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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 24, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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this is bbc news the headlines at five. the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* as the economy recovers from the pandemic. strong investment in public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving businesses confidence and then supporting working families. eight people have been arrested in brentwood in essex after the deaths of two teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. labour is urging ministers to bring in plan b measures to tackle covid in england, including advice to work from home and compulsory masks. new rules allowing travellers returning to england to take lateral flow tests instead of more expensive pcr tests have come into force. coming up in the sport,
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michail antonio continued his prolific form as he grabbed west ham's winner against tottenham to lift the hammers into 4th place in the premier league. the chancellor rishi sunak says he will deliver a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* in order to grow the british economy as it recovers from the pandemic. on questions about the rising cost of living, the chancellor insisted that current inflationary pressures were global and that he didn�*t have a �*magic wand�* to reduce them. here�*s our political correspondent charlotte rose. the damage done by covid is measured notjust in the impact on the uk�*s health, but also on its wealth. the government spent billions on the furlough scheme and other
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support for families and businesses in the past 18 months. many expected the chancellor to rein that in, but it seems the purse strings may still be loose. children, schools, skills, all of these things, policing and crime, you will see investment across the board in public services, because that�*s what we were elected to deliver and that�*s what we are getting on and doing. rishi sunak�*s already promised 5.4 billion for the nhs this winter. now he�*s pledged 1.6 billion for new vocational qualifications called t—levels and half a billion for adult skills, but there�*s questions over whether these announcements are as generous as suggested. some of the funding has been announced previously. and all that money will do little to help families this winter. many are facing what labour describes as a "cost of living crisis", because of high energy prices and a rise in the cost of basics like food. the bulk of that increase is down to two things.
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one of those is the fact that as economies have reopened rather rapidly after coronavirus, that has put pressure on global supply chains. and then, the other part of the increase is very much just down to energy prices. both of those factors are global factors. we�*re not alone in experiencing those problems. you know, i don�*t have a magic wand that can make either of those things disappear. labour says there is action the government could take. when we pay our gas and electricity bills, 5% of that money goes automatically to the taxman. there's something very simple the government could do. it would be immediate and it would be felt automatically on people's bills next month, and that is to cut that rate of vat from 5% to 0%. with one week to go until the climate conference in glasgow, the government needs a long—term energy fix which helps move the uk to a zero—carbon economy. that�*ll mean a population with the skills to do the work, but also — you guessed it — quite a lot of cash. charlotte rose, bbc news.
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police in essex say they�*re keeping an open mind as to the motive behind the killing of two teenage boys in brentwood. officers were called to regency court at around 1.30 this morning. they found three injured people, two of whom later died. essex two of whom later died. police said they didn�*t believe essex police said they didn�*t believe there was any wider threat to the public. we believe there was any wider threat to the public— believe there was any wider threat to the public. we responded to the incident in regency _ to the public. we responded to the incident in regency court - to the public. we responded to the l incident in regency court brentwood at around 1:30 am this morning. officers were on scene within three minutes and found three people had been injured during a disturbance. sadly, despite the efforts of medics to teenage boys have now died. they families being supported by our specialist officers from essex police was up a third victim was treated for injuries which are now
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confirmed as neither life—threatening or life—changing. detectives are working to establish how the boys died and a forensic postmortem examination will be carried out to determine the cause of death. we�*ve arrested eight men on suspicion of murder. they all remain in custody at this time. this is a fast—moving investigation and we won�*t be speculating on the circumstances surrounding the incident. we remain open—minded as to what has occurred. what i can say is that investigations so far suggest that this is in an isolated incident and there is no wider threat to the brentwood community. we would like to appeal to anyone who was in the crown street area of brentwood between 10pm last night and 5am this morning who witnessed any suspicious behaviour between that timeframe.
