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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 24, 2021 9:30am-10:00am BST

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to allocate £1.6 billion for t—levels skills training for 16 to 19—year—olds as "a good start". it is a bit of a gamble from the government because we don't know yet whether those 16—year—olds will want to do t—levels when already there are courses there which appear to have suited them really well. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker is captured — after a joint operation by the armed forces, and the police. a candlelit vigil to remember halyna hutchins, the film—maker killed on the set of an alec baldwin movie. and gone for $110 million: a las vegas hotel auctions off its collection of picasso artworks. sarah mulkerrins has the sport. let's begin with a superb showing from england's cricketers — a perfect start for them to their t20 world cup campaign. they thrashed defending champions west indies by six wickets,
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after bowling them all out forjust 55 runs. our sports correspondent joe wilson reports. the cricketers of west indies and england shared the stance against racism at the t20 world cup. they share memories in this competition. the last final, when carlos braithwaite�*s magnificent sixes took the trophy away from england. the best of times, the worst of times. but it motivated england. they are now ranked top of the world in this format and from this moment, we saw why. the west indies side was mature. chris gayle, now 42, made 13. success for tymal mills on his england comeback. dwayne bravo, jonny bairstow. caught it. the captain's brain beneath the caps. everything eoin morgan thought worked and how west indies obliged.
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where england's fielders stood west indies batters hit — there! four wickets for adil rashid. 55 all out 7 completely the new england. the batting wasn't perfect, though. hosein�*s agility to catch livingston. four wickets down but in the ninth over it was done. england looks like the world number one. joe wilson, bbc news. there was a rout at stamford bridge, as the premier league's top side chelsea beat bottom—of—the—table norwich 7—0. mason mount hadn't scored since may but he started the hosts off inside the first ten minutes — and that was just a sign of things to come. callum hudson odoi, reece james and ben chilwell all got on the score sheet, before mount finished off the scoring, with his first chelsea hat—trick. manchester city are breathing down chelsea's neck, just two points behind them. phil foden was impressive yet again,
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scoring twice in city's 4—1win at brighton. and what a turnaround we saw from watford — beaten 5—0 by liverpool last week, they put five past everton — including a hat—trick from josh king, who was on loan at everton last season. it finished 5—2. we have one of the great rivalries in english football to look forward to — it's manchester united against liverpool, and whereas united's form has been erratic this season, liverpool can go second with a win, so they'll provide a tough challenge. it's going to take everything to get a result against the best teams in europe and the world and liverpool are one of them at the moment. they are one of them at the moment. they are one of them at the moment. they are one of the teams that we are chasing and we are trying to chase because we have had, what they have done the last four years is something that we are striving
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towards, and of course go past them. a point at st mirren today will be enough to put rangers back on top of the scottish premiership. they slipped below hearts on goal difference after they drew 1—1 at home to dundee. hearts could have gone clear at the top — john souttar put the edinburgh side ahead but poor defending was punished and jason cummings equalised. england's women continued their unbeaten start to qualifying for the 2023 world cup. they comfortably beat northern ireland 4—0 in their first competitive match at the new wembley. 23,000 fans watched as beth mead became the first woman to score a hat—trick for england there. that took them back to the top of their group
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with three wins from three. northern ireland stay third. iam very i am very happy for the team that she scored goals and for her especially but the team feels really good and the players feel comfortable and it feels like we are cooperating and collaborating together and the players can shine to. max verstappen edged out lewis hamilton in qualifying for the us grand prix, which returns after last year's race was cancelled due to the pandemic. the championship leader was two tenths of a second quicker than hamilton's mercedes, as he claimed his ninth pole of the season. verstappen will also have support from his red bull team mate sergio perez who'll start from third. great britain have won a second gold medal at the track cycling world championships in france — and once again it came in the omnium, ethan hayter following katie archibald's success by dominating the points race, the final event of the four—race contest. it's his first
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individual world title. a couple of years ago, the last time i took part in the world ominium, i was leading literally until 20 laps to go. that was obviously quite hard to do. i was 50 laps in and i had built up a bit of a lead, i felt good still and i thought i was in control 7 crazy feeling. that's all the sport for now. hello and welcome to our look at what this morning's papers are saying. with me are the social commentatorjoanna jarjue, and dave wooding, the political editor of the sun on sunday.
