. stores like these, i don't think these were stay if we don't
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have money to spend.— think these were stay if we don't have money to spend. people shopping onfine have money to spend. people shopping online should — have money to spend. people shopping online should pay _ have money to spend. people shopping online should pay their— have money to spend. people shopping online should pay their fair _ have money to spend. people shopping online should pay their fair share - online should pay their fair share of tax _ online should pay their fair share of tax. those people are putting these _ of tax. those people are putting these people out of work and making these people out of work and making the town _ these people out of work and making the town dead. you these people out of work and making the town dead-— the town dead. you have got to pay for what you _ the town dead. you have got to pay for what you have _ the town dead. you have got to pay for what you have to _ the town dead. you have got to pay for what you have to pay. _ the town dead. you have got to pay for what you have to pay. not - the town dead. you have got to pay for what you have to pay. not work| for what you have to pay. not work more _ for what you have to pay. not work more hours — for what you have to pay. not work more hours. that _ for what you have to pay. not work more hours. that is _ for what you have to pay. not work more hours. that is it. _ for what you have to pay. not work more hours. that is it. find- for what you have to pay. not work more hours. that is it.— more hours. that is it. and for eo - le more hours. that is it. and for people like — more hours. that is it. and for people like jane. _ more hours. that is it. and for people like jane, who - more hours. that is it. and for people like jane, who runs - more hours. that is it. and for people like jane, who runs a i people like jane, who runs a restaurant nearby, rising food and staff costs make it harder to balance the books. l staff costs make it harder to balance the books.— staff costs make it harder to balance the books. ., ~ balance the books. i am feeling like we are being _ balance the books. i am feeling like we are being constantly _ balance the books. i am feeling like we are being constantly squeezed i balance the books. i am feeling like l we are being constantly squeezed by the government for more. they understand how resilient independent business people are and they know we will fight to keep what we have got and not lose it, so we work harder, we save money, we work a bit harder, the squeeze is a bit more, we work harder because we are not prepared to lose what we have got. if you want to help businesses, show us how you are going to help them. {lin you are going to help them. on wednesday, we will see the details of the chancellor's plans. spending and investment is perhaps the easy part. much harder is creating jobs,
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opportunity, growth and optimism. in places like my hometown. ben thompson, bbc news in burnley. the actorjames michael tyler — who played ther in the tv series friends — has died at the age of 59. he was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in 2018 and had campaigned to raise awareness of the disease. here's our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba. its focus was on six friends, but a seventh character also made a big impression. have you seen chandler? i thought you were chandler. gunther�*s infatuation... this is a "getting rid of everything rachel ever touched" sale. i will take it all. a recurring theme. and as friends' popularity grew, so did the role originally credited simply as "coffee guy." gunther, six glasses. six, you want me tojoin you? oh, i thoughtjoey was here. five is good.
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but, of course, he had one storyline everyone remembers. the arc where he was obsessed with rachel, loved her, hated ross, the writers could have had that for two episodes but they kept it going for ten years. rachel? yeah? when's your birthday? 5 may, why? i'm just making a list of people's birthdays. 0h, mine's december... yeah, whatever. i've finished it, i did it all by myself! and there's nobody to hug. it was so important to fans, the show felt they had to resolve it in friends' final episode. ijust have to tell you... ..i love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. there were other small roles like an arts journalist in sabrina the teenage witch. was bird on stoop a visual metaphor for man's isolation in a soulless,
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technology driven world? a therapist on medical show scrubs. i think you pretend everything's 0k even though deep down inside, a lot of things are not. and he was reunited with friends cast mate matt leblanc in the bbc sitcom episodes. seriously? is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be friends. to ill to appear in person, hejoined the show�*s reunion special remotely. it was the most memorable ten years of my life, honestly. i could not have imagined a better experience. all these guys, it was just a joy to work with them. i felt very special. the world's biggest tv show would never have been quite what it was without james michael tyler's gunther.
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it's less than a week to go until more than 120 world leaders descend on glasgow for the cop26 un global climate summit. the conference is seen as the last—chance to for countries to agree a plan to reduce global emissions and to limit the rise in the earth's temperature to 1.5 degrees above pre—industrial levels. the uk has already committed to reach net zero by 2050. with me to answer some of your questions is doctor kate crowley from the edinburgh climate change insitute. and also i'm joined by michael grubb, professor of energy and climate change at the institute for sustainable resources at university college london. welcome to both of you. first question for you, kate. what sorts of hazards will homes and businesses
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face as a result of climate change? will we see a direct impact? yes. face as a result of climate change? will we see a direct impact? yes, we will. we already _ will we see a direct impact? yes, we will. we already are _ will we see a direct impact? yes, we will. we already are in _ will we see a direct impact? yes, we will. we already are in certain - will. we already are in certain parts of the country. we have got to consider that on the whole the uk is going to have warmer and wetter winters, but then hotter and drier summers. in amongst there, we are likely to see more extreme events such as extreme rainfall events. this is going to have a direct impact on buildings we use every day and also our lives, being able to get to work, school, and we are going to have flooded buildings and buildings may not be comfortable to work in as well in those heat waves i described. they are going to be quite serious direct impacts that we need to consider now and we need to adapt to those impacts as quickly as we can. . ~' adapt to those impacts as quickly as we can. ., ~ ,., adapt to those impacts as quickly as we can. ., ~ i., ., adapt to those impacts as quickly as wecan. ., ., ~. ., we can. thank you, kate. michael, i am sorry i — we can. thank you, kate. michael, i am sorry i do _ we can. thank you, kate. michael, i am sorry i do not— we can. thank you, kate. michael, i am sorry i do not have _ we can. thank you, kate. michael, i am sorry i do not have any - we can. thank you, kate. michael, i
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am sorry i do not have any viewers. am sorry i do not have any viewers names attached to the questions. i promise the questions that have come in from viewers. michael, the next question is, are we making any progress in tackling the root problem of climate change? we are makin: problem of climate change? we are making progress — problem of climate change? we are making progress on _ problem of climate change? we are making progress on climate - problem of climate change? we are| making progress on climate change. it never _ making progress on climate change. it never seems enough. the uk has done _ it never seems enough. the uk has done pretty— it never seems enough. the uk has done pretty well in terms of reducing _ done pretty well in terms of reducing its emissions and particularly from electricity. the uk is _ particularly from electricity. the uk is pretty much more than halved its emissions from electricity generation over the last couple of decades — generation over the last couple of decades. its national emissions are well down — decades. its national emissions are well down. that is not unique. there are over— well down. that is not unique. there are over 20 — well down. that is not unique. there are over 20 countries that have substantially reduced emissions. but, of— substantially reduced emissions. but, of course, that is among smatter— but, of course, that is among smaller countries, there is still a global— smaller countries, there is still a global increase, we don't want to
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paint— global increase, we don't want to paint too— global increase, we don't want to paint too rosy a picture. the other area _ paint too rosy a picture. the other area of— paint too rosy a picture. the other area of progress is a lot of green technologies have improved, including the cost of energy has come _ including the cost of energy has come down dramatically. it is a glass— come down dramatically. it is a glass half—full, half empty situation. you can look at it different— situation. you can look at it different ways.— situation. you can look at it different ways. kate, he will be affected the — different ways. kate, he will be affected the worst _ different ways. kate, he will be affected the worst in _ different ways. kate, he will be affected the worst in the - different ways. kate, he will be affected the worst in the uk - different ways. kate, he will be affected the worst in the uk by| affected the worst in the uk by climate change?— affected the worst in the uk by climate change? again, it is no surrise climate change? again, it is no surprise that — climate change? again, it is no surprise that those _ climate change? again, it is no surprise that those who - climate change? again, it is no surprise that those who we - climate change? again, it is no - surprise that those who we consider most vulnerable are likely to be impacted the first and the worst. this could be for a variety of reasons. they may not have the resources to be able to adapt to those hazards so that i mentioned earlier. in the uk in particular, we see those who are more elderly, vulnerable to flooding or heatwaves. and a very bad heatwave that affected europe in 2003, it was mainly the elderly that suffered the most. and so we need to make sure