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labour is calling on the government to bring in its plan b measures to tackle covid in england, including mask wearing and working from home. but ministers say the current data does not suggest that the government should be moving "immediately" to these tougher measures. our health correspondent jim reed has this report. this, say the government, is our best line of defence against covid this winter. you�*re all boosted. i'm all boosted up. on the wirral this weekend, they�*re giving third booster jabs to the over—50s and other vulnerable groups. there have, though, been growing calls for what�*s been called plan b in england — wider mask—wearing, vaccine passports and more working from home. the chancellor, though, says there is no immediate need for that. 90% of the population have antibodies, and although the winter was always going to be challenging for a combination of different factors, the booster roll—out should give us the protection we need. and there is a fallback, there is a plan b if we need it. the data doesn�*t suggest that we need it today but,
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if that changes, then of course the government will be ready to act. that�*s why those plans are there. and your covid passes... many of those stricter measures have been in place for some time in scotland, wales and northern ireland. labour said it would support so—called plan b in england, but accelerating those booster doses needs to be the priority. we need to do more to get on top of this virus, protect our national health service, and stop more stringent measures having to be introduced further down the line. there have been calls for ministers to tweak the vaccine programme, perhaps shortening the time between the second dose and the booster from six months. but speaking today, one government adviser said other measures are more important. we do need to have people using lateral flow tests, avoiding contact with large numbers of people in enclosed spaces, using masks. all of those things now need to happen if we�*re going to stop this rise and get things under control soon enough to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter.
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that is the concern — that covid, flu and other pressures make the situation unsustainable for the nhs this winter. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation but, for the moment, the data does not justify changing the rules. jim reed, bbc news. from today, fully vaccinated travellers returning to england can take a lateral flow test — rather than a more expensive pcr test — to prove their covid status. the change, which the government has described as a �*huge boost�* for the travel industry, applies to those arriving from non—red—list countries. wales will make the same change to their testing policy next weekend. meanwhile professor denis kinane — who is an immunologist and founding scientist at cignpost diagnostics — told us there are slight risks with the changes. i think that we�*ve got to understand that lateral flow is a little like a pregnancy test, very simple type test and a pcr is a more full—blown laboratory test which is much more accurate, let�*s say.
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the danger with lateral flow tests is that there are certain individuals who come through with a lateral flow and still be positive. so it�*s not as sensitive and there is a slight risk there that we might be letting more people in with covid. the bbc has learned that 18 months after the government announced a £1 billion scheme to help tower block owners remove flammable cladding from their homes — only a fraction of the nearly 700 applications processed so far have been granted money to start work. but as sarah corker has been finding out, even in the few buildings where work has started the problems are far from over. imagine having to live inside this — your home wrapped in plastic sheeting for months on end, windows that barely open, no way to see out. here you are, sarah, middle of the day, no natural light. jim lives on the first floor at islington gates, here in birmingham city center. and this is the limited air we can get into the flat. this is the view for the next
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year that you�*ve got? yeah, 12 months of being depressed. there is relief that the combustible cladding is being removed, but government funding won�*t cover the full cost of almost £9 million. it means leaseholders need to find more than one million between them. that�*s at least £20,000 each. what�*s it like living in this box? you haven�*t got a clue what�*s happening outside. it affects you mentally, it makes you depressed. it makes you very stressed. the stress is worse knowing you�*ve got to pay for it, and you�*ve got to pay for the privilege of living in a dark, dull box. in my case, you know, £20,000. and i grind my teeth. you feel like you're suffocating. just next door, liz and rodriguez are renting this one—bed flat. they not only have to cope with the building work, but there�*s a serious damp and mould problem, too. it's horrible. i really hate living here now, to be honest with you. and, er, ifeel embarrassed.
