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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 24, 2021 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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this is bbc news the headlines at eight. labourjoins calls from doctors�* leaders and health unions for the government to reimpose some coronavirus restrictions in england — warning that the vaccine rollout is losing traction. we need to do more to get on top of this virus, protect our national health service and stop more stringent measures of being having to be introduced further down the line. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* as the economy recovers from the pandemic. strong investment in public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving businesses confidence and then supporting working families. eight people have been arrested in brentwood, in essex, after the deaths of 2 teenage boys
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in the early hours of this morning. britain's biggest supermarket chain apologises after it's computer systems were hacked, affecting millions of online shoppers. and a five—nil win at old trafford for liverpool as mo salah scores a hat—trick in their biggest ever away win at manchester united. labour has urged the government to introduce its �*plan b�* for tackling covid in england — increasing pressure on ministers following similar pleas by doctors�* leaders and health unions. the shadow chancellor,
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rachel reeves, warned the vaccination programme was "stalling" — and encouraged downing street to follow the advice of scientists calling for more mask wearing in public places and working from home. but further measures have been ruled out for now by the chancellor, rishi sunak — who said the data did not suggest �*plan b�* was needed "immediately". here�*s our health correspondent, jim reed. this, say the government, is our best line of defence against covid this winter. you�*re all boosted. i'm all boosted up. on the wirral this weekend, they�*re giving third booster jabs to the over—50s and other vulnerable groups. today labour added to calls from some doctors groups for what�*s called plan b in england — wider mask—wearing, vaccine passports and more working from home. the chancellor, though, said there is no immediate need for that. although the winter was always going to be challenging
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for a combination of different factors, the booster roll—out should give us the protection we need and there is a fallback, there is a plan b, if we need it. the number of people in hospital with covid in england has been rising over the last fortnight, but is no higher now than it was back in mid—september and is well below the level seen at the start of the year. but the nhs is also facing other pressures as the weather gets colder. in september, just 75% of people going to a&e in england were seen within four hours, the lowest figure on record. and hospitals in scotland, wales and northern ireland are facing very similar pressure. some emergency doctors on the front line are warning they are already struggling to cope. when i go into start seeing patients, you just have this enormously long queue of people who have been waiting a long time. at busy times of the day you find you�*ve got ambulances outside your emergency department who can�*t off—load because your
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emergency departement is full, because your hospital is full. you do feel slightly overwhelmed and a little bit helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland have had stricter covid rules than england for some time. the government says its focus is currently on rolling out more vaccines to teenagers along with those booster doses to over—50s but speaking today one government adviser said other measures would be needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow tests, avoiding contact with large numbers of people in enclosed spaces, using masks. all of those things now need to happen if we are going to stop this rise and get things under control soon enough to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter. that is the concern — that covid, flu and other pressures make the situation unsustainable for the nhs this winter. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation but for the moment the data does not justify changing the rules. jim reed, bbc news.
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asjim mentioned hospital pressures are being felt around the uk. last month, just 60% of people going into a and e in northern ireland were seen within 4 hours — a significantly lower proportion than elswhere in the uk. the british medical association in northern ireland says not enough people have been vaccinated. from belfast, mark simpson reports. the health services facing another winter with the pandemic. and it seems already is proving difficult. our hospitals are really struggling to cope and at this time of the year to be running at 107% in our hospitals across northern ireland is just unheard of. those of the sort of things you would see in late december, early january.
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we are nowhere near that. that means we have more patients in bed. absolutely. that�*s 7% extra people who have no bed. so where are they? they are basically unfortunately in the corridors in a very busy in a&e departments. some believe that covid restrictions in northern ireland are being relaxed too soon. we have the potential on halloween night for a super spreader event for young people who have not been vaccinated yet. that will only add pressures to our health system. if we can invest in out they were have to help help. the rules around covid are being kept under constant review as ministers way up the medical as well as the economic pressures. in the past three days the department of health has reported the deaths of 22 people who�*d recently tested positive for the virus. as winter begins the pandemic remains and there is still no end in sight. earlier i spoke with paul turner, a paramedic and gmb
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union deputy branch secretary for the northwest ambulance service. i think it�*s fair to say it�*s probably one of the worst winters we�*ve ever experienced. with the amount of calls coming in and the lack of resources . we�*ve got across the country different ambulance services reporting different things. we tend to work 7— seven to give you an idea of what sort of finish times we do. in 19:45 to one particular we have 360 emergency calls outstanding. because of those delays, those ambulances still wait at hospitals because they can�*t clear. that means the day crew or the night crew can�*t take over. in this case the night crew, those brought back empty waiting for the night crew to jump on but that is 360 calls outstanding in one particular ambulance services. on the other end 165 calls outstanding at eight o�*clock in the morning.
