Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 24, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

9:00 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the facebook whistleblower frances haugen prepares to face british mps for the first public evidence she will give in europe about the social media giant. on the eve of her appearence, the whistleblower meets a social media safety campaigner whose child took her own life after viewing disturbing content. we'll get more on what we can expect to hear from the facebook whistleblower. also in the programme: colombia captures one of the world's most wanted drug lords — he now faces possible extradition to the us. labourjoins calls from doctors�* leaders and health unions for the british government to reimpose some coronavirus restrictions in england — warning that the vaccine rollout is losing momentum.
9:01 pm
we need to do more to get on top of this virus, protect our national health service and stop more stringent measures having to be introduced further down the line. ethiopia steps up its aerial bombardment in the tigray region — hitting targets in the west and north. congratulations. congratulations. and gone for $110 million — a las vegas hotel auctions off its collection of picasso artworks. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the facebook whistleblower, frances haugen, will give evidence to british mps on monday on government plans for social media regulation.
9:02 pm
this will be the american data scientist's first public evidence she has given in europe regarding her experiences at the company. when frances haugen spoke to the us congress earlier this month, she claimed facebook consistently chose to maximize its growth rather than implement safeguards on its platforms. she also said... the mental health impact of social media on children is something she's also talked about. she said the company's apps harmed children. since arriving in the uk, frances haugen has met the campaigner, ian russell. his 14—year—old daughter, molly, took her own life after viewing disturbing content on instagram, which is owned by facebook. angus crawford has more. she's the former facebook insider who revealed its most closely guarded secrets.
9:03 pm
14—year—old molly russell... he's the father who lost his daughter to suicide. now campaigning to protect other children online. nice to meet you. today they met for the first time. so what do you think the impact of molly's story was on instagram as a platform and how it approaches safety? facebook is full of kind, conscientious, well—meaning people. the real question is around, can we as a public change the incentives such that it makes more sense for facebook to invest more money in safety on instagram? so i'm sure that molly's... the experience that molly had, caused them to look at these questions more. at the same time, we need way more invested in this, because we need to make more progress faster. one of the things that lead us to find out more about molly was some notes that she'd left that were found after she died. and in one of them she wrote, "i keep a lot to myself and it
9:04 pm
keeps building up inside. you get addicted to it and you don't even realise you've spun out of control. you're living in a trap, in a circle." what's so dangerous about having children under the age of 16, under the age of 18, using systems like instagram, is that facebook�*s own research shows that a startlingly high fraction of them exhibit what is known as "problematic use," which means that they can't regulate their own usage of the product. it's kind of like cigarettes in that way. and they know it's hurting their physical health, their schoolwork or their employment. as time goes on, as a parent bereaved by the suicide of his 14—year—old, i look at a huge corporation with massive resources and say, there must be more you can be doing. unquestionably facebook could be investing more resources in making the platforms safer. they have made a series of choices to prioritise profits over people. what do you think regulators can do to persuade those big, big tech companies to behave differently?