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i don't want to bring my friends here, i don't want to bring my family here, because i've got a six—year—old niece who we absolutely adore and i don't want her here because i don't want her to be breathing in the same stuff that's making me feel so poorly. liz says her asthma has been getting progressively worse. this is footage from a neighbouring flat. with the external cladding removed, this is what can happen when it rains. hundreds of people here say they face a miserable winter living on a building site, and this is one street in one city. but across the country, we�*re going to be seeing much more of this in the months and years ahead. this tower in ipswich has been like this for five months. it�*s a similar picture here in london. and these living conditions are worrying health professionals. they�*re stuck there, with all the kind of stresses of the physical environment, the financial worries
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and the uncertainty about when this is going to end. so we�*re going to see, i think, quite serious mental health issues. back in the midlands, the leaseholder board overseeing this work said it�*s monitoring issues closely to minimize discomfort. the government told us it�*s unacceptable people are facing these bills, and building owners must make buildings safe, without passing on costs. but forjim and his neighbours, life behind the plastic is hard to bear. sarah corker, bbc news, in birmingham. tesco supermarket says problems with its website and app over the last 2a hours have been caused by an attempt to hack its system. shoppers have been unable to book deliveries 01’ or orders. kate hardcastle is a retail and conumer expert. we�*ve been reading on social media just how many tesco customers have been able to edit, find out information, understand if they can cancel their orders and it seems
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that on surveys testers might not have been that quick to respond put up have been that quick to respond put up i think there�*s a lot being asked of retailers at the moment particularly in the food arena where we are looking at everything from making sure shells are full for christmas, that vital trading. and also dealing with elements like climate change are a lot of retailers are having to stand up and be cancelled. this is put on customers who are very hungry to make sure that retailers behave the way they want them to behave. at the front of that has to be making sure that your transactions happen and you groceries are delivered. that your transactions happen and you groceries are delivered. details are still emerging over how the actor alec baldwin accidentally shot dead the cinematographer halena hutchins on a movie set. investigations are ongoing as court documents suggest the actor was told the gun was safe, moments before the shooting. meanwhile a candlelight vigil has taken place in new mexico to honour her memory. with more, here�*s tanya dendrinos. a cinematographer, a wife, a mother, and a life cut tragically short.
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by candlelight in albuquerque, not far from the bonanza creek ranch, halyna hutchins was remembered. she was beloved, talented, respected and loving. she was also passionate about her work and that is really who all of you are, she was part of our family, one of us. the 42—year—old was killed and film directorjoel souza injured when a prop gun with a live round was fired by actor alec baldwin on the set of the film rust. court records revealed mr baldwin was handed the gun by an assistant director who told the actor the weapon was safe. her death should not have happened. union sets should be safe sets. every person deserves to go to work with complete security knowing they can perform their work and return home safely.
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this moment has shaken all of us to the very core and we will carry her in our hearts and minds forever. police investigations are continuing as hollywood mourns the loss of one of its rising stars. the american film institute establishing the halyna hutchins memorial scholarship fund in her honour. i was really lucky to get to work with her, because whom i met was one of the most talented and kind, collaborative artists who did things that i could never ever think of, that her photography was beautiful, and every day everybody on the camera team was proud to be there for her. her husband described her legacy as too meaningful to encapsulate in words.
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a harrowing and a long list of questions remaining. the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor promises a budget that invests in �*infrastructure, innovation and skills�* as the economy recovers from the pandemic. eight people have been arrested in brentwood in essex after the deaths of two teenage boys in the early hours of this morning. labour is urging ministers to bring in plan b measures to tackle covid in england, including advice to work from home and compulsory masks. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport center. to the football first. one of the biggest rivalry is liverpool who have the edge at old trafford at the moment. goals to put them to you and they are no 3— zero out that was most hollow got the third. they
