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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 24, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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this is bbc news the headlines at six. labour is urging ministers to bring in plan b measures to tackle covid in england, including advice to work from home and compulsory masks. warning that the vaccine roll—out is losing traction. warning that the vaccine roll—out is losing traction. we need to do more to get on top of this virus, protector national service and stop more stringent measures of being having to be introduced further down the line. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills' as the economy recovers from the pandemic. strong investment in public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving businesses confidence and then supporting working families. eight people have been arrested in brentwood in essex after the deaths of two teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. and, the facebook whistleblower, frances haugen meets ian russell,
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who's daughter molly took her own life, after viewing disturbing content, online. britain's biggest supermarket chain, has it's computer systems hacked, affecting millions, shopping online. and a mo salah hat—trick sees liverpool lead manchester united five — nil at old trafford in the premier league. labour has urged the government to introduce its �*plan b' for tackling covid in england — increasing pressure on ministers following similar pleas by doctors' leaders and health unions. the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves, warned the vaccination programme was "stalling" — and encouraged downing street to follow the advice
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of scientists calling for more mask wearing in public places and working from home. but further measures have been ruled out for now by the chancellor, rishi sunak — who said the data did not suggest �*plan b�* was needed "immediately". here�*s our health correspondent, jim reed:. this correspondent, jim reed:. essay the government i best this essay the government is our best line of defence against covid this winter. best line of defence against covid this winter-— best line of defence against covid| this winter._ i'm this winter. euro boosted out. i'm all boosted _ this winter. euro boosted out. i'm all boosted up. _ this winter. euro boosted out. i'm all boosted up. on _ this winter. euro boosted out. i'm all boosted up. on the _ this winter. euro boosted out. i'm all boosted up. on the world - this winter. euro boosted out. i'm all boosted up. on the world this| all boosted up. on the world this weekend there giving third rooster jabs to the over �*50s and other vulnerable groups. today labour added a cause for some doctors groups for its cause plan b in england. wider mask wearing faxing passport and more working from home. the chancellor said there was no immediate need for that. although the winter was _ immediate need for that. although the winter was always _ immediate need for that. although the winter was always good - immediate need for that. although the winter was always good to - immediate need for that. although the winter was always good to be l the winter was always good to be challenging through a combination of different factors, the booster roll—out should give us the protection we need and there is a full two fall back, there is a plan b if we needed. the full two fall back, there is a plan b if we needed.— full two fall back, there is a plan b if we needed. , ., , .,, b if we needed. the number of people in hosital
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b if we needed. the number of people in hospital with _ b if we needed. the number of people in hospital with covid _ b if we needed. the number of people in hospital with covid in _ b if we needed. the number of people in hospital with covid in england - in hospital with covid in england has been rising over the last fortnight but it�*s no higher now that it was back in mid—september and it�*s well below the level seen at the start of the year. but the nhs is also facing other pressures as the weather gets colder. in septemberjust as the weather gets colder. in september just 75% of as the weather gets colder. in septemberjust 75% of people going into a and e and england were seen within four hours. that�*s a lowest figure on record and hospitals in scotland, wales and northern ireland are facing very similar pressure. some emergency doctors on the front line out warning they are already struggling to cope. 50 line out warning they are already struggling to cope.— struggling to cope. so when i go into start seeing _ struggling to cope. so when i go into start seeing patients - struggling to cope. so when i go into start seeing patients you i struggling to cope. so when i go l into start seeing patients you just have this enormously long queue of people who have been waiting a long time. at busy times of the day you find that you�*ve got ambulances outside who can�*t off—load because your emergency is full because your hospital is full. you do feel slightly overwhelmed, a little bit helpless. slightly overwhelmed, a little bit helless. ., ., slightly overwhelmed, a little bit helless. ., . ., , slightly overwhelmed, a little bit helless. ., . ., helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland _ helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland had - helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland had stricter. helpless. scotland, wales and - northern ireland had stricter covid rules and england for some time. the