9:05 pm
i think on the most basic level, right now there is no company in the world that has as much power as facebook and as little transparency. frances, thank you so much. facebook believes frances haugen�*s evidence gives "a false picture of the company... which cares deeply about safety... doesn't allow material promoting self harm... and has an industry—leading standard for transparency." a whistle—blower and a campaigner with one aim — to make social media a safer place. angus crawford, bbc news. i'm joined now by charles arthur, who is a technologyjournalist and the author of "social warming: the dangerous and polarising effects of social media". good to have you with us. we heard about from frances haugen when she testified to us congress, what will learn when she gives evidence to the british lawmakers tomorrow? i learn when she gives evidence to the british lawmakers tomorrow? i expect it's auoin to british lawmakers tomorrow? i expect it's going to be _ british lawmakers tomorrow? i expect it's going to be very — british lawmakers tomorrow? i expect it's going to be very much _ british lawmakers tomorrow? i expect it's going to be very much the - british lawmakers tomorrow? i expect it's going to be very much the same . it's going to be very much the same sort of things that the questions
9:06 pm
that the mps will hamper her will tend to be very much the same as they had in the us. ? mark mps will have for her. but what she said there was significant, she was talking about it being like cigarettes, this is like facebook�*s tobacco man, this is the point where it is unable to stop the discussion which is that it is having a bad effect on people. even if facebook doesn't intend that it is having that effect and that's what i said in my book, nobody meant for this to happen but this is what has happened. and facebook can say, well, lots of teens get benefits from instagram by the fact is it's own research which is swimming inside the company for huge amounts of research shows that about a third of research shows that about a third of them don't get to benefit from instagram, they get the sad ? but they get sad and upset. this is the challenge it has, how does facebook and to some extent twitter and tiktok, all the social media
9:07 pm
companies, how to fix themselves so they don't have a bad effect on society even while they bring us the benefits they can bring? it is society even while they bring us the benefits they can bring?— benefits they can bring? it is all ve well benefits they can bring? it is all very well learning _ benefits they can bring? it is all very well learning about - benefits they can bring? it is all very well learning about the - very well learning about the inner workings and failings and the criticisms but how much will actually change as a result of evidence sessions like the one that's happening on monday? weill. that's happening on monday? well, this is the $64,000 _ that's happening on monday? -ii this is the $64,000 question. really what you need is regulation and i think some of the discussion that's been going around from the tory party hasn't been particularly useful, talking about stopping online abuse, well, the difficulty becomes, what are you to finding —— defining as amplification algorithms? pretty much anything that people post gets looked at by an algorithm. if you say they can't amplify, such that you are saying they have to switch the whole thing off. i think you have to go through
9:08 pm
different options. my own suggestion is that you actually regulate so they can't be bigger than a certain size. because that puts them ? might put an immediate cap on the amount of annoyance that could be caused. i of annoyance that could be caused. i suppose the difficulty when you cut a multinational social media firm is, patchwork of regulation, if you have different laws in the us to laws in the uk to the laws in europe, which standard do they meet and how do you apply that across different users to interact with each other across those international borders? ~ �* international borders? well, we've already seen _ international borders? well, we've already seen with _ international borders? well, we've already seen with instagram - international borders? well, we've already seen with instagram for i already seen with instagram for example, where it has tightened up its verification minimum ages because of what the uk did in changing the law here. so that has been rolled out in the us as well. it's quite clear that actually, if you have one country that actually matters sets a higher bar, then it
9:09 pm
will try tojump over that matters sets a higher bar, then it will try to jump over that higher bar and set the standard higher. so it's not a lost cause by any means. you can actually raise the standards these company's, you can make behave more carefully if you apply it and if you apply the pressure in markets they care about.— they care about. charles, many thanks. one of colombia's most wanted drug traffickers is facing extradition to the us after being captured in a major international operation. dairo antonio usuga — known as otoniel — was found hiding in thejungle near the colombia/panama border. hundreds of special forces troops from the us, uk and colombia took part in the mission. katy watson reports. this was a huge feet for the bays authorities. after years of a ten finally got him. the head of a powerful criminal organisation involved in a long list of activities from drug and people
9:10 pm
