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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 24, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and katherine downes. our headlines today: the government doubles down on its skills revolution, confirming it'll spend billions on training and new technical qualifications. millions of letters will be sent to parents in england this week, urging them to use the half term holiday to get their children vaccinated. film directorjoel souza speaks for the first time since being accidentally shot on set by alec baldwin. england make a stunning start to the t20 world cup — they hammer defending champions west indies. england captain eoin morgan says, "it is as good as it gets."
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sunday is looking mild. a bit of rain in the forecast but sunny spells on the way too. it's sunday the 24th of october. good morning. our main story: ministers are to formalise their committment to a skills revolution in england with a series of measures to be unveiled in the chancellor's budget on wednesday. in his autumn statement, rishi sunak will announce £1.6 billion to roll out new t—levels for teenagers and £550 million for adult skills. college leaders say the funding is welcome but doesn't go far enough. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. what we want to see is a high wage, high skilled economy... the government _ high skilled economy... the government says _ high skilled economy... the government says it - high skilled economy... the government says it wants to change the way the uk economy works, moving to higher skilled, more productive workforce which earns more money. in
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this week's budget, the chancellor will have the task of setting out more about how we get there and key to his plans will be what the government is selling as a skills revolution. rishi sunak will announce £i.5 revolution. rishi sunak will announce £1.5 billion for t levels in england for up to 100,000 young people to train for vocational qualifications. there will be 500 million for adult skills too and more than 800 million to revitalise colleges in england. the government argues the plans will give people the skills they need to get on in life. all the skills they need to get on in life. �* w' , . , the skills they need to get on in life. ~ , ., , ., life. all skills, whatever they are doinu , life. all skills, whatever they are doing, whether _ life. all skills, whatever they are doing, whether it _ life. all skills, whatever they are doing, whether it be _ life. all skills, whatever they are doing, whether it be technical. doing, whether it be technical education or academic education, or somewhere in between, deserve to have their education properly funded so we hope this new story, which focuses on technical education, is one part of the announcements that will come out over the course of the next few days. we hope the government will find the means to
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address the needs of the vast majority of young people to study a—levels or btec qualifications. ministers also want to balance the books after huge spending during the pandemic. but despite concerns over the economic picture, the government is making clear there is money to spend on its political priorities. the question is: will it be enough to deliver the big changes that ministers have promised and will the plans work? the film director who was accidentally shot on a movie set by the actor alec baldwin has spoken for the first time after leaving hospital. in a statement, joel souza thanked well—wishers for their support, and said he was gutted by the loss of his colleague, cinematographer halyne hutchins, who was killed in the same incident. from hollywood, sophie long reports. "we miss you", the simple words of a husband and a son whose lives have been changed forever. in this audio
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released by the emergency services, you can hear the script supervisor calling for help, describing what happened moments before. tiara calling for help, describing what happened moments before. two people accidentally shot _ happened moments before. two people accidentally shot on _ happened moments before. two people accidentally shot on a _ happened moments before. two people accidentally shot on a movie _ happened moments before. two people accidentally shot on a movie set. - happened moments before. two people accidentally shot on a movie set. we . accidentally shot on a movie set. we need immediate help. we accidentally shot on a movie set. we need immediate help.— need immediate help. we now know that when alec _ need immediate help. we now know that when alec old _ need immediate help. we now know that when alec old win _ need immediate help. we now know that when alec old win was - need immediate help. we now know that when alec old win was handed i that when alec old win was handed the weapon, he was told it was safe — what is called a cold gun. but the shot or shots it released killed cinematographer halyne hutchins and seriously injured directorjoel souza. the person responsible for the safety of all weapons used on the safety of all weapons used on the last set was this woman. the daughter of a legendary hollywood armourer, she had been around guns all her life but a month ago she spoke of her lack of experience in thejob. i spoke of her lack of experience in the 'ob. . , . spoke of her lack of experience in the “ob. ., , ., the 'ob. iam still learning. dad has the job. iam still learning. dad has taught— the job. iam still learning. dad has taught me _ the job. iam still learning. dad has taught me everything. - the job. i am still learning. dad i has taught me everything. loading blanks was the scariest thing to me because i didn't know anything about it. ., , . .,
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it. there have been unconfirmed re orts it. there have been unconfirmed reports of _ it. there have been unconfirmed reports of complaints _ it. there have been unconfirmed reports of complaints about - it. there have been unconfirmed i reports of complaints about safety standards on the set and that a number of crew walked out hours before the shooting. at this stage of the investigation we do not know whether hannah gutierrez read was among those who remained. halyne hutchins honed her craft here. one of her teacher said she had a unique perspective of the world. as the industry and family grieve and search for answers, a candlelit vigil will be held near the film said where she lost her life doing what she loved. more than two million letters will be sent to parents and guardians across england from tomorrow, inviting them to book their children in for covid jabs during half—term. health officials are offering vaccinations for those aged 12 to 15, saying it will give them crucial protection ahead of winter. 0ur correspondent aruna iyengar has more. the biggest rise in covid—19 infections in england is now among 12 to 15 —year—olds. that's why
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health officials are targeting this group and urging their parents to bookjabs online during half term. vaccines are being offered in some schools but not all. 0utside schools there are around 100 vaccination sites offering jabs teenagers, with more to open shortly. this sites offering jabs teenagers, with more to open shortly.— more to open shortly. this is the arm we're _ more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going _ more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going be _ more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going be using... - more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going be using... in . arm we're going be using... in scotland vaccines have been widely available for 12 to 15 —year—olds since september. health officials in england are asking families to book in so children and loved ones have crucial protection overwinter. im’ith crucial protection over winter. with startina crucial protection over winter. with startin: to crucial protection over winter. with starting to think _ crucial protection overwinter. ti starting to think about winter and christmas and trying to keep the best chance of ever thing being open at christmas, being able to visit your family and at christmas, being able to visit yourfamily and mixing between teenagers and they ran parents — clearly want children to be immunised to reduce the risk of spreading the virus to their elderly relatives. . ~ . , spreading the virus to their elderly relatives. ., ~ ., , , ., relatives. take a deep breath in... 500,000 teenagers _ relatives. take a deep breath in... 500,000 teenagers have - relatives. take a deep breath in... 500,000 teenagers have been - 500,000 teenagers have been vaccinated so far. the decision for some families is difficult. young
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people don't tend to come very ill with covid but they can still pass it on, affecting the wider community and, crucially, their own education if schools have to shut down. 0ver if schools have to shut down. over 6000 people are in hospital with covid, nearly a same number as a year ago. writing in the sunday telegraph today, professor stephen paris, the nhs director, is encouraging everyone to take up vaccination offers and booster shots. he says: that is why health officials are keen to get all age groups vaccinated ahead of what could be a challenging christmas. from today, fully vaccinated travellers returning to england can take a lateral flow test rather than a more expensive pcr test to prove their covid status. the change, which the government has described as a huge boost for the travel
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industry, applies to those arriving from non—red—list countries. wales will make the same change to their testing policy next weekend. young people should know more about osteoporosis, according to camilla, duchess of cornwall. in a bbc interview she told tv presenter gloria hunniford that the bone—weakening condition one of the most urgent societal challenges to living well in later life. the duchess, who is president of the royal osteoprosis society, said the disease can't be cured, but it can be prevented through exercise. she also reflected on her mother's struggles with it. it was terrible because we didn't know anything about it. at some point she thought, well, initially making a great fuss about all of this? 0ccasionally when she moved or you touched her, she literally screamed. i rememberwhen you touched her, she literally screamed. i remember when a friend of hers came in one dayjust to give her a coach, her rib broke. —— hug. artworks by picasso have been auctioned in las vegas forjust under £80 million.