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that�*s significant amount of calls, the crews are out there we are getting battered from pillar to post or nothing changes and i can�*t see anything changing in the future. just to go back a little bit, the reason that you are having this backlog is what exactly? not enough people, not enough resources? there�*s not enough resources. the easiest way to describe it is, the government are underfunding the nhs although they�*re telling everyone and the media is very good getting it out there that is people in the nhs for extra money. the that money is not recovered and therefore we can�*t redeploy people into those gaps. if the government added to most that i give you what do enact the nhs £100 million eperience a lot of that goes to private providers. because you cannot grow individual members. for instance if it�*s 100,000,000, what are the ambulance in nhs service is going to do with back was that?
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to market to get 100,000,000 again in the future. therefore they don�*t employ the staff that has to go out to agencies. that�*s where the big issue is, this money needs to be recovered, they need to properly fund the nhs and stop telling lies. because that�*s all it is. we are not funding the nhs properly and we are massively under resourced. it would take a particular ambulance service, if you asked them how many staff you�*ve got they would tell you they are maybe —1 or two. however if you went on to demand that 399 staff short. 0n—demand. the government�*s latest coronavirus figures show, there were 39,962 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average 46,920 new cases were reported per day in the last week. there were 8,238 people
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in hospital with covid, as of thursday 72 deaths were reported, that�*s of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 124 deaths were announced every day. and we�*ll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow�*s front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are political commentator, faiza shaheen and former conservative advisor, mo hussein. the chancellor, rushi sunak, says he�*ll deliver a budget on wednesday, that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills,�* to grow the british economy, as it recovers from the covid pandemic. he told the bbc, there�*d be a boost for the nhs and schools,
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as well as money for services for children, policing and fighting crime. he acknowledged the rising cost of living, but says this is due to global factors, and he doesn�*t have a �*magic wand�* to make them disappear. here�*s our political correspondent, nick eardley. rishi sunak has been chancellor at a far from rishi sunak has been chancellor at a farfrom normal time. the man who spent on sums during the covid crisis. this week though he wants to set out his plans for after the pandemic. all they do not although the treasury has promised to balance a book there�*s a growing list of pledges to be delivered. fine a book there's a growing list of pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of— pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building _ pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building a _ pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building a stronger- elements of building a stronger economy is having stronger public services and you�*ll see that next week. whether it�*s the nhs which we�*ve already taken steps to recover significantly from coronavirus, children, schools, skills all of these things, policing and crime juicy investment across the board
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and public services because that�*s what we are elected to deliver it and that�*s what we are getting on in doing. and that's what we are getting on in doinu. ., , and that's what we are getting on in doinu. ., ., , doing. the government says it wants hi . her doing. the government says it wants higher productivity _ doing. the government says it wants higher productivity and _ doing. the government says it wants higher productivity and higher - higher productivity and higher wages. they be or for skills. billions two for transports and health research. commitments this weekend amounted to more than £20,000,000,000. the spending cap hasn�*t been turned off completely. yet in the treasury they are keen to get spending under control and there are concerns about inflation which could squeeze living standards and because the government a lot more when it comes to borrowing. the bulk ofthat when it comes to borrowing. the bulk of that increases _ when it comes to borrowing. the bulk of that increases down _ when it comes to borrowing. the bulk of that increases down to _ when it comes to borrowing. the bulk of that increases down to two - of that increases down to two things. one of those is the fact that as economies are reopened rather rapidly after coronavirus, thatis rather rapidly after coronavirus, that is put pressure on global supply chain. the other part of the increases very much onto energy prices. both of those factors are global factors, prices. both of those factors are globalfactors, we prices. both of those factors are global factors, we are prices. both of those factors are globalfactors, we are not prices. both of those factors are global factors, we are not alone prices. both of those factors are globalfactors, we are not alone in experiencing those problems. i don�*t have a magic wand that can make