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that we understand the risks that we face further specific hazards and look at who are going to be more vulnerable. they can change from hazard to hazard and location to location. generally speaking, we are thinking about those who we need to support the most. so those who may already be living in pure conditions, in poor housing, in flood zones, for example. as i have said already, those who are going to be affected the most from those of your wedding events.— your wedding events. michael, is it ossible your wedding events. michael, is it possible to — your wedding events. michael, is it possible to stop — your wedding events. michael, is it possible to stop using _ your wedding events. michael, is it possible to stop using petrol, - possible to stop using petrol, diesel and gas before 2030? why does it take nine years? rpm? diesel and gas before 2030? why does it take nine years?— it take nine years? why can't we go faster. it would _ it take nine years? why can't we go faster. it would nice _ it take nine years? why can't we go faster. it would nice to _ it take nine years? why can't we go faster. it would nice to be - it take nine years? why can't we go faster. it would nice to be going - faster. it would nice to be going faster — faster. it would nice to be going faster the _ faster. it would nice to be going faster. the government is committed to finishing _ faster. the government is committed to finishing the sale of ordinary .as to finishing the sale of ordinary gas by— to finishing the sale of ordinary gas by 2030. but, of course, that is a long _ gas by 2030. but, of course, that is a long way— gas by 2030. but, of course, that is a long way from stopping the use on the roads. _
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a long way from stopping the use on the roads, of many existing... that really— the roads, of many existing... that really encapsulates the problem. we have built _ really encapsulates the problem. we have built up economies based on fossil_ have built up economies based on fossil fuels. there is a lot of capital— fossil fuels. there is a lot of capital stock, whether that is in your— capital stock, whether that is in your own — capital stock, whether that is in your own cars or bilayers and the buildings, — your own cars or bilayers and the buildings, or in the industry. some of that— buildings, or in the industry. some of that capital lasts a long time and it— of that capital lasts a long time and it takes a while to replace. that— and it takes a while to replace. that is— and it takes a while to replace. that is the _ and it takes a while to replace. that is the big constraint. like anything. _ that is the big constraint. like anything, depends on how much we are willing _ anything, depends on how much we are willing to _ anything, depends on how much we are willing to spend to try and retire things— willing to spend to try and retire things prematurely and how much disruption — things prematurely and how much disruption would people be willing to face _ disruption would people be willing to face. we can make a lot of progress _ to face. we can make a lot of progress in the next nine years. after— progress in the next nine years. after that — progress in the next nine years. after that 2030 call. there will still be — after that 2030 call. there will still be cars on the road using petrol— still be cars on the road using petrol and industry stop using fossil— petrol and industry stop using fossil fuels. those do take a while to change — fossil fuels. those do take a while to chance. . fossil fuels. those do take a while to chance. , ., , ., ., to change. there is a question that has come up _ to change. there is a question that has come up from _ to change. there is a question that has come up from lots _ to change. there is a question that has come up from lots of - to change. there is a question that has come up from lots of years, i l has come up from lots of years, i will put it to both of you. first of all kate, if you could answer it. what is the point of the uk, a
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relatively small nation, making all these changes when massive countries like brazil and china do not help? that is a question that comes up a lot. there are a couple of good answers for this one. i think we have a legacy of starting from the industrial revolution of pumping these greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. up until relatively recently, we were the leading polluter. even though we are a very small country, per capita, so per person, we are still some of the top polluters in the world. we are still pumping out a lot of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are driving this climate change that we are seeing. so we have this legacy, we are already high emitters. we
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have a moral responsibility to address climate change, reduce our emissions, take action to help others who are less fortunate than ourselves. this is really, really important that we show that leadership going forward as well. michael, your thoughts. yes, ithink michael, yourthoughts. yes, ithink one thing _ michael, yourthoughts. yes, ithink one thing that has really struck me from, _ one thing that has really struck me from. dare — one thing that has really struck me from. dare i— one thing that has really struck me from, dare i say, almost three decades— from, dare i say, almost three decades working in the space is the interdependence of country's actions _ interdependence of country's actions. went back ten or 15 years, europe. _ actions. went back ten or 15 years, europe, could in the uk, was helping to lead _ europe, could in the uk, was helping to lead development of renewable energy _ to lead development of renewable energy. china had one gigawatt by of solar installed by 2010. now has 250 gigawatts _ solar installed by 2010. now has 250 gigawatts. wind energy close to 300. that is _ gigawatts. wind energy close to 300. that is 50 _ gigawatts. wind energy close to 300. that is 50 times are more than we have _ that is 50 times are more than we have in— that is 50 times are more than we have in the — that is 50 times are more than we have in the uk. it is a myth that the dutch— have in the uk. it is a myth that the dutch iron is so big, it is
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doing — the dutch iron is so big, it is doing a _ the dutch iron is so big, it is doing a lot _ the dutch iron is so big, it is doing a lot of everything. —— it is a myth — doing a lot of everything. —— it is a myth that _ doing a lot of everything. —— it is a myth. that would not have happened were it _ a myth. that would not have happened were it not _ a myth. that would not have happened were it not for the efforts led by these _ were it not for the efforts led by these countries and the technology is an that _ these countries and the technology is an that were shown to the rest of the world _ is an that were shown to the rest of the world that it was possible and that combination really engineered down _ that combination really engineered down the _ that combination really engineered down the cost, frankly now for the whole _ down the cost, frankly now for the whole world to benefit. that down the cost, frankly now for the whole world to benefit.— whole world to benefit. that is so interesting- _ whole world to benefit. that is so interesting. that _ whole world to benefit. that is so interesting. that is _ whole world to benefit. that is so interesting. that is not _ whole world to benefit. that is so interesting. that is not a - whole world to benefit. that is so interesting. that is not a story . whole world to benefit. that is so j interesting. that is not a story we often hear told.— interesting. that is not a story we often hear told. no, well, i know, what i have _ often hear told. no, well, i know, what i have just _ often hear told. no, well, i know, what i have just told _ often hear told. no, well, i know, what i have just told you - often hear told. no, well, i know, what i have just told you is - often hear told. no, well, i know, what i have just told you is a - what i have just told you is a positive _ what i have just told you is a positive story. the negative side of it as i _ positive story. the negative side of it as i have — positive story. the negative side of it as i have observed industry lobbies — it as i have observed industry lobbies who try and use this argument, going backa lobbies who try and use this argument, going back a long time, what _ argument, going back a long time, what is _ argument, going back a long time, what is the — argument, going back a long time, what is the point of us doing anything? and going to developing countries _ anything? and going to developing countries and saying, it will be mass — countries and saying, it will be mass to— countries and saying, it will be mass to expensive for your development. the messiness is that peopie _ development. the messiness is that people try— development. the messiness is that people try and paint a picture that we are _ people try and paint a picture that we are the — people try and paint a picture that we are the only ones really acting and the _ we are the only ones really acting and the rest of the world are not, it is simply—
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and the rest of the world are not, it is simply not true. there is a huge _ it is simply not true. there is a huge amount of action going on in many— huge amount of action going on in many countries, not withstanding the points _ many countries, not withstanding the points kate _ many countries, not withstanding the points kate made that industrialised countries _ points kate made that industrialised countries have caused the bulk of the problem. most of the major countries — the problem. most of the major countries now are seriously engaged. it does _ countries now are seriously engaged. it does take _ countries now are seriously engaged. it does take time to change.- it does take time to change. another ruestion it does take time to change. another question for — it does take time to change. another question for you. _ it does take time to change. another question for you, michael. _ it does take time to change. another question for you, michael. can - it does take time to change. another question for you, michael. can we i question for you, michael. can we rely on renewable energy? if it is not windy, how do wind farms work? to solar power is work when it is not sunny?— to solar power is work when it is notsunn ? ., , , , , , not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able _ not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able to _ not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able to use _ not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able to use it _ not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able to use it a _ not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able to use it a lot - not sunny? one of the big surprises as we are able to use it a lot more i as we are able to use it a lot more renewable — as we are able to use it a lot more renewable energy than a lot of peopie — renewable energy than a lot of people thought, for precisely that reason _ people thought, for precisely that reason. the reason is, actually, our power— reason. the reason is, actually, our power systems are more flexible than maybe _ power systems are more flexible than maybe people took credit for. we have _ maybe people took credit for. we have done — maybe people took credit for. we have done that in various ways. we have _ have done that in various ways. we have back—up sources, interconnectedness, extra storage. bear in _ interconnectedness, extra storage. bear in mind although the wind is not constant, there is about twice as much— not constant, there is about twice