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welcome to both of you. let's have a look at the front pages. amid rising covid infections, the observer says the uk health security agency — formerly public health england — has written to local councils to canvass their level of support for the rollout of �*plan b�* covid rules. the independent has been speaking to health professionals who warn the nhs faces its hardest winter yet — as soaring covid cases combine with a surge in a&e demand. the telegraph says the chancellor will use next week's budget statement to announce plans for a digital overhaul of the nhs. the paper also has a picture of the head armourer on the film set where alec baldwin shot and killed cinematographer halyna hutchins. the upcoming budget is also the lead for the express which says plans to beef up border security
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will be at the heart of the chancellor's speech. the times leads on the case of a british soldier who has confessed to murdering a 21—year—old woman while training in kenya in 2012. and as the cop climate summit looms, the mirror claims borisjohnson flew over 1,000 miles in two weeks — byjetting between campaign trips and events on a private jet so let's begin. let's start with the news on the front of the observer. ministers ave the front of the observer. ministers pave the way — front of the observer. ministers pave the way for _ front of the observer. ministers pave the way for plan _ front of the observer. ministers pave the way for plan b - front of the observer. ministers pave the way for plan b in - front of the observer. ministers - pave the way for plan b in england. dave, the government has been saying they are not going for plan b but it seems that is planning for that behind—the—scenes. i seems that is planning for that behind-the-scenes._ seems that is planning for that behind-the-scenes. i suspect of the sto will behind-the-scenes. i suspect of the story will privately _ behind-the-scenes. i suspect of the story will privately infuriate - behind-the-scenes. i suspect of the story will privately infuriate boris i story will privately infuriate boris johnson and some of his ministers. they have been spending most of the week telling us there is plan b. just to refresh, this is to tell us all we must wear masks in public spaces, we must work from home
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wherever possible. it is not quite a lockdown but it is tightening up restrictions again. and of course this uk healths security agency has written to all these public bodies and local council chiefs and asked what is your view on this, what do you think? what sort of restriction should we impose? that then sets running there is a secret plan to impose up plan b at some stage. joanna, what is your sense on how ministers best handle this in fact that we have seen this before and this it will not happen and then it happens and last christmas it was very late in the day people had to change the plans and yesterday we had a warning from someone saying he is concerned about the prospects of another cancelled christmas and therefore it is better to bring in restrictions now? i
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therefore it is better to bring in restrictions now?— therefore it is better to bring in restrictions now? i think by now we have noticed _ restrictions now? i think by now we have noticed this _ restrictions now? i think by now we have noticed this government - restrictions now? i think by now we have noticed this government is - restrictions now? i think by now we | have noticed this government is the government of u—turns, that is all it seems_ government of u—turns, that is all it seems like it does especially when _ it seems like it does especially when it— it seems like it does especially when it comes to this pandemic. it is concerning that section within the government, a body like the uk healths _ the government, a body like the uk healths security agency is speaking to councils — healths security agency is speaking to councils because it kind of show is a hit _ to councils because it kind of show is a hit of— to councils because it kind of show is a bit of mistrust and the government and shows they are not really _ government and shows they are not really working in parallel with each other, _ really working in parallel with each other, it _ really working in parallel with each other, it shows they are doing something completely different in terms _ something completely different in terms of— something completely different in terms of the pandemic and i think with the _ terms of the pandemic and i think with the government we have seen there _ with the government we have seen there are _ with the government we have seen there are conversations had behind—the—scenes but i think to save _ behind—the—scenes but i think to save face — behind—the—scenes but i think to save face especially because of the vaccination roll—out which has basically _ vaccination roll—out which has basically been then they market their_ basically been then they market their saving grace like the pandemic, they are still clinging onto_ pandemic, they are still clinging onto that — pandemic, they are still clinging onto that and i think public opinion and having — onto that and i think public opinion and having the support of the public is at the _ and having the support of the public is at the top of their agenda and bringing — is at the top of their agenda and bringing in extra mandates, masks and asking — bringing in extra mandates, masks and asking people to work from home
