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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 24, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc news, i'mjoanna gosling. our top stories... chancellor rishi sunak says this week's budget will focus on helping the economy and delivering a plan forjobs. strong investment in plan for “obs. strong investment in -ublic plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, _ plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, driving _ plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, driving economic l public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving business confidence and then supporting working families. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker is captured — after a joint operation by the armed forces, and the police. a candle—lit vigil to remember halyna hutchins, the film—maker killed on the set of an alec baldwin movie. sold, congratulations. and gone for $110 million — a las vegas hotel auctions off its collection of picasso artworks.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. ministers are to formalise their committment to a "skills revolution" in england, with a series of measures to be unveiled in the chancellor's budget on wednesday. in his autumn statement, rishi sunak will announce £1.6 billion to roll out new "t—levels" for teenagers — and £550 million for adult skills. college leaders say the funding is welcome, but doesn't go far enough. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. what we want to see is a high—wage, high—skill economy... the government says it wants to change the way the uk economy works, moving to a higher skilled, more productive workforce which earns more money. in this week's budget, the chancellor will have the task of setting out more about how we get
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there, and key to his plans will be what the government is selling as a skills revolution. rishi sunak will announce £1.5 billion for t—levels in england for up to 100,000 young people to train for vocational qualifications. there will be £500 million for adult skills too and more than £800 million to revitalise colleges in england. the government argues the plans will give people the skills they need to get on in life. all students, whatever they are doing, whether it be technical education or academic education — or somewhere in between — deserve to have their education properly funded, so we hope this new story, which focuses on technical education, is one part of the announcements that will come out over the course of the next few days. we hope the government will also find the means to address the needs of the vast majority of young people
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who study a—levels or btec qualifications. ministers also want to balance the books after huge spending during the pandemic. but despite concerns over the economic picture, the government is making clear there is money to spend on its political priorities. the question is: will it be enough to deliver the big changes that ministers have promised and will the plans work? well, earlier i spoke to grainne hallahan — who's a senior analyst at tes. she welcomed any talk of new investment in skills. i think the increase in funding is really good news for students who aren't looking at the traditional a—level route of college study and it is also really good news for industries who want to recruit people with skills in technical subjects. however there still needs to be a lot of work done on actually telling
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people what t—levels are and letting people know what is to study because at the moment we know not many people know about them and therefore employers might be a little bit confused when people are going to them with t—levels if they don't know what those actually mean. so tell us what are they and how do they compare with btecs? t—levels or technical levels are meant to be those skills equivalent to a—levels and if you get a distinction in your t—levels, that is the equivalent of three a's at a—level and gives you the same number of ucas points and you can go to university with them. they come in all subjects, different subjects, it is notjust building and hairdressing, it can be design and survey or planning or accountancy or agriculture or animal care but they are rolling these courses out slowly so every moment there are only ten but these will expand by 2023, all 20 subjects should be up and running. am i right in thinking that by 2025 other alternatives will not have
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funding and therefore they are going to gradually become defunct and it will be a much more streamlined system so you have the a—levels, the academic, t—levels the technical? exactly, where there is overlapin btec and t—levels the funding of the btecs is going and originally the plan was that the dfe was just going to have a—levels or t—levels and they seem to have rowed back a bit on that. this announcement today, it looks like the future will be far more t—level shaped rather than btec—shaped and that is a shame because for some students t—levels won't be appropriate so having a wider range of courses is better in lots of ways, and also we have got btecs which are really good, why is the money not being put into improving the btecs that are there already? instead of going out with new courses that haven't actually been written yet and put out yet. not everybody is happy with this for lots of good reasons. what do you think are the reasons behind the switch? as far as i understood,
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t—levels are even more vocational in that they get students into the workplace with more work placements so it is even more practical than the current btec. that is right. you have to have time on a workplace and you have to do your studies and you have to have qualifications in english and maths so it is considered far more rigorous and i think that is a reason why they are pushing for it. however it is not so great when you think about the fact that not all of our students will be suitable for taking these btec, t—level courses and perhaps the btec would have been more suitable for them. i think we need to spend more time talking to colleges themselves and teachers and colleges about the students they work with and asking them what qualifications they think need to be put into place, notjust coming from a point of view of we need to have more skills—based, we are going to push a skills revolution, let's think about the students that
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are out there, and also really importantly we need to improve our careers advice for these young people. back in 2012 we got rid of connections, it was reduced down to a telephone service and the onus was put onto schools to provide advice for young people and they weren't given the funding to do that, so all very well having t—levels, btecs and a—levels and different options for students but unless they get proper independent unbiased advice that is informed to tell them about all the different courses on offer, all of this money is really a waste in some ways because students need to know what there is out there to do and at the moment they are not getting decent careers advice. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker and leader of the country's largest gang has been captured. dairo antonio usuga — known as 0toniel — is the boss of the clan del golfo, and was seized close to the border with panama in a joint operation by the army, air force and police. the president of colombia, ivan duque, described the capture as the most significant blow to drug trafficking in the country since the death of pablo escobar in 1993.