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as much wind energy than there is in summer. _ as much wind energy than there is in summer, which is actually when we also consume a lot more. what you need _ also consume a lot more. what you need is _ also consume a lot more. what you need is a _ also consume a lot more. what you need is a more sophisticated electricity system that utilises the options _ electricity system that utilises the options available to make sure the lights _ options available to make sure the lights stay— options available to make sure the lights stay on when the wind is not blowing, _ lights stay on when the wind is not blowing, the sun is not shining. we have _ blowing, the sun is not shining. we have seen— blowing, the sun is not shining. we have seen countries that are even further— have seen countries that are even further ahead of the uk. denmark has pretty— further ahead of the uk. denmark has pretty much— further ahead of the uk. denmark has pretty much half of its total electricity from renewable sources. i have _ electricity from renewable sources. i have no— electricity from renewable sources. i have no worries about the lights going _ i have no worries about the lights going out — i have no worries about the lights going out. its i have no worries about the lights auoin out. �* ., ., i have no worries about the lights aoian out. �* ., ., ., i have no worries about the lights aoain out. �* . ., ., going out. a final thought from both of ou on going out. a final thought from both of you on what _ going out. a final thought from both of you on what this _ going out. a final thought from both of you on what this conference i going out. a final thought from both j of you on what this conference could achieve, based on the history of what big conferences like this tend to achieve in concrete terms. kate, what are your thoughts?— to achieve in concrete terms. kate, what are your thoughts? well, there have been big _ what are your thoughts? well, there have been big achievements - what are your thoughts? well, there have been big achievements in i what are your thoughts? well, there have been big achievements in past| have been big achievements in past conferences like this one. we have seen commitments for a lot of money for climate action in developing countries, we have seen the paris
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agreement, a big commitment to reducing emissions. so, ifeel quite positive that i would like to see strong commitments around adaptations. making sure that we cannot only survive in terms of the hazards we are going to be experiencing, but drive as well. michael, how optimistic are you feeling about this conference? well. feeling about this conference? well, conferences — feeling about this conference? well, conferences like _ feeling about this conference? well, conferences like this, _ feeling about this conference? well, conferences like this, the _ feeling about this conference? well, conferences like this, the annual, almost, _ conferences like this, the annual, almost, conference of parties, they are two— almost, conference of parties, they are two things, global negotiations but also _ are two things, global negotiations but also global events. i think the former— but also global events. i think the former negotiating agenda for cop26 is a relatively modest, although some _ is a relatively modest, although some of— is a relatively modest, although some of those details are important. it is also _ some of those details are important. it is also a _ some of those details are important. it is also a huge global event. we have _ it is also a huge global event. we have seen— it is also a huge global event. we have seen the power of these events to basically— have seen the power of these events to basically raise the profile on climate — to basically raise the profile on climate change all over the world and this— climate change all over the world and this conference is already iooking — and this conference is already looking like a big success from that point _ looking like a big success from that point of— looking like a big success from that point of view. we have seen major
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players _ point of view. we have seen major players from countries, most recently _ players from countries, most recently saudi arabia to net zero goats, _ recently saudi arabia to net zero goals, more than 75% of the world's emissions _ goals, more than 75% of the world's emissions covered by policies, that is attributable to the pressure and the processes given by these global events _ the processes given by these global events i— the processes given by these global events. i should add, also the willingness of rich countries to help _ willingness of rich countries to help support other countries who are, for— help support other countries who are, for various reasons, much appear, — are, for various reasons, much appear, further behind on this topic and it— appear, further behind on this topic and it is— appear, further behind on this topic and it is a _ appear, further behind on this topic and it is a global problem, we do not solve — and it is a global problem, we do not solve it— and it is a global problem, we do not solve it for ourselves unless it is soft _ not solve it for ourselves unless it is soft for— not solve it for ourselves unless it is soft for everyone.— not solve it for ourselves unless it is soft for everyone. thank you very much forjoining _ is soft for everyone. thank you very much forjoining us. _ is soft for everyone. thank you very much forjoining us. thank - is soft for everyone. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you i is soft for everyone. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you very j much for 'oining us. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. yesterday temperatures widely were 16 degrees or higher.
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today, cooler. short lived because temperatures pick up again tomorrow. we have got sunshine and showers today, breezy conditions. we have a weather front coming in from the atlantic and it is going to be slowly moving eastwards through the day, enhancing the showers. the ice buyers are sure it is going to be breezy, especially in the north. a warm front bringing persistent rain. today, a lot of dry weather. if you're a bit of sunshine. a lot of showers. heaviest with the odd rumble of thunder across north—west scotland and potentially the south—east of england. showers getting over toward yorkshire and lincolnshire. these white cycles represent the average wind speeds. strongest across the north west. temperature why today, 11 to 14 celsius. we could still hit 16 celsius. we could still hit 16 celsius around the london area. this evening and overnight, those showers
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will ease. a lot of clear skies for a time. as a warm front comes in from the atlantic, the cloud will build ahead of it. the rain will arrive, strengthening winds. the temperatures falling to six and 12 celsius. not particularly called for this time of year. as we pick up the weather front here, this time of year. as we pick up the weatherfront here, it this time of year. as we pick up the weather front here, it will move across here on tuesday. another breezy day. this second one comes in from behind. this is called a waving weather front. from behind. this is called a waving weatherfront. it from behind. this is called a waving weather front. it will have rain from behind. this is called a waving weatherfront. it will have rain in it and it may waive further north and further south with the rain. the rain will be persistent. this is the warm front, introducing all of the rain. if you're a bit of cloud around. the brightest skies will be in the south—east. the second one, the wavy one comes in. gusty winds here. temperatures up to 17 celsius. the temperatures across the board tomorrow will be higher than today.
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eventually, that rain does move over towards the east. heavy and persistent. particularly so across snowdonia and parts of scotland. slowly, the temperatures start to decline.
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this is bbc news the headlines: a warning one million children in afghanistan are at risk of starving to death —this little girl has been sold by herfamily — to get money for food. we have a special report from herat the desperation and the urgency of the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put in words. there is no time left to reached people of afghanistan. there is no time left to reached people of afghanistan. a six billion pound budget boost for the nhs in england to tackle the huge backlog in people waiting for tests, scans and surgery. meanwhile, the health secretary sajid javid says he's leaning towards making vaccinations mandatory for all nhs staff in england. i think ithink our i think our nhs would be a safer nhs if the people who worked on it were
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open to taking the vaccinations that are necessary to protect them and their patients. petrol prices hit a record high — the average family car now costs £15 more to fill up compared to a year ago james michael tyler — who became famous playing gun—ther in friends — has died aged 59. afghanistan has become the largest humanitarian crisis in the world, according to the world food programme and the un. they that as winter approaches, more than half the population, some twenty—two million people, are suffering hunger
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on a daily basis. afghanistan was already in crisis before the taliban takeover in august, but the aid agency says problems caused by conflict have been replaced by an economic implosion. it says the freezing of international funds has left local ngos struggling to work. our correspondent yogita limaye has this special report from afghanistan — and a warning, you may find some of the images in it distressing. this is what starvation does to a country. to this is what starvation does to a count . ., , , , country. to its tiniest lives. six-month-old _ country. to its tiniest lives. six-month-old baby. i country. to its tiniest lives. six-month-old baby. this | country. to its tiniest lives. i six-month-old baby. this one country. to its tiniest lives. - six-month-old baby. this one born six—month—old baby. this one born three months ago. afghanistan was barely surviving before the taliban took over but now foreign funds which popped up this country have been frozen. putting at least1 million children at risk of dying.