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and asking people to work from home and especially potential vaccine passports is something that probably won't be _ passports is something that probably won't be very popular with voters so ithink— won't be very popular with voters so i think they— won't be very popular with voters so i think they are playing politics with this — i think they are playing politics with this and dragging their feet in terms _ with this and dragging their feet in terms of— with this and dragging their feet in terms of what they should probably be terms of what they should probably he doing _ terms of what they should probably be doing. it terms of what they should probably be doinu. ., , , terms of what they should probably be doinu. . , , ., ., be doing. it leads us into the front ofthe be doing. it leads us into the front of the independent. _ be doing. it leads us into the front of the independent. nhs - be doing. it leads us into the front of the independent. nhs facing i be doing. it leads us into the frontj of the independent. nhs facing its hardest winter yet. we have been hearing from the nhs confederation for a few days saying things need to change now because basically there is only one way things are going with winter coming and covid numbers ticking up. dave, it is a perennial story injournalism, the ticking up. dave, it is a perennial story in journalism, the winter crisis but all these extra factors. flew puts added pressure on the nhs and with dash—mac influenza puts added pressure on the nhs and with
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covid, even more siren voices then we had in the past. infection rates are going up. 50,000 is the latest figure we are hearing but deaths and serious admissions to hospital and down. i think 6% of hospital admissions at the moment, people in hospital are suffering from covid but it is right to be on guard. that influenza crisis will add to that and it is important we get influenza jabs this year as well as covid. than jabs this year as well as covid. an extraordinary statistic that one in ten nhs trust still operates on a paper based system. it seems now
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rishi sunak really wants to nail the digital revolution in the nhs. this is a surprise _ digital revolution in the nhs. this is a surprise to _ digital revolution in the nhs. this is a surprise to me because i thought— is a surprise to me because i thought it _ is a surprise to me because i thought it was more widespread throughout the country and i thought everybody _ throughout the country and i thought everybody had an nhs number and you were able _ everybody had an nhs number and you were able to view your patient records — were able to view your patient records that way but i think the plan _ records that way but i think the plan with— records that way but i think the plan with this is to give people the opportunity to give people the chance — opportunity to give people the chance to book appointments online. i'm surprised this is our leading story— i'm surprised this is our leading story in— i'm surprised this is our leading story in terms of rishi sunak concentrating so much in the digitisation of the nhs because it seems _ digitisation of the nhs because it seems like there has been so much conversation about the nhs when it comes— conversation about the nhs when it comes to _ conversation about the nhs when it comes to covid and it seems to me we have bigger— comes to covid and it seems to me we have bigger fish to fry than that but there — have bigger fish to fry than that but there is a passive backlog and -- massive— but there is a passive backlog and —— massive end if we were to look