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gail maclellan reports. this is the man with the $5 million bounty on his head. the us government accuses him of exporting tons of cocaine into the united states. antonio usuga, also known as �*0toniel�*, was arrested in a joint operation by the army, airforce and police. 0ne officer died in the operation. the colombian president, ivan duque, described the capture as the most significant blow to drug trafficking in the country since the death of pablo escobar. translation: this man . is a murderer of policemen, soldiers, social leaders as well as a recruiter of minors. usuga has also been accused of human trafficking, extortion, and killing community leaders across the country. it took 500 officers and 22 helicopters and several years
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to bring him tojustice. gail maclellan, bbc news. more than two million letters will be sent to parents and guardians across england from tomorrow, inviting them to book their children in for covid jabs during half—term. health officials are offering vaccinations for those aged 12 to 15, saying it will give them "crucial protection ahead of winter. 0ur correspondent aruna iyengar has more. the biggest rise in covid—19 infections in england is now among 12—to—15—year—olds. that's why health officials are targeting this group and urging their parents to book jabs online during half—term. vaccines are being offered in some schools but not all. 0utside schools there are around 100 vaccination sites offering jabs to teenagers, with more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going be using... in scotland vaccines have been widely available for 12 to 15—year—olds since september. health officials in england are asking families to book in so children and loved ones have
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crucial protection overwinter. we are starting to think about winter and the best chance of everything being open at christmas, being able to visit your family and mixing between teenagers and grandparents — clearly want children to be immunised to reduce the risk of spreading the virus to their elderly relatives. take a deep breath in... 500,000 teenagers have been vaccinated so far. the decision for some families is difficult. young people don't tend to become very ill with covid but they can still pass it on, affecting the wider community and, crucially, their own education if schools have to shut down. over 6,000 people are in hospital with covid, nearly the same number as a year ago. writing in the sunday telegraph today, professor stephen powis, the nhs medical director, is encouraging everyone to take up vaccination offers and booster shots. he says...
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that is why health officials are keen to get all age groups vaccinated ahead of what could be a challenging christmas. from today, fully vaccinated travellers returning to england can take a lateral flow test — rather than a more expensive pcr test — to prove their covid status. the change, which the government has described as a �*huge boost�* for the travel industry, applies to those arriving from non—red—list countries. wales will make the same change to their testing policy next weekend. joining me now is karen dee, chief executive of the airport 0perators association. welcome and thanks forjoining us. the government says it will be a huge boost to the travel industry, do you agree? we
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huge boost to the travel industry, do you agree?— huge boost to the travel industry, do you agree? we do. we have had very stringent _ do you agree? we do. we have had very stringent restrictions - do you agree? we do. we have had very stringent restrictions on - very stringent restrictions on travel going through and the move to, away from the pcr test which can be very expensive for families is very welcome news, especially as it comes in time for the half term in a good. comes in time for the half term in a aood. ., . ., ,, ~' comes in time for the half term in a aood. ., . ., ~ good. how much do you think the cost element of testing _ good. how much do you think the cost element of testing has _ good. how much do you think the cost element of testing has been _ good. how much do you think the cost element of testing has been putting . element of testing has been putting off people versus the complication off people versus the complication of the system? i off people versus the complication of the system?— of the system? i think it is a combination _ of the system? i think it is a combination of— of the system? i think it is a combination of both. - of the system? i think it is a combination of both. pcr i of the system? i think it is a i combination of both. pcr test, of the system? i think it is a - combination of both. pcr test, if you are travelling as a family, can soon add up to be very expensive, but of course in the previous regime we had free departure tests, then dave two and day five in some countries so this is a good simplification of the system and both the burden factor and cost will ensure that families, those wanting to have a break or wanting to reconnect, should find it easier to do it. it reconnect, should find it easier to do it. , ., , ., reconnect, should find it easier to do it. , . , ., ., do it. it is undeniable that travel is 'ust so do it. it is undeniable that travel