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in this ward, one in five will not make it. this baby weighs less than half of what he should. his father is among millions who have no work. his mother told us his twin is in a room next door. this hospital is full. some babies are already sharing a bed. while we
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were there, six more children were brought in. it is the only facility for hundreds of miles. because without foreign money, most hospitals are collapsing. doctors and nurses among masses of government workers who have not been paid for months. a third of the country's people don't know where the next meal will come from. we travelled to a rural settlement. tens of thousands displaced from remote provinces by decades of war and severe drought. no means of income, barely any food. some days, families here don't eat. they have sold whatever little they had. and now some are forced to do the unthinkable. this baby girl has been
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sold by herfamily. we are hiding their identity to protect them. her husband used to collect rubbish but even that earned him nothing now. once the baby is able to walk she will be taken away by the man who bought her. he has paid more than half of the $500 she has been sold for. that will get the family
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through a few months. they have been told to go will be married to his child but no one can be sure. we know there are other families here who sold their children and well we have been here another person came up have been here another person came up to one of our team and asked if we would like to buy their child. the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put into words. there is no more time left to reach the people of afghanistan, it cannot wait for the world to debate whether or not to recognise the taliban government. nearby, aid agencies hand—out parcels that might save some from hunger. alone, they can't provide for the staggering needs. giving the taliban money without guarantees on human rights and how the funds will be used is dangerous. but afghanistan is sinking fast. millions here will not survive the winter.
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millions here will not survive the winter. we will get more reaction to that a little bit later. we will get more reaction to that a little bit later. the nhs in england is to receive almost six billion pounds in the budget on wednesday, in an effort to help clear the huge backlog of people waiting for tests, scans and non—urgent operations. the extra 5 point 9 billion pounds is part of plans to reduce the unprecedented number of people in england waiting for hospital treatment, which has been worsened by the pandemic. it will also be used for new equipment and to overhaul it systems. the money is on top of the 12 billion pounds extra a year announced last month, which will be raised through a rise in national insurance. more details are due on wednesday, but the chancellor rishi sunak described the money as "game—changing".health bodies have welcomed the extra cash, but said staff shortages need to be fixed.
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our health correspondent dominic hughes has this report. the nhs is facing a huge backlog of non—urgent diagnostic tests and procedures. this new money, known as capital funding, that pays for equipment and infrastructure, is designed to clear by the end of this parliament most of that backlog. nearly £6 billion will be used in part to fund a big expansion of diagnostic tests. that means more ct, mri and ultrasound scans. the government aims to create 100 one—stop shop community diagnostic centres across england, including more than 40 already announced. what that really means is investment in physical things that are really going to make a difference in tackling that waiting list, things like the community diagnostic centres, buying ct scanners for example for more checkups and tests, investment in equipment, in beds, buildings, surgical hubs, and investment in it, so it will free up more time for dedicated nhs staff so
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they can spend even more time with patients. as part of the uk's funding formula for the nhs, a proportionate amount of money will also go to the health services in scotland, wales and northern ireland. health experts have welcomed the extra money, but they point to persistent problems around staffing. extra scanners are no good, if you don't have the trained staff to operate them and interpret the results. if this is new money it's truly welcome and the devil will be in the detail when it's announced on wednesday. it will help to deliver the proposals the government outlined last month. but what we've got to make sure is that we have the workforce in place to deliver the services. and we've also got to remember this isn't just about waiting lists. we have high demand in mental health, community services and in urgent and emergency care.
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those pressures on the nhs, being seen right across the uk, show no sign of easing. many will be looking closely at the details in wednesday's budget to see if further help is on the way. dominic hughes, bbc news. this morning the health secretary said he was leaning towards making it compulsory for nhs staff in england to be vaccinated against covid. a consultation has just closed and sajid javid said he'll make a final decision in the coming weeks. is that something that i am minded to do? yes, iam. i think it is not only right for someone working in the nhs, because naturally they are more likely to come into contact with covid and indeed other viruses but also for those they are caring for. we are people vulnerable in hospital and just like many other countries throughout europe have done this, i think it is something that we should actively be looking at. our political correspondent damian grammaticas explains the factors the health secretary will be considering over compulsary covid vaccination
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for nhs staff in england. he was questioned several times this morning and very clear every time that he said that this is the what he is minded to do. the direction he's going and having received the result of the consultation that has been going on. he pointed out it has already been happening in social care sector. the deadline there. is coming up in november the 11th and it said there would be a surge of people coming forward to get vaccinated in the social care sector and they have around 1 million workers and 30,000 or so unvaccinated. many of those, he said, would have legitimate reasons not to be. in the health service similar sort of size workforce. 100,000 still to be vaccinated. the concern is that if you force people to do it but they rather quit their jobs? here starmer said that he feared that. here starmer said that he feared that. two million more people will be invited to get their third
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covid jabs this week. the over—50s, healthcare workers and people with underlying health conditions are currently eligible for a booster — provided it has been six months since their second injection. the government believes that increasing vaccination rates is the key to avoiding new restrictions. the average price of petrol in the uk has reached a record high. that's according to the aa and the rac, which said fuel cost nearly one pound forty three pence a litre on sunday, with dieseljust a little off its all—time high price. the price to fill up a family car is now £15 more than a year ago. our business presenter alice baxter explained the impact a dark day for anyone out there who has to drive a car. brac is calling this a dark day for drivers. it is now thought that on average costs around £15 more to fill up a normal
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sized family car. a record number hit today, 142.9 2p a litre. the highest level to according to both the rac and the aa. fuel prices will last a band that level at april 2012. we seeing this bike? a huge part is to do with this increase in the wholesale cost of oil. it has doubled since last year and that, coupled with problems that we have seen on the global supply chain, all of which is at a huge impact on a number of sectors that we've spoken about from food to be detailed to energy. but now it is really hurting people in the pocket when it comes to prices at the at the pump. the price of unleaded petrol has dropped by a litre since last october. the raf saying it now costs 78p to fill a family car. they go on to say this will hurt many household budgets and no doubt have a knock—on implication for the wider economy. in the really bad news is that according to many
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analysts and experts out there these price prices are set to continue. you're watching bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. a warning one million children in afghanistan are at risk of starving to death —this little girl has been sold by herfamily — to get money for food. we have a special report from herat a six billion pound budget boost for the nhs in england to tackle the huge backlog in people waiting for tests, scans and surgery. the health secretary sajjid javid says he's heading towards making vaccinations mandatory for all nhs staff in england sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. we are going to start with some good news for england cricket fans. ben stokes has been added to the ashes squad and will head to australia next month. he has been given the
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all clear by his consultant after a second operation on a fractured finger. it has been taking time out to prioritise his mental health. i have been speaking to our sports correspondent who says his presence is important for the site. it is correspondent who says his presence is important for the site.— is important for the site. it is not 'ust a is important for the site. it is not just a question — is important for the site. it is not just a question of _ is important for the site. it is not just a question of the _ is important for the site. it is not just a question of the runs i is important for the site. it is not just a question of the runs he i is important for the site. it is not| just a question of the runs he can score at the wicket he can take or even the catches he can hold. it is really his influence and his position and his charisma. the respect that he will immediately enforce when it comes to the australian team. australia will see england completely differently with ben stokes in it and i think that is crucial. irate ben stokes in it and i think that is crucial. ~ ~ ., ., ben stokes in it and i think that is crucial. ~ ., ., ., , crucial. we know how important he is to enaland crucial. we know how important he is to england and _ crucial. we know how important he is to england and presumably _ crucial. we know how important he is to england and presumably he - crucial. we know how important he is to england and presumably he is i to england and presumably he is coming back now because he feels 100% ready to go again. you are crucially epic two elements in the statements that were released from england today. england are saying they are going to treated cautiously with ben stokes comeback. himself is
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saying i'm looking forward to seeing my mates and being on the field with them. if you can feel thatjoy my mates and being on the field with them. if you can feel that joy again of being part of the team, part of england, part of cricket than for me, that is the most important factor in this whole thing. the pressure is growing on manchester united after a shocking defeat at old trafford. the boss god at his darkest day but says he has come too far to give up now and for liverpool it was an unforgettable day. 4—0 up at half—time. boos rang out at old trafford at half—time. one player was sent off for united in their biggest defeat to liverpool since 1895. an international olympic committee has released details of the cover 19 counter measures in place at the 2022 beijing winter
