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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 24, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten, the chancellor lays out some of his spending priorities ahead of wednesday's budget. billions of pounds for infrastructure, innovation and more — to help grow the british economy after covid. children, schools, skills, all of these things, policing and crime — you will see investment across the board in public services. but labour says the government should be cutting vat on energy bills now to help struggling families. also tonight: senior doctors warn rising covid infections are putting intense pressure on a&e departments in england and join calls for tougher coronavirus rules. the flat owners facing winter with their homes wrapped in plastic, as the government tackles the cladding crisis after grenfell.
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and the facebook whistleblower frances haugen meets ian russell, whose daughter molly took her own life after viewing disturbing content online. good evening. as he prepares to deliver his budget on wednesday, the chancellor, rishi sunak, says there'll be billions of pounds of investment in infrastructure, innovation and skills to grow the british economy as it recovers from the covid pandemic. he told the bbc there'd be a boost for the nhs and schools, as well as money for services for children, policing and fighting crime. he acknowledged the rising cost of living but says this is due to global factors and he didn't have a magic wand to make them disappear. here's our political correspondent nick eardley.
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morning, sir! rishi sunak has a lot to weigh up this week. he's been chancellor through an unprecedented crisis which has meant unprecedented spending. now a trickier path — he wants to balance the books at the same time as announcing a number of spending commitments. one of the elements of building a stronger economy is having strong public services, and you will see that next week — whether it's the nhs, which we've already taken steps to support significantly to recover from coronavirus, children, schools, skills, all of these things, policing and crime. you will see investment across the board in public services. the government says it wants higher productivity and higher wages, so there will be around £3 billion earmarked for skills. billions too for transport and health research. commitments this weekend have amounted to more than £20 billion — a sign the spending tap hasn't been turned off completely. yet in the treasury, they are keen
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to get spending under control, and there are concerns about inflation, which could squeeze living standards and cost the government a lot more when it comes to borrowing. as economies have reopened rather rapidly after coronavirus, that has put pressure on global supply chains. and then the other part of the increase is very much just down to energy prices. both of those factors are global factors. we're not alone in experiencing those problems. you know, i don't have a magic wand that can make either of those things disappear. the chancellor will be trying to appeal to different audiences on wednesday. he wants to persuade many in his party of his conservative credentials, that he'll manage the economy sensibly and bring spending under control. but then there are voters — the conservatives have made some big pledges on levelling up, on rebuilding the economy, on repairing the nhs. none of that is going to be cheap. labour has warned of a cost—of—living crisis — higher prices for things
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like food and energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills, 5% of that money goes automatically to the taxman. there's something very simple the government could do — it would be immediate, and it would be felt automatically on people's bills next month, and that is to cut that rate of vat from 5% to 0%. there will be no blank cheques in the budget, the treasury wants to move on from pandemic spending — but there are still big promises to be fulfilled. nick eardley, bbc news. so what can we expect to hear from the chancellor on wednesday? our economics editor, faisal islam, is here. the budget backdrop is an economy that has rebounded faster from the lockdowns than assumed at the last one in march, with unemployment no longer expected to hit 6%. but some of that rebound is petering out — against a background of supply—chain worries and rising prices. it is notjust the budget — there's also a three—year spending review to continue
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to draw a line under the decade of squeezed spending. this is the total in terms of day—to—day spending by the end of the parliament, {a40 billion. that is bigger than it is today — spending is going to rise. but let's give you a sense of how the spending review will carve that up. well, we already have spending plans for health and schools in england, and for aid and defence too — that's nearly two thirds of spending. so most of the debates within government should come here in the unprotected areas, important public services — courts, prisons, borders, and especially council spending. now, the chancellor used the phrase "across the board" increases in spending — let's dig down here. these are some of the existing plans over the next three years. significant growth in health spending and some in schools spending. unprotected areas will eventually see a spending rise, but there is a tough immediate squeeze. this could have consequences for council tax, for example. on top of all that, we are expecting extra post—pandemic catch—up
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funding, for example, to tackle nhs waiting lists, meaning a further squeeze elsewhere. throw in the need for longer term investment funds to improve the economy of the uk's regions, and also to meet net—zero climate promises, all against the backdrop of record borrowing and tax rises — you have an historic budget—balancing challenge this week for mr sunak. let's talk to nick eardley in downing street. rishi sunak, it seems, is to prove the government can look beyond policies and has the policies and the money for a post pandemic britain. ~ ., ., , britain. well, clive, the main “ob of the man fl britain. well, clive, the main “ob of the man in �* britain. well, clive, the main “ob of the man in numberi britain. well, clive, the main “ob of the man in number11�* britain. well, clive, the main “ob of the man in number 11 is i britain. well, clive, the main “ob of the man in number 11 is to h britain. well, clive, the mainjob. of the man in number“ is to make of the man in number 11 is to make sure that the economic plans add up, and this is a big political moment as well. remember that many of the government's big plans were parked during the pandemic, ministers know they have potentially only got a