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government says it�*s focus is currently on rolling out more vaccines to teenagers along with those booster doses to over �*50s. but speaking today one government advisers at other measures would be needed. irate advisers at other measures would be needed. ~ ., ., ., , needed. we do need to have people usin: needed. we do need to have people using lateral — needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow _ needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow tests, _ needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow tests, avoiding - using lateral flow tests, avoiding contact _ using lateral flow tests, avoiding contact with large numbers of people in enclosed spaces, using mask, all of those _ in enclosed spaces, using mask, all of those things now need to happen if were _ of those things now need to happen if were going to stop this rise and -et if were going to stop this rise and get things— if were going to stop this rise and get things under control soon enough to stop _ get things under control soon enough to stop a _ get things under control soon enough to stop a real meltdown in the middle — to stop a real meltdown in the middle of— to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter. that to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter.- to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter. that is the concern that _ middle of the winter. that is the concern that covid, _ middle of the winter. that is the concern that covid, flu _ middle of the winter. that is the concern that covid, flu and - middle of the winter. that is the | concern that covid, flu and other pressures make the situation unsustainable for the nhs this winter. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation but for the moment the data does not justify changing the rules. jim mentioned hospital pressures are being felt around the uk. last month just 6% of people going to the ame
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and northern ireland significantly lower than in the uk. not enough people have been vaccinated. the health services facing another full winter dealing with a pandemic and everything else that the colder months bring. and it seems already is proving difficult. fiur months bring. and it seems already is proving difficult.— is proving difficult. our hospitals are really struggling _ is proving difficult. our hospitals are really struggling to - is proving difficult. our hospitals are really struggling to cope - is proving difficult. our hospitals are really struggling to cope and j is proving difficult. our hospitals i are really struggling to cope and at this time of year to be running at 107% this time of year to be running at io7% capacity. all our hospitals across northern island isjust unheard of. those of the sort of things you would see in late december orjanuary for sub we are nowhere near that. that december orjanuary for sub we are nowhere near that.— december orjanuary for sub we are nowhere near that. that means that basically we — nowhere near that. that means that basically we have _ nowhere near that. that means that basically we have more _ nowhere near that. that means that basically we have more patients - basically we have more patients hospitals then we have beds? absolutely. usually were running at 107 present that 7% extra people who have no bed. so where are they? they are basically unfortunately in the corridors and are very busy ane departments. corridors and are very busy ane departments-—
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corridors and are very busy ane departments. corridors and are very busy ane de artments. , ., ., departments. some believe that covid restrictions and _ departments. some believe that covid restrictions and northern _ departments. some believe that covid restrictions and northern ireland - restrictions and northern ireland are being relaxed too soon. we have the potential— are being relaxed too soon. we have the potential on _ are being relaxed too soon. we have the potential on halloween - are being relaxed too soon. we have the potential on halloween night - are being relaxed too soon. we have the potential on halloween night for| the potential on halloween night for a super— the potential on halloween night for a super spreader event for young people _ a super spreader event for young people of— a super spreader event for young people of not been vaccinated yet. that will— people of not been vaccinated yet. that will only add pressures to our health_ that will only add pressures to our health system for survival can invest — health system for survival can invest and help that we have to help health _ invest and help that we have to help health. , ., ., ., ., health. the rules around covid are bein: ket health. the rules around covid are being kept under— health. the rules around covid are being kept under constant - health. the rules around covid are being kept under constant reviewl health. the rules around covid are i being kept under constant review as ministers way up the medical as well is the economic pressures. in the past three days the department of health has reported the deaths of 22 people who had recently tested positive for the virus. as winter begins the pandemic remains and there is still no end in sight. the government�*s latest coronavirus figures show, there were 39,962 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period,which means on average 46,920 new cases were reported per day in the last week. there were 8,238 people in hospital with covid, as of thursday 72 deaths were reported, that�*s of people who died within 28 days
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of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 124 deaths were announced every day. the chancellor, rushi sunak, says he�*ll deliver a budget on wednesday, that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills,�* to grow the british economy, as it recovers from the covid pandemic. he told the bbc, there�*d be a boost for the nhs and schools, as well as money for services for children, policing and fighting crime. he acknowledged the rising cost of living, but says this is due to global factors, and he doesn�*t have a �*magic wand�* to make them disappear. here�*s our political correspondent, nick eardley. rishi sunak spent unprecedented sums
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during the covid crisis. this week he wants to set out his plans for after the pandemic. although the treasury has promised to balance the book there�*s a growing list of pledges to be delivered. fine book there's a growing list of pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of— pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building _ pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building a _ pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building a stronger- elements of building a stronger economy is having strong public services and you will see that next week. whether that�*s the nhs which we�*ve already taken steps to support significantly to recover from coronavirus, children, schools, skills all of these things, policing and crime you will see investment across the board and public services because that�*s what we are elected to deliver and that�*s what we are getting on and doing. the to deliver and that's what we are getting on and doing. the government sa s it getting on and doing. the government says it wants — getting on and doing. the government says it wants higher _ getting on and doing. the government says it wants higher productivity - says it wants higher productivity and higher wages. says it wants higher productivity and higherwages. so says it wants higher productivity and higher wages. so there will be around £3,000,000,000 earmarked for skills. billions two for transport and health research. commitments this weekend amounted to more than £20,000,000,000. the same is spending hasn�*t been turned off completely. yet in the treasury they are keen to get spending under control and there are concerns that