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the collection, featuring nine paintings and two ceramics, had been a centrepiece at the picasso restaurant in the bellagio hotel. they went under the hammer for us $110 million. i have never seen i have never seen one i have never seen one in real life, i have never seen one in real life, i don't think. i have never seen one in real life, i don't think-— i don't think. know... the guy in the picture _ i don't think. know... the guy in the picture there _ i don't think. know... the guy in the picture there with _ i don't think. know... the guy in the picture there with the - i don't think. know... the guy in the picture there with the girl i the picture there with the girl doesn't quite do itjustice. get the picture there with the girl doesn't quite do itjustice. doesn't quite do it 'ustice. get it on a smart h doesn't quite do itjustice. get it on a smart screen... _ doesn't quite do itjustice. get it on a smart screen... a - doesn't quite do itjustice. get it on a smart screen... a bit - doesn't quite do itjustice. get it| on a smart screen... a bit small. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the observer reports that the government is paving the way to implement the stricter covid control measures. the paper says whitehall has contacted councils to canvass their level of support to implement the so—called plan b. the sunday mirror accuses the prime minister of hypocrisy on the environment after he used a tory donor's private jet during local election campaigning in may, generating what the paper calls "21 tons of hot air". it quotes a tory spokesman saying it is important for democracy that
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party leaders visit as many places as possible during election campaigns. the sunday telegraph has a royal story as one of its front page offerings. it says the queen will now be accompanied by one of her children or grandchildren on official visits to avoid letting the public down in the event of a health scare. and the daily star has a very worrying lead story. it says mince pies could be in short supply this christmas due to a lack of dried fruit. the headline is one forfans of the streets: "dry your pies mate". get it? just about. i am more worried about _ get it? just about. i am more worried about the _ get it? just about. i am more worried about the story. - get it? just about. i am more. worried about the story. mince get it? just about. i am more - worried about the story. mince pies should be available all year. you have to have _ should be available all year. you have to have the _ should be available all year. you have to have the first pie of the season, that is a special moment. it is fine if we can get them but it needs to be all year. if is fine if we can get them but it needs to be all year.— is fine if we can get them but it needs to be all year. if you were organised _ needs to be all year. if you were organised you — needs to be all year. if you were organised you would _ needs to be all year. if you were organised you would have - needs to be all year. if you were organised you would have made| needs to be all year. if you were - organised you would have made your own mincemeat last year so the dried
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fruit shortage and shouldn't be a problem — anyone who has ahead screwed on! i problem - anyone who has ahead screwed on!— problem - anyone who has ahead screwed on!_ and | screwed on! i like this one. and istanbul straight _ screwed on! i like this one. and istanbul straight dog _ screwed on! i like this one. and istanbul straight dog has - screwed on! i like this one. and | istanbul straight dog has become screwed on! i like this one. and - istanbul straight dog has become the city's best known commuter after being spotted riding across the city and he's been of the city. i like this one with his tail and his back leg disappearing through the barriers. he goes to the bosphorus where he watches the seagulls. he has been microchipped and vaccinated because he has been a national treasure. ~ ., ~' because he has been a national treasure. ~ ., ~ , ., ., ~ treasure. working his way around. a ureat treasure. working his way around. a great headline _ treasure. working his way around. a great headline in _ treasure. working his way around. a great headline in the _ treasure. working his way around. a great headline in the sun. _ treasure. working his way around. a great headline in the sun. this - treasure. working his way around. a great headline in the sun. this is - great headline in the sun. this is because harrison ford credit card, hence the headline. a british tourist found it on the beach. he is thought to be worth around £300
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million, so hopefully he gave a reward to the guy who on the beach. it can't be the real harrison, you would say, wouldn't you? how would you fancy this? 150 stops, 65 countries and a whopper of a world cruise. it takes you across the world from december through to september. you leave on december the 10th and you get back on september the 10th, pretty much the whole year, and you take in the whole world with 150 stops. it sounds great but you have to do it on a cruiseship, that's the problem — i don't fancy it! it’s cruiseship, that's the problem - i don't fancy it!— don't fancy it! it's a long time to be with the _ don't fancy it! it's a long time to be with the same _ don't fancy it! it's a long time to be with the same people. - don't fancy it! it's a long time to be with the same people. who's don't fancy it! it's a long time to i be with the same people. who's to sa --eole be with the same people. who's to say people don't — be with the same people. who's to say people don't hop _ be with the same people. who's to say people don't hop on _ be with the same people. who's to say people don't hop on and - be with the same people. who's to say people don't hop on and hop i be with the same people. who's to | say people don't hop on and hop off for different legs of the journey? for me, you are either a cruiser or not. if for me, you are either a cruiser or not. , ., ., ., for me, you are either a cruiser or not. i. ., ., , a for me, you are either a cruiser or not. ., ., , , not. if you have a bucket list you can tick off _ not. if you have a bucket list you can tick off every _ not. if you have a bucket list you can tick off every destination - not. if you have a bucket list you j can tick off every destination and you have done it. been there — world, done it! for
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you have done it. been there - world, done it!— you have done it. been there - world, done it! for some people, seeinr world, done it! for some people, seeing the _ world, done it! for some people, seeing the world _ world, done it! for some people, seeing the world on _ world, done it! for some people, seeing the world on a _ world, done it! for some people, seeing the world on a cruise - world, done it! for some people, seeing the world on a cruise ship| world, done it! for some people, i seeing the world on a cruise ship is the best way to do it but i'm not sure. i think i would go a bit bonkers! it is never too early to talk about strictly. 0ur it is never too early to talk about strictly. our weekly glitter six. it is never too early to talk about strictly. 0urweekly glittersix. he strictly. our weekly glitter six. he is not strictly. 0urweekly glitter six. he: is not a fan but i don't understand it! -- is not a fan but i don't understand it! —— six. our weekly glitter fix was back last night — it's only week five of strictly but there were some massive scores at the top end of the leaderboard, with a few tens handed out. let's take a look at some of the highlights. highlights that ben did not see.
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that was the moment of last night — the pie in the face. i that was the moment of last night - the pie in the face.— the pie in the face. i missed it! you should _ the pie in the face. i missed it! you should be _ the pie in the face. i missed it! you should be watching - the pie in the face. i missed it! you should be watching everyl you should be watching every saturday, especially as our holly is tearing up the dance floor. i get the best it's _ tearing up the dance floor. i get the best it's right _ tearing up the dance floor. i get the best it's right here - tearing up the dance floor. i get the best it's right here with the highlights — you don't need to dedicate two hours of your saturday evening. dedicate two hours of your saturday evenina. :, dedicate two hours of your saturday evenina. ., ., , ., dedicate two hours of your saturday evenina. :, ., , ., ., evening. two hours of glitter and seauins. evening. two hours of glitter and sequins- and _ evening. two hours of glitter and sequins. and a _ evening. two hours of glitter and sequins. and a glass _ evening. two hours of glitter and sequins. and a glass of - evening. two hours of glitter and sequins. and a glass of wine - i i evening. two hours of glitter and i sequins. and a glass of wine - i am therefore that _ sequins. and a glass of wine - i am therefore that it! _ later on breakfast we'll be joined on the sofa by former strictly dancer
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flavia cacace—mistry. she'll run us through the performances and her predictions for tonight's results show. here's tomasz with a look at the weather. good morning. good morning to you. the weather. — good morning. good morning to you. the weather, yeah, _ good morning. good morning to you. the weather, yeah, you _ good morning. good morning to you. the weather, yeah, you know, - good morning. good morning to you. the weather, yeah, you know, it - good morning. good morning to you. the weather, yeah, you know, it is i the weather, yeah, you know, it is not too bad, it is not a perfect day, we have sunshine and showers for you in the forecast but at least it is quite mild and it will be mild through most of the week had in fact. this is what the satellite picture looks like. this is a weather front crossing the country right now. i say sunshine and showers in the weather headline at the bottom there but for a time for some of us it will be quite overcast and wet and it has been wet in south—western scotland all through the night. but here is the weather front and yesterday if you are watching i was promising it would fizzle away and it certainly is, you can see it's some leftovers here with streaks of cloud and some showers through this afternoon so on the whole it is actually not a bad
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day. a little breezy but i think we can deal with out but especially windy here in the north—west of scotland, a bit more used to it and hardy here with a gale force winds. the forecast for tonight, these must three atlantic winds bring in further showers into tomorrow morning, these are the early morning temperatures so seven am, some of us popping out to work at this stage, 12 in london, not too cold at all first thing. at least for the time of year. tomorrow, a very decent day on the way! plenty of sunshine around but occasional sunny spells, sorry, occasional showers too, some could be heavy in the north—west of the country and again, temperatures decent, 15 around 210 or 11 in scotland, and the average this year is around about 12 or so in the heart of the country so we are sort of, you know, a few degrees either side is not too bad. this is tuesday's weather map and the russians of south—westerly wind still here but tuesday could end up
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being really mild across many parts of the uk, notjust in the south but in the north. the weather front is weeping to the north—west of us so some rain across the north—west highlands, could be quite heavy. temperatures in some spots could get up temperatures in some spots could get up to 17 degrees. all fast, considerably above the average. five or six degrees or so. then the rest of the week, this is a complicated looking map with a jet stream and low pressure, so what does this all mean? we have a very unsettled we go ahead with spells of rain at times but it is going to be mild. look at these temperatures. 18 degrees in cardiff, in london, mid or even high teens as far north as edinburgh and belfast. that'sjust teens as far north as edinburgh and belfast. that's just for a teens as far north as edinburgh and belfast. that'sjust for a day teens as far north as edinburgh and belfast. that's just for a day or two. so a breezy week ahead with some sunshine thrown in from time to time. : ., some sunshine thrown in from time to time. ., ~ ., ., , time. half term week would not be half term without _ time. half term week would not be half term without quite _ time. half term week would not be half term without quite a _ time. half term week would not be half term without quite a lot - time. half term week would not be half term without quite a lot of- half term without quite a lot of wind and rain. thank you very much.