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couple of years to persuade voters that they mean business with some of those big promises. and it was really striking, actually, from the chancellor this morning that he repeatedly made clear that public spending was going to be a key part of his economic rebuild plan. now, we've not seen the full budget, there will be some people who miss out on the chancellor's final draft, there will be ministers nervous they will not get the funding that they've asked for. but the fact that taxes are going up to pay for many of the nhs improvements, the economic recovery has been slightly better than many predicted, it means there is a hope in there that the government can continue to spend and balance the books at the same time. we will find out a lot more on wednesday. come out 0k, nick, thank you. nick eardley in downing street. senior doctors say rising covid infections are adding to intense
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pressure on accident and emergency departments in england, and they're calling for tougher coronavirus rules as we head into winter. labour says the government should bring in its plan b of measures, like advising more people to work from home. but ministers have again ruled out further restrictions for now, saying the current rate of infections and hospitalisations doesn't suggest changes are needed immediately. here's our health correspondentjim reed. at this surgery in cumbria, 12—year—old lola was getting her firstjab 12—year—old lola was getting her first jab today. 12—year—old lola was getting her firstjab today. the government says it is sticking to its plan a, using vaccines to control covid. but cases have been rising in england, and today labour added to calls for what is known as plan b — more mask wearing, vaccine passports and working from home. the chancellor, though, said there was no immediate need for that. though, said there was no immediate need for that-— need for that. although the winter was alwa s need for that. although the winter was always going _ need for that. although the winter was always going to _ need for that. although the winter was always going to be _ need for that. although the winter| was always going to be challenging for a combination of factors, the booster roll—out should give us the
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protection we need, and there is a fallback, plan b, if we needed. the number of people in hospital with covid has been rising but is well below the levels seen at the start of the year. but the nhs is also facing other pressures as the weather gets colder. in september, just 75% of people going to a&e in england were seen within four hours, the lowest figure on record, and hospitals in scotland, wales and northern ireland are facing very similar pressure. some emergency doctors are warning that they are already struggling to cope. so when i auoin to already struggling to cope. so when i going to start _ already struggling to cope. so when i going to start seeing _ already struggling to cope. so when i going to start seeing patients, - i going to start seeing patients, you have this enormously long queue of people who have been waiting a long time, and at busy times of the day you have ambulances outside the emergency department who cannot off—load because you're up —— your
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emergency department is full because your hospital is full, and you do feel overwhelmed, helpless. ministers in westminster say a faster roll—out of booster vaccines for the over 50s should help control hospital admissions. for the over 50s should help control hospitaladmissions. in for the over 50s should help control hospital admissions. in scotland, wales and northern ireland, though, strictly covid rules, like compulsory masks, have been in place for some time. one government adviser is one in those measures may soon be needed in england. we adviser is one in those measures may soon be needed in england.— soon be needed in england. we do need to have _ soon be needed in england. we do need to have people _ soon be needed in england. we do need to have people using - soon be needed in england. we do need to have people using lateral. need to have people using lateral flow tests, avoiding contact with large _ flow tests, avoiding contact with large numbers of people in enclosed spaces. _ large numbers of people in enclosed spaces, using masks, all of those things— spaces, using masks, all of those things now— spaces, using masks, all of those things now need to happen if we are going _ things now need to happen if we are going to _ things now need to happen if we are going to stop this rise and get things— going to stop this rise and get things under control soon enough to stop a _ things under control soon enough to stop a real_ things under control soon enough to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the _ stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter.— of the winter. that is the concern - that covid, — of the winter. that is the concern - that covid, flu _ of the winter. that is the concern - that covid, flu and _ of the winter. that is the concern - that covid, flu and a _ of the winter. that is the concern - that covid, flu and a treatment - that covid, flu and a treatment backlog could put unsustainable pressure on the nhs. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation but for the moment the
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data does notjustify changing the rules. the government's latest coronavirus figures show there were 39,962 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average 46,920 new cases were reported per day in the last week. there were 8,238 people in hospital with covid. as of thursday, 72 deaths were reported. that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. on average in the past week, 124 deaths were announced every day. the uk's largest supermarket chain, tesco, says an attempt a to hack its computer systems is behind problems with its website and app. shoppers have been unable to book deliveries or amend existing orders for nearly two days. tesco says it's working hard to restore services. our business correspondent katy austin is here.
