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tv   Climate Change  BBC News  October 24, 2021 7:30pm-7:46pm BST

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this evening and overnight showers this evening and overnight to northern and western parts of the of the country, the heavier one. if you're into eastern side much of the east will tend to stay dry with lengthy clear spells. another mild not to come for most of us double figures and places for england and wales. we start breezy, mild some sunshine around for monday morning. lots of showers from the word go across western areas, these will become a lot more widespread project lake, scotland, northern ireland, perhaps england and wales and developing across southern england as well. eastern parts will tend to stay driest for so a few showers will get in here and it's going to be a blustery day wherever you are in a very mild particularly across the south.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. labourjoins calls from doctors' leaders and health unions for the government to reimpose some coronavirus restrictions in england — warning that the vaccine rollout
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is losing traction. we need to do more to get on top of this virus can get protectorate national health service and prevent more stringent measures from having to be introduced on the line. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills' as the economy recovers from the pandemic. also tonight... eight people have been arrested in brentwood, in essex, after the deaths of 2 teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. and a five—nil win at old trafford for liverpool as mo salah scores a hat—trick in their biggest ever away win at manchester united. now on bbc news, former prime minister tony blair talks to the bbc s climate editor
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justin rowlatt about the challenges facing the world s politicians at cop26. thank you for doing this interview. can i start off with a really big question? do you think the road understands the scale of the climate challenge was electing road does understand but the difficulty is to work out the practical steps that meet the challenge adequately. but i don't think there's any shortage of a political desire or well in some countries may be, but overall globally, i think the science is clear, people accepted. i think how, in practical terms, do we get to where we are from or we need to be? why is this such a problem? we are on the 26th we have not come anywhere near resolving it. it is difficult because _ anywhere near resolving it. it 3 difficult because the road is grown
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up difficult because the road is grown up developing with carbon emissions industrialisation happens in a way that has been driven by carbon and other world has to change and for leaders who have to run countries and fight and win elections, the scale of the change is enormous. it can be done and again, and general terms, the public is willing to to be done. but how you put this together in the most practical way politically is incredibly difficult. because on the one hand, developed countries are making significant strides, but they've got to do more but on the other hand, if the developing world simply makes up for the omissions being reduced in the developed world, then we are no better off as a planet. and so, how to structure the measures you're going to take, how you agree what is fair and going to take, how you agree what is fairand unfair but going to take, how you agree what is fair and unfair but is effective and needs to be done, this is a really difficult politics. and there are costs associated with
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this and it's very tricky we have every nation in the world sitting at the table. ~ ,,., , , the table. absolutely, but the claimant does _ the table. absolutely, but the claimant does not _ the table. absolutely, but the claimant does not care - the table. absolutely, but the claimant does not care where | the table. absolutely, but the i claimant does not care where the emissions come from for subject of a solution that is fair otherwise you have to take the measures that are necessary and you've got to make sure the developed world is bearing the principal burden for making these changes but it has to be done in a way in which you don't end up in a way in which you don't end up in a situation where the developing world this makes up for the emissions that the developed world has cut. ., , u, , , has cut. how significant is this meeting. _ has cut. how significant is this meeting, com? _ has cut. how significant is this meeting, com? |_ has cut. how significant is this meeting, com? i think- has cut. how significant is this meeting, com? i think this| has cut. how significant is this i meeting, cop26? i think this one has cut. how significant is this - meeting, cop26? i think this one was siunificant meeting, cop26? i think this one was significant climate _ meeting, cop26? i think this one was significant climate meeting _ meeting, cop26? i think this one was significant climate meeting since - significant climate meeting since the very beginning, since the rio summit. and that is because we are at an inflection point and we have about three major challenges. the first is the reality is that without significant action from china and
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the developing world as well is we have no chance of meeting 2 , never mind 1.5, but it is important for the developed world to be taking accelerated action because that is a spur to china and india and the rest of southeast asia and the developing world to make the changes necessary. in the next decade is crucial. you can invest and we should invest in the technologies of the 2030 and the 2004 these are going to be transformative. but the next decade requires really radical measures and ready to make sure that we've got any chance of hitting the targets of 2030 and i think, if i was handling this negotiation, i do a lot of focus on this. what are the practical measures that are going to allow you to make these changes and identify the changes and make them over the next decade? because that