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time now for this week's edition of click, and spencer kelly has been to dubai for the world expo. spencer singing: # ladies and gents, this is the moment you've waited for. # whoa! # in the heat of dubai. # your sweat soaking through the floor... # whoa! yes, it's a year later than planned, but it's finally on. world expo 2020 has opened its doors and we're finally on the ground to see the spectacle. dubai has turned an enormous section of desert into an event where nearly every country under the sun gets to wave its flag and show off its ideas on a world stage.
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# so tell me, do you wanna go? # where it's covered in all the coloured lights? the hype has been huge, so it's time to see if it's lived up to its promise. time to find out if this is the greatest show. 192 countries, 192 pavilions — all different, some extravagant, some just bonkers and maybe, just maybe, some world—changing ideas hidden amongst them. who knows? maybe it's the robot helpers delivering food, giving directions and... robot: excuse me, i'm in charge of the security here. _ please let me through. ..keeping order. maybe it's the giant displays — some of the biggest and boldest i've ever seen. is it the architecture itself, hinting at new ways that we could live and work as we motor on into the 21st century? from the great exhibition in crystal palace in london in 1851
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through paris' eiffel tower in 1889, brussels' atomium in 1958, and seattle's space needle in '62, these world expos are meant to make a statement and leave a mark — a legacy for the host country. and this enormous expo site will certainly do that, even if the exhibits themselves don't stand the test of time. the sky garden is a garden in the sky. now, if you're tempted to ask "what is the point?", i'd suggest you're missing the point. in many ways, the show is all about the show, each pavilion a blank canvas for a country to paint itself as forward—thinking and future—facing. we believe we're doing this for a bigger cause, and especially during a time period of covid where we've collectively, as humanity, faced all the challenges that we have and then, to bring the world
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literally together in one place, in one city. this event is something very important not only for the uae, but for the world at large. this is more art than innovation, more concepts than creation. but anyway, it's time to get stuck into this great big, noisy, colourful event, one in which water cascades down into the desert and then, at night, with a trick of the light, it cascades back up again. we are here, at the uae pavilion. i know, and it's no surprise, really, that it is the most spectacular of all of them. yeah, it's the biggest, it's the largest. and what you see, the design of this pavilion is actually a falcon, the bird in flight, because that's the main bird of the country. so it really reflects the journey
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of this country from the desert to where they are right now. what should we expect from these kind of world fairs? should we expect the next big invention, or is it more about countries posturing? it's more our posturing, really. i think the uae is very clear that they were not expecting one big idea to come out of the expo, which we have seen in the past, right? and the fact that this would be the first, or one of the first big in—person events after covid—19 gives them a great opportunity to showcase the world, this new world we live in. what happens to this site after the expo? the main exhibition centre is where they're planning to host all the major events going ahead, which used to take place in the heart of the city. well, sameer, thanks for having us to your place and we'll see you again soon. yeah, great to have you here. many of the country pavilions
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here are stunning, although it's good to remember that this show is more about ideas than invention — a chance for a nation to promote its values and its visions — so i was a bit nervous to see how the uk had chosen to represent itself. i shouldn't have worried — not a red telephone box in sight. this is a building that embodies an idea from one of our greatest minds, stephen hawking. "the days of 1,000 photographs. "no—one thought we could actually talk to water." "it's like looking out the window on a starship." "at first, we were trying to make in relations by feeding ourfangs." what? "now turning to foods in the shape of letters." that's alphabetti spaghetti, isn't it? hmm, profound. this is poetry generated by an artificial intelligence and inspired by professor hawking's project to find a universal message that we could send into space in an effort to contact alien life. to learn what kind of phrases go where, the al was trained on thousands of actual poems, and it then creates new verses
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from words donated by the pavilion's thousands of visitors, who make their way up the winding ramp to the top. you can tell this is the uk pavilion because they've built in a massive queuing system. time to add my own genius to the masterpiece. oh, i'm so original. and then your donation is taken into the structure where you can watch it being absorbed into the walls, accompanied by a soundtrack of international voices and sounds all playing in harmony. off to italy now, where we posed the question if michelangelo had had a 3d printer, would he have bothered with all that sculpting?
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this is an exact replica of his david which has been scanned in incredible detail — to within 100th of a millimetre. the process took a0 hours, and the result was a 3d file that was then sent off to a massive 3d printer. and even then, the 5m—tall statue had to be printed in acrylic resin in 1a different pieces, which were then glued together and covered in marble dust. of course, now the data exists from the 3d scan. it's not a big leap to think that in the future, anyone could download it and 3d—print their own version of david. the data isn't being made available at the moment, though. it's being kept under wraps by the museum — i guess as an insurance policy, just in case anything happens to the original. now, here's the slight quirk. most visitors only get to see david's top half, which is a really interesting view that you never normally get. did you know, for example, that
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david's pupils were heart—shaped? but, to protect his modesty, wide ledges stop you from seeing the downstairs department. however, downstairs there is a luxury lounge where special guests get to see the rest. yes, only those at the bottom can appreciate the bottom. 0nly vips get to see the vip. it's a humbling experience. when the sun goes down, the expo really comes to life. at the heart of the action, the al wasl dome. and if there is an eiffel tower of expo 2020, this is it. i've found myself saying this a lot when i've been in dubai but honestly, this is the greatest projection i've ever seen.
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by day, the dome is a beautiful, semi—shaded structure. but the extraordinary performances after dark are where the magic really happens. and it's all driven by the team in the control room. cos those are the biggest projectors i've seen in my life. 252 40k projectors that provide the projection. if we want to get into the numbers, 27,000 pixels byjust over 5,500. oh, i love that! yeah. so we've got 42 pods, and each of these pods houses six of the projectors, six layers of projection focused into the dome. each piece of video which makes up the patchwork in the sky is feathered at the edges, so it all blends smoothly together. and bill told me that not all of the graphics are pre—recorded in advance. they can actually make changes live, which sounds terrifying.
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it goes wrong very quickly. so there's been a lot of testing of the sizes, the shapes and the speed of how things move around. it's a feast for the eyes and for the ears. the sounds come from any and every direction around the circumference. got 27 channels of audio, plus the one. 27.1 surround sound. that's it, exactly. what you can't see is that this dome is made of lots of different shapes, lots of different circles and diamond and triangle and arch—shaped tiles. the images are being perfectly projected on some of those shapes so theyjust perfectly match the circle or the arch. i mean, it really is faultless. 0utrageous, audacious, and spectacular — the dome and the whole expo, really.
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i wasn't sure that a show like this could possibly live up to the hype but i have to be honest, it really has to be seen to be believed. there is much more from the world expo 2020 in the full version of the programme which you can see right now on iplayer. i'm afraid that's it for the shortcut of click from though. was it the greatest show on earth? it's the best i've seen in a while, i have to say. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon.
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hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and kat downes. time for a look at the sport with sarah. good morning. best possible start for england _ sarah. good morning. best possible start for england at _ sarah. good morning. best possible start for england at the _ sarah. good morning. best possible start for england at the t20? - sarah. good morning. best possible start for england at the t20? this i start for england at the t20? this tournament _ start for england at the t20? this tournament so _ start for england at the t20? this tournament so far, _ start for england at the t20? in 3 tournament so far, the super 12 stage, but even before for the teams qualifying, there's been some brilliant cricket with shocks. yesterday was another dramatic day.