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isjust so much _ do it. it is undeniable that travel isjust so much more _ do it. it is undeniable that travell isjust so much more complicated do it. it is undeniable that travel- isjust so much more complicated of your seat now than it used to be because it is notjust the rules in this country that need to be understood and adhered to, and there are discrepancies even here, scotland and northern ireland have said when they will make the change to the day to micro testing, there are also different restrictions in countries being visited. how much do you think all of that is stopping people travelling, where are we now in terms of the numbers travelling compared with what it used to be? you're quite right, it is a more complex system, although there is a lot of good information out there and people do need to do a bit research before they travel. certainly that has had an impact. in the rest of our competitors in the eu, the system is still even more simple than it is here, so if you're travelling between european countries you do not need to test at all if your double vaccinated. that has been an issue. we are now beginning to see some recovery in the uk but we are lagging behind the
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rest of our european competitors stop for example across the summer, we were still loss—making in terms of revenue at uk airports because really only saw passengers get up to 30, 20 or 30% of normalfigures, so we still have a long way to go but we still have a long way to go but we very much hope this will instil some confidence in people that do want to travel. you some confidence in people that do want to travel.— some confidence in people that do want to travel. you said that was a situation in — want to travel. you said that was a situation in the _ want to travel. you said that was a situation in the summer. - want to travel. you said that was a situation in the summer. what - want to travel. you said that was a situation in the summer. what is l want to travel. you said that was a j situation in the summer. what is it currently and how confident are you that things can just continue to build from here when we look at what is happening in terms of covid numbers in this country? certainly for england _ numbers in this country? certainly for england we _ numbers in this country? certainly for england we have _ numbers in this country? certainly for england we have an _ numbers in this country? certainly for england we have an importantl for england we have an important travel period at the moment which is half term, obviously scotland has already had half term, so they can't take benefit from this and we are still waiting for the announcement there, but obviously winter is a much quieter period for aviation anyway, so we are not as a sector
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anywhere near in recovery yet. we characterise it as being just about restarting. but we look forward and are urging government to ensure we can actually get rid of the dust of those testing requirements as soon as the health situation changes as they have done europe so we can be ready and prepared for a much better spring and summer situation. it is definitely a step in the right direction, but it is going to be some time before our sector, uk aviation, is going to be properly recovering. aviation, is going to be properly recovering-_ aviation, is going to be properly recoverinu. ., ~ , ., , . ., recovering. thank you very much for “oininu recovering. thank you very much for joining us- — details are still emerging over how the actor alec baldwin accidentally shot dead the cinematographer halyna hutchins on a movie set. investigations are ongoing as court documents suggest the actor was told the gun was safe, moments before the shooting. meanwhile a candlelight vigil has taken place in new mexico to honour her memory. with more, here's tanya dendrinos. a cinematographer, a wife, a mother,
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and a life cut tragically short. by candlelight in albuquerque, not far from the bonanza creek ranch, halyna hutchins was remembered. she was beloved, talented, respected and loving. she was also passionate about her work and that is really who all of you are, she was part of our family, one of us. the 42—year—old was killed and film directorjoel souza injured when a prop gun with a live round was fired by actor alec baldwin on the set of the film rust. court records revealed mr baldwin was handed the gun by an assistant director who told the actor the weapon was safe. her death should not have happened. union sets should be safe sets. every person deserves to go to work with complete security knowing they can perform their work
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and return home safely. this moment has shaken all of us to the very core and we will carry her in our hearts and minds forever. police investigations are continuing as hollywood mourns the loss of one of its rising stars. the american film institute establishing the halyna hutchins memorial scholarship fund in her honour. i was really lucky to get to work with her, because whom i met was one of the most talented and kind, collaborative artists who did things that i could never ever think of, that her photography was beautiful, and every day everybody on the camera team was proud to be there for her. her husband described her legacy as too meaningful
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to encapsulate in words. a harrowing and and a long list of questions remaining. it's been a week since clashes between shia and christian groups in lebanon led to the deaths of seven people. although beirut is now calm, the incident has raised fears of a return to the civil war which dominated lebanese life at the end of the 20th century. 0ur middle east correspondent anna foster reports from beirut. a week ago she was a mother. now they call her a martyr. mariam farhat was one of seven people killed in the worst violence in beirut for a decade. it brought back painful memories. translation: we lived - through the civil war and we know who committed the crimes. i protected my children, my daughter. when they were children i protected them from shelling and snipers.