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too, it has little over a million online orders a week, so this could be affecting a lot of people.- be affecting a lot of people. tesco is the country's — be affecting a lot of people. tesco is the country's biggest _ be affecting a lot of people. ifcr is the country's biggest supermarket in demand for online ordering has been growing, a lot more people rely on it than they used to, so this disruption is significant and potentially costly for tesco. since yesterday morning, customers have been complaining that they cannot place, change or cancel orders of groceries through the website or the app. neither of those are working still, and tesco has apologised to customers. it said the problem has happened because of an attempt to interfere with its systems, which seems to have happened at some point overnight friday into saturday. tesco isn't giving any more details about what has happened for now apart from that. a spokesperson did add that it thinks there is no reason to believe that customer data has been affected and it said the retailer was acting to ensure details remain safe.- retailer was acting to ensure details remain safe. katy, thank ou. ka details remain safe. katy, thank you. katy austin _ details remain safe. katy, thank
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you. katy austin there. - eight people have been arrested on suspicion of murder after two teenage boys died in essex. emergency services were called to regency court in brentwood overnight, and police are now working to establish the causes of death. a third person was treated for injuries which were not life—threatening. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has started his second hunger strike to try to secure her return to the uk from iran. she's been detained since 2016, initially accused of breaching national security. last week, she lost an appeal against a second conviction for spreading propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard staged his first hunger strike two years ago, which helped lead to the return of their daughter gabriella, who'd been travelling with her mother in iran when she was arrested. the facebook whistleblower frances haugen will give evidence to mps tomorrow on government plans for social—media regulation. the american data scientist worked at facebook for two years and today met the campaigner ian russell, whose ila—year old—daughter molly took her own life after viewing
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disturbing content on instagram, which is owned by facebook. angus crawford has more details. she's the former facebook insider who revealed its most closely guarded secrets. 14—year—old molly russell... he's the father who lost his daughter to suicide — now campaigning to protect other children online. nice to meet you. today they met for the first time. so what do you think the impact of molly's story was on instagram as a platform and how it approaches safety? facebook is full of kind, conscientious, well—meaning people. the real question is around, can we, as a public, change the incentives such that it makes more sense for facebook to invest more money in safety on instagram? so i'm sure that molly's... the experience that molly had caused them to look at these questions more. so one of the things that lead us to find out more about molly was some notes that she'd left
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that were found after she died. and in one of them she wrote, "i keep a lot to myself, and it keeps building up inside." "you get addicted to it, and you don't even realise you've spun out of control." "you're living in a trap, ina circle." what's so dangerous about having children under the age of 16, under the age of 18, using systems like instagram is that facebook�*s own research shows that a startlingly high fraction of them exhibit what is known as problematic use, which means that they can't regulate their own usage of the product. it's kind of like cigarettes in that way. and they know it's hurting their physical health, their schoolwork or their employment. facebook says it has never allowed content that promotes or encourages suicide or self—harm and it works with experts to continually update its policies. as time goes on, as a parent bereaved by the suicide of his 14—year—old, i look at a huge corporation with massive resources and say, "there must be
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more you can be doing." unquestionably, facebook could be investing more resources in making the platforms safer. they have made a series of choices to prioritise profits over people. what do you think regulators can do to persuade those big tech companies to behave differently? there's no company in the world that has as much power as facebook and as little transparency. in a statement, facebook said... a whistle—blower and a campaigner with one aim — to make social media a safer place. angus crawford, bbc news. the bbc has learned that 18 months after the government announced a £1 billion scheme to help tower—block owners remove flammable cladding from their homes, funds so far have been allocated
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to less than a third of nearly 700 applications processed so far. but as sarah corker reports, in the few buildings where remedial work has begun, there are fresh problems. imagine having to live inside this — your home wrapped in plastic sheeting for months on end, windows that barely open, no way to see out. here you are, sarah, middle of the day, no natural light. jim lives on the first floor at islington gates, here in birmingham city centre. and this is the limited air we can get into the flat. this is the view for the next year that you've got? yeah, 12 months of being depressed. there is relief that the combustible cladding is being removed, but government funding won't cover the full cost of almost £9 million. it means leaseholders need to find more than 1 million between them. that's at least £20,000 each. what's it like living in this box? you haven't got a clue what's happening outside. it affects you mentally, it makes you depressed.