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into it _ —— massive end if we were to look into it on — —— massive end if we were to look into it on a — —— massive end if we were to look into it on a granular level we might see it _ into it on a granular level we might see it would help the problem of backiogs — see it would help the problem of backlogs but i'm surprised to see it as a key— backlogs but i'm surprised to see it as a key thing in his agenda. what are our as a key thing in his agenda. what are your thoughts, _ as a key thing in his agenda. what are your thoughts, dave? - as a key thing in his agenda. what are your thoughts, dave? let's . as a key thing in his agenda. what| are your thoughts, dave? let's not foruet are your thoughts, dave? let's not for: et the are your thoughts, dave? let's not forget the nhs _ are your thoughts, dave? let's not forget the nhs does _ are your thoughts, dave? let's not forget the nhs does need - are your thoughts, dave? let's not forget the nhs does need reform. | are your thoughts, dave? let's not. forget the nhs does need reform. we are all very proud of the nhs and has had lots of praise heaped on it over the last couple of years, understandably and correctly because of the work the staff have done in tackling this pandemic bravely. however it is a big giant leviathan of an organisation. we used to spend 28% of government spending on the nhs 20 years ago and is now a0%. a lot of this is down to people living longer and new treatments for all sorts of ailments. reform is vital if all this money going on is to be spent wisely where we all wanted to be spent and that is on making people better. be spent and that is on making peeple better-— be spent and that is on making people better. more news in your --aer people better. more news in your paper about _ people better. more news in your paper about what _ people better. more news in your paper about what will _ people better. more news in your paper about what will be - people better. more news in your paper about what will be in - people better. more news in your paper about what will be in the i paper about what will be in the budget. the skills revolution. we have been covering it on the bbc
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this morning. page two of the sun. the 3 billion skills revolution. there is loads of stuff out in the various papers on the budget so we are getting a sense of what is to come. in terms of spending so much on that, what is the story? this come. in terms of spending so much on that, what is the story?— on that, what is the story? this is the biggest _ on that, what is the story? this is the biggest figure _ on that, what is the story? this is the biggest figure we've - on that, what is the story? this is the biggest figure we've got - on that, what is the story? this is the biggest figure we've got so i on that, what is the story? this is| the biggest figure we've got so far of any spending commitment. we have beaver doubt away to work out more during the past week. a lot will be on education and on t—levels. there is a new campaign called multiply which will be aimed at adult numeracy and will help those who have left school but do not have the equivalent of a grade c in gcse to
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brush up on their maths. not only brush up on their maths. not only brush up on their maths. not only brush up but learn to add properly which is holding many people back from some of those jobs and because of the shortage of staff in so many areas like writing and reading and broadcasting about in recent weeks we need more people with skills and of british people to get these higher paid jobs we need to brush up on more skills and that is something the chancellor is targeting this money out in his budget on wednesday. money out in his budget on wednesday-— money out in his budget on wednesday. money out in his budget on wednesda .g ., ., , , ., wednesday. joanna, what is your view on the money — wednesday. joanna, what is your view on the money for— wednesday. joanna, what is your view on the money for the _ wednesday. joanna, what is your view on the money for the skills _ on the money for the skills revolution? i on the money for the skills revolution?— on the money for the skills revolution? ~ , . ., , revolution? i think it is certainly important _ revolution? i think it is certainly important and _ revolution? i think it is certainly important and definitely - revolution? i think it is certainlyl important and definitely needed, especially after brexit. it depends what areas and who will realistically adopt this. i think in this country sometimes there are so many— this country sometimes there are so many schemes and things that are happening and gaps we see but unfortunately not enough people within _ unfortunately not enough people within the british public go in to fill those — within the british public go in to fill those gaps. i think this is something else that will definitely
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complement the government levelling up complement the government levelling up agenda and another counterpart to help boost _ up agenda and another counterpart to help boost that when the draw up their sound bites but anything that helps _ their sound bites but anything that helps the — their sound bites but anything that helps the working class i am always four~ _ helps the working class i am always four i_ helps the working class i am always four~ ithink— helps the working class i am always four. i think it is a good idea as long _ four. i think it is a good idea as long as — four. i think it is a good idea as long as it— four. i think it is a good idea as long as it is— four. i think it is a good idea as long as it is orchestrated properly and goes — long as it is orchestrated properly and goes towards people who needed and goes towards people who needed and benefits them in the right way. the mail— and benefits them in the right way. the mail on sunday, a double page spread, rishi sunak, iwill the mail on sunday, a double page spread, rishi sunak, i will make women safer. £435 million to beef up street lightning. there has been a lot of pressure on the government for changes to be made to make women safer. after the murder of sarah everard in particular. i