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couldn't believe what i was seeing. the defending champions, the west indies, very easy! england's cricketers made the perfect start to their t20 world cup campaign. they thrashed defending champions west indies by six wickets after bowling them all out for just 55 runs. 0ur sports correspondent joe wilson reports. the cricketers of west indies and england are shared the stance against racism at the t20 world cup. they share memories in this competition. the last final, when carlos braithwaite's magnificent 60s took the trophy away from england. the best of times, the worst of times. but in motivated england. they are now ranked top of the world in this format and from this moment, we saw why. the west indies side was mature. chris gayle, now 42, made 13. success for mills on his england comeback. dwayne bravo, jonny
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bairstow. caught it. the captain's brain beneath the caps. everything eoin morgan thought worked and how west indies obliged and where the field stood west indies batters hit. four wickets for adil rashid. 55 all out — completely the new england. the batting wasn't perfect, though. hussein's agility to catch livingston. three wickets down but in the ninth over it was done. england looks like the world number one. joe wilson, bbc news. speaking of hammerings. .. there was a rout at stamford bridge as the premier league's top side chelsea beat bottom—of—the—table norwich 7—0. mason mount hadn't scored since may but he started the hosts off inside the first ten minutes, and that was just a sign of things to come. callum hudson—0doi, reecejames and ben chilwell all got on the scoresheet, before mount finished off the scoring with his first chelsea hat—trick.
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manchester city are breathing down chelsea's neck, just two points behind them. phil foden was impressive yet again, scoring twice in city's 4—1 win at brighton. and what a turnaround we saw from watford. beaten 5—0 by liverpool last week, they put five past everton — including a hat—trick from josh king, who was on loan at everton last season. it finished 5—2. a point at st mirren today will be enough to put rangers back on top of the scottish premiership. they slipped below hearts on goal difference after they drew 1—1 at home to dundee. hearts could have gone clear at the top. john souttar put the edinburgh side ahead but poor defending was punished and jason cummings equalised. beth mead became the first woman to score a hat—trick for england at wembley, as they beat northern ireland 4—0 in world cup qualifying, and that took england back to the top of their group. jo currie was watching.
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this is a landmark day here at wembley. walking into the history books, england women's first ever competitive match at wembley. for semi—professional northern ireland, an opportunity to test themselves against their full—time neighbours. it was lauren hemp who struck first. the woodwork that is. with the goalkeeper jacqueline burns beaten, only the frame of the goal could deny the lionesses an opener. and that set the tone for england's first half. lots of chances created but one way or another, the lionesses couldn't find a breakthrough. a change of ends however brought about a change of fortune for england as substitute beth mead, who had only been on the pitch a matter of seconds, acrobatically turned the ball home. and that lead was doubled shortly afterwards. lauren hemp with the ball in. beth england at the back post to make sure. england now on a roll with mead at it again. this time slamming the ball home for her second of the night. and she wasn't done yet. she wrapped up the win and her 14—minute hat—trick with this simple finish. job done for the home side.
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three wins from three in the qualifying campaign. so, in the end, a night to rememberfor england and in particular for beth mead. next up, the lionesses travel to latvia on tuesday, the same night that northern ireland host austria, aiming to put this defeat behind them. jo currie, bbc news. max verstappen edged out lewis hamilton in qualifying for the us grand prix, which returns after last year's race was cancelled due to the pandemic. the championship leader was two tenths of a second quicker than hamilton's mercedes as he claimed his ninth pole of the season. verstappen will also have support from his red bull team mate sergio perez, who'll start from third. great britain have won a second gold medal at the track cycling world championships in france, and once again it came in the omnium — ethan hayter following katie archibald's success by dominating the points race, the final event of the four—race contest. it's his first individual world title.
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a couple of years ago, the last time i run the world on the, i was leading literally until 20 laps to go. that was obviously quite hard to do. i was 50 laps in and i had built up do. i was 50 laps in and i had built upa bit do. i was 50 laps in and i had built up a bit of a lead, do. i was 50 laps in and i had built up a bit ofa lead, i do. i was 50 laps in and i had built up a bit of a lead, ifelt do. i was 50 laps in and i had built up a bit of a lead, i felt good still and i thought i was in control — crazy feeling. congratulations to him. i love the reactions. we had katie archibald yesterday, brilliant! it is great when they fully reveal the true emotions when the pressure is done. they have had a bonkers year because they had the olympics and then a couple of weeks later they had the europeans and then a few weeks later here we are and they are competing at the worlds. some of the big names won the big medals at the olympics and are relaxing somewhere on the beach. it’s and are relaxing somewhere on the beach. 3 , , and are relaxing somewhere on the beach. �*, , , , , beach. it's because they let us behind the _ beach. it's because they let us behind the curtain _ beach. it's because they let us behind the curtain that - beach. it's because they let us behind the curtain that they i beach. it's because they let us| behind the curtain that they are normal, they face the same sorts of
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pressures. i say normal... superhuman.— pressures. i say normal... superhuman. pressures. i say normal... suerhuman. :, ~' pressures. i say normal... suerhuman. :, ~ ., superhuman. some of them, like katie archibald, have _ superhuman. some of them, like katie archibald, have chosen _ superhuman. some of them, like katie archibald, have chosen to _ superhuman. some of them, like katie archibald, have chosen to keep - archibald, have chosen to keep racing — archibald, have chosen to keep racing if— archibald, have chosen to keep racina. , :, archibald, have chosen to keep racina. ,, :, archibald, have chosen to keep racin _ l, ., archibald, have chosen to keep racina. ,, ., ., ~' racing. if you are in good form like that and you _ racing. if you are in good form like that and you have _ racing. if you are in good form like that and you have chances - racing. if you are in good form like that and you have chances to - racing. if you are in good form like that and you have chances to win l that and you have chances to win medals, why stop?— that and you have chances to win medals, why stop? keep racking them u . medals, why stop? keep racking them u- on that medals, why stop? keep racking them up on that cv! — medals, why stop? keep racking them up on that cv! we _ medals, why stop? keep racking them up on that (v! we are _ medals, why stop? keep racking them up on that (v! we are going _ medals, why stop? keep racking them up on that (v! we are going to - medals, why stop? keep racking them up on that (v! we are going to talk i up on that (v! we are going to talk about alex dowsett, _ up on that (v! we are going to talk about alex dowsett, who _ up on that (v! we are going to talk about alex dowsett, who is - up on that (v! we are going to talk about alex dowsett, who is a - up on that (v! we are going to talkj about alex dowsett, who is a world champion road racer. you don't see him on the track very often. here's a story to make your legs burn — imagine riding a bike at nearly 35 miles per hour, consistently, for a full hour. that's what alex dowsett is planning to do when tries to break a world record in mexico next month. he's also using the opportunity to raise awareness of haemophilia, which he's had since childhood. james burridge has been to see him in training. this is the giant windtunnel which gb cyclist alex dowsett hopes will help him become a world recordholder. he is training for the
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one hour record, cycling as fast and as far as possible in 60 minutes. so every technical scientific advantage gained in here is critical. basically air is pulled through here, my bike and me are on a large—scale and that measures how much wind resistance i'm creating. we are optimising helmets, shoes and, most importantly, the skin suit to make me as aerodynamic as possible so i am as slippery as possible so i am as slippery as possible through the wind, which means, come the end of the attempt, the last 20 or 30 minutes, i can accelerate a bit and try not to just break the record but try to break it by a bit more. break the record but try to break it by a bit more-— by a bit more. alex is racing to raise awareness _ by a bit more. alex is racing to raise awareness of _ by a bit more. alex is racing to i raise awareness of haemophilia, a disorder where blood doesn't clot properly. he was diagnosed as a child and is the only known elite sportsperson with the condition. there are some aspects to it that are really quite unpleasant. it is