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olympics. they are travelling to china we need to be fully vaccinated or fate of 21 day quarantine on arrival. there will be daily tests and temperature checks and loop system of travel. china is currently experiencing an increase in the delta variant forcing the beijing marathon to be suspended and the games start on the 4th of february. that is all your support for now and i will have more for you later. for now, back to you joanna. for now, back to you joanna. let's return to this morning's news of extra money for the nhs, that's expected in the budget, along with warnings about staff shortages and possible mandatory vaccinations for health workers. i'm joined by the labour shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth. let's start with compulsory vaccinations for nhs staff. do you agree? vaccinations for nhs staff. do you aaree? , ., , , vaccinations for nhs staff. do you aaree? , ., _ ., ., vaccinations for nhs staff. do you aaree? , ., .y ., .,, vaccinations for nhs staff. do you aaree? , ., _ ., .,, ., ,, agree? obviously want to see all nhs staff had the — agree? obviously want to see all nhs staff had the vaccination _ agree? obviously want to see all nhs staff had the vaccination is _ agree? obviously want to see all nhs staff had the vaccination is that i staff had the vaccination is that they need to have. for covid as well
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as other diseases. many nhs staff have to have vaccinations for things like hepatitis. so we have got to drive up those vaccination rates. they're pretty high as it is. my only word of caution is that often when you make a vaccination compulsory, for those who are concerned, who are not convinced, sometimes women who want to get pregnant have concerns, they need to be reassured that the vaccination is safe. they have done this in the care sector and you've actually seen a number of people leave the care sector because they not been persuaded of the case the vaccination. i want nhs staff to get vaccinated but we have to work better at persuading them. i want to see nhs staff vaccinated and i am worried about imposing it on a compulsory way like this at the moment could cause some problems. when we look at what is happening in the care sector, because this many sided javad said it is a good example of where the element of it
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becoming compulsory has led to a lot of staff choosing to get the vaccine but it is estimated there are 40,000 care home worker is not vaccinated and coming up very soon as the deadline of the 11th of november which is when, that point, anyone not vaccinated would have to leave. there is already a shortage of care home workers. what do you think should happen after that point? there is a desperate shortage across the care sector. the secrecy, the body regulates the care sector was warning just at the end of last week about the lack of nursing provision in care homes. routine care homes pulling away from providing the very high level of nursing care that many vulnerable people need. the care sector, like health care itself usually depends on the workforce and if we have care homes closing beds or home care providers not being able to go into peoples homes we've
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got a problem. able to go into peoples homes we've got a problem-— got a problem. sorry to interrupt ou, got a problem. sorry to interrupt you. what _ got a problem. sorry to interrupt you. what then _ got a problem. sorry to interrupt you, what then should _ got a problem. sorry to interrupt you, what then should happen? l got a problem. sorry to interrupt | you, what then should happen? if there are still a large number of people who are not vaccinated by the 11th of november do you think that deadline should be extended, potentially? element we will have to make an assessment based on what the care sector are saying on the level of care they are able to provide foot up on the other issues with the workforce shortage in the care sector is the low pay. and terrible condition. so if you paid care workers are proper, decent, living wage, if you gave them secure terms and conditions, many don't even have access to statutory sick pay. i mean thatjust beggars belief giving that it is care workers who are exposed to the virus themselves get ill from the virus cant even access statutory sick pay in some circumstances because of the nature of their contracts. so if you pay care workers better and you give them decent terms and conditions a much more attractive place to work. plan b now with — more attractive place to work. plan b now with covid _ more attractive place to work. plan b now with covid cases rising? what do you think? we have always said
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that we should have continued with face masks and maintain flexibility around working from home so those elements would have been in our plan a. elements would have been in our plan a, if you like. but now that we are seeing infections bouncing around 40000 and 50,000, that is a high level of sickness and society so we do think we need these extra protections because the last thing we want is another borisjohnson lockdown. we know ministers are looking at further restrictions, so called plan c. i don't want to go back to the dark days of another boris lockdown so abbott put in place these protections alongside fixing the vaccination programme, alongside paying proper sick pay so we can avoid another lockdown. what we can avoid another lockdown. what ou think is we can avoid another lockdown. what you think is the _ we can avoid another lockdown. what you think is the issue _ we can avoid another lockdown. what you think is the issue with a vaccination programme and what would you do to speed it up? aha, vaccination programme and what would you do to speed it up? aha. lat vaccination programme and what would you do to speed it up?— you do to speed it up? a lot of the infrastructure _ you do to speed it up? a lot of the infrastructure that _ you do to speed it up? a lot of the infrastructure that was _ you do to speed it up? a lot of the infrastructure that was in - you do to speed it up? a lot of the infrastructure that was in place i infrastructure that was in place earlier in the year has been stood down and we rapidly need to get centre, the pop—up centres up and running again. we need to fully mobilise community pharmacy. i think
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part of the problem is you've got a growing number of people, 5.5 million on the waiting list for a booster you've also got pockets of the country where the second jab rate to the abbey low are relatively low other parts of the country like for example leicester or blackburn. and then of course you've got the children's vaccination programme which has really struggled to get off the ground. i believe, but it has been hindered because a lot of the work will also deliver that, the health visitors, the school nurses, they have been cut back under the tories these last decades and we actually have less school nurses, less health visitors, so we don't have the capacity of that programme either. it means our wall of defence is crumbling and i reallyjohnson to get a grip of this because nobody wants another borisjohnson lockdown. wants another boris johnson lockdown-— thank you. well, scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has been speaking about climate this morning in glasgow, which is hosting world leaders at the cop26 summit next week. she called the international community to take "credible
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actions" to achieve net zero on carbon emissions. i want to set out what in my view this summit must achieve in terms of hard commitments on reducing emissions and climate finance and also crucially on promoting both international and intergenerational fairness. i will talk about the part scotland will seek to play during the summit itself by encouraging dialogue and bridging what has been called the climate gap in perspectives on climate change. and i will end by reflecting on the importance of scotland truly leading by example. reading in actions notjust in words. and also doing so and some of the more difficult decisions countries like ours face in making that transition to a net zero future. first and foremost, what must the summit achieve?
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above all, it must secure to emission reductions that are capable of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees. at the very least it must achieve near—term commitments that keep that objective well and truly alive in the longer term. the recent report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change could not have been clearer about the necessity of this. compared to preindustrial times global temperatures have already risen by more than one degree on average. the impacts of this are no longer distant or theoretical. they are being experienced by many people across the world right now. just this year wildfires in greece, massive flooding in nigeria and uganda, food crisis in madagascar. we won't escape the impacts here in our own country. climate protesters insulate britain have blocked a major road near liverpool street
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in east london. in a statement the campaign group says 61 protestors have blocked three locations across the city of london demanding the government to do more on the climate crisis. police say they are on the scene to deal with the demonstrators. some breaking news to bring you. we arejust some breaking news to bring you. we are just hearing that the national living wage is set to rise to £9 50 an hour, it is understood. the chancellor is expected to confirm that right which would apply to all of those over 23 years old in his budget later this week. the current rate is £8 91. there has been some speculation around that and it seems it is going to be confirmed in the budget on wednesday. there have been a glut of announcement over the weekend in terms of what is going to be coming through in the budget and it seems it adds up to £32 billion of spending so we are hearing lots
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and lots in the run—up to wednesday about what spending the government is going to be doing. the questions about how it will be paid for will of course, later. the actorjames michael tyler — who played gunther in the tv series friends — has died at the age of 59. he was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in 2018 and had campaigned to raise awareness of the disease. here's our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba. its focus was on six friends, but a seventh character also made a big impression. have you seen chandler? i thought you were chandler. gunther�*s infatuation... this is a "getting rid of everything rachel ever touched" sale. i will take it all. a recurring theme. and as friends' popularity grew, so did the role originally credited simply as "coffee guy." gunther, six glasses. six, you want me tojoin you? oh, i thoughtjoey was here. five is good. but, of course, he had one
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storyline everyone remembers. the arc where he was obsessed with rachel, loved her, hated ross, the writers could have had that for two episodes but they kept it going for ten years. rachel? yeah? when's your birthday? 5 may, why? i'm just making a list of people's birthdays. 0h, mine's december... yeah, whatever. i've finished it, i did it all by myself! and there's nobody to hug. it was so important to fans, the show felt they had to resolve it in friends' final episode. ijust have to tell you... ..i love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. there were other small roles like an arts journalist in sabrina the teenage witch. was bird on stoop a visual metaphor for man's isolation in a soulless, technology driven world? a therapist on medical show scrubs. i think you pretend everything's
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ok even though deep down inside, a lot of things are not. and he was reunited with friends cast mate matt leblanc in the bbc sitcom episodes. seriously? is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be friends. too ill to appear in person, hejoined the show�*s reunion special remotely. it was the most memorable ten years of my life, honestly. i could not have imagined a better experience. all these guys, it was just a joy to work with them. i felt very special. the world's biggest tv show would never have been quite what it was without james michael tyler's gunther. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear.