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scored at least three goals in every way game this season. it's it�*s going very well at half—time as we produce that match. west him one — zero over tottenham. broke the deadlock with just over a quarter left at the london stadium at the six primary goal of the season. voices that start to the season since 2004 everton defeat drop spurs. since 2004 everton defeat drop surs. ~ �* ., since 2004 everton defeat drop surs, . �* ., ., since 2004 everton defeat drop surs.~ �* ., ., ., , , spurs. we've not done anything but last ear spurs. we've not done anything but last year we — spurs. we've not done anything but last year we had — spurs. we've not done anything but last year we had to _ spurs. we've not done anything but last year we had to hang _ spurs. we've not done anything but last year we had to hang in - spurs. we've not done anything but last year we had to hang in and - spurs. we've not done anything but last year we had to hang in and get| last year we had to hang in and get europe and we done so. chevy league sports back up a couple of points why should we not try and aim for it? were not sure but will try and aim for it. i want to be positive with the team, i want everybody in the stadium to be positive for the team. and hopefully we can continue to build it up. and leicester continued their good run of form — with a win at brentford. james maddison with the winner, his first goal since february — in their 2—1 win. leicester up to ninth. rangers returned to the top of the scottish premiership after a hard fought 2—1 win over st
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mirren. rangers were rocked when connor ronan gave the hosts a fourth minute lead in stunning fashion. but kemar roofe levelled from the penalty spot and two minutes later alfredo morelos scored what turned out to be the winner just before half time. great britain�*s katie archibald has won herfourth medal at the track cycling world championships in france. after a gold and two bronze medals the scot completed the full set with silver in the points race. she won the final sprint to take it ahead of kirsten wild of the netherlands after belgium�*s lotte kopecky had put gold out of reach. in the cricket — all eyes on the big clash of the day between rivals india and pakistan in dubai, at the t20 world cup, pakistan are chasing a target of 152 to win. and sri lanka beat bangladesh by five wickets in the first match of the day. bangladesh opener mohammed naim top scored for his side with 62 as they set sri lanka a target of 172. charith asalanka came in with the score at two for one,
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but turned things round smashing five sixes as he scored 80 not out. fittingly he hit the winning runs as sri lanka reached their target with seven balls to spare. they go second behind england in their group. saracens thrash walls to keep the pressure on at the top. they won 56 points to 15 scoring eight tries in all, maidens with for of them as they blew their opponents away today. a bullet point victory keeps them third. a point behind harlequins, leicester and them third. a point behind harlequins, leicesterand in them third. a point behind harlequins, leicester and in front. a point behind harlequins, leicester and in front. fabio quartararo has won the motogp riders championship with two races to spare. finishing fourth at the emilia romagna grand prix was enough to secure his first title in his third season in motorcycle racing�*s premier class. spain�*s marc marquez won the race, but all the attention at the misano circuit was on the 22 year old frenchman. the us grand prix should be exciting later, with the resumpion of the rivalry between max verstappen and lewis hamilton. verstappen had the edge in qualifying. the championship leader was two
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tenths of a second quicker than hamilton�*s mercedes, as he claimed his ninth pole of the season. verstappen will also have support from his red bull team mate sergio perez who�*ll start from third on the grid in austin, texas. maybe he struggled a little bit more as we get to fully comfortable in the car and get my lap time out of it. normally it�*s quite easy to do that or to be competitive. seem like it had to continue until the last run i can finally put in i say reasonably together. it hasn�*t been the easiest but i think as a team they been advising me a lot and we�*ve been working together really well to try and extract the noise. going from bad to worse for liverpool and manchester united. most hollow his discord for liverpool there. not good at all there. four — zero at half—time.
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the exam board, aqa, has apologised and withdrawn an a—level history textbook after a youth worker said she was horrified by one of the exercises in it. students were asked to judge whether the treatment of native americans by the us government in the late nineteenth century had been exaggerated — that period saw several massacres of tribes. earlier we spoke to the youth worker who came across the exercise, hannah wilkinson — hannah also offers history mentoring sessions at durham sixth form center. and i was prepping for one of my sessions on american valour policy and turning the textbook and came across this exercise, it seemed to me the question was asking if the history of genocide of native americans in the late 19th century has been exaggerated. i was horrified. and above that question was a set of scales that were level, completely level, and it was asking students to weigh up arguments for the treatment
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of native americans and arguments against the treatment of native americans during this period. which, actually, ifound quite shocking considering during this period native americans had at their land stolen, many of them were killed, there communities were completely devastated. a level history textbook was asking students , and a—level history textbook without insurance to weigh up arguments for that. the exam board said it should not have made it through the process and does not match their standards for equality. have you been able to discuss that question with the six you mentor? i haven't as of yet but i think what haven�*t as of yet but i think what this points to, i think with a rightly highlighted is it should have never gotten through in the first place.