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something we are trying to address with little breeders to navigate kids through school and in conjunction with the app, to navigate young haemophiliacs and theirfamilies and their navigate young haemophiliacs and their families and their friends as well because it's a tough condition to explain. it is not visual. that doesn't help either. he to explain. it is not visual. that doesn't help either.— doesn't help either. he used to bruise very _ doesn't help either. he used to bruise very easily, _ doesn't help either. he used to bruise very easily, large - doesn't help either. he used to | bruise very easily, large bruises 'ust bruise very easily, large bruises just from — bruise very easily, large bruises just from holding him up around his middle _ just from holding him up around his middle. pretty much had to find out what haemophilia — having a haemophiliac really meant. we were educated _ haemophiliac really meant. we were educated and we also had to know what _ educated and we also had to know what his— educated and we also had to know what his limitations were, the dos and don'ts — what his limitations were, the dos and don'ts. there were quite a lot of don'ts — and don'ts. there were quite a lot of don'ts. we adjusted as best as we could _ of don'ts. we ad'usted as best as we could. , ., ., could. every time even now we get a -hone could. every time even now we get a hone call could. every time even now we get a phone call and _ could. every time even now we get a phone call and if— could. every time even now we get a phone call and if he's _ could. every time even now we get a phone call and if he's on _ could. every time even now we get a phone call and if he's on tour- could. every time even now we get a phone call and if he's on tour you i phone call and if he's on tour you .et phone call and if he's on tour you get a _ phone call and if he's on tour you get a phone — phone call and if he's on tour you get a phone call— phone call and if he's on tour you get a phone call at _ phone call and if he's on tour you get a phone call at 1am _ phone call and if he's on tour you get a phone call at 1am or- phone call and if he's on tour you get a phone call at 1am or 2am, i phone call and if he's on tour you i get a phone call at 1am or 2am, we are worried — get a phone call at 1am or 2am, we are worried because _ get a phone call at 1am or 2am, we are worried because it _ get a phone call at 1am or 2am, we are worried because it means- get a phone call at 1am or 2am, we are worried because it means he'sl are worried because it means he's .ot are worried because it means he's got a _
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are worried because it means he's got a problem _ are worried because it means he's got a problem - _ are worried because it means he's got a problem - he— are worried because it means he's got a problem — he has— are worried because it means he's got a problem — he has crashed i are worried because it means he'sj got a problem — he has crashed or pulled _ got a problem — he has crashed or pulled out — got a problem — he has crashed or pulled out or— got a problem — he has crashed or pulled out or something. - got a problem — he has crashed or pulled out or something. every. got a problem — he has crashed or. pulled out or something. every time he races _ pulled out or something. every time he races it— pulled out or something. every time he races it is— pulled out or something. every time he races it is nerve _ pulled out or something. every time he races it is nerve wracking. - pulled out or something. every time he races it is nerve wracking. [- he races it is nerve wracking. have to take my intravenous injection medication everyday during races, but it is managed. that is where haemophilia is now compared to where haemophilia is now compared to where it was, we can do these things. it doesn't hold me back at all. that is the overriding message — if it doesn't hold me back and actually what ends up being quite a dangerous sport at times, it shouldn't hold a kid back at school. alex has to raise over—55 kilometres to beat the record in mexico on november the third. he has held it once before in 2015 only for sir bradley wiggins to quickly usurp it. this time there is no shortage of motivation. he's got a point to prove after sir bradley wiggins broke his record, alex dowsett trying to get the hour record back.
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that was james burridge reporting. you can watch alex take on that challenge on the bbc iplayer or the bbc sport website. it'll be streaming live at 10pm, uk time, on the 3rd of november. good luck to him. 35 in ph for a full hour! sounds easy when we say it. i full hour! sounds easy when we say it. . ., , full hour! sounds easy when we say it. : : , leave! good morning. the weather is pretty goodin good morning. the weather is pretty good in some parts of the country this morning. not everywhere. raining quite heavily in some western parts in the last few hours, especially south—west scotland. its broad by this weather front, which will be sliding across the uk today and as it does it will break up into and as it does it will break up into a scattering of showers, so not everyone will have heavy rain this morning. here's the weather front as it goes across the country through the day. the forecast shows the front in the west through the mid—morning and as it moves into central parts of england it fizzles away. towards the west we have a scattering of sunshine and showers.
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the showers will be heaviest in the north—west and also the strongest winds around coastal areas of northern and western scotland. elsewhere the showers will be a lot more scattered, meaning the likelihood of catching one is that much lower. a mild day. tonight the westerly atlantic winds will move across the country, blowing in further showers that could be heavy and thundery in the north—west of the uk. a very mild night with morning temperatures on monday ranging from nine in stornoway to 12 degrees on the south coast of england. a real mild feel to things when you go to work first thing tomorrow. lots of sunshine around and we have a fine start to the week apart from these scattered showers. sum could be heavy. the chance of catching one is pretty low but when you do get one, it could be a brief, fleeting downpour. 15 on monday. what does the tuesday weather map mean? low pressure means rain and
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the south—westerly wind is here will keep drawing in very mild air all the way from the southern climes of the way from the southern climes of the edge of the screen, from the azores, meaning the temperatures will be mild through much of the week. in fact on tuesday i wouldn't be surprised if we get mid—to—high teens in some spots. belfast, 17. the average is closer to 11 or 12 for the time of year. this is the jetstream, which is responsible for sending weather fronts to us and spawning low pressure. the week ahead, especially the second half of the week and next weekend, is looking very autumnal. wind and rain heading our way but, you know what, it's the typical pattern. a lot of change. some days will be sunnier than others and others will be wetter than others but what we shouldn't complain about is the temperatures, 16 or 17. but a little below the average. hat
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temperatures, 16 or17. but a little below the average.— temperatures, 16 or 17. but a little below the average. not bad for this time of year- _ below the average. not bad for this time of year. we _ below the average. not bad for this time of year. we will take - below the average. not bad for this time of year. we will take those. i below the average. not bad for this | time of year. we will take those. we have to time of year. we will take those. - have to also point out that whenever we get these higher temperatures, if they are too high, that is not necessarily a good sign. i have to say that as well.— say that as well. you are quite ri . ht. say that as well. you are quite right- also _ say that as well. you are quite right. also for _ say that as well. you are quite right. also for the _ say that as well. you are quite right. also for the rain. - say that as well. you are quite right. also for the rain. we i say that as well. you are quite i right. also for the rain. we might not want it but it is also useful. it absolutely! you cannot wind! i like those crisp autumn mornings for the next _ like those crisp autumn mornings for the next week also. when danny 0'ryan was diagnosed with dementia three years ago, his wife carole set out to help him fulfill some life—long ambitions. danny, who began learning the piano and organ almost 80 years ago, has always dreamed of playing on the big stage, so carole made it happen. audrey dias has been to meet them. making sweet music to fulfil the ambition of a lifetime. 82—year—old
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danny from 0swestry has played the piano since he was four and has always dreamt of playing the famous well with the organ at blackpool tower. i well with the organ at blackpool tower. ., well with the organ at blackpool tower. :, , :, well with the organ at blackpool tower. :, , ., ., well with the organ at blackpool tower. ., , ., ., ., tower. i would start to tune and he would move _ tower. i would start to tune and he would move up _ tower. i would start to tune and he would move up and _ tower. i would start to tune and he would move up and change - tower. i would start to tune and he would move up and change the i tower. i would start to tune and he| would move up and change the taps and the settings while i was playing. so, and wejust and the settings while i was playing. so, and we just went on non—stop for an hour doing that. and of course what i can do is i can play the piano or the organ and play in any key. fin play the piano or the organ and play inan ke. , .,., in any key. on monday his wife carol made that dream _ in any key. on monday his wife carol made that dream a _ in any key. on monday his wife carol made that dream a reality. - in any key. on monday his wife carol made that dream a reality. he i in any key. on monday his wife carol| made that dream a reality. he played ureat made that dream a reality. he played treat and it made that dream a reality. he played great and it came _ made that dream a reality. he played great and it came out _ made that dream a reality. he played great and it came out on _ made that dream a reality. he played great and it came out on the - made that dream a reality. he played great and it came out on the stage i great and it came out on the stage and his face, he was concentrating so hard, i think the building could have fell down and he would not have noticed! the have fell down and he would not have noticed! : , noticed! the family filled the performance _ noticed! the family filled the performance so _ noticed! the family filled the performance so danny i noticed! the family filled the performance so danny can i noticed! the family filled the i performance so danny can watch it again and again. it performance so danny can watch it again and again-— again and again. it was on an absolute _ again and again. it was on an absolute high _ again and again. it was on an absolute high and _ again and again. it was on an absolute high and i _ again and again. it was on an absolute high and i thought i again and again. it was on an i absolute high and i thought do you know, these things are so worth it, sorting out what he wants to do and what he enjoys doing and making the effort to do it. he