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hope you're having a lovely monday so far. this is the kind of story we would like with the weather. a little bit of sunshine coming to for late october but some others unfortunately have got something a little bit different. just take a look at bournemouth earlier one. i suspect it will not be much crazy golf on this course this morning. showers, though. they are moving to and allowing a little bit of sunshine to come through and most of the showers have been further north and west across scotland in particular and into northern ireland. one to moving to england and wales. if you do dodge those showers and keep the sunshine it is going to be pretty mild out there for the time of year. temperatures are likely to peak at highs of 16 degrees. that is very good indeed for the end of october. as we move out of monday into tuesday we will see more wet and windy weather gathering into the far north—west. look how many isobars here. ahead of it and that means a chilly start across eastern england. but it does
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mean that that is where the best of the sunshine is likely likely to be elio on keeping wet and windy further north. hello,this is bbc news. the headlines... a warning one million children in afghanistan are at risk of starving to death —this little girl has been sold by herfamily — to get money for food. desperation is hard to put in words. there is no more time left to reach the of afghanistan. a six billion pound budget boost for the nhs in england to tackle the huge backlog in people waiting for tests, scans and surgery. the health secretary also said he was leaning towards making vaccination for nhs staff mandatory the health secretary sajjid javid says he's leaning towards making vaccinations mandatory for all nhs staff in england i think ithink our i think our nhs would be a safer nhs
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if the people who work in it were open to taking the vaccinations. they are necessary to protect them and their patients. the average uk petrol price reaches its highest ever price — beating the record set in 2012. let's return now to our top story — the united nations is warning that afghanistan is heading for catastrophe with millions facing starvation, and the harsh winter months still to come. the world food programme has warned 22 million people are suffering hunger on a daily basis. let's speak now to amir abdulla, deputy executive director at the world food programme. welcome. thank you very much for joining us. can you tell us more about what your reporters have established? shag about what your reporters have established?— about what your reporters have established? a ., , established? as you have 'ust said, over 22 million i established? as you have 'ust said, over 22 million people i established? as you have just said, over 22 million people are - established? as you have just said, over 22 million people are now i over 22 million people are now facing an imminent food crisis and of those, nearly 9 million are in
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close to starvation. we are really on the edge of a precipice here. this is a crisis that has been building over quite some time. afghanistan has faced conflict, it has faced covid, and certainly a climate crisis as well. all of that combined has pushed people into basically almost starvation. what has happened now is with the recent takeover by the taliban and the freezing of much of the remittances and development assistance that the government of afghanistan used to get to pay many salaries, has stopped, which has pushed more people into economic difficulties.
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people in the rural areas who have been facing insecurity, it is now in urban centres. as hasjust been facing insecurity, it is now in urban centres. as has just been mentioned, nearly1 million children, unicef has done a study and up to1 million people are in danger. you mentioned in the clip, terrible mechanisms that families are resorting to. no family should be pushed into that. we need urgent assistance to relieve the suffering that ordinary afghan people find themselves in. i assume you are referring to our reporter meeting people who are selling their babies in order to get money to pay for food. i mean, it is tragic. unfortunately, what your reporter has seen there is probably not an
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isolated incident. people are basically facing starvation, or imminent starvation, unable to basically live, basic living requirements. but the good news is, if we remain optimistic, that humanitarian agencies, such as the world food programme, but other partners, plus ngos, are able to kick into action very, very quickly. we are operating in afghanistan. we are facing funding shortfalls. in september we tripled what we were doing in august. in october we expect to be reaching even more people. unless we get the funds we need, which is not a small price tag. it is $200 million per month.
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that, quite honestly pales into insignificance when one thinks how much money had been being poured into afghanistan. many thousands of people lost their lives in the 20 years of conflict that have just passed. and before that. but quite honestly, that was in the thousands, tens of thousands. we could be looking at the hundreds of thousands or millions in the next phase, if we are not able to do what is a humanitarian imperative. we should not let political obstacles stop us from meeting people is basic humanitarian needs. we do need to find a way to unfreeze funds and make funding available for humanitarian action. he make funding available for humanitarian action. . . , ., humanitarian action. he clearly made the aoint humanitarian action. he clearly made the point about— humanitarian action. he clearly made the point about the _ humanitarian action. he clearly made the point about the need _ humanitarian action. he clearly made the point about the need for- the point about the need for funding. what about working on the ground and being able to distribute what you can. as the taliban allowing ngos to work freely? i{finite
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allowing ngos to work freely? quite honestl , allowing ngos to work freely? quite honestly. for — allowing ngos to work freely? quite honestly, for the _ allowing ngos to work freely? quite honestly, for the past _ allowing ngos to work freely? (iii fie honestly, for the past several years we have been working with caliban authorities in areas that taliban had control. it is not always the easiest. you have to have a working relationship. the taliban have stated very openly that the welcome humanitarian assistance. they know they need humanitarian assistance. we know that sometimes there is a gap between what people say and the actions. untilwe gap between what people say and the actions. until we have the level of funding and i would say the material assistance that we need to deliver, we will be unable to really test that access. for now, they are allowing us to operate. there are instances when there are certain areas where certain field commanders may not have received the messages. we are facing some problems and difficulties. we want to ensure that our female staff are able to do what
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they need to do. it is not uniform across the whole of the country. but we have seen enough to at least remain positive for now so that we can get to those 22 million people, more importantly the 9 million who are really on the brink.— are really on the brink. assistant secretary general _ are really on the brink. assistant secretary general of _ are really on the brink. assistant secretary general of the - are really on the brink. assistant secretary general of the world i are really on the brink. assistant i secretary general of the world food programme, thank you very much for joining us. programme, thank you very much for 'oinina us. ., ~ programme, thank you very much for 'oinina us. . ,, ,., programme, thank you very much for 'oinina us. . ,, y., , programme, thank you very much for 'oinina us. ., ~' , . programme, thank you very much for 'oinina us. ., ~ , . ., joining us. thank you very much for havina joining us. thank you very much for having us- — more on the glasgow climate summit and the united nations warning that greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere reached record more on the glasgow climate summit and the united nations levels last year. that's despite many countries being in lockdown during the pandemic. the un world meteorological organisation said concentrations of co2 rose at faster rates in 2020 than at any point in the previous decade. today — bbc local radio stations are coming together to try and make a difference ahead of cop26. betweeen now and sunday, listeners are being encouraged to 'pledge to change' one thing that will help
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where they live and our planet. from cutting out plastic or scrapping carjourneys — to planting wildflowers or reducing power use at home — the possibilities are endless. with me is dominic cotterfrom bbc radio gloucestershire. )and rima ahmed from bbc radio leeds. good afternoon. yes, it is very exciting. it is all ahead of the cup 26 climate change conference that starts in glasgow on sunday. on the run up to it, bbc gloucestershire and all local bbc radio stations are asking our listeners to pledge to make the one change in their life and to help the environment. it could be small things like i pledged to work the school run for a month, rather than using the car. you could pledge to use a reusable coffee cups. they seem like micro changes but if we all adapt our lives, they become macro achievements. we are
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wanting to get as many pledges as we can across the country before cop26 on sunday. in gloucestershire, we are a very green county already. gloucestershire cathedral, you have seenin gloucestershire cathedral, you have seen in the harry potter movies, it date back to the fifth century, they have taken a giant leap into the 2ist have taken a giant leap into the 21st century by installing solar power is on its roof. gloucestershire police have the largest electric car fleet of any constabulary in the country. their employees are going to making pledges during the week. we are home to the greenest football club. forest green rovers. they serve up vegan match day food to supporters and also to the players. we want to take things a step further. that is why we want you to get involved during the week. there is a hashtag pledge for change. the website is
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available. across bbc local radio, i have had pledges from people like harriet from gloucester. she is putting down a deposit on an electric car. eve says she is moving to a new flat and there is no recycling bin so she is taking her waist to the local recycling plant until they shot things out. dom jolly, he phoned me the other day and he is pledging to not eat meat three days a week and got more vegetarian. there are endless pledges to change what we really want you to do is to go to bbc dot co dot uk slash make a difference. you can upload your pledge there. we will read it out on bbc local radio during the week. you could be mentioned online as well. to get involved where you can. that hashtag pledge to change.