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i think that brings up a wider question of how we teach issues of injustice in our history curriculum, how we use a debate any constructive way and i think i do not want to speak on behalf of the students i mentor, but i do think this comes up in a lot of subjects. i think the fact it got into the textbook is concerning and we need to be thinking critically about how we are teaching and what we�*re teaching. are you planning speak to historians of native american affairs in order to get their perspective on this? yes. i would love to do that. also, i would love aqa entity exam board and the people who are writing the textbooks to be engaging in dialogues with historians across the board, especially historians of native american
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history because i think it is so misunderstood and the question that has come up in this history textbook i think is indicative of a wider problem so i am a youth mentor and work for a church, so i would love the opportunity to talk to historians, but really i am hoping that the dialoguing is happening with the people who are writing the curriculum, and who are kind of at the top and putting this out. hannah wilkinson, thank you so much for speaking to us. colombia�*s most wanted drug trafficker and leader of the country�*s largest gang has been captured. dairo antonio ooshuga — known as otoniel — is the boss of the clan del golfo, and was seized close to the border with panama in a joint operation by the army, air force and police. the president of colombia, ivan duque, described the capture as the most significant blow to drug trafficking in the country since the death of pablo escobar in 1993. gail maclellan reports. this is the man with the $5,000,000 bounty on his head. the us
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government accuses him of exporting tonnes of cocaine into the united states. also known as o tonnes of cocaine into the united states. also known as 0 tony l was arrested in a joint operation by the army, air force and police. one officer died in the operation. colombian president described the capture is the most significant blow to drug trafficking in the country since the death of pablo escobar. translation: this man is a murderer of policemen, soldiers, social leaders as well is a recruiter of minors. . , ., ,., leaders as well is a recruiter of minors. ., ., ,., , leaders as well is a recruiter of minors. ., ., , ., .. , minors. he has also been accused of human trafficking, _ minors. he has also been accused of human trafficking, extortion - minors. he has also been accused of human trafficking, extortion and - human trafficking, extortion and killing community leaders across the country. it took 500 officers and 22 helicopters and several years to bring him tojustice. the �*un climate change conference — cop26�* opens at the end of the month. here on the bbc news channel we will have plenty of special coverage. what do you want to know about climate change?
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we�*ll be getting some of your questions answered tomorrow morning at 11.30, when we�*ll bejoined by two leading academics — kate crowley from the edinburgh climate change center — and michael grubb from ucl. send an email to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or get in touch on social media using the hashtag bbc your questions. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. it�*s been a brighter day out there for many of us. either side of a weather system that has brought some rain into parts of wales and is spreading east across england. ahead of it in essex, there has been some blue sky, but it is east anglia and south—east england on the weather front. although it is weakening, there is a chance of some splashes of rain for a time this evening before it clears away. behind it, the clearer weather has moved in. there are showers around and that is how things are looking as we get on through the evening and into tonight. it is clear spells and areas of showers mainly in the west, but some will push further east as the night goes on.
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it is breezy out there and temperatures just dipping a little bit lower, so more spots just getting down into single figures by the morning. for monday, then, it is a day of sunshine and showers, the greater chance of catching these will be in the west, especially here into western scotland, some along southern coastal counties of england, the heaviest places, a chance of hail and thunder. and a few showers willjust push inland and east as the day goes on. not everyone will catch them and most of the day is going to be dry rather than wet with sunny spells around. still a noticeable breeze. it will feel a touch fresher out there. and it will be cooler on monday night, as some spots dip down into mid or even low single figures, especially across southern areas of the uk where the winds are light and skies are clear. we are going to see the winds pick up again in northern ireland as we get rain moving in overnight and into tuesday morning, and by the morning, that�*ll be into western parts of scotland. and that is from another area of low pressure which, from tuesday, and for several days, is going to park itself to the west of the uk and around it there will be a weather front
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wriggling around northern and western areas with outbreaks of rain at times, rain totals mounting in the wettest spots from that rain, with the risk of disruption as a result. so this is how tuesday is looking. that first spell of rain pulls away from northern ireland, across scotland, through northern england, maybe fringing north wales and the north midlands, it�*s turning breezier across the uk. plenty of cloud in the north and west, some drizzle in places too, central and eastern england, with some sunny spells. central and eastern areas, here of england, will stay dry for much of the week ahead. but again, that weather front will continue to bring some outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales before clearing away on friday as it moves in towards central and eastern parts of england. whether you see the rain, though, or stay dry for much of the week, it�*s mild or very mild.