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what he enjoys doing and making the effort to do it— effort to do it. he was diagnosed with dementia _ effort to do it. he was diagnosed with dementia three _ effort to do it. he was diagnosed with dementia three years i effort to do it. he was diagnosed with dementia three years ago i effort to do it. he was diagnosed i with dementia three years ago and after the initial shock, gregory decided to give her husband a series of experiences to treasure. iie decided to give her husband a series of experiences to treasure.— of experiences to treasure. he has alwa s of experiences to treasure. he has always looked _ of experiences to treasure. he has always looked after _ of experiences to treasure. he has always looked after me _ of experiences to treasure. he has always looked after me and - of experiences to treasure. he has always looked after me and now. of experiences to treasure. he has always looked after me and now it| of experiences to treasure. he has i always looked after me and now it is my time to make sure his life is all right —— carol. that's important. they've been married for 47 years and carol is determined danny's dementia will not define their relationship from now on. that person hasn't changed, that person is still there. i might not be able to cope with life like they did and you might have very exasperated moments with them but at the end of the day, that's the person you married and you just go along with it and accept what the day brings. their next big project is a trip to australia to see their grandchild and until then, they have always got the music to keep them smiling. audrey dias, bbc news. danny 0'ryan's story there and wife carol who helped him fulfil the lifelong ambition. what a great
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story. we're just a week away from the start of the un climate change conference, which is being held in glasgow. in advance of that, the former prime minister tony blair has been talking to our climate editorjustin rowlatt about the challenges facing the politicians who'll be attending. tony blair, thinking indeed for doing this interview and can i off with a really big question? do you think the world understands the scale of the climate challenge? i think the world does understand the scale of the challenge. i think the difficulty is to work out the practical steps that meet the challenge adequately. but i don't think there is any shortage of political desire or will. in some countries, may be, but overall, globally, i think the science is clear, people accept it, the question is how in practical terms do we get to where we are to where we need to be? 50 do we get to where we are to where we need to be?— we need to be? so why is this such an intractable _ we need to be? so why is this such an intractable problem? _ we need to be? so why is this such an intractable problem? i- we need to be? so why is this such an intractable problem? i mean i we need to be? so why is this such | an intractable problem? i mean you only have to look at the fact we're only have to look at the fact we're
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on cop26 tells you we have not got anywhere near resolving it yet. but that's anywhere near resolving it yet. ifizi,ii that's obvious because it is really difficult. the world has grown up developing with, dimensions, industrialisation has happened and industrialisation has happened and in a way that is driven by carbon and the other what has to change michael valgren up with carbon emissions. and for leaders who have to run countries, fight and win elections, the scale of the changes enormous and it can be done and i think again in general terms the public is willing to be done by default the change is enormous. but how you put this together in the most practical way politically is incredibly difficult. because on the one hand, developed countries are making significant strides but they've got to do more but on the other hand, if the developing world simply makes up for the emissions being reduced in the developed world than we are no better off as a planet and so how you structure the measures you're going to take, how you agree what is fair and unfair, what is effective and what needs to
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be done, this is of course really difficult politics. find be done, this is of course really difficult politics.— difficult politics. and there are costs associated _ difficult politics. and there are costs associated with - difficult politics. and there are costs associated with the i difficult politics. and there are i costs associated with the changes, aren't they, and that makes this a particularly tricky negotiation when you have every nation in the world sitting at the table. flit you have every nation in the world sitting at the table.— sitting at the table. of course, absolutely. — sitting at the table. of course, absolutely, but _ sitting at the table. of course, absolutely, but unfortunately. sitting at the table. of course, i absolutely, but unfortunately the claimant does not really care where the emissions come from the you have to have a solution but is fair, otherwise you look at the developing world to take the measures that are necessary. and you've got to make sure that the developed world is bearing the principal burden for making these changes but it's got to be done in a way in which you don't end up in a situation where the developing world does makes up for the omission that the developed world has cut.— world has cut. how significant is this meeting — world has cut. how significant is this meeting in _ world has cut. how significant is this meeting in glasgow, - world has cut. how significant is. this meeting in glasgow, cop26? world has cut. how significant is i this meeting in glasgow, cop26? i think this is the most significant climate meeting has been. since the very beginning, since the summit, frankly. and the reason for that is we are at an inflection point. and you've got, i think, three major
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challenges. the first is the reality is that without significant action from china, in time to come from india, from the developing world as well as the developed world, we cannot, you know, we have no chance of meeting two degrees, nevermind 1.5. but it is as important for the developed world to be taking accelerated action because that is also a spur to china and india and the rest of southeast asia and the developing world to make the changes that are necessary. secondly, the next decade is crucial. you can invest and we should invest in the technologies in the 20 30s, 20 40s are going to be transformative but the next decade requires really radical measures in order to make sure we've got any chance of hitting the target of 2030 and then thirdly, and i think if i was handling this negotiation, i would do a lot of focus on this, what other practical mechanisms to allow you to make
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these changes, identify the changes and make them, over the next decade? because that is what i think is most difficult to see.— difficult to see. what would you advise me _ difficult to see. what would you advise me to — difficult to see. what would you advise me to boris _ difficult to see. what would you advise me to boris johnson i difficult to see. what would you advise me to boris johnson and| advise me to borisjohnson and sharma who will be the president of cop26 and over these negotiations? you have to focus on practical measures so let me give you some examples of what i mean by that. you need over the next decade to be accelerating the development for example in transport, of electric vehicles. you need to be doing energy efficiency measures. we need to be making sure that we are investing even more in renewables. we need to make sure that countries can switch from coal and oil because these are the two big sources of emissions. we need for example that you are capturing the methane escape from oil and gas. all of these things are a practical set of
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measures and they require things like how do you mobilise the large amount of private capital, notjust government capital but private capital, in a climate finance initiative that means that you are able to give countries the ability, the means, of going sustainably? not just in the developed world but especially in the developing world. so these, i would also focus on a lot of the practical things that need to come out of that. people can see the effects of climate change and the effects of climate change by the way on countries like india and china are going to be dramatic. fir china are going to be dramatic. 0r australia. china are going to be dramatic. or australia- 0r _ china are going to be dramatic. or australia. or indeed _ china are going to be dramatic. or australia. or indeed australia. i china are going to be dramatic. or australia. or indeed australia. so| australia. or indeed australia. so there is no. _ australia. or indeed australia. so there is no, you _ australia. or indeed australia. so there is no, you know, _ australia. or indeed australia. so there is no, you know, this i australia. or indeed australia. so there is no, you know, this is i australia. or indeed australia. so there is no, you know, this is alll there is no, you know, this is all about understanding that even though the challenges are immense, there really isn't an alternative to dealing with attend one of the things i've done since i've loved offices i don't advise people to do something in office, i know that if i was there i would not be doing it because it is easy to grandstand on the side and this is a really tricky negotiation but you've got to show those countries how we can help with
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this process. that's why things around the financing of different ways of doing things are really important. ways of doing things are really important-— ways of doing things are really imortant. ., , , , important. look at, 'ust briefly if we can, important. look at, just briefly if we can, deforestation _ important. look at, just briefly if we can, deforestation in - important. look at, just briefly if we can, deforestation in brazil. i important. look at, just briefly if i we can, deforestation in brazil. we know that they are bolsonaro, the brazilian president, he would say listen, there has to be some kind of compensation for this because otherwise, we are foregoing, you know, and economic opportunity on behalf of the world. yes. know, and economic opportunity on behalf of the world.— behalf of the world. yes, well, these are _ behalf of the world. yes, well, these are exactly _ behalf of the world. yes, well, these are exactly the - behalf of the world. yes, well, these are exactly the sorts i behalf of the world. yes, well, these are exactly the sorts of i these are exactly the sorts of things you have to look at very carefully because because these countries have a point in saying historically, you guys have created the problem. the difficulty as i say is in the end the claimant does not care about you know who is responsible —— the climate does not care. we should care but in the end you have to deal with the problem. look, i am very sympathetic when a leader steps forward and says look, i support the ambition but i need help to get there. i am less sympathetic when they say we don't even share the ambition. do sympathetic when they say we don't even share the ambition.— even share the ambition. do you understand _ even share the ambition. do you understand why _ even share the ambition. do you understand why people - even share the ambition. do you understand why people like i even share the ambition. do you | understand why people like greta thunberg say this is all blah, blah,