trafficking, illegal gold mining to extortion. the golf clan is a heavily armed and dangerous gang and this is the man at the top. otoniel was a very wanted man. columbia had offered a reward of $800,000 for information on his whereabouts. the us had a $5 million bounty on his head too. but despite his notoriety, this is a country where drug lords can sometimes be seen as celebrities. tories couldn't resist documenting this big moment. translation: die documenting this big moment. translation:— documenting this big moment. translation: , ., ., ~ translation: die ro antonio bosuku, known as otoniel, _ translation: die ro antonio bosuku, known as otoniel, has _ translation: die ro antonio bosuku, known as otoniel, has been _ translation: die ro antonio bosuku, known as otoniel, has been captured. | known as otoniel, has been captured. this is the biggest blow against drug trafficking in our country this century. this is only comparable to the fall of pablo escobar in the 19905. ., ., , , ., 19905. otoniel was captured in a rural hideout _ 19905. otoniel was captured in a rural hideout in _ 19905. otoniel was captured in a rural hideout in the _ 19905. otoniel was captured in a rural hideout in the north-west l 19905. otoniel was captured in a | rural hideout in the north-west of rural hideout in the north—west of the country. close to the border with panama. it was an operation
9:11 pm
involving 500 soldiers, 22 helicopters, and one policeman was killed. translation: we helicopters, and one policeman was killed. translation:— helicopters, and one policeman was killed. translation: we were clear he was moving _ killed. translation: we were clear he was moving with _ killed. translation: we were clear he was moving with security - killed. translation: we were clear he was moving with security teams l he was moving with security teams separated by one to three kilometres each. we began an important satellite work against him with agencies from the united states and the united kingdom where with each movement to trace analysts, with communications, more than 50 experts in signal intelligence permanently covering that area with an exact coverage that allowed us to indicate were his movements were, to get him from his hiding place.— from his hiding place. otonielfaces cocaine trafficking _ from his hiding place. otonielfaces cocaine trafficking charges - from his hiding place. otonielfaces cocaine trafficking charges as - from his hiding place. otonielfaces cocaine trafficking charges as well. cocaine trafficking charges as well as the recruitment of children. indicted in the us in 2009, he also faces extradition proceedings that could eventually see him face justice in new york. katy watson, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to toby muse — the author of kilo, a book about the colombian drug cartels.
9:12 pm
certainly at a report we just heard said, the government is trying to paint this as the capture equivalent to, the killing of pablo escobar, which was around 30 years ago. and certainly otoniel is certainly the largest drug trafficker in colombia if not south america. but the question is, how much will this impact the cocaine trade because many people think it will not at all. what we have seen in the past is when these cartels are taken down, often there is a period of infighting in the cartel, or there could be fighting with other organisations as they try to take over the land in the businesses that used to belong to attorney. but sooner or later, someone tends to replace these cartels and that has been a problem with this strategy. remember, we're celebrating the 50th year of the war on drugs since richard nixon announced it, and it keeps on being this focus on taking
9:13 pm
down a cap hour but every time, they get replaced and that is what we will see in the next six months or a year. i will see in the next six months or a ear, , , , ., , will see in the next six months or a ear. , year. i suppose the point you make there is that _ year. i suppose the point you make there is that people _ year. i suppose the point you make there is that people will— year. i suppose the point you make there is that people will fill- year. i suppose the point you make there is that people will fill that - there is that people will fill that vacuum. is there any way of stopping that from happening? the vacuum. is there any way of stopping that from happening?— that from happening? the colombian covernment that from happening? the colombian government has _ that from happening? the colombian government has tried _ that from happening? the colombian government has tried or _ that from happening? the colombian government has tried or perhaps - government has tried or perhaps hasn't tried hard enough, but so far hasn't tried hard enough, but so far has been unsuccessful. we are talking about these cartels and these kind of, the weird strange animal of what this cartel is, the organisation otoniel was leading. how strange this hybrid was, it is notjust how strange this hybrid was, it is not just a how strange this hybrid was, it is notjust a regular cocaine cartel like once we have seen like with pablo escobar, this was something different, it was this armed militia with the men under his command wearing uniforms, they at least pretended to have an ideology. they seemed to kind of tend towards far right politics when there was politics involved, they were known
9:14 pm
to kill social leaders, social activists, environmental activists, but really often the main focus of the group was to export cocaine. on the group was to export cocaine. on the problem is, where these groups thrive, there is a lack of the colombian state, the colombian state is unable to impose a minimum of law and order in these zones. so these types of groups become the de facto state, they are the ones who impose order on some sort of security and order on some sort of security and order in these zones. until the government can really take control of this entire country, i feel we are going to keep seeing these new groups spring up. the opposition labour party has urged the british government to introduce its �*plan b' for tackling covid in england. that would mean mandatory mask wearing in some public places and working from home — steps recommended by some scientists. doctors�* leaders and health unions have also called for those. and labour warned the vaccination programme was "stalling". but the government has ruled out further measures for now. here's our health correspondent, jim reed.