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inflation which could squeeze living standards and because the government a lot more when it comes to borrowing. a lot more when it comes to borrowing-— borrowing. the bulk of that increases _ borrowing. the bulk of that increases down _ borrowing. the bulk of that increases down two - borrowing. the bulk of that increases down two things| borrowing. the bulk of that | increases down two things - borrowing. the bulk of that - increases down two things - one of increases down two things — one of thoseis increases down two things — one of those is that the fact that as the economy has opened rather rapidly after coronavirus that is put pressure on global supply chains. the other part of the increase is very much down to energy prices. both of those factors are global factors, we are not alone in experiencing those problems. i don�*t have a magic wand that can make either of those things disappear. labour has warned of a cost—of—living crisis. higher prices for things like food and energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills 5% of that money goes automatically to the tax man. there�*s something very simple the there's something very simple the government can do. it would be immediately and it would be felt automatically on peoples bills next month— automatically on peoples bills next month and that is you got that rate of vat— month and that is you got that rate of vat from — month and that is you got that rate of vat from 5% to 0%. month and that is you got that rate of vat from 596 to 0%.— month and that is you got that rate of vat from 596 to 0%. there will be no of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks _ of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in _ of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in the _ of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in the budget - of vat from 596 to 096. there will be no blank checks in the budget as - of vat from 596 to 096. there will be j no blank checks in the budget as the
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treasury moves on from pandemic spending but there are still big promises to be fulfilled. and they won�*t be cheap. and they won�*t be cheap. police in essex say they�*re keeping an open mind as to the motive behind the killing of two teenage boys in brentwood. officers were called to an address in brentwood early this morning and found three people with injuries, two of whom later died. detectives investigating the deaths have arrested eight people on suspicion of murder. at a press conference this afternoon, essex police said they didn�*t believe there was any wider threat to the public. we responded to the incident in regency court brentwood at around 1:30 am this morning. officers were on scene within three minutes and found three people had been injured during a disturbance. sadly, despite the efforts of medics two teenage boys have now died. they�*re families being
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supported by our specialist officers from essex police was up a third victim was treated for injuries which are now confirmed as neither life—threatening or life—changing. detectives are working to establish how the boys died and a forensic postmortem examination will be carried out to determine the cause of death. we�*ve arrested eight men on suspicion of murder. they all remain in custody at this time. this is a fast—moving investigation and we won�*t be speculating on the circumstances surrounding the incident. we remain open—minded as to what has occurred. what i can say is that investigations so far suggest that this is in an isolated incident and there is no wider threat to the brentwood community. we would like to appeal to anyone who was in the crown street area of brentwood between 10pm last night and 5am this morning who witnessed any suspicious behaviour
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between that timeframe. the husband of nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, has started his second hunger strike, to try to secure her return to the uk from iran. she�*s been detained since 2016, initially accused of breaching national security. last week, she lost an appeal against a second conviction, for spreading propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard, staged his first hunger strike 2 years ago, which helped lead to the return of their daughter gabriella, who�*d been travelling with her mother, in iran when she was arrested. i worry, with the latest news we�*ve had with nazanin�*s case, that she�*s going to be thrown back in prison any time soon. so i wanted to make an escalation that would get the attention of the british government, but also, in the end, we do need the british to move. the bbc has learned that 18 months after the government announced a £1 billion scheme, to help tower block owners remove flammable cladding from their homes, funds so far have been allocated
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to less than a third of nearly 700 applications processed so far. the building safety fund, was one of the schemes set up in the wake of the grenfell tower tragedy, covering cladding of wood and other flammable laminates. but as sarah corker reports, in the few buildings where remedial work has begun, there are fresh problems. imagine having to live inside this — your home wrapped in plastic sheeting for months on end, windows that barely open, no way to see out. here you are, sarah, middle of the day, no natural light. jim lives on the first floor at islington gates, here in birmingham city center. and this is the limited air we can get into the flat. this is the view for the next year that you�*ve got? yeah, 12 months of being depressed. there is relief that the combustible cladding is being removed, but government funding won�*t cover the full cost of almost £9 million. it means leaseholders need to find more than one million between them. that�*s at least £20,000 each. what�*s it like living in this box?