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lebanon is no stranger to war. for 15 years its people fought each other. last week's running battle in the streets of beirut mirrored life there in the 1970s and �*80s. a week after the fighting there is still paralysis. the shia muslim and christian armed groups continue to trade barbed insults. lebanon's politically fractured cabinet hasn't met. there is fear about what might come next. mariam's son wants her death to send a message. we don't need civil war in lebanon. if my mother has faith of not having a new civil war, for me and for my family and for all my family we accept this, to stop the civil war. the people of lebanon are living through a crippling financial crisis.
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it's exhausting humiliating, but could it trigger a fresh conflict? civil war needs a generalised state of hatred. i don't think we are there. i think we are on the level of political parties able to mobilise their sympathisers, during episodes on short periods. i don't believe deep inside that we are on the verge of a civil war, but maybe a series of similar episodes of violent clashes. they are still cleaning up here but the streets are calm and order has been restored. what hasn't been resolved though are the underlying tensions that led to this violence and that makes it very difficult to predict how all this will end. when danny 0'ryan was diagnosed with dementia three years ago, his wife carole set out to help him fulfill some life—long ambitions. danny — who began learning the piano and organ almost 80 years ago — has always dreamed of playing on the big stage — so carole made it happen. audrey dias has been to meet them.
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making sweet music to fulfil the ambition of a lifetime. 82—year—old danny from 0swestry has played the piano since he was four, but he has always dreamt of playing the famous wurlitzer organ at blackpool tower. so i'd start a tune and he would move up and change the taps and the settings while i was playing, so — and we just went on non—stop for an hour doing that. and, of course, what i can do is i can play the piano or the organ and play in any key. on monday, his wife carole made that dream a reality. he played great and he came out of the stage and his face — he was concentrating so hard, i think the building could've fell down and i don't think he'd have noticed! the family filmed the performance so danny can watch it again and again. he was on an absolute high
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and i thought, do you know, these things are so worth it — sorting out what he wants to do and what he enjoys doing and making the effort to do it. he was diagnosed with dementia three years ago and after the initial shock, carole decided to give her husband a series of experiences to treasure. he's always looked after me and now's my time to make sure his life is all right. you know, that's important. they've been married for 47 years and carole is determined danny's dementia won't define their relationship from now on. that person hasn't changed, that person is still there. they might not be able to cope with life like they did and you might have very exasperated moments with them but, at the end of the day, that's the person you married and you just go along with it and accept what the day brings. their next big project is a trip to australia to see their grandchild. until then, they have always got the music to keep them smiling.
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audrey dias, bbc news. the duchess of cornwall has said she would love to see more young people educated about osteoporosis. she was speaking to gloria hunniford for the bbc to mark world 0steoporosis day, and also opened up about her mother's struggles with the condition. it was terrible, because we didn't know anything about it, so at some point we thought, well, is she making a great fuss about this? 0ccasionally when she moved or you touched her she literally screamed. i remember when a friend of hers came in one day just to give her a hug, her rib broke. a collection of artworks by picasso has been auctioned by the hotel in las vegas where they've been displayed for the past 20 years. until now, they were a striking centrepiece of the picasso restaurant at the hotel on las vegas strip. but the hotel's owner, mgm, decided to sell off the works. catherine karelli reports.