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the chancellor promises investment right across society, as he prepares for wednesday�*s budget. billions are on the table, says rishi sunak, to help the recovery after covid. children, schools, skills, all of these things. policing and crime. you will see investment across the board in public services. but, acknowledging the rising cost of living, he says he hasn�*t got a magic wand to wish it away. also on the programme: senior doctors say rising covid infections are putting intense pressure on a&e departments in england, and call for tougher coronavirus rules. britain�*s biggest supermarket chain has its computer systems hacked, affecting millions shopping online. the flat owners facing winter with their homes wrapped in plastic as the government tackles
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the cladding crisis after grenfell. and the facebook whistleblower, frances haugen, meets ian russell, who�*s14—year—old daughter molly took her own life after viewing disturbing content online. good afternoon. the chancellor, rushi sunak, says he�*ll deliver a budget on wednesday that invests in "infrastructure, innovation and skills," to grow the british economy as it recovers from the covid pandemic. he told the bbc there�*d be a boost for the nhs and schools, as well as money for services for children, policing and fighting crime. he acknowledged the rising cost of living, but says this is due to global factors, and he doesn�*t have a "magic wand" to make them disappear. here�*s our political correspondent, nick eardley.
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this is not a time for ideology and orthodoxy. rishi sunak has been chancellor at a far from normal time. the man who spent unprecedented sums during the covid crisis. this week, though, he wants to set out his plans for after the pandemic. and although the treasury has promised to balance the books, there is a growing list of pledges to be delivered. one of the elements of building a strong economy is having strong public services, and you will see that next week, whether it�*s the nhs, which we have already taken steps to support significantly to recover from coronavirus, children, schools, skills, all of these things. policing and crime. you will see investment across the board in public services because that�*s what we were elected to deliver and that�*s what we are getting on and doing. the government says it wants higher productivity and higher wages, so there will be around £3 billion earmarked for skills. billions too for transport and health research. commitments this weekend have
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amounted to more than £20 billion, a sign the spending tap hasn�*t been turned off completely. yet in the treasury they are keen to get spending under control, and there are concerns about inflation, which could squeeze living standards and cost the government a lot more when it comes to borrowing. the bulk of that increase is down to two things. one of those is the fact that as economies have reopened rather rapidly after coronavirus, that has put pressure on global supply chains. and then the other part of the increase is very much just down to energy prices. both of those factors are global factors. we are not alone in experiencing those problems. i don�*t have a magic wand that can make either of those things disappear. labour has warned of a cost of living crisis, higher prices for things like food and energy. when we pay our gas and electricity bills, 5% of that money goes automatically to the taxman. something very simple the government could do, it would be immediate,
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and it would be felt automatically on people's bills next month, and that is to cut that rate of vat from 5% to 0%. there will be no blank cheques in the budget as the treasury moves on from pandemic spending, but there are still big promises to be fulfilled and they won�*t be cheap. that�*s the point, isn�*t it, nick. no magic one, but for the government�*s critics there is seemingly a magic money tree and yet rishi sunak has made it clear he will balance the books. �* , . , , books. it's really interesting, isn't it, because _ books. it's really interesting, isn't it, because in _ books. it's really interesting, isn't it, because in some - books. it's really interesting, | isn't it, because in some ways books. it's really interesting, - isn't it, because in some ways rishi isn�*t it, because in some ways rishi sunak, who is finishing off the budget in number 11 this evening has competing interests to weigh up over the weekend. there are many conservatives who want him to live up conservatives who want him to live up to his rhetoric of bringing spending under control, are starting to repay you some of the massive debt that the country accrued during the pandemic. but there are also
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voters, many of them who backed the conservatives at the last time in the election, who borisjohnson is determined to keep hold of, who want rishi sunak to spend money on the things that matter to them, but levelling up agenda, the government speaks a lot about, on changing the economy in the ways the government has promised. the details of this will be very important when we get them on wednesday. there will not be money for everything. there will be some departments and some interest groups who are undoubtedly disappointed by what the chancellor announces, but based on that interview this morning, rishi sunak wanted to emphasise that he is still prepared to spend, and spend on a number of things. hick prepared to spend, and spend on a number of things.— number of things. nick eardley in downin: number of things. nick eardley in downing street, _ number of things. nick eardley in downing street, thank _ number of things. nick eardley in downing street, thank you. - senior doctors say rising covid infections are adding to intense pressure on a&e departments in england, and are calling for tougher coronavirus rules as we head into winter.