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you haven�*t got a clue what�*s happening outside. it affects you mentally, it makes you depressed. it makes you very stressed. the stress is worse knowing you�*ve got to pay for it, and you�*ve got to pay for the privilege of living in a dark, dull box. in my case, you know, £20,000. and i grind my teeth. you feel like you're suffocating. just next door, liz and rodriguez are renting this one—bed flat. they not only have to cope with the building work, but there�*s a serious damp and mould problem, too. it's horrible. i really hate living here now, to be honest with you. and, er, ifeel embarrassed. i don't want to bring my friends here, i don't want to bring my family here, because i've got a six—year—old niece who we absolutely adore and i don't want her here because i don't want her to be breathing in the same stuff that's making me feel so poorly.
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liz says her asthma has been getting progressively worse. this is footage from a neighbouring flat. with the external cladding removed, this is what can happen when it rains. hundreds of people here say they face a miserable winter living on a building site, and this is one street in one city. but across the country, we�*re going to be seeing much more of this in the months and years ahead. this tower in ipswich has been like this for five months. it�*s a similar picture here in london. and these living conditions are worrying health professionals. they�*re stuck there, with all the kind of stresses of the physical environment, the financial worries and the uncertainty about when this is going to end. so we�*re going to see, i think, quite serious mental health issues. back in the midlands, the leaseholder board overseeing this work said it�*s monitoring issues closely to minimize discomfort. the government told us it�*s unacceptable people
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are facing these bills, and building owners must make buildings safe, without passing on costs. but forjim and his neighbours, life behind the plastic is hard to bear. sarah corker, bbc news, in birmingham. the headlines on bbc news... labourjoins calls from doctors�* leaders and health unions for the government to reimpose some coronavirus restrictions in england — warning that the vaccine rollout is losing traction. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* as the economy recovers from the pandemic. eight people have been arrested in brentwood in essex after the deaths of two teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. tesco supermarket says problems with its website and app over the last 26 hours have been caused by an attempt to hack its system. shoppers have been unable to book deliveries or amend existing orders. kate hardcastle is a retail and consumer expert —
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she described the pressure tesco are under to solve the problem. very serious i think when we are in an area where a neighbour to consumers are expecting so much from retailers particularly online that they expect to feel that their information is safe, that they�*re able to shop and edit their purchases. we all know that a grocery shop is something that we all rely on. therefore hearing at 24, 25 hours of frustration being created for the customers when there are so many competitors out there for tesco is going to be a very challenging. forthe for tesco is going to be a very challenging. for the brand. they have assured their customers that they feel the breach of information of anyone�*s data but at the same point is 24 hours in the life of an organisation that has millions of transactions every year. i suppose eo - le transactions every year. i suppose people watching — transactions every year. i suppose people watching this, _ transactions every year. i suppose people watching this, customers l transactions every year. i suppose | people watching this, customers of tesco might think to questions, when can i get my groceries and is my
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data safe? i can i get my groceries and is my data safe?— can i get my groceries and is my data safe? ~ ,_, ., , data safe? i think tesco have been cuick off data safe? i think tesco have been quick off the _ data safe? i think tesco have been quick off the mark _ data safe? i think tesco have been quick off the mark to _ data safe? i think tesco have been quick off the mark to reassure - data safe? i think tesco have been quick off the mark to reassure on i quick off the mark to reassure on the data but not so much in terms of dealing with the challenges to grocery shopping. as we know it�*s a seven day a week economy for retail, grocery is a massive part of everyone�*s weekly commitment, everyone�*s weekly commitment, everyone needs to grocery shop. and we were reading a social media is tesco customers have been able to edit, find out information, understand if they can cancel their orders and it seems that on surveys tesco might�*ve not been that quick to respond was up i think there�*s a lot being asked to retails at the moment particularly in the food arena where we are looking at everything from making sure shelves are full for christmas, that vital trading. and also dealing with elements like climate change were a lot of retailers are having to stand up lot of retailers are having to stand up and be counted. this is exactly the pressure that�*s been put on by customers were very hungry to make sure that retailers behave the way they want them to be able at the front of that has to be making sure that your transactions happen at your groceries are delivered.