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blah, build back better, blah, blah, blah, build back better, blah, blah, blah she says. i blah, build back better, blah, blah, blah she save— blah, build back better, blah, blah, blah she says._ can - blah, build back better, blah, blah, blah she says._ can you i blah, build back better, blah, blah, i blah she says._ can you see blah she says. i mean... can you see wh she blah she says. i mean... can you see why she feels — blah she says. i mean... can you see why she feels that _ blah she says. i mean... can you see why she feels that way? _ blah she says. i mean... can you see why she feels that way? she - blah she says. i mean... can you see why she feels that way? she looks i blah she says. i mean... can you see why she feels that way? she looks at the science and says you are nowhere near there, the science and says you are nowhere nearthere, guys! the science and says you are nowhere near there. guys!— near there, guys! typically, we're a lot further along _ near there, guys! typically, we're a lot further along than _ near there, guys! typically, we're a lot further along than we _ near there, guys! typically, we're a lot further along than we were - near there, guys! typically, we're a lot further along than we were but. lot further along than we were but no, we're not there yet but people that and that's why i say to you at this moment in time, because, you know, you can stand there and say well the leaders, they don't care and are not doing enough and, you know, i mean, that is its own version of blah, blah, blah by the way but if you want to deal with this problem, you have to deal with it practically. and that's why what i'm saying to you is we need to accelerate in this 2020 period because the risk is if you don't really act in the next decade, you will already — if you are taking radical action by 2040 you are already having the climate a breaking point.— already having the climate a breakin: oint. ., a, , ~ breaking point. you mean things like sa inc breaking point. you mean things like saying we're — breaking point. you mean things like saying we're going — breaking point. you mean things like saying we're going to _ breaking point. you mean things like saying we're going to phase - breaking point. you mean things like saying we're going to phase out - saying we're going to phase out coal, we will switch to electric vehicles, practical things that you can point to and say give us a date,
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give us the details on how you're going to achieve this?— give us the details on how you're going to achieve this? yes, plus as i sa , the going to achieve this? yes, plus as i say. the attempt _ going to achieve this? yes, plus as i say, the attempt to _ going to achieve this? yes, plus as i say, the attempt to mobilise - going to achieve this? yes, plus as i say, the attempt to mobilise the l i say, the attempt to mobilise the capital that you're going to need to invest to do that and that's really important part of this and you've got a large part the international investment community today that really wants to invest in clean and green but i know this from the work my institute does around the world, any projects that have put into investable form, you need to get the right guarantees and insurance because often they are happening in places where people are reluctant to make the investment, so there's practical work that needs to be done out of this. do practical work that needs to be done out of this. ,, practical work that needs to be done out of this. _, , l, , out of this. do you understand why some peeple _ out of this. do you understand why some peeple are — out of this. do you understand why some people are now _ out of this. do you understand why some people are now so _ out of this. do you understand why some people are now so frustrated that for example they block the roads, extinction rebellon, can you understand the source of that frustration?— understand the source of that frustration? that's not going to hel. it's frustration? that's not going to help. it's really _ frustration? that's not going to help. it's really not _ frustration? that's not going to help. it's really not going - frustration? that's not going to help. it's really not going to . frustration? that's not going to i help. it's really not going to help. also, you don't need to persuade. most of the leaders turning up at this conference know it is a big problem. right? most of them want to
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tackle it. it'sjust problem. right? most of them want to tackle it. it's just they've got to have the practical means of doing it. now, the pressure on them to go further and faster is perfectly legitimate pressure. i think a lot of those leaders already come inside themselves, feel that pressure. so it's a question of putting it all together because they've also got to go back into their countries and sell their own commitments to their own people and i think that can be done and look, my own government, we introduced the first climate legislation, are instrumental in the kyoto treaty, we pushed forward a lot but you look back now and of course, i would like to have done even more. so it's, you know, because i've been in these positions of leadership, i know what a challenge it is for them but really, you know, the answer to it is not to stop people getting to work in the uk. , . ~ stop people getting to work in the uk. , i ~ , a, , stop people getting to work in the uk. let me pick you up on that, --eole uk. let me pick you up on that, peeple do _ uk. let me pick you up on that, people do say — uk. let me pick you up on that, people do say if— uk. let me pick you up on that, people do say if you _ uk. let me pick you up on that, people do say if you invested i
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uk. let me pick you up on that, i people do say if you invested more heavily in for example renewable technology, we would be further down the line and as you say, a shining example for other nations of what could be achieved.— could be achieved. yes, i think to be fair, written, _ could be achieved. yes, i think to be fair, written, if _ could be achieved. yes, i think to be fair, written, if you _ could be achieved. yes, i think to be fair, written, if you look- could be achieved. yes, i think to be fair, written, if you look back. be fair, written, if you look back over the last 30 years, we have grown by 70% and cut emissions by 40% or we are pretty much up at the top there but of course, you know, you would like to have done more —— britain. over these past years, though, you have to say the uk government on the whole, governments of both persuasions politically, have been at the forefront of this and we know we should continue to do it and we need to do more. going to have to make big changes ourselves the 20 30s to hit at zero.— the 20 30s to hit at zero. people do so we have — the 20 30s to hit at zero. people do so we have done _ the 20 30s to hit at zero. people do so we have done easy _ the 20 30s to hit at zero. people do so we have done easy stuff, - the 20 30s to hit at zero. people do so we have done easy stuff, we - the 20 30s to hit at zero. people do | so we have done easy stuff, we have been fortunate and have got big continental shelf and can build offshore wind turbines that have switched from coal to gas which is actually where most of the emissions reductions come from. the difficult stuff is now on we are saying to people get rid of your gas boiler,
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change your car. this people get rid of your gas boiler, change your car-— people get rid of your gas boiler, change your car. this is the tricky stuff, change your car. this is the tricky stuff. isn't _ change your car. this is the tricky stuff, isn't it? _ change your car. this is the tricky stuff, isn't it? it— change your car. this is the tricky stuff, isn't it? it will— change your car. this is the tricky stuff, isn't it? it will be _ stuff, isn't it? it will be extremely tricky. it can be done. and if you look at electric vehicles, for example, and you go back even five years, i think most people were thinking well, it is really going to happen? maid? people were thinking well, it is really going to happen? now they know it is going — really going to happen? now they know it is going to _ really going to happen? now they know it is going to happen. - really going to happen? now they know it is going to happen. two l know it is going to happen. two final questions, first, what would you be saying to world leaders who are going to this conference in glasgow, sitting on those negotiating rooms, what would you be saying about, about how history will regard their decisions they make. the truth is you cannot put off these decisions. i mean, they are for now. because it is the next decade that is going to be dramatically important. so there is no way that you're going to be able to come back to this in a decade's time with a different generation of leaders and deal with it then. if it's not dealt with now, it's going to go possibly passed the point of no return in terms of the damage to
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climate and then future generations are going to be having to deal with the mitigation effects of that and those are going to be vast so i don't... it is, as i say, leaders haven't... we haven't chosen this moment of history, but they are in a moment of history, but they are in a moment of history, in history where what they do is going to determine the future of humanity. i mean, that, in normal circumstances, that would be seen as absurd political hyperbole and in this case it happens to be true. mr hyperbole and in this case it happens to be true. mr blair, thank ou ve happens to be true. mr blair, thank you very much _ happens to be true. mr blair, thank you very much indeed. _ happens to be true. mr blair, thank you very much indeed. very - happens to be true. mr blair, thank you very much indeed. very good i happens to be true. mr blair, thank| you very much indeed. very good to meet you. thank you.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and katherine downes. our headlines today: the government doubles down on its skills revolution, confirming it'll spend billions on training and new technical qualifications. millions of letters will be sent to parents in england this week, urging them to use the half—term holiday to get their children vaccinated. film directorjoel souza speaks for the first time since being accidentally shot on set by alec baldwin. england make a stunning start to the t20 world cup — they hammer defending champions west indies. england captain eoin morgan says, "it is as good as it gets."