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but the government has again ruled out further measures for now saying the current rate of infections and hospitalisations did not suggest changes in england were needed "immediately". here�*s our health correspondent, jim reed. this, say the government, is our best line of defence against covid this winter. you�*re all boosted. i'm all boosted up. on the wirral this weekend, they�*re giving third booster jabs to the over—50s and other vulnerable groups. today labour wider mask—wearing, vaccine passports and more working from home. the chancellor, though, says there is no immediate need for that. the booster roll—out should give us the booster roll—out should give us the protection we need and there is a fallback, a plan b, if we need it.
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and is well below the level seen at the start of the year but the nhs is also facing other pressures as the weather gets colder. in september, just 75% of people going to a&e in england were seen in four hours, the lowest figure on record. and hospitals in scotland, wales and northern ireland are facing very similar pressure. some emergency doctors on the front line are warning they are already struggling to cope. warning they are already struggling to coe. ~ ., warning they are already struggling to co e. ~ ., ., warning they are already struggling to coe. ~ ., ., , ., , to cope. when i go into start seeing atients to cope. when i go into start seeing patients who _ to cope. when i go into start seeing patients who just _ to cope. when i go into start seeing patients who just have _ to cope. when i go into start seeing patients who just have this - patients who just have this enormously long queue of people who have been waiting a long time. at busy times of the day you find you have got ambulances outside your emergency department who can�*t off—load because your emergency ward is full because your hospital is. you do feel slightly overwhelmed and helpless. you do feel slightly overwhelmed and helless. ., ., . ., , you do feel slightly overwhelmed and helless. ., . ., helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland _ helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland had - helpless. scotland, wales and northern ireland had stricter. helpless. scotland, wales and - northern ireland had stricter covid rules than england for some time. the government says its focus is
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currently on rolling out more vaccines to teenagers along with those booster doses to over 50s but speaking today one government adviser said other measures would be needed. we adviser said other measures would be needed. ~ ., ., ., , needed. we do need to have people usin: needed. we do need to have people using lateral — needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow _ needed. we do need to have people using lateral flow tests, avoiding - using lateralflow tests, avoiding contact with the large numbers of people in enclosed spaces, using masks. all of those things now need to happen if we are going to stop this rise and get things under control soon enough to stop a real meltdown in the middle of the winter. . , .., . ., winter. that is the concern, that covid, flu _ winter. that is the concern, that covid, flu and _ winter. that is the concern, that covid, flu and other— winter. that is the concern, that covid, flu and other pressures i winter. that is the concern, that - covid, flu and other pressures make the situation unsustainable for the nhs this winter. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation but for the moment the data does notjustify changing the rules. jim reed, bbc news. the government�*s latest coronavirus figures show there were 39,962 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average 46,920 new cases were reported per day in the last week.
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there were 8,238 people in hospital with covid as of thursday. 72 deaths were reported — that�*s of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 124 deaths were announced every day. the uk�*s largest supermarket chain, tesco, says an attempt to hack its computer systems is behind problems with its website and app. shoppers have been unable to book deliveries or amend existing orders for more than 24 hours. tesco says it�*s working hard, to restore services. our business correspondent katy austin is here. millions of people could be affected. any idea when services will be up and running. hat affected. any idea when services will be up and running.— affected. any idea when services will be up and running. not at the moment. online _ will be up and running. not at the moment. online ordering - will be up and running. not at the moment. online ordering has- moment. online ordering has seen huge growth since the pandemic began. tesco customers have been told existing orders that were already in the pipeline will go ahead if they are three items or
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more. since yesterday morning there have been complaints on social media from customers who have found they can�*t place, amend or cancel orders of groceries through tesco�*s website or app, which has around 6.5 million users. tesco has apologised and said it happened because of an attempt to interfere with its systems, it says, which seems to have happened at some point overnight on friday. a spokesperson added there was no reason to believe customer data had been affected and the supermarket was acting to ensure details remain safe. we are told tesco is working hard to try to resolve these issues but as i speak to you the problem seems to still be there and it hasn�*t yet been fixed. seems to still be there and it hasn't yet been fixed.- seems to still be there and it hasn't yet been fixed. katy austin, thank yon — the husband of nazanin zaghari ratcliffe has started his second hunger strike to try to secure her return to the uk from iran. she�*s been detained since 2016, initially accused of breaching national security. last week, she lost an appeal against a second conviction
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for spreading propaganda against the iranian regime. her husband richard staged his first hunger strike two years ago, which helped lead to the return of their daughter gabriella, who�*d been travelling with her mother in iran. i worry, with the latest news we�*ve had with nazanin�*s case, that she�*s going to be thrown back in prison anytime soon. so i wanted to make an escalation that would get the attention of the british government, but also, in the end, we do need the british to move. eight people have been arrested on suspicion of murder after two teenage boys died in essex. emergency services were called to regency court in brentwood in the early hours of this morning and police are now working to establish the causes of death. a third person was treated for injuries which were not life threatening. the bbc has learned that 18 months after the government announced a £1 billion scheme to help tower block owners remove flammable cladding from their homes, funds so far have been allocated to less than a third of nearly 700 applications processed so far.