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details are still emerging over how the actor alec baldwin accidentally shot dead the cinematographer halyna hutchins on a movie set. investigations are ongoing as court documents suggest the actor was told the gun was safe, moments before the shooting. meanwhile a candlelight vigil has taken place in new mexico to honour her memory. with more, here�*s tanya dendrinos. a cinematographer, a wife, a mother, and a life cut tragically short. by candlelight in albuquerque, not far from the bonanza creek ranch, halyna hutchins was remembered. she was beloved, talented, respected and loving. she was also passionate about her work and that is really who all of you are, she was part of our family, one of us.
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the 42—year—old was killed and film directorjoel souza injured when a prop gun with a live round was fired by actor alec baldwin on the set of the film rust. court records revealed mr baldwin was handed the gun by an assistant director who told the actor the weapon was safe. her death should not have happened. union sets should be safe sets. every person deserves to go to work with complete security knowing they can perform their work and return home safely. this moment has shaken all of us to the very core and we will carry her in our hearts and minds forever. police investigations are continuing as hollywood mourns the loss of one of its rising stars. the american film institute establishing the halyna hutchins memorial scholarship fund in her honour. i was really lucky to get to work with her, because whom i met was one of the most talented and kind,
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collaborative artists who did things that i could never ever think of, that her photography was beautiful, and every day everybody on the camera team was proud to be there for her. her husband described her legacy as too meaningful to encapsulate in words. a harrowing end and a long list of questions remaining. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. colombia�*s most wanted drug trafficker and leader of the country�*s largest gang has been captured. dairo antonio oo—shug—a — known as otoniel — is the boss of the clan del golfo, and was seized close to the border with panama in a joint operation by the army, air force and police. the president of colombia, ivan duque, described the capture as the most significant blow to drug trafficking in the country since the death of pablo escobar in 1993. gail maclellan reports.