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involved where you can. that hashtag pledge to change-— pledge to change. thank you, dominic- _ pledge to change. thank you, dominic. lots _ pledge to change. thank you, dominic. lots going _ pledge to change. thank you, dominic. lots going on i pledge to change. thank you, dominic. lots going on in i dominic. lots going on in gloucestershire. what about bbc radio leeds?— gloucestershire. what about bbc radio leeds? leeds is an amazing lace and radio leeds? leeds is an amazing place and lots _ radio leeds? leeds is an amazing place and lots of _ radio leeds? leeds is an amazing place and lots of things _ radio leeds? leeds is an amazing| place and lots of things happening at the _ place and lots of things happening at the moment. leeds city council, as well— at the moment. leeds city council, as well as — at the moment. leeds city council, as well as our new mayor, has pledged — as well as our new mayor, has pledged basically to make leeds a carbon— pledged basically to make leeds a carbon neutral place by 2030. it is really _ carbon neutral place by 2030. it is really interesting. that targets depends on the options of lots of low carbon alternatives. one thing that has— low carbon alternatives. one thing that has happened just this week is that has happened just this week is that plans — that has happened just this week is that plans to cap gusts of a deeper smack— that plans to cap gusts of a deeper smack worth of travel buses within west— smack worth of travel buses within west yorkshire have been approved. £1 west yorkshire have been approved. it 50 _ west yorkshire have been approved. it 50 to— west yorkshire have been approved. £1 50 to get around on a bus. —— cap the price _ £1 50 to get around on a bus. —— cap the price of— £1 50 to get around on a bus. —— cap the price of travel. that is a green alternative — the price of travel. that is a green alternative to travel and not be in
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the car— alternative to travel and not be in the car att— alternative to travel and not be in the car all of the time. it is really— the car all of the time. it is really exciting. here at leeds, our listeners _ really exciting. here at leeds, our listeners are very conscientious of climate _ listeners are very conscientious of climate change as it is. flooding is something — climate change as it is. flooding is something that affects our community is pretty— something that affects our community is pretty much every single year now _ is pretty much every single year now that — is pretty much every single year now. that is something we are reporting — now. that is something we are reporting on. not only that, bus travel, — reporting on. not only that, bus travel, recycling, single use of plastics. — travel, recycling, single use of plastics, these are all things that are weighing heavy on the minds of our listeners. not least because these _ our listeners. not least because these are — our listeners. not least because these are things that we are seeing where _ these are things that we are seeing where we _ these are things that we are seeing where we live, air pollution, auto pollution, — where we live, air pollution, auto pollution, flooding, our listeners in west— pollution, flooding, our listeners in west yorkshire are being affected by climate _ in west yorkshire are being affected by climate change already and so the impetus _ by climate change already and so the impetus to _ by climate change already and so the impetus to change, the impetus to pledge _ impetus to change, the impetus to pledge one small thing is actually quite _ pledge one small thing is actually quite high here.— pledge one small thing is actually quite high here. thank you so much. and if ou quite high here. thank you so much. and if you want _ quite high here. thank you so much. and if you want to _ quite high here. thank you so much. and if you want to join _ quite high here. thank you so much. and if you want to join the _ quite high here. thank you so much. and if you want to join the campaign | and if you want to join the campaign and pledge to change in your local area, go online.
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a radical change to london's roads as one of the largest pollution—charging schemes in the world comes into force. the extended ultra low emission zone. that only applies to one in five cars. tom edwards has more details. a radical change to london's roads. the extended ultra low emission zone. this scaffolding company in north west london, the welcome the scheme in uncertain times. they think it should be delayed. what think it should be delayed. what im act think it should be delayed. what impact will _ think it should be delayed. what impact will it _ think it should be delayed. what impact will it have _ think it should be delayed. what impact will it have on _ think it should be delayed. what impact will it have on you? i think it should be delayed. target impact will it have on you? it is going to cost us two and half thousand pounds per week. per week. on top of that, we are committed to
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£350,000 of expenditure on new vehicles and loss of value on existing values. that we are having to dispose of. the existing values. that we are having to dispose of-_ to dispose of. the principle is the aolluter to dispose of. the principle is the polluter pays- — to dispose of. the principle is the polluter pays. the _ to dispose of. the principle is the polluter pays. the original- to dispose of. the principle is the polluter pays. the original zone l polluter pays. the original zone covered just central london. the expansion means it will be 18 times larger. if expansion means it will be 18 times laraer. , ., ., expansion means it will be 18 times laraer. ., ., , ., larger. if you own a diesel and it was made _ larger. if you own a diesel and it was made before _ larger. if you own a diesel and it was made before september- larger. if you own a diesel and it. was made before september 2015 larger. if you own a diesel and it i was made before september 2015 or a petrol car or vehicle that was made before 2006, you will have to pay £12 50 per day to drive into the zone. �* , , ., ., , ., zone. but the best thing to do is to ao on the zone. but the best thing to do is to go on the tfl _ zone. but the best thing to do is to go on the tfl website _ zone. but the best thing to do is to go on the tfl website and - zone. but the best thing to do is to go on the tfl website and check i zone. but the best thing to do is to i go on the tfl website and check your registration plate and see if it meets the standards. if you don't pay, y°u meets the standards. if you don't pay, you could get a £160 fine. the existing zone has cut pollution. ruth's son has been into hospital 12 times with breathing difficulties. she thinks the scheme should be covering the whole of london.
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obviously, it is going to help reduce the traffic and the amount of harmful pollutants that are in the air. for him, iam relieved harmful pollutants that are in the air. for him, i am relieved and for others like him, there are countless children, one in ten in london have asthma. ., , ., ., asthma. the mayor is not ruling out further measures _ asthma. the mayor is not ruling out further measures in _ asthma. the mayor is not ruling out further measures in outer _ asthma. the mayor is not ruling out further measures in outer london i asthma. the mayor is not ruling out| further measures in outer london for pollution hotspots. cities across the world will be looking at what happens here closely. earlier i spoke to sadiq khan the mayor of london about the changes. the area in london is toxic. ? the air in london is toxic. it is an invisible killer. people die prematurely because of the toxic air. there are children who have stunted lungs forever because of the toxic air. there are adults with asthma to cancer, from heart disease to dementia because of the toxic air. it is the purest londoners least likely to own a car who suffered the worst consequences.
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this policy is about improving the quality of air in london. the good news is, we introduced this scheme in 2019 in central london and the first two years before the pandemic, we managed to reduce the toxic air in the centre of our city by almost a half. i want all londoners to benefit from cleaner air. i a half. i want all londoners to benefit from cleaner air. i want to read ou benefit from cleaner air. i want to read you some — benefit from cleaner air. i want to read you some comments - benefit from cleaner air. i want to read you some comments from i benefit from cleaner air. i want to i read you some comments from viewers and concerns about how it will impact on them and others. you as one from samantha. has the merit given any thoughts to police officers, paramedics and hospital staff need to get to work in the new zone during unsociable hours when transport for london does not operate? what about the key workers we clapped for early on in the pandemic?— we clapped for early on in the aandemic? . . , ., , pandemic? well, many are behind me. the are pandemic? well, many are behind me. they are incredibly _ pandemic? well, many are behind me. they are incredibly grateful _ pandemic? well, many are behind me. they are incredibly grateful about i they are incredibly grateful about our policy. the treat those who have suffered because of air pollution. i have got those who work in the nhs, london ambulance service, the fire service, the police and many others.