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is going to be most difficult to see. ~ ., ., _, is going to be most difficult to see. ~ ., ., ., . , is going to be most difficult to see. ., ., ., . , ., see. what would your advice be to boris johnson _ see. what would your advice be to boris johnson and _ see. what would your advice be to boris johnson and others - see. what would your advice be to boris johnson and others were - see. what would your advice be to l boris johnson and others were going borisjohnson and others were going to be overseeing these negotiations? you have to focus on practical measures. let me give some examples of what i mean by that. . you need to accelerate the development and transport of electric vehicles, you need to be doing energy efficiency measures and we need to be making sure that we are investing more and renewables and we need to make sure that countries can switch from coal and oil because these are the two big sources of emissions and your capturing the methane escape from oil and gas, all of these things are practical set of measures and the required things like how do you mobilise the large amount of private
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capital, notjust government capital but private capital and an initiative that means you're able to give countries the ability, the means of drawing sustainably. not just in the developed world but in the developing world. these, i would also focus on a lot of the practical things that need to come out of the facility can all see the effects of climate change and the effects of climate change and the effects of climate change and the effects of climate change like places like india and china are going to be traumatic. 0r australia. this is all about understanding that even though the challenges immense. there really is not an alternative to dealing with this. since i've left office, i don't advise people to do things in office, but i would not be doing. it's easy to stand on the side and this is a really tricky negotiation but a gift sure those countries how we can help with this process and thatis we can help with this process and that is why things around the finances of different ways of doing
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things are really important. just briefl , things are really important. just briefly, deforestation in brazil. we know that the brazilian president, there has to be some sort of compensation for this because otherwise, we are forgoing an economic opportunity on behalf of the world. find economic opportunity on behalf of the world. �* , ., economic opportunity on behalf of the world. �* , . , , , the world. and these are the types of thin . s the world. and these are the types of things you _ the world. and these are the types of things you have _ the world. and these are the types of things you have to _ the world. and these are the types of things you have to look - the world. and these are the types of things you have to look at very l of things you have to look at very carefully because of course these countries of a point in saying historically, you guys created the problem. in the end, the claimant doesn't really care about who's responsible. we should care who's responsible. we should care who's responsible been in the end, have to do with the problem. and i am very sympathetic when a leader steps forward and says support the ambition but i need help to get there. i am less than they say, we don't even show the ambition. you see my peeple _ don't even show the ambition. you see my people say this is all blah blah blah, build back better, she says? you see how she feels? we are
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nowhere near there, guys. we says? you see how she feels? we are nowhere near there, guys.— nowhere near there, guys. we are a lot further along _ nowhere near there, guys. we are a lot further along than _ nowhere near there, guys. we are a lot further along than we _ nowhere near there, guys. we are a lot further along than we were - nowhere near there, guys. we are a lot further along than we were but l lot further along than we were but we are not there yet. i think people understand that and that is why i say to you at this moment in time, you can stand there and you can say the leaders, they're not doing enough and that's also its own version of blah blah blah. if you want to deal with this problem, you've got to deal with the practically and that is why what i'm saying to you is, we need to accelerate in this because the risk is, if you do not really act in the next decade, you are ready, if you haven't taken radical action by then, you already have acclimated breaking point. then, you already have acclimated breaking point-— breaking point. phasing out coal, switchin: breaking point. phasing out coal, switching to _ breaking point. phasing out coal, switching to electric _ breaking point. phasing out coal, switching to electric vehicles, - breaking point. phasing out coal, | switching to electric vehicles, give us a date, give us details on how you want to achieve this.- us a date, give us details on how you want to achieve this. plus, as i