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this is the man with the $5 million bounty on his head. the us government accuses him of exporting tons of cocaine into the united states. antonio usuga, also known as �*otoniel�*, was arrested in a joint operation by the army, airforce and police. one officer died in the operation. the colombian president, ivan duque, described the capture as the most significant blow to drug trafficking in the country since the death of pablo escobar. translation: this man . is a murderer of policemen, soldiers, social leaders as well as a recruiter of minors. usuga has also been accused of human trafficking, extortion, and killing community leaders across the country. it took 500 officers and 22 helicopters and several years to bring him tojustice. gail maclellan, bbc news. eleven masterpieces by spanish painter pablo picasso have sold for a total of 80 million
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pounds at auction in las vegas. the one to hit the highest price was the painting "woman with a red—orange cap" which went for almost 30 million pounds. it was a portrait of one of the artist�*s lovers, painted in 1938. the auction took place in the bellagio hotel, where the paintings had been hanging in its picasso restaurant. here�*s a story to make your legs burn. imagine riding a bike at nearly 35 miles per hour, consistently, for a full hour. that s what alex dowsett is planning to do when he tries to break a world record in mexico next month. he s also using the opportunity to raise awareness of haemophilia, which he s had since childhood. james burridge has been to see the flying cyclist in training. this is a giant wind tunnel which alex helps will be having become a world record holder. he is training
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for the hour record. cycling as fast and as far as possible in 60 minutes and as far as possible in 60 minutes and so every technical scientific advantage gained in here is critical. , ., ., critical. basically at the night air is come bike _ critical. basically at the night air is come bike on _ critical. basically at the night air is come bike on here _ critical. basically at the night air is come bike on here and - critical. basically at the night air is come bike on here and a - critical. basically at the night air| is come bike on here and a large scale and that measures how much wind resistance i�*m creating. and we are optimising helmets, choose and most importantly the skin suit to make me as aerodynamic as possible so i�*m as whispery as possible through the win. which means come the end of the attempt to last 20, 30 minutes i can accelerate a little bit so try to not just 30 minutes i can accelerate a little bit so try to notjust break bit so try to not just break the record but try to break a bit more. alex is racing to raise awareness for haemophilia. it�*s where the blood does not clot properly. he was diagnosed as a child and is the only known elite sport person with the condition. , ., known elite sport person with the condition. , . ., , , . , condition. there is an aspect is really quite _
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condition. there is an aspect is really quite unpleasant - condition. there is an aspect is really quite unpleasant and - condition. there is an aspect is really quite unpleasant and is i really quite unpleasant and is something we are really trying to address is to navigate kids through school and also in conjunction with the chemo heroes app which is to navigate young haemophiliacs and theirfamilies and navigate young haemophiliacs and their families and friends as well. it's their families and friends as well. it�*s a tough condition to explain. and it�*s not visual, i think that doesn�*t help either. he and it's not visual, i think that doesn't help either.— and it's not visual, i think that doesn't help either. he used to bruise very _ doesn't help either. he used to bruise very easily, _ doesn't help either. he used to bruise very easily, large - doesn't help either. he used to | bruise very easily, large bruises 'ust bruise very easily, large bruises just from — bruise very easily, large bruises just from holding him up around his middle _ just from holding him up around his middle. pretty much had to find out what haemophilia or having a haemophiliac really meant. we educated and also had to know what his limitations were, the dues and does, _ his limitations were, the dues and does. quite — his limitations were, the dues and does, quite a lot of don'ts. we 'ust ad'usted does, quite a lot of don'ts. we 'ust adjusted as — does, quite a lot of don'ts. we 'ust adjusted as best i does, quite a lot of don'ts. we 'ust adjusted as best we i does, quite a lot of don'ts. we 'ust adjusted as best we could. i does, quite a lot of don'ts. we just adjusted as best we could. every . adjusted as best we could. every time _ adjusted as best we could. every time even — adjusted as best we could. every time even i — adjusted as best we could. every time even i would _ adjusted as best we could. every time even i would get _ adjusted as best we could. every time even i would get a - adjusted as best we could. every time even i would get a phone i adjusted as best we could. every. time even i would get a phone call and if he _ time even i would get a phone call and if he is — time even i would get a phone call and if he is on— time even i would get a phone call and if he is on tour— time even i would get a phone call and if he is on tour we _ time even i would get a phone call and if he is on tour we get - time even i would get a phone call and if he is on tour we get a - and if he is on tour we get a phone call at _ and if he is on tour we get a phone call at one — and if he is on tour we get a phone call at one or— and if he is on tour we get a phone call at one or two _ and if he is on tour we get a phone call at one or two o'clock— and if he is on tour we get a phone call at one or two o'clock we - and if he is on tour we get a phone call at one or two o'clock we are i call at one or two o'clock we are worried — call at one or two o'clock we are worried because _ call at one or two o'clock we are worried because it— call at one or two o'clock we are worried because it means - call at one or two o'clock we are worried because it means he's l call at one or two o'clock we are . worried because it means he's got call at one or two o'clock we are - worried because it means he's got a problem _ worried because it means he's got a problem either— worried because it means he's got a problem either he's _ worried because it means he's got a problem either he's stressed -