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it makes you very stressed. the stress is worse knowing you've got to pay for it, and you've got to pay for the privilege of living in a dark, dull box. in my case, you know, £20,000. and i grind my teeth. you feel like you're suffocating. just next door, liz and rodriguez are renting this one—bed flat. they not only have to cope with the building work, but there's a serious damp and mould problem, too. it's horrible. i~ ~~ - i really hate living here now, to be honest with you. and, er, ifeel embarrassed. i don't want to bring my friends here, i don't want to bring my family here, because i've got a six—year—old niece who we absolutely adore, and i don't want her here, because i don't want her to be breathing in the same stuff that's making me feel so poorly. liz says her asthma has been getting progressively worse. this is footage from a neighbouring flat. with the external cladding removed, this is what can happen
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when it rains. hundreds of people here say they face a miserable winter living on a building site, and this is one street in one city. but across the country, we're going to be seeing much more of this in the months and years ahead. this tower in ipswich has been like this for five months. it's a similar picture here in london. and these living conditions are worrying health professionals. they're stuck there with all the kind of stresses of the physical environment, the financial worries and the uncertainty about when this is going to end. so we're going to see, i think, quite serious mental health issues. back in the midlands, the leaseholder board overseeing this work said it's monitoring issues closely to minimise discomfort. the government told us it's unacceptable people are facing these bills and building owners must make buildings safe without passing on costs. but forjim and his neighbours, life behind the plastic is hard to bear. sarah corker, bbc news,
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in birmingham. with all the sport now, here's lizzie greenwood—hughes at the bbc sport centre. thanks, clive. good evening. we're starting with football, and that means if you want to wait for the results on match of the day 2 or sportscene, which are on later, then avert your attention, because they're coming now. in an extraordinary game at old trafford, liverpool thrashed their arch rivals manchester united 5—0. mo salah scoring a hat—trick before paul pogba was sent off for a wreckless challenge. united's manager, ole gunnar solskjaer, said after the game he's "come too far to give up now". elsewhere, west ham moved into the top four after beating tottenham, and leicester had a win at brentford. rangers are back on top of the scottish premiership afterfighting back from a goal down to beat st mirren. lewis hamilton gave everything in the final stages of the us grand prix, but he couldn't catch max verstappen, who's now doubled his lead in the drivers' championship to 12 points.
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joe lynskey reports. this is formula 1's blockbuster track, the circuit of the americas, where 140,000 fans were fixed on to mccrimmon on the front row and if one's modern rivalry. max verstappen and lewis hamilton have with six races left to seal a title, and it can all change on one turn. from second on the grade, hamilton surged in front, butjust like the drivers standings, in this race, they traded the lead. after both pit stops, verstappen was back ahead. the question was how the tactics and the tyres would hold out at the close. verstappen is chasing his first world title. he knew these nerve jangling laps could be the difference. after 56 times round the track, it came down to the last corners. ~., track, it came down to the last corners. , ., , , , ,, corners. max verstappen wins the us grand prix! his—
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corners. max verstappen wins the us grand prix! his lead _ corners. max verstappen wins the us grand prix! his lead at _ corners. max verstappen wins the us grand prix! his lead at the _ corners. max verstappen wins the us grand prix! his lead at the top - corners. max verstappen wins the us grand prix! his lead at the top is - grand prix! his lead at the top is now 12 points. — grand prix! his lead at the top is now 12 points, and _ grand prix! his lead at the top is now 12 points, and this - grand prix! his lead at the top is now 12 points, and this sport's . now 12 points, and this sport's great rivalry comes down to five more grands prix. this drilling season will have more tents turns to come. —— a thrilling season will have more tents turns to come. just before that race on the same track in austin, britain's jamie chadwick wrapped up her second successive w series title, fighting off her british rival alice powell on the final weekend of the season. the w series is an all—female contest designed to help drivers into the top tier of motor sport based on talent, rather than finances. pakistan's cricketers pulled off one of the best results in their history by beating favourites india in their opening game at the t20 world cup. pakistan put aside chaotic preparation to stun their rivals, first by bowling them out for 151—7 and then with a perfect batting display, cruising to victory without losing a single wicket. it's india's biggest t20 defeat and the first time they've lost to pakistan at a world cup. that's the sport — back to you, clive.