9:15 pm
this, say the government, is our best line of defence against covid this winter. you're all boosted. i'm all boosted up. on the wirral this weekend, they're giving third booster jabs to the over—50s and other vulnerable groups. today labour added to calls from some doctors groups for what's called plan b in england — wider mask—wearing, vaccine passports and more working from home. the chancellor, though, said there is no immediate need for that. although the winter was always going to be challenging for a combination of different factors, the booster roll—out should give us the protection we need and there is a fallback, there is a plan b, if we need it. the number of people in hospital with covid in england has been rising over the last fortnight, but is no higher now than it was back in mid—september and is well below the level seen at the start of the year. but the nhs is also facing other pressures as the weather gets colder. in september, just 75% of people
9:16 pm
going to a&e in england were seen within four hours, the lowest figure on record. and hospitals in scotland, wales and northern ireland are facing very similar pressure. some emergency doctors on the front line are warning they are already struggling to cope. when i go into start seeing patients, you just have this enormously long queue of people who have been waiting a long time. at busy times of the day you find you've got ambulances outside your emergency department who can't off—load because your emergency departement is full, because your hospital is full. you do feel slightly overwhelmed and a little bit helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland have had stricter covid rules than england for some time. the government says its focus is currently on rolling out more vaccines to teenagers along with those booster doses to over—50s but speaking today one government adviser said other measures would be needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow tests,
9:17 pm
avoiding contact with large numbers of people in enclosed spaces, using masks. all of those things now need to happen if we are going to stop this rise and get things under control soon enough to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter. that is the concern — that covid, flu and other pressures make the situation unsustainable for the nhs this winter. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation but for the moment the data does not justify changing the rules. jim reed, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the facebook whistleblower frances haugen prepares to face british mps on monday for the first public evidence she will give in europe on her experiences at the social media giant. colombia captures one of the world's most wanted drug lords — he now faces possible extradition to the us.
9:18 pm
sport — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's marc edwards. liverpool have thrashed manchester united 5— 04 the biggest ever victory at old trafford. liverpool remain the only side in the premier league who are unbeaten in its window piles pressure on the united head coach, ole gunnar solskjaer who covered his darkest day as a manager. the visitors emphasised the vast gulf between the sides in brutalfashion. mohamed salah brutal fashion. mohamed salah predictably brutalfashion. mohamed salah predictably the main tormentor, claiming a hat—trick. it also means he's scored for the 10th successive game but there were also goals for jota and naby keita while half—time substitute paul pogba was sent off on the hour mark in a chasing debut for united. liverpool, though, second, one point of league leaders chelsea. we second, one point of league leaders chelsea. ~ . , , chelsea. we were incredibly
9:19 pm
clinical. really _ chelsea. we were incredibly clinical. really good - chelsea. we were incredibly clinical. really good stuff. chelsea. we were incredibly l clinical. really good stuff high chelsea. we were incredibly - clinical. really good stuff high on the pitch and we put them under pressure with our higher price. it was phenomenal to be honest. as the opponent, you cannot really, like, do anything. we were greedy in all challenges. that's what it was 4—0 at half—time. challenges. that's what it was 4-0 at half-time— at half-time. sad, disappointed, an: of at half-time. sad, disappointed, angry of course- _ at half-time. sad, disappointed, angry of course. my _ at half-time. sad, disappointed, angry of course. my