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either of those things disappear. labour has warned of a cost—of—living crisis was up higher prices for things like food and energy. prices for things like food and ener: . ~ _ prices for things like food and ener. _ . ., prices for things like food and ener: . ~ ., ., energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills _ energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills 596 _ energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills 596 of _ energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills 596 of that - energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills 596 of that moneyl electricity bills 5% of that money goes _ electricity bills 5% of that money goes automatically to the taxman. there _ goes automatically to the taxman. there is_ goes automatically to the taxman. there is something very simple the government can do. it would be immediate and would be felt automatically on peoples bills next month_ automatically on peoples bills next month and that is to cut that rate of vat— month and that is to cut that rate of vat from 5% to 0%. month and that is to cut that rate of vat from 596 to 0%.— month and that is to cut that rate of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks _ of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in _ of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in the _ of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in the budget - of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in the budget as - of vat from 596 to 096. there will be j no blank checks in the budget as the treasury moves on from pandemic spending but there are still big promises to be filled and they won�*t be cheap. i�*ve been getting reaction from pauljohnson who�*s the director of the institute for fiscal studies. he�*s got quite a lot of money to spend on infrastructure and capital projects which could go towards his net zero and levelling up ambitions. indeed his aim is to bring backs capital spending to its highest level. national income since the early
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1980s always get a fair bit of space there. 0n the other side, on the day today spending he�*s got less wiggle room. that�*s despite quite big increases in total over the next three years. if you look at his total increase, 3% a year, that�*s much closer to the sort of numbers gordon brown was talking about in the 2,000. but he�*s spending so much of that on the national health service, he hasn�*t actually gotten off a lot left for everything else. come wednesday in terms of everyday people we are going to be keeping our eye on vat on energy bill, alcohol tax, capital gains, tax rates, student loan thresholds and minimum wage rise as well as pension. who is going to lose out, or who is likely to lose out on wednesday? there�*s a lot of pressure on the chancellor, isn�*t there? i don�*t think there will be any big losers.
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don�*t forget this year is already been the biggest tax rise year since at least 1993. we�*ve had enormous tax rises announce this year, the national insurance site, the big corporation and income tax hikes announced back in march. i�*d be quite surprising if there�*s any doubt doing nothing else is going to be a big tax ours you did mention the student loan issue, it is possible to the point of which student loans are supposed to be repaid comes down. it went up just three or so years ago, we�*ve could have a sort of reverse policy and that would clearly make graduates somewhat worse off particularly as it will probably be applied to people who have already graduated. i don�*t think we get to see any increases in taxes or fuel or domestic energy. as ever, alcohol taxation could go either way. i wonder if we could take a step back and i wonder if you could paint
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a picture for us, you have the figures, this is your special area, what does the economy look like right now? it looks quite unbalanced. 0bviously we�*ve all seen the headlines about the shortage of drivers and care workers and people in other occupations and some areas is looking very, very tight. and there are big wage rises in price increases in some areas. in other areas it�*s looking much less tight. there are still areas that are not fully recovered from the pandemic where wages and jobs are not increasing it so fast. i think overall we should be pretty relieved that following the deepest recession in history, essentially the economy is bouncing back much quicker i think that most people expected. unemployment is remarkably low considering what�*s happened over the last 18 months. the difficulty facing the chancellor is the economy is moving at different speeds.