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that's it. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. but now on bbc one, time for the news where you are.
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hello, this is bbc news. as we've been hearing, the chancellor, rishi sunak, says there'll be billions of pounds of investment in "infrastructure, innovation and skills" in his budget on wednesday. he told the bbc there'd be a boost for the nhs and schools, as well as money for services for children, policing and fighting crime. i've been getting reaction from pauljohnson, who's the director of the institute for fiscal studies — which carries out economic research.
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he's got quite a lot of money to actually spend on infrastructure, and capital projects which can go towards net zero and levelling up ambitions and indeed his aim is to bring capital spending to its highest level is a fraction of national income since early 1980. so he has a fair bit of space there. on the other side, on the day—to—day spending, he has less, and that is despite quite a big increase in total over the next three years. if you look at his total increases, 3% a year of that is much closer to the sort of numbers gordon brown was talking about in the 2000s. but he is spending so much of that in the national health service, he doesn't have an awful lot left for everything else. have an awful lot left for eve hinaelse. , ., �*, everything else. obviously our men's date, in everything else. obviously our men's date. in terms _ everything else. obviously our men's date, in terms of _ everything else. obviously our men's date, in terms of everyday _ everything else. obviously our men's date, in terms of everyday people, . date, in terms of everyday people, we will be keeping an eye on vat, energy bills, alcohol tax, capital gains tax rates, student loan thresholds and the minimum wage rise, as well as pensions. who is
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going to lose out or who is likely to lose outcome wednesday? there is a lot of pressure on the chancellor, isn't there? i a lot of pressure on the chancellor, isn't there?— isn't there? i don't think there will be any _ isn't there? i don't think there will be any big _ isn't there? i don't think there will be any big losers, - isn't there? i don't think there will be any big losers, don't i isn't there? i don't think there - will be any big losers, don't forget this year has already been the biggest tax raising year since at least 1993. we have had enormous tax rises announced this year, the national insurance hike announced in the september and the big corporation tax and income hikes announced back in march so i will be surprised if there is anything else that's really going to be a big tax rise. you did mention, though, the student loan issue. it is possible that the point at which a student loans are supposed to be repaid comes down. don't forget, it went up just three or so years ago, we could have a reverse of that policy and that would clearly make graduates somewhat worse off, particularly as it will probably be applied to people who have already graduated. i don't think we are going to see any increases in taxes on fuel or
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domestic energy. and as ever, alcohol taxation could go either way. i alcohol taxation could go either wa . ., , ., , alcohol taxation could go either wa. ., , way. i wonder if you could 'ust take a ste- way. i wonder if you could 'ust take a step back — way. i wonder if you could 'ust take a step back and h way. i wonder if you could 'ust take a step back and if t way. i wonder if you could 'ust take a step back and if you _ way. i wonder if you could just take a step back and if you could - way. i wonder if you could just take a step back and if you could paint i way. i wonder if you could just take a step back and if you could paint a| a step back and if you could paint a picture for us, do you have the figures? this is yourjob, especially areas. what does the economy look like right now? well. economy look like right now? well, it looks quite _ economy look like right now? well, it looks quite unbalanced. - it looks quite unbalanced. obviously, we have all seen the headlines about the shortage of drivers and care workers and people in some other occupations, so in some areas it is looking very tight and there are big wage rises in price increases in some areas. in other areas it is looking much less tight. there are still areas that are not fully recovered by any means from the pandemic, where wages and jobs are not increasing, so fast. so we have a lot of imbalances. i think overall we should be pretty relieved that following the deepest recession
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in history, essentially, the economy is bouncing back much quicker, i think, than most people expected. unemployment is remarkably little considering what's happened over the last 18 months. i think the difficulty facing the chancellor is that the economy is moving at different speeds. there are some bits of it which are red—hot and some bits of it which are still lagging a long way behind, and that from someone pulling these really big macro economic levers, that's a really hard position to be in. the actorjames _ really hard position to be in. the actorjames michael taylor, best actor james michael taylor, best known actorjames michael taylor, best known as gunther from france, has died at the age of 59. he had been suffering from prostate cancer. lizo mzimba takes a look back at his life. its focus was on six friends, but a seven character also made a big impression. i thought you were chandler. his infatuation in... this