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sa , you want to achieve this. plus, as i say. mobilise _ you want to achieve this. plus, as i say, mobilise the _ you want to achieve this. plus, as i say, mobilise the capital _ you want to achieve this. plus, as i say, mobilise the capital that - say, mobilise the capital that you're going to need to invest in to do that. and you have a large part of the international investment community that were the most to invest in clean and green, but i know this from the work my institute does run the world, you need to have projects to invest in and you need the right guarantees and insurances because also there happening in places where people are reluctant to make the investment and so, there's practical work that needs to be done with this. �* , ., , ., practical work that needs to be done with this. �* y., , ., , .,, with this. and you see that people for example _ with this. and you see that people for example block _ with this. and you see that people for example block the _ with this. and you see that people for example block the roads, - for example block the roads, extinction rebellion, to understand the root of the source of this frustration?— the root of the source of this frustration? . �* , ., ., ., frustration? that's not going to hel. it's frustration? that's not going to help. it's really _ frustration? that's not going to help. it's really not _ frustration? that's not going to help. it's really not going - frustration? that's not going to help. it's really not going to . frustration? that's not going to i help. it's really not going to help. you don't need to persuade most of the leaders turning up at this conference. they know it's a big problem. red? most of them want to tackle it. it'sjust that problem. red? most of them want to tackle it. it's just that they've got to have the practical means of
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doing it. the pressure on them to go further and faster is completely legitimate but a lot of those leaders are ready feel that pressure and so, it is a question of putting it all together because they have to go back into their countries and sell their own commitments to their own people. i think that can be done in my own government and we introduce the first legislation, we are instrumental to the kyoto treaty. we pushed for it a lot back now and of course, i would like to have done even more. because i've beenin have done even more. because i've been in these positions of leadership and i know what a challenge it is for them that really, the answer to it is not to stop people getting to work in the uk. ., , ., stop people getting to work in the uk. ., ., stop people getting to work in the uk. people to say that if you invest more heavily _ uk. people to say that if you invest more heavily in _ uk. people to say that if you invest more heavily in renewable - more heavily in renewable technology, would be further down the line and as you say, a shining example for other nations of what
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can be achieved. to example for other nations of what can be achieved.— can be achieved. to be fair, britain, _ can be achieved. to be fair, britain, if— can be achieved. to be fair, britain, if you _ can be achieved. to be fair, britain, if you look- can be achieved. to be fair, britain, if you look over - can be achieved. to be fair, britain, if you look over the j can be achieved. to be fair, - britain, if you look over the last 30 years, we have grown by 75% and cut emissions by 40%, we are pretty much at the top there. but you would like to have done more. 0ver these past years, yet the city uk government on the whole governments support persuasions politically have been at the forefront of this and we should continue to do more. we have to make big changes ourselves and the 2030 stated that zero. four might be perceived on the easy stuff, we are fortunate and have huge continental shelves we can build wind turbines in ipswich from coal to gas where most of the emissions reduction has come from. the stuff is now, they ready your gas boiler, change your car, this is the tricky stuff, institute crystal extremely tricky and if you look at
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the other examples and go back even five years, i think those people were thinking, is this really going to happen. were thinking, is this really going to ha en. ., ., were thinking, is this really going to hauen. ., . , ., , to happen. two final questions. first, to happen. two final questions. first. would _ to happen. two final questions. first, would you _ to happen. two final questions. first, would you be _ to happen. two final questions. first, would you be saying - to happen. two final questions. first, would you be saying to i to happen. two final questions. . first, would you be saying to world leaders for going into this conference in glasgow, sitting in those negotiating rooms, won't you be saying about how history will regard the decisions they make? the truth is, regard the decisions they make? the: truth is, you cannot regard the decisions they make? ti9 truth is, you cannot put off these decisions. for now, because it is next decade that is going to be dramatically important. so, there is no way that you're going to come back to this in a decades time with a different generation of leaders and deal with them. if it's not dealt with now, it's going to go possibly past the point of no return in terms of the damage to the climate in the future generations are going to be have to deal with the mitigation effects of that and those would be vast. leaders, for
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haven't chosen this moment of history, but they are at a moment of history, but they are at a moment of history where what they do is going to determine the future of humanity and in normal circumstances, that would be seen as absurd political hyperbole, but in this case it happens to be true stop very good to meet you. happens to be true stop very good to meet ou. :, ~ happens to be true stop very good to meet ou. ., ~ ,., welcome to sports day. in the top for the expense of tottenham. and the captains endings as they lead pakistan to victory over the great rivals india. and the quarterfinals.

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