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it was the smallest piece in the sale, but the star of the show. this 1938 portrait of picasso's muse and lover fetched more than $40 million. this was one of the other highlights of the auction, a 1969 painting, one of the artist's later works. it is part of a wider move by mgm resorts to make its global collection more diverse and inclusive. the auction of picasso's work was hosted by sotheby�*s and held at the bellagio hotel in las vegas. it brought in nearly $109 million. several of the 11 pieces have been on display at the las vegas hotel for years. but now the hotel says it wants to shift its focus and showcase more works by women, people of colour, lgbtq artists and those with disabilities. i've gotten the sense there is a change in management of focus,
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las vegas likes to reinvent itself every ten years, so there is always new invention on what the direction will be. over the past year american museums and art galleries have been working to broaden their collections. it is part of a wider cultural reckoning over racism in the us that started in 2020. this marks the start of a new chapter in the art world. but how it will play out remains to be seen. and crowds have been flocking to the new "dubai eye" — the world's largest and tallest ferris wheel. the giant structure stands at 250 metres tall. together the pods can carry 1,750 visitors in a single rotation for a rotation lasting 30 minutes. it was officially opened with a laser and lavish firework display.
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hello. another mild day out there today with a good breeze blowing around the autumn leaves. that's how it's going to stay over the next few days, quite breezy at times, mild and with showers in the forecast for today and for tomorrow. here is the satellite picture, and a weather front has been crossing the country, so it was quite wet, quite cloudy at the very least across many western parts of the uk. really quite wet in the southwest of scotland overnight but i think by the time we get to lunchtime the weather front�*s here, so cloudy for a time across england and wales before that cloud breaks up to allow some sunshine, and certainly sunny spells in the west of the uk here. most—frequent showers in the north—west of the country, and some hail and thunder possible as well. now, through tonight, the atlantic breeze continues
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to blow in the showers. there will be clear spells around, too, but thanks to the wind and a bit of mild air that's over us, those local temperatures won't drop off too low. in fact, 12 degrees in london, nine degrees expected in belfast, glasgow and edinburgh. 0nto the forecast for tomorrow. it starts off quite sunny for many parts of the uk, but showers continue there right from the word go in western scotland and northern ireland. there will be showers scattered elsewhere, some of them will move deeper inland but i think the further east and south—east you are the drier the weather will be through tomorrow. 15 in london on monday, 11 in the north, so temporarily cooling off in the north before the temperatures rise again as we head into tuesday. it's brought in by this next area of low pressure. you can see quite strong south—westerly winds drawing in that warmth from the southern climes, and in fact that mild air spresds all the way across scotland as well. so early in the morning some rain across the western isles and central scotland eventually, too. perhaps some wet weather for northern ireland. much of england and wales
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stays dry on tuesday, maybe a few spits and spots around the lake district. look at the temperatures, 16 and 17 degrees in some spots, that's way above the average for example in belfast. how about the rest of the week? quite a strong jet stream out in the atlantic, this big dip here spawning an area of low pressure. that means weather fronts will be heading our way. further heavy rain expected towards the end of the week. at times it could even turn very, very windy but i think the real message for this week is how changeable at times the weather is going to be with those showers coming in and those particularly high temperatures up to 18. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news, i'mjoanna gosling.
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britain's chancellor, rishi sunak, says his budget on wednesday will focus on rebuilding the uk economy with investment in public services and deliver a plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving business confidence and then supporting working families. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker is captured — after a joint operation by the armed forces, and the police. a candlelit vigil to remember halyna hutchins, the film—maker killed on the set of an alec baldwin movie. and gone for $110 million: a las vegas hotel auctions off its collection of picasso artworks. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has been speaking to the bbc in the past hour — ahead of his budget on wednesday. 0ur political correspondent charlotte rose is here. covid time impacting and what is likely to do.
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covid time impacting and what is likely to do— covid time impacting and what is likel to do. ~ , , , ., likely to do. absolutely. this whole bud . et will likely to do. absolutely. this whole budget will be _

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