emotions i at half-time. sad, disappointed, - angry of course. my emotions doesn't matter— angry of course. my emotions doesn't matter here _ angry of course. my emotions doesn't matter here now. apart from what do we do _ matter here now. apart from what do we do to _ matter here now. apart from what do we do to improve and make sure this doesn't _ we do to improve and make sure this doesn't happen again? human nature, it can _ doesn't happen again? human nature, it can go _ doesn't happen again? human nature, it can go either way, this, of course _ it can go either way, this, of course i_ it can go either way, this, of course. i can sulk or we can come togethen — before the game at old trafford — west ham united moved up to fourth in the premier league, with their 1—0 win over tottenham. michail antonio broke the deadlock withjust over quarter of an hour left
9:20 pm
at the london stadium with his sixth premier league goal of the season. the win makes it boss david moyes�* best start to a season since 2004 with everton. the defeat drops spurs to sixth. and leicester continued their good run of form with victory at brentford. james maddison with the winner, his first goal since february, in their 2—1 win. leicester up to 9th. real madrid beat barcelona 2—1 in the first el clasico without barca icon lionel messi david alaba opened the scoring at the camp nou, with the pick of the goals. it's his first since joining real from bayern munich in the summer. lucas vazquez scored the second with sergio aguero's first barca goal almost the last kick of the match. real have gone top of la liga, barcelona are down to eighth. pakistan hammered india by 10 wickets to claim a famous win over their great rivals at the men's t20 world cup in dubai. the first meeting between the two sides in two years. chasing 152, mohammad rizwan made
9:21 pm
an unbeaten 78 and captain babar azam 68 not out as pakistan registered their first win over india at a world cup. sri lanka beat bangladesh by five wickets in the first match of the day. bangladesh opener mohammed naim top scored for his side with 62, as they set sri lanka a target of 172. charith asalanka hit 5 sixes as he smashed 80 not out with sri lanka reached their target with seven balls to spare. a quick update on formula one. you can follow the latest on the bbc sport website and app. that's all the sport for now. the ethiopian government says it's launched two air strikes on rebel positions in the west and north of the tigray region — expanding the range of its aerial bombardments. it said the targets were facilities used by the tigray people's liberation front for training and manufacturing military equipment. they are in mai tsebri, west of the regional capital mekelle, as well as in adwa in the north.
9:22 pm
a spokesperson for the rebel group denied that the training centres existed. the bbc�*s kalkidan yibeltal reports from addis ababa. but the government and rebel forces have confirmed they have been two rounds of air strikes on the western part of tigray as well as in the middle around the historic town of adwa. details are still sketchy and we don't know whether there are casualties or not. but the government is saying they have bombarded these places that have been used by the rebel forces for training and military command and things like that. but rebel forces are saying these are just civilian targets, one of them in the western front in a place called mai tsebri was a local hospital while the other one around adwa was manufacturing plant for garments. but this comes
9:23 pm
as bombardments are being expanded to other areas. over the past week, the airstrikes focused on the regional capital of mekelle and now we are seeing there happening outside, suggesting that all these airstrikes might be like the word self expanding to other areas as well. the husband of nazanin zaghari ratcliffe has started his second hunger strike to try to secure her return to the uk from iran. she's been detained since 2016, initially accused of breaching national security. last week, she lost an appeal against a second conviction, for spreading propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard staged his first hunger strike two years ago, which helped lead to the return of their daughter gabriella, who'd been travelling with her mother in iran when she was arrested. the uk's largest supermarket chain, tesco, says an attempt to hack its computer systems has caused problems with its website and app.