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is caettin chandler. his infatuation in... this is getting rid _ chandler. his infatuation in. .. this is getting rid of— chandler. his infatuation in... this is getting rid of anything which i touched — is getting rid of anything which i touched sale. _ is getting rid of anything which i touched sale. i’ll— is getting rid of anything which i touched sale.— touched sale. i'll take it all. a recurring _ touched sale. i'll take it all. a recurring theme, _ touched sale. i'll take it all. a recurring theme, and - touched sale. i'll take it all. a recurring theme, and as - touched sale. i'll take it all. a recurring theme, and as the l recurring theme, and as the popularity of the show grew, so did the role of the man originally credited simply as coffee guy. six classes! ., ., ., ., | classes! you want me to 'oin you? i thou~ht classes! you want me to 'oin you? i thought joy — classes! you want me to 'oin you? i thought joy was t classes! you want me to 'oin you? i thought joy was here, _ classes! you want me to join you? i thought joy was here, five - classes! you want me to join you? i thought joy was here, five is - classes! you want me to join you? i thought joy was here, five is good. | thoughtjoy was here, five is good. but he had one storyline everyone remembers. he but he had one storyline everyone remembers— but he had one storyline everyone remembers. he was obsessed with rachel, remembers. he was obsessed with rachel. loved _ remembers. he was obsessed with rachel, loved her, _ remembers. he was obsessed with rachel, loved her, headed - remembers. he was obsessed with rachel, loved her, headed ross. . remembers. he was obsessed with i rachel, loved her, headed ross. they kept it going for ten years. rachel, when it's your birthday? the fifth, while? �* , ., ~ ., when it's your birthday? the fifth, while? �* , .,~ ., , ~ while? i'm 'ust making a list. mine is while? i'mjust making a list. mine is december... _ while? i'mjust making a list. mine is december... whatever. - while? i'mjust making a list. mine l is december... whatever. villa-mac while? i'mjust making a list. mine i is december... whatever. villa-mac i did it all by — is december... whatever. villa-mac i did it all by myself! _ is december... whatever. villa-mac i did it all by myself! and _ is december... whatever. villa-mac i did it all by myself! and there - is december... whatever. villa-mac i did it all by myself! and there is - did it all by myself! and there is nobody to hug! it did it all by myself! and there is nobody to hug!— did it all by myself! and there is nobody to hug! it was so important to fans at the _ nobody to hug! it was so important to fans at the show _ nobody to hug! it was so important to fans at the show felt _ nobody to hug! it was so important to fans at the show felt they - nobody to hug! it was so important to fans at the show felt they had i to fans at the show felt they had to resolve it. in to fans at the show felt they had to resolve it. ., , , ., resolve it. in the final episode. i 'ust have resolve it. in the final episode. i just have to _ resolve it. in the final episode. i just have to tell _
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resolve it. in the final episode. i just have to tell you _ resolve it. in the final episode. i just have to tell you full- resolve it. in the final episode. i just have to tell you full stop i i just have to tell you full stop i love you. i just have to tell you full stop i love ou. ., just have to tell you full stop i love you-— just have to tell you full stop i love ou. ., , love you. i love you too. probably not in the — love you. i love you too. probably not in the same _ love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. _ love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. there - love you. i love you too. probably not in the same way. there were | not in the same way. there were other small _ not in the same way. there were other small roles. _ not in the same way. there were other small roles. an _ not in the same way. there were other small roles. an arts - other small roles. an arts journalist in sabrina the teenage which. . ., , journalist in sabrina the teenage which. . , , ., ., ., which. was this visual metaphor for the isolation — which. was this visual metaphor for the isolation of _ which. was this visual metaphor for the isolation of man _ which. was this visual metaphor for the isolation of man in _ which. was this visual metaphor for the isolation of man in a _ which. was this visual metaphor for the isolation of man in a soulless i the isolation of man in a soulless technology driven world? abs, the isolation of man in a soulless technology driven world? a therapist in medical show _ technology driven world? a therapist in medical show scrubs. _ technology driven world? a therapist in medical show scrubs. i _ technology driven world? a therapist in medical show scrubs. i think- technology driven world? a therapist in medical show scrubs. i think you | in medical show scrubs. i think you pretend everything is ok star and he was reunited with his friends cast mate matt leblanc in a bbc sitcom. is that the best you've got? but mate matt leblanc in a bbc sitcom. is that the best you've got?- is that the best you've got? but his leta will is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always _ is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be _ is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be friends. - is that the best you've got? but his legacy will always be friends. too i legacy will always be friends. too ill to appear in person, hejoined the show�*s reunion special remotely. it was the most memorable ten years of my life. honestly, i could not have imagined a better experience. all these guys were fantastic, it was just a joy to work with them. i
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felt very,

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