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there are some bits that are red—hot and some bits which are still lagging a long way behind. that from pulling these take macro economic is a really hard position to be in. the time is 17 minutes past eight. the headlines on bbc news... labourjoins calls from doctors�* leaders and health unions for the government to reimpose some coronavirus restrictions in england — warning that the vaccine rollout is losing traction. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* as the economy recovers from the pandemic. eight people have been arrested in brentwood, in essex, after the deaths of 2 teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. tesco has assured customers their data is safe
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after there was an attempt to hack its website and app. problems with the services were first reported yesterday morning. the supermarket has apologised. i�*ve been speaking to tesco customer chris hodgson, and technologyjournalist will guyatt. i book my shop things early in the week, philip have a basket and then fill it in towards the end of the weekend for a weekend shop. and discovered on thursday night that it probably wasn�*t working and then on friday night it definitely wasn�*t working. it said there was an error with the app. by saturday night i couldn�*t make any amendments to my order or cancel it. so that was why the app over on the website i tried calling customer service and unfortunately they weren�*t answering the telephone. they cut off the call after 15 minutes. and then i went to collect my shopping this morning the
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order that i made was fulfilled but it was only have a shop because i haven�*t had a chance to finish it and the draught when i collected it were actually aware of it being an issue until they looked and discovered it was going to be a very quiet few hours. so what have they said about helping you out, if you�*ve only got half an order, what if they set about sorting that out for you? they haven�*t said anything. i�*ve tried to contact them and the staff who are on site were extremely apologetic and said the only items it could reject were the substitutes. so the staff were as helpless as they could be at the store. but i�*ve heard nothing from tesco itself. how confident are you about continuing to shop with tesco online within the next few days, are you happy to do that? there�*s always problems with technology. but i think it�*s just annoying because you plan your weekend around it and i think we
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come to rely on online shopping and then had to go out and repeat the shopping this afternoon. i think yes, it�*s a fault that has been very annoying but it�*s the lack of contact from customer services that is been the most difficult. 0k, thank you very much for telling us in sharing your story here at bbc news. have a lovely evening. were going to speak now to a technologyjournalist. tesco, not the first time they�*ve been hit by a hack. tell us what you know about this one. we don't know very much and that's _ a lwa ys always a challenge in situations like this. i don�*t think tesco is been very good at communicating this at all. they talked about they don�*t believe peoples data has been compromised, that�*s actually quite different than saying data has been compromised. given that 6.6 million people use this app there are a lot of people like chris right now all over the uk who are concerned and
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they haven�*t been able to get any information from customer services. this is a sign of the times. when a platform or a service so well used goes down. the automatic concern goes down. the automatic concern goes to, are my card details, my personal information safe? then we sometimes seldom hear what caused these outages. i think it�*s actually time for there to be some kind of universal language for wendy�*s incidents happen. companies delay telling people what the outcome was and people often get very concerned to whether personal information has been compromised. the? to whether personal information has been compromised.— been compromised. they were very cuick been compromised. they were very . uick to been compromised. they were very quick to reassure _ been compromised. they were very quick to reassure people _ been compromised. they were very quick to reassure people that - been compromised. they were very quick to reassure people that the i quick to reassure people that the was of essay. we talk about tesco it�*s notjust a supermarket, it�*s got its financial arm, has in a? i�*m sure they also have mobile phones, there is a lot of data being held there. would you be confident to hear tesco say, "no, your data is
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all fine. ” hear tesco say, "no, your data is all fine. hear tesco say, "no, your data is allfine. hear tesco say, "no, your data is all fine. i. , hear tesco say, "no, your data is allfine. , ., , ., ., all fine. "? do you believe any data was last there _ all fine. "? do you believe any data was last there is _ all fine. "? do you believe any data was last there is a _ all fine. "? do you believe any data was last there is a cast-iron - was last there is a cast—iron assures that there is no data loss? i certainly don�*t. as somebody who works in data and communication i think they need to come out clearly and say no data has been lost. it�*s and say no data has been lost. it�*s a big concern here. tesco does have got millions of customers 6.6 million people use the app, debate made £6,000,000,000 last year through online shopping alone. there�*s a lot of concern here. one of the theories floating around on the internet if this was some kind of attack on tesco there�*s been a number of organisations in food distribution that have been targeted by ransom where attacks over the last six months to a year. essentially locking up their systems and making them pay ransom in order to reopen. that doesn�*t appear to have happened with tesco but it�*s clear that sites like tesco and other services that so many of us rely on and also tesco don�*t want the reputation of damage of not
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working are going to be increasingly targeted by hackers and unscrupulous groups or do exactly this kind of stuff. there�*s money to be made in causing massive disruption, unfortunately. be that take our data or stop the service working, that�*s the nightmare that tesco or any other large retailer would not want. police in essex say they�*re keeping an open mind as to the motive behind the killing of two teenage boys in brentwood. officers were called to an address in brentwood early this morning and found three people with injuries, two of whom later died. detectives investigating the deaths have arrested eight people on suspicion of murder. at a press conference this afternoon, essex police said they didn�*t believe there was any wider threat to the public. we responded to the incident in regency court brentwood at around 1:30 am this morning.