9:24 pm
shoppers have been unable to book deliveries, or amend existing orders for more than 24 hours. tesco says it's working hard to restore services. a collection of artworks by picasso has been auctioned off by a hotel in las vegas where they've been displayed for the past twenty years. until now, they were the centrepiece of the picasso restaurant at the hotel on the las vegas strip. but the hotel's owner, mgm, decided to sell off the works. catherine karelli reports. it was the smallest piece in the sale, but the star of the show. this 1938 portrait of picasso's muse and lover fetched more than $40 million. this was one of the other highlights of the auction, a 1969 painting, one of the artist's later works. it is part of a wider move by mgm resorts to make its global collection more diverse and inclusive. the auction of picasso's work was hosted by sotheby�*s and held
9:25 pm
at the bellagio hotel in las vegas. it brought in nearly $109 million. several of the 11 pieces have been on display at the las vegas hotel for years. but now the hotel says it wants to shift its focus and showcase more works by women, people of colour, lgbtq artists and those with disabilities. i've gotten the sense there is a change in management of focus, las vegas likes to reinvent itself every ten years, so there is always this new invention on what the direction will be. over the past year american museums and art galleries have been working to broaden their collections. it is part of a wider cultural reckoning over racism in the us that started in 2020. this marks the start of a new chapter in the art world. but how it will play out remains to be seen. catherine karelli, bbc news.
9:26 pm
plenty more on the website and the bbc news app. thanks for watching. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. it was a pretty decent day across much of the east and southeast of the country. quite a bit of sunshine around and it was also pretty mild for the time of year, temperatures got close to 17 c in one or two spots. into monday it's going to be a fairly unsettled one with sunshine and showers. that's because this area of low pressure which is slowly pushing its way eastwards to the north of the uk, that's going to bring quite a few showers into northern and western parts to end sunday. but we are all in this fairly mild air you can see here from the yellows and the orange colours. and it's going to stick with us for much of this upcoming week. through this evening and overnight we lose that weak weather front, it should take the cloud and showery bursts of rain with it. many places seeing clear skies but there will these showers rattling in to western areas, some heavy and frequent for the north and west of scotland.
9:27 pm
it's here will it will be breeziest too. temperatures may be a degree or so down on previous night, around 8 for england and wales is another pretty mild night, ten or 11 c. so for monday we start out fairly mild, quite breezy, a lot of sunshine around but these showers from the word go will be affecting southern and western areas. again, they could turn often quite heavy in places. the odd one just getting towards eastern scotland and eastern england but here i think generally is going to be mainly dry. a blustery day to come for all areas particularly for the irish seacoast and windy for the north and the west of scotland closest to that area of low temperature—wise, a little above the seasonal norm for england and wales certainly 14 to 16 again, ten to 12 across the north. that is closer to the average. as we move out of monday and into tuesday this new area of low—pressure moves into the northwest of the uk. this is a deeperfeature, more isobars on the charts and that weather front will be more active. quite a bit of rain fall through the week to northern central
9:28 pm
and western areas with much of the south and east closer to an area of high pressure in the near continent. so actually a lot of dry and even sunny weather here. for tuesday it's certainly a southeast, northwest divide and heavy rain at times across the north and west. strongest of the winds here too, best of the sunshine further south. but very mild indeed, even across the north could see 17 in some of the warmer spots, maybe 18 couldn't be ruled out as well. similar story for wednesday and into thursday. most of the rain in the north of the west where it will be windiest. tending to stay dry across the south in the east and it will be mild or very mild for many of us.
9:29 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: labourjoins calls from doctors' leaders and health unions for the government to reimpose some
9:30 pm
coronavirus restrictions in england, warning that the vaccine rollout is losing traction. we need to do more to get on top of this virus, protect our national health service and stop more stringent measures having to be introduced further down the line. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in "infrastructure, innovation and skills" as the economy recovers from the pandemic. strong investment in public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving businesses confidence, and then supporting working families. eight people have been arrested in brentwood, in essex, after the deaths of two teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. britain's biggest supermarket chain apologises after its computer systems were hacked, affecting millions of online shoppers. and a 5—0 win at old trafford for liverpool, as mo salah scores a hat—trick in their biggest ever away win at manchester united.

15 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on