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safer. after the murder of sarah everard in particular.— everard in particular. i after the murder of— everard in particular. i after the murder of sarah _ everard in particular. i after the murder of sarah everard - everard in particular. i after the murder of sarah everard there l everard in particular. i after the - murder of sarah everard there were so many— murder of sarah everard there were so many enquiries going on police conduct _ so many enquiries going on police conduct and vetting procedures but on this— conduct and vetting procedures but on this that they are focusing on improved — on this that they are focusing on improved street lighting, better cctv— improved street lighting, better cctv and — improved street lighting, better cctv and more money for crown prosecution services. in a sense this is— prosecution services. in a sense this is good, anything that can make women _ this is good, anything that can make women feel— this is good, anything that can make women feel safer is always good for me as _ women feel safer is always good for me as a _ women feel safer is always good for me as a young woman and i think me and my— me as a young woman and i think me and my friends have been quite terrified — and my friends have been quite terrified after all the things that have _ terrified after all the things that have been happening in terms of women _ have been happening in terms of women being subject to violence and their safety. it almost feels like this is— their safety. it almost feels like this is a — their safety. it almost feels like this is a bit of a plaster to cover a more — this is a bit of a plaster to cover a more deep problem and it would be -ood a more deep problem and it would be good to— a more deep problem and it would be good to see _ a more deep problem and it would be good to see investment or even more investigation into what is the root of the _ investigation into what is the root of the problem, why women are feeling — of the problem, why women are feeling unsafe in the first place. streetlights are everywhere already and women are still in danger so it seems _ and women are still in danger so it seems as— and women are still in danger so it seems as if— and women are still in danger so it seems as if it has got the right intent — seems as if it has got the right intent but _ seems as if it has got the right intent but i would like to see more
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substance — intent but i would like to see more substance. , ., , substance. dave, there is also news in the mail — substance. dave, there is also news in the mail coverage _ substance. dave, there is also news in the mail coverage of— substance. dave, there is also news in the mail coverage of domestic - in the mail coverage of domestic flight duty. what we're hearing in the papers today is the spending, obviously, that begs the question of how this will be paid for.— how this will be paid for. domestic fli . hts is how this will be paid for. domestic flights is an _ how this will be paid for. domestic flights is an interesting _ how this will be paid for. domestic flights is an interesting one - flights is an interesting one because we are nearly a week away from cop26, the climate summit in glasgow and the chancellor says he will cut duty on internal flights which often people travel around the uk by train instead. the other interesting thing is the article by david davies, the former brexit secretary says the chancellor spending too much here. he is going to tax too much and can't claim to to tax too much and can't claim to to be the successor to margaret thatcher as he has been promoted by
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some of his allies if he will spend some of his allies if he will spend so much and he is warning there will be dire consequences ahead of it goes ahead on the scale he is in spending and taxing. but this is against a backdrop of an unprecedented pandemic where £4 billion is being splashed out it keep the soul and work and keep us all safe and we are now £2.2 trillion in debt stop so there's not a lot of manoeuvre for the chancellor on this one with taxis and to watch the spending. you mentioned _ and to watch the spending. you mentioned flight _ and to watch the spending. you mentioned flight issues ahead of cop26. the front page of the mirror, the prime minister racking up a lot of miles two weeks ahead of cop26. i think we can have a look at the front page. i don't think we have it, actually. basically, 1000 miles in two weeks and it adds up to a lot of carbon emissions. dave. i