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officers were on scene within three minutes and found three people had been injured during a disturbance. sadly, despite the efforts of medics two teenage boys have now died. thierfamilies being supported by our specialist officers from essex police. a third victim was treated for injuries which are now confirmed as neither life—threatening or life—changing. detectives are working to establish how the boys died and a forensic postmortem examination will be carried out to determine the cause of death. we�*ve arrested eight men on suspicion of murder. they all remain in custody at this time. this is a fast—moving investigation and we won�*t be speculating on the circumstances surrounding the incident. we remain open—minded as to what has occurred. what i can say is that investigations so far suggest
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that this is an isolated incident and there is no wider threat to the brentwood community. we would like to appeal to anyone who was in the crown street area of brentwood between 10pm last night and 5am this morning who witnessed any suspicious behaviour between that timeframe. the husband of nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, has started his second hunger strike, to try to secure her return to the uk from iran. she�*s been detained since 2016, initially accused of breaching national security. last week, she lost an appeal against a second conviction, for spreading propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard, staged his first hunger strike 2 years ago, which helped lead to the return of their daughter gabriella, who�*d been travelling with her mother, in iran when she was arrested. i worry, with the latest news we�*ve
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had with nazanin�*s case, that she�*s going to be thrown back in prison any time soon. so i wanted to make an escalation that would get the attention of the british government, but also, in the end, we do need the british to move. the bbc has learned that 18 months after the government announced a £1 billion scheme, to help tower block owners remove flammable cladding from their homes, funds so far have been allocated to less than a third of nearly 700 applications processed so far. the building safety fund, was one of the schemes set up in the wake of the grenfell tower tragedy, covering cladding of wood and other flammable laminates. but as sarah corker reports, in the few buildings where remedial work has begun, there are fresh problems. imagine having to live inside this — your home wrapped in plastic sheeting for months on end, windows that barely open, no way to see out.
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here you are, sarah, middle of the day, no natural light. jim lives on the first floor at islington gates, here in birmingham city centre. and this is the limited air we can get into the flat. this is the view for the next year that you�*ve got? yeah, 12 months of being depressed. there is relief that the combustible cladding is being removed, but government funding won�*t cover the full cost of almost £9 million. it means leaseholders need to find more than 1 million between them. that�*s at least £20,000 each. what�*s it like living in this box? you haven�*t got a clue what�*s happening outside. it affects you mentally, it makes you depressed. it makes you very stressed. the stress is worse knowing you�*ve got to pay for it, and you�*ve got to pay for the privilege of living in a dark, dull box. in my case, you know, £20,000. and i grind my teeth. you feel like you're suffocating. just next door, liz and rodriguez
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are renting this one—bed flat. they not only have to cope with the building work, but there�*s a serious damp and mould problem, too. it's horrible. i ~~ - i really hate living here now, to be honest with you. and, er, ifeel embarrassed. i don't want to bring my friends here, i don't want to bring my family here, because i've got a six—year—old niece who we absolutely adore and i don't want her here because i don't want her to be breathing in the same stuff that's making me feel so poorly. liz says her asthma has been getting progressively worse. this is footage from a neighbouring flat. with the external cladding removed, this is what can happen when it rains. hundreds of people here say they face a miserable winter living on a building site, and this is one street in one city. but across the country, we�*re going to be seeing much more of this in the months and years ahead. this tower in ipswich has been like this for five months.
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it�*s a similar picture here in london. and these living conditions are worrying health professionals. they�*re stuck there, with all the kind of stresses of the physical environment, the financial worries and the uncertainty about when this is going to end. so we�*re going to see, i think, quite serious mental health issues. back in the midlands, the leaseholder board overseeing this work said it�*s monitoring issues closely to minimise discomfort. the government told us it�*s unacceptable people are facing these bills, and building owners must make buildings safe, without passing on costs. but forjim and his neighbours, life behind the plastic is hard to bear. sarah corker, bbc news, in birmingham. chart—topping musician ed sheeran says he is self—isolating after testing positive for covid—19. the announcement comes less than a week before the release of his new album, �*equals�*. in a post on his instagram page,
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the singer says that he will continue to give planned interviews and performances from home while he isolates. last week he performed in london as part of the inaugural earthshot prize awards, hosted by the duke and duchess of cambridge. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with stav danos. hello. whether it�*s cloudy or dry and bright, today was a very mild one. temperatures in the mid teens for many of us. monday looks like one of sunshine and showers, it will be quite windy but once again fairly mild particularly with low pressure pushing into towards the north of the uk that can bring lots of showers this evening and overnight to northern and western parts of the of the country, the heavier one. if you�*re into eastern side much of the east will tend to stay dry with lengthy clear spells. another mild night to come for most of us double figures and places
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for england and wales. we start breezy, mild some sunshine around for monday morning.

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