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worried because it means he's got a problem either he's stressed or- problem either he's stressed or pulled — problem either he's stressed or pulled out _ problem either he's stressed or pulled out or— problem either he's stressed or pulled out or something. - problem either he's stressed or pulled out or something. so- problem either he's stressed or. pulled out or something. so every time _ pulled out or something. so every time he _ pulled out or something. so every time he races _ pulled out or something. so every time he races is _ pulled out or something. so every time he races is nerve—racking. ii time he races is nerve—racking. i have time he races is nerve—racking. have to take my medication time he races is nerve—racking]. have to take my medication every second day which is an intravenous injection. i have to take it every day during races. but it�*s managed and i think that�*s what haemophilia is now compared to where it was for them it�*s we can do these things. it doesn�*t hold me back at all. i think that�*s the overriding message is if it doesn�*t hold me back what actually ends up being a quite dangerous for the times it shouldn�*t really hold a kid back in school now. �* . , really hold a kid back in school now. ~ ., , ., ., , really hold a kid back in school now. ~ ., ., , ., really hold a kid back in school now. �* .,, ., ., , ., " really hold a kid back in school now. �* ., , ., ., , ., " ., now. alex has to raise over 55 km to beat the record _ now. alex has to raise over 55 km to beat the record in _ now. alex has to raise over 55 km to beat the record in mexico _ now. alex has to raise over 55 km to beat the record in mexico on - beat the record in mexico on november the third. he sold it once before in 2015 only for sir bradley wiggins to quickly usurp it. this time there is no shortage of motivation. there is not. the �*un climate change conference — cop26�* opens at the end of the month. here on the bbc news channel
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we will have plenty of special coverage. what do you want to know about climate change ? we�*ll be getting some of your questions answered tomorrow morning at 11.30, when we�*ll be joined by two leading academics — kate crowley from the edinburgh climate change centre and michael grubb from ucl. send an email to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or get in touch on social media using the hashtag bbc your questions. clive�*s here in a few minutes with the early evening news. before that, a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. it�*s been a brighter day out there for many of us. either side of a weather system that has brought some rain into parts of wales and is spreading east across england. ahead of it in essex, there has been some blue sky, but it is east anglia and south—east england on the weather front. although it is weakening, there is a chance of some splashes of rain for a time this evening before it clears away. behind it, the clearer weather has moved in. there are showers around and that is how things are looking as we get on through the evening and into tonight. it is clear spells and areas of showers mainly in the west, but some will push further east
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as the night goes on. it is breezy out there and temperatures just dipping a little bit lower, so more spots just getting down into single figures by the morning. for monday, then, it is a day of sunshine and showers, the greater chance of catching these will be in the west, especially here into western scotland, some along southern coastal counties of england, the heaviest places, a chance of hail and thunder. and a few showers willjust push inland and east as the day goes on. not everyone will catch them and most of the day is going to be dry rather than wet with sunny spells around. still a noticeable breeze. it will feel a touch fresher out there. and it will be cooler on monday night, as some spots dip down into mid or even low single figures, especially across southern areas of the uk where the winds are light and skies are clear. we are going to see the winds pick up again in northern ireland as we get rain moving in overnight and into tuesday morning, and by the morning, that�*ll be into western parts of scotland. and that is from another area of low pressure which, from tuesday, and for several days, is going to park itself to the west of the uk and around it there will be a weather front wriggling around northern and western areas with outbreaks
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of rain at times, rain totals mounting in the wettest spots from that rain, with the risk of disruption as a result. so this is how tuesday is looking. that first spell of rain pulls away from northern ireland, across scotland, through northern england, maybe fringing north wales and the north midlands, it�*s turning breezier across the uk. plenty of cloud in the north and west, some drizzle in places too, central and eastern england, with some sunny spells. central and eastern areas, here of england, will stay dry for much of the week ahead. but again, that weather front will continue to bring some outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales before clearing away on friday as it moves in towards central and eastern parts of england. whether you see the rain, though, or stay dry for much of the week, it�*s mild or very mild.
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the headlines labourjoins calls from doctors�* leaders and health unions for the government to reimpose some coronavirus restrictions in england — warning that the vaccine rollout is losing traction. we need to stop more stringent measures that they will introduce further down the line. the chancellor promises a budget that invests
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in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* as the economy

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