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in two weeks and it adds up to a lot of carbon emissions. dave.- of carbon emissions. dave. i take this one with _ of carbon emissions. dave. i take this one with a _ of carbon emissions. dave. i take this one with a bit _ of carbon emissions. dave. i take this one with a bit of— of carbon emissions. dave. i take this one with a bit of pinch - of carbon emissions. dave. i take this one with a bit of pinch of- this one with a bit of pinch of salt, a bit of an easy hit. if you are a climate change enthusiast campaigner, he would say we should all fly less however you have to take on board that prime ministers and world leaders have to fly to get round and do the work in the time they have available. yes, we all have seem but there's nothing better to face—to—face. —— zoom. dash—mac there is nothing better than a face—to—face. all the people flying into glasgow will be flying in by plane. borisjohnson is a prime minister and he has to fly around. even the queen has been getting into zoom. there are a lot of articles wonder whether she has to slow down. there is one article saying on every
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engagement she will be accompanied by someone else from the royal family so she has to pull back there will not be the disappointment of it being completely cancelled. this article in the sunday telegraph by jennie bond says we have seen the queen conducting many things by modern technology, zoom and skype conversations and they have given us an insight into your personality and she's been relaxed and chatty and glimpses of her sense of humour. the question is how much can she do going forward? joanna, she doesn't seem to have slowed down very much. she has been incredibly busy and she is 95. ., ., ., she has been incredibly busy and she is 95. . . ,, ., , is 95. yeah, and i think that this is 95. yeah, and i think that this is something — is 95. yeah, and i think that this is something that _ is 95. yeah, and i think that this is something that is _ is 95. yeah, and i think that this is something that is not - is 95. yeah, and i think that this l is something that is not surprising with the _ is something that is not surprising with the queens personality and everybody compliments a lot in the amount— everybody compliments a lot in the amount of— everybody compliments a lot in the amount of hard work she puts in even at this— amount of hard work she puts in even at this age _ amount of hard work she puts in even at this age i— amount of hard work she puts in even at this age. i think she is 95 now. ithink— at this age. i think she is 95 now. i think there _ at this age. i think she is 95 now. i think there is probably extra pressure _ i think there is probably extra pressure on the queen at the moment because _ pressure on the queen at the moment because of— pressure on the queen at the moment
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because of all the controversy that has been _ because of all the controversy that has been around the royal family and ithink— has been around the royal family and i think she _ has been around the royal family and i think she really is the glue that holds _ i think she really is the glue that holds altogether and she is the person— holds altogether and she is the person that everybody holds so closely — person that everybody holds so closely to their hearts. so i think that the — closely to their hearts. so i think that the queen should probably slow down and _ that the queen should probably slow down and is probably feeling at this point but _ down and is probably feeling at this point but at the end of the day it is probably the job she loves she wants— is probably the job she loves she wants to — is probably the job she loves she wants to serve her country and probably— wants to serve her country and probably has to do some damage control— probably has to do some damage control as — probably has to do some damage control as well and still keep it all together because that is so much that has— all together because that is so much that has happened with the criticisms of meghan and harry leaving — criticisms of meghan and harry leaving the family and with her son as well— leaving the family and with her son as well with the scandal. the leaving the family and with her son as well with the scandal.— as well with the scandal. the day before she _ as well with the scandal. the day before she went _ as well with the scandal. the day before she went into _ as well with the scandal. the day before she went into hospital- as well with the scandal. the day| before she went into hospital she turned down the chance to be recipient of all day of the year and said you're only as old as you feel.