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they come on a daily basis, deal with children who cannot breathe because of the toxic air. i am grateful to our public servants. they are calling out to take action. i want london to be a world leader. the area covered by this expanded zone is nearly 4 million people benefiting from the ultra low emission zone expansion. that is double the size of paris, eight times the size of manchester. i am incredibly proud of that.— incredibly proud of that. c zanne has written. _ incredibly proud of that. c zanne has written, you _ incredibly proud of that. c zanne has written, you scheme - incredibly proud of that. c zanne has written, you scheme offers. incredibly proud of that. c zanne i has written, you scheme offers zero support of blue badge people. why have you not offered exemptions? those who are disabled, who have an adapted vehicle, do not pay. there is a scrappage scheme to help those who are disabled who have a vehicle thatis who are disabled who have a vehicle that is not compliant to move away to a compliant vehicle. we have made sure there is a grace period. we have made sure that black taxis, which are wheelchair accessible, do not pay the zone. if those with a
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wheelchair accessible car did not pay the fee. we are making sure we are helping those who are disabled. it is disabled londoners who suffer the worst consequences from the toxic air. that is why i am determined to improve this invisible killer. ., . ., , . determined to improve this invisible killer. ., . ,. ., killer. how much do you expect to raise and what _ killer. how much do you expect to raise and what will— killer. how much do you expect to raise and what will the _ killer. how much do you expect to raise and what will the money i killer. how much do you expect to raise and what will the money be. raise and what will the money be spent on? raise and what will the money be sent on? n a, , raise and what will the money be senton? a a, , a, , , spent on? actually, initially it is costin: spent on? actually, initially it is costing us _ spent on? actually, initially it is costing us far _ spent on? actually, initially it is costing us far more _ spent on? actually, initially it is costing us far more because - spent on? actually, initially it is costing us far more because of. spent on? actually, initially it is i costing us far more because of the costing us far more because of the cost in relation to the cameras, signage and so forth. what we do know from the ultra low emission zonein know from the ultra low emission zone in london is the number of vehicles that were compliant went up. the amount of money raised went down. it is not about raising money, it is about cleaning the air in central london.— it is about cleaning the air in central london. my ., ., ., ., central london. the mayor of london talkin: to central london. the mayor of london talking to me — central london. the mayor of london talking to me earlier. _ one of saudi arabia's former top intelligence officials has described the country's de—facto ruler, crown prince mohammed bin salman, as a "psychopath". saad al—jabri claims the crown prince suggested he could assassinate the country s
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former king abdullah. he made the allegations on the cbs programme 60 minutes. i am he made the allegations on the cbs programme 60 minutes.— he made the allegations on the cbs programme 60 minutes. i am here to sound the alarm _ programme 60 minutes. i am here to sound the alarm about _ programme 60 minutes. i am here to sound the alarm about a _ programme 60 minutes. i am here to} sound the alarm about a psychopathic killer in the middle east, who poses a threat to his people, to the americans, and to the planet. a psychopath with no empathy, does not feel emotion, never learns from his experiences, and we have witnessed atrocities and crimes committed by this killer. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner says saad al—jabri is a controversial figure. he designed saudi arabia's counter—terrorism strategy and helped foil al-qaeda plots. but he's fallen out with the current government. the saudi government says that he is a fraudster, that he has embezzled money,
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which he denies, and he has stolen up to $5 million of saudi counterterrorism funds. and they have said he is a discredited former official. what he is claiming in this interview with cbs that aired a few hours ago is that in 2014 the current de facto ruler of saudi arabia, mohammad bin salman the crown prince, came to his boss, another prince muhammad, this time prince muhammad bin nayef, and offered to assassinate saudi king abdullah, who was in the last year of his reign, he was in his 80s at the time, because he was concerned about the succession, and that branch of the family would be somehow frozen out of the succession. it does, i have to say, sound a very strange tale, because he offered to do it, allegedly, using a poisoned ring from russia. those are his words. he told muhammad bin nayef, allegedly, one handshake will be enough. it sounds like something out
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of a james bond thing. but saad al—jabri maintains there are two recordings secretly made, two copies of the recordings of this conversation which he is keeping in a safe place. and he has recorded a death video so that if anything happens to him, more secrets will come out, he says. in sudan a state of emergency has been announced together with the dissolution of the transitional government. the head of the ruling council, general abdel fattah al—burhan, has said elections will take place in 2023. earlier, soldiers arrested most members of the government and other civilian leaders. 0ur senior africa correspondent anne soy is in neighbouring kenya. she said it is difficult to get a clear picture of what's happening in sudan. it is not easy but we have seen some of the images that have been posted online, presumably by sudanese who are monitoring the situation and have means to send
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that information out. hundreds of thousands... you know, many people coming out in large numbers on the streets of sudan to what they call resist a military takeover of government. there have been calls in mosques, because apart from internet shutdowns, they have been experiencing shutdowns of mobile networks, and therefore, they have been using mosques to mobilise people to come out in the streets, pro—democracy demonstrators, to resist attempts by the military to take over power. in the last hour the general abdel fattah al—burhan, head of the ruling council, has spoken and he has said he has dissolved the body that he leads, as well as the government, which is civilian led. earlier in the day, the military arrested the prime minister abdalla hamdok and his wife. they are holding him and his wife
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at a undisclosed location. they have arrested several cabinet members. indeed, there is so much tension now. people are trying to make sense of what has happened. a statement from the prime minister's office came earlier and warned against tearing into shreds the accord, the deal that has enabled the military and civilians to share power. and so we are waiting to see what happens. the united states has spoken. the embassy in sudan and has said those who are disrupting the road map to democracy must stand down. archaeologists have discovered the world s oldest known animal cave painting in indonesia. a panel showing wild pigs believed to have been made 45,500 years ago was found in a cave in a remote valley on the island of sulawesi. previously, rock art found in european sites were considered to be the world s oldest narrative artworks.
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bbc indonesia was given rare access to film inside the cave. rebecca henschke reports. here in this remote valley is the world's oldest known painting of animals. the discovery made by a doctoral student at australia's griffith university. 0na map on a map we found this unique location. the area is surrounded by mountains. in the middle there is a valley. we were curious and decided to explore. the name means buffalo cave. during the monsoon, this area is only floods. in the past, our ancestors kept the buffaloes in the cave to protect them. 50 metres inside the cave they found this panel that
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appears to tell the story of wild pigs fighting. translation: the panel expresses quite - a complex narrative. two boars are painted on top of each other. if we look closely at pigs it looks like the artist has used a brush dipped into paint to make the strokes on the cave wall. we see a different style with the hands. it appears as if a spray technique was used. they put their hands on the wall and then sprayed the pigment on. using a uranium series isotope dating technique it's been revealed that it was made more than 16,000 years ago. translation: it's as if. the painting wants to show the animals are moving. the fact that the artist could create such an imaginative work from 16,000 years ago is truly extraordinary. the team of archaeologists behind the discoveries are even
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older paintings may be found in nearby case. this ancient art a source of great national pride. translation: these cave art is really unique. - nothing quite like it in the world. so i tell young people in your blood are these clever genes, brilliant genes. it proves that 16,000 years ago your ancestors made this incredibly clever paintings. researchers are warning that the art is decaying at an alarming rate due to the effects of climate change. rising temperatures causing these ancient paintings to crumble. any moment it is time for the one o'clock news. now for a look at the weather. it seems to have been a slow creep towards winter. another
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mild day to day. sunny spells and scattered showers out there. a good deal of sunshine as well. this was from earlier today. a stunning photograph. along western fringes of england and wales as well. there are breaks in the cloud. sunny spells coming through. as we go through the remainder of the afternoon, most of the frequent showers in the strongest of the winds again into the far north and west of scotland. winds in excess of 30 mph. there might be a chance they will catch you out if you are outside for any length of time. winds, the sharpest of the showers. a south—westerly direction. mild across the country. 11 to 13 celsius in scotland. ii to 13 celsius in scotland. highest values of 16 celsius. now, we see this as easing away. clearer
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skies for eastern england overnight. wet and windy weather pushes in from the west. i saw buyers on the charts. heavy rain expected into tuesday. clear skies. temperatures down to five to 527 celsius. the cloud and the rent will continue to gather and push its way out of northern ireland and scotland. and into the far north. 50 mph. we move out of tuesday into wednesday. weather front drift its way out of scotland by then. back down into the north of england and north wales. that is going to be the dividing line between this warm air thatis dividing line between this warm air that is continuing to fit out from the south. across england and wales, perhaps wednesday will be the
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warmest day of the week. temperatures at 18 or 19 celsius. cooler and fresher as we go towards the end of the week. the further north you are, you will continue to see plenty of sharp showers.
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the bbc has found evidence that some families are even selling their children to make ends meet. the desperation and the urgency of the situation is hard to put in words. there is no more time left to reach the people of we'll have a special report from herat, afghanistan's third biggest city. also this lunchtime... the nhs in england is promised almost £6 billion to help clear the record backlog of people waiting for tests, scans and treatments. the government says it is leaning towards making it compulsory for nhs staff in england to have the covid vaccine.
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the bbc is told the national living wage is set

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