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the building safety fund was one of the schemes set up in the wake of the grenfell tower tragedy, covering cladding of wood and other flammable laminates. but as sarah corker reports, in the few buildings where remedial work has begun, there are fresh problems. imagine having to live inside this — your home wrapped in plastic sheeting for months on end, windows that barely open, no way to see out. here you are, sarah, middle of the day, no natural light. jim lives on the first floor at islington gates, here in birmingham city centre. and this is the limited air we can get into the flat. this is the view for the next year that you�*ve got? yeah, 12 months of being depressed. there is relief that the combustible cladding is being removed, but government funding won�*t cover the full cost of almost £9 million. it means leaseholders need to find more than 1 million between them. that�*s at least £20,000 each. what�*s it like living in this box?
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you haven�*t got a clue what�*s happening outside. it affects you mentally, it makes you depressed. it makes you very stressed. the stress is worse knowing you�*ve got to pay for it, and you�*ve got to pay for the privilege of living in a dark, dull box. in my case, you know, £20,000. and i grind my teeth. you feel like you're suffocating. just next door, liz and rodriguez are renting this one—bed flat. they not only have to cope with the building work, but there�*s a serious damp and mould problem, too. it's horrible. l~ ~~ - i really hate living here now, to be honest with you. and, er, ifeel embarrassed. i don't want to bring my friends here, i don't want to bring my family here, because i've got a six—year—old niece who we absolutely adore and i don't want her here because i don't want her to be breathing in the same stuff that's making me feel so poorly. liz says her asthma has been getting progressively worse.
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this is footage from a neighbouring flat. with the external cladding removed, this is what can happen when it rains. hundreds of people here say they face a miserable winter living on a building site, and this is one street in one city. but across the country, we�*re going to be seeing much more of this in the months and years ahead. this tower in ipswich has been like this for five months. it�*s a similar picture here in london. and these living conditions are worrying health professionals. they're stuck there, - with all the kind of stresses of the physical environment, the financial worries - and the uncertainty— about when this is going to end. so we're going to see, i think, - quite serious mental health issues. back in the midlands, the leaseholder board overseeing this work said it�*s monitoring issues closely to minimise discomfort. the government told us it�*s unacceptable people are facing these bills, and building owners must make buildings safe, without passing on costs.
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but forjim and his neighbours, life behind the plastic is hard to bear. sarah corker, bbc news, in birmingham. one of the world�*s most wanted drug lords has been captured in colombia, in what�*s seen as the most significant arrest since pablo escobar. hundreds of special forces troops were involved in the operation to seize dairo antonio usuga — known as otoniel, who�*d been hiding out in thejungle. colombia�*s president says it�*s the biggest blow to drug trafficking for three decades. the facebook whistleblower frances haugen will give evidence to mps tomorrow on government plans for social media regulation. the american data scientist worked at facebook for two years, and today met the campaigner, ian russell, whose 14—year—old daughter, molly, took her own life after viewing disturbing content on instagram, which is owned by facebook. angus crawford has more.
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she�*s the former facebook insider who revealed its most

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