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——0ldie. that is really what people want to hear and be able to see from her. it want to hear and be able to see from her. , . . ., want to hear and be able to see from her. , . ., ., , ., , her. it is amazing to see how she works with _ her. it is amazing to see how she works with younger _ her. it is amazing to see how she works with younger people - her. it is amazing to see how she works with younger people and l her. it is amazing to see how she i works with younger people and the zoom calls show she is not as old as she seems and she can grip zoom better than some younger people. some ambassadors when they want to join the court of stjames have to meet the queen as she has gone ahead by zoom and they have had some remarkable conversation with her and some of her personality shine through even when she is down the line so she really is a remarkable old lady. line so she really is a remarkable old lad . , ., line so she really is a remarkable oldlad. , ., , old lady. lets a story about young male novelists _ old lady. lets a story about young male novelists being _ old lady. lets a story about young male novelists being left - old lady. lets a story about young male novelists being left the - old lady. lets a story about young. male novelists being left the shelf. this is in the sunday times. there has been a lot about pushing young upcoming women through but now one
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author, she says it has perhaps gone too far the other way. she said if it was all male dominated that would be a bad thing and if it was all female dominated that will be just as bad, we need to mix it up. on the point is also being made very few young men are breaking into literary publishing and there are not as many male readers out there as female readers. i don't have that is true, but what is your perspective, dave? is the token male in this sense, i am outnumbered by women, men have dominated the literary world for many years but maybe it is the turn of women to have a goal and it is amazing how they have overtaken men. i think there were 39 women on the entry for prizes on the bestselling list a notice 57%. i don't care what
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the gender of the person who writes a book is as long as it is good. there are some strides being made in the music world. the bbc proms perform lots of women composer music this year and bbc radio three are playing it on air. perhaps women are coming late to the game and some of these arts and that is a very good thing because there are a lot of very talented femurs out there. by, very talented femurs out there. a good point to end on. we are out of time. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. thank you. that's it for the papers this morning — from us all, goodbye. hello. another mild day out there today with a good breeze blowing around the autumn leaves. that's how it's going to stay over the next few days,
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quite breezy at times, mild and with showers in the forecast for today and for tomorrow. here is the satellite picture, and a weather front has been and a weatherfront has been crossing the country, so it was quite wet, quite cloudy at the very least across many western parts of the uk. really quite wet in the southwest of scotland overnight but i think by the time we get to lunchtime the weatherfront�*s here, so cloudy for a time across england and wales before that cloud breaks up to allow some sunshine, and certainly sunny spells in the west of the uk here. most—frequent showers in the north—west of the country, and some hail and thunder possible as well. now, through tonight, the atlantic breeze continues to blow in the showers. there will be clear spells around, too, but thanks to the wind and the mild air that's over us, those local temperatures won't drop off too low. in fact, 12 degrees in london, nine degrees expected in belfast, glasgow and edinburgh. 0nto the forecast for tomorrow. it starts off quite sunny for many parts of the uk, but showers continue there right from the word go in western scotland and northern ireland. there will be showers scattered elsewhere, some of them will move deeper inland
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but i think the further east and south—east you are the drier the weather will be through tomorrow. 15 in london on monday, 11 in the north, so temporarily cooling off in the north before the temperatures rise again as we head into tuesday. it's brought in by this next area of low pressure. you can see quite strong south—westerly winds drawing in that warmth from the southern climes, and in fact that mild air spresds all the way across scotland as well. so early in the morning some rain across the western isles and central scotland eventually, too. perhaps some wet weather for northern ireland. much of england and wales stays dry on tuesday, maybe a few spits and spots around the lake district. look at the temperatures, 16 and 17 degrees in some spots, that's way above the average for example in belfast. how about the rest of the week? quite a strong jet stream out in the atlantic, this big dip here spawning an area of low pressure. that means weatherfronts will be heading our way. further heavy rain expected towards the end of the week. at times it could even turn very, very windy but i think the real message for this week is how changeable at times the weather
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is going to be with those showers coming in and those particularly high temperatures up to 18. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news, i'mjoanna gosling. our top stories... chancellor rishi sunak says this week's budget will focus on helping the economy and delivering a plan forjobs. strong investment in plan for “obs. strong investment in -ublic plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, _ plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, driving _ plan forjobs. strong investment in public services, driving economic l public services, driving economic growth by investing in infrastructure, innovation and skills, giving business confidence and then supporting working families. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker is captured — after a joint operation by the armed forces, and the police. a candle—lit vigil to remember halyna hutchins, the film—maker killed on the set of an alec baldwin movie. sold, congratulations. and gone for $110 million — a las vegas hotel auctions off its collection of picasso artworks.

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