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sunday is looking mild. a bit of rain in the forecast but sunny spells on the way too. it's sunday the 24th of october. good morning. our main story: ministers are to formalise their committment to a skills revolution in england with a series of measures to be unveiled in the chancellor's budget on wednesday. in his autumn statement, rishi sunak will announce £i.6 billion to roll out new t—levels for teenagers and £550 million for adult skills. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. what we want to see is a high wage, high skilled economy... the government says it wants to change the way the uk economy works, moving to higher skilled, more productive workforce which earns more money. in this week's budget, the chancellor
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will have the task of setting out more about how we get there, and key to his plans will be what the government is selling as a skills revolution. rishi sunak will announce £1.5 billion for t—levels in england for up to 100,000 young people to train for vocational qualifications. there will be £500 million for adult skills too and more than £800 million to revitalise colleges in england. the government argues the plans will give people the skills they need to get on in life. all students, whatever they are doing, whether it be technical education or academic education, or somewhere in between, deserve to have their education properly funded so we hope this new story, which focuses on technical education, is one part of the announcements that will come out over the course of the next few days. we hope the government will find the means to address the needs of the vast majority of young people to study a—levels or btec qualifications.
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ministers also want to balance the books after huge spending during the pandemic. but despite concerns over the economic picture, the government is making clear there is money to spend on its political priorities. the question is: will it be enough to deliver the big changes that ministers have promised and will the plans work? let's speak to our political correspondent, charlotte rose. charlotte, ministers say this investment amounts to £3 billion but some say it's not enough? some say it is not new money as well. that is right. we there's been criticism that some of the funding isn't new or as an expansion of existing programmes. what it does show is how important skills are to two of the government's biggest
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agendas, levelling up areas and moving to a zero carbon economy. the funding of t—levels, vocational qualifications equivalent to three a—levels, aim to get ten times many people signed up and ordering them at the moment. there's been criticism that at the same time funding is being from popular btecs. the money for adult skills, which is much more modest, is a recognition that if the government wants to move to a high wage, high skill economy then there needs to be opportunities for people to retrain through their lives. this all comes in the context of a budget where the chancellor wants to show his party that he's focused on balancing the books after huge spending during the pandemic, and also that he's got an eye on inflation because if that is to go up, that will mean the cost of government borrowing would increase dramatically. government borrowing would increase dramaticall . l, a, government borrowing would increase dramaticall . l, ,, a, government borrowing would increase dramatically-— dramatically. charlotte, for now, thank ou dramatically. charlotte, for now, thank you so _ dramatically. charlotte, for now, thank you so much. _ the film director who was
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accidentally shot on a movie set by the actor alec baldwin has spoken for the first time after leaving hospital. in a statement, joel souza thanked well—wishers, but said he was gutted by the loss of his colleague, the cinematographer halyne hutchins, who was killed in the same incident. court records say mr baldwin was told the gun was safe. more than two million letters will be sent to parents and guardians across england from tomorrow, inviting them to book their children in for covid jabs during half—term. health officials are offering vaccinations for those aged 12 to 15, saying it will give them crucial protection ahead of winter. our correspondent aruna iyen—guhr has more. the biggest rise in covid—i9 infections in england is now among i2— to is—year—olds. that's why health officials are targeting this group and urging their parents to book jabs online during half—term. vaccines are being offered in some schools but not all. outside schools there are around 100 vaccination
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sites offering jabs to teenagers, with more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going be using... in scotland vaccines have been widely available for 12 to is—year—olds since september. health officials in england are asking families to book in so children and loved ones have crucial protection overwinter. with starting to think about winter and the best chance of ever thing being open at christmas, being able to visit yourfamily and mixing between teenagers and they ran parents — clearly want children to be immunised to reduce the risk of spreading the virus to their elderly relatives. take a deep breath in... 500,000 teenagers have been vaccinated so far. the decision for some families is difficult. young people don't tend to come very ill with covid but they can still pass it on, affecting the wider community
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and, crucially, their own education if schools have to shut down. over 6,000 people are in hospital with covid, nearly a same number as a year ago. writing in the sunday telegraph today, professor stephen powis, the nhs medical director, is encouraging everyone to take up vaccination offers and booster shots. he says: that is why health officials are keen to get all age groups vaccinated ahead of what could be a challenging christmas. from today, fully vaccinated travellers returning to england can take a lateral flow test rather than a more expensive pcr test to prove their covid status. the change, which the government has described as a huge boost for the travel industry, applies to those arriving from non—red—list countries. wales will make the same change to their testing policy next weekend.
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colombia's most wanted drug trafficker and leader of the country's largest criminal gang has been captured following years of failed attempts. antonio ush—uga better known as ooto—niel was arrested as part of a joint operation between the army, the air force and police. the 50—year—old faces charges for offences including the murder of police officers, recruiting children and supplying cocaine to the us. artworks by picasso have been sold at auction in las vegas forjust under £80 million. the nine paintings and two ceramics had been a centrepiece at the picasso restaurant in the bellagio hotel for the last 20 years. they went under the hammer forjust short of $110 million us dollars. it makes you wonder what is left in the casio restaurant in the blood
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rio hotel. it won't be much of one if there no picassos! —— picasso restaurant. i if there no picassos! -- picasso restaurant-— if there no picassos! -- picasso restaurant. ., ., , , ., , restaurant. i would assume if i was there eating _ restaurant. i would assume if i was there eating pasta _ restaurant. i would assume if i was there eating pasta that _ restaurant. i would assume if i was there eating pasta that they - restaurant. i would assume if i was| there eating pasta that they weren't real picassos. there eating pasta that they weren't real picassos— real picassos. flicking a bit of asta real picassos. flicking a bit of pasta sauce — real picassos. flicking a bit of pasta sauce on _ real picassos. flicking a bit of pasta sauce on a _ real picassos. flicking a bit of pasta sauce on a picasso - real picassos. flicking a bit of pasta sauce on a picasso by i real picassos. flicking a bit of- pasta sauce on a picasso by mistake — but i'm sure they were very well protected. it's being billed as a skills revolution by ministers — three billion pounds to help people in england learn new technical skills and get higher—paying jobs. the chancellor rishi sunak will unveil full details in next week's budget, but the plans include more funding for t—levels — which is a type of vocational qualification. let's speak to geoff barton from the association of school and college leaders. good morning. what's your reaction to the funding announcement? it has to the funding announcement? it has to be good for young people to get an injection of cash?—
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an injection of cash? absolutely. it would be churlish _ an injection of cash? absolutely. it would be churlish not _ an injection of cash? absolutely. it would be churlish not to _ an injection of cash? absolutely. it would be churlish not to welcome l would be churlish not to welcome more money going to a sector of education that we know traditionally has been starved of funding, the ft sector needs more money and independent think tanks have been saying that. quite whether it is the revolution we are being promised we will have to see because my guess is if you were to ask viewers what t levels are, they would find that more difficult than what a—levels, gcses and apprenticeships are. it's worth reminding ourselves that post 16 something like 900,000 young people are doing a—levels, btecs and cambridge nationals — all good courses, well—recognised and will help them get to university. the t levels have 1500 young people doing them, very small, none of whom have yet graduated. it's a gamble from the government because we don't know if the 16 —year—olds want to do t levels when there are already well—suited causes. t
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levels when there are already well-suited causes.— levels when there are already well-suited causes. t levels are this new thing — well-suited causes. t levels are this new thing which, _ well-suited causes. t levels are this new thing which, obviously, well-suited causes. t levels are i this new thing which, obviously, as you have said, people may not recognise but perhaps in future they will become well—known like btecs and a—levels. do you think t levels are a good idea putting aside the fact many people haven't heard of there the moment? the? fact many people haven't heard of there the moment? they probably are. the add to there the moment? they probably are. they add to the — there the moment? they probably are. they add to the market _ there the moment? they probably are. they add to the market the _ they add to the market the opportunity for a young person to specialise. that's a good thing but for some it won't be. they won't necessarily want to spend two years just focusing on one narrow area. some well, some won't. but like with a—levels, at the moment you can do history, science and music — a range — you won't be able to do the same with t levels. if you know what career you want, that's fine, but the government talks about skills after 16 but never before 16. you have young people with no experience of vocational—technical education
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because they have to do gcses who are then expected to take a big step into a world of a qualification that nobody has yet gained. none of this is to criticise it but i would say to the government with their plans to the government with their plans to scrap things like btecs, they need to be really careful because btecs and similar have served this country very well and they are an engine of social. fibre country very well and they are an engine of social.— engine of social. are you worried about the demise _ engine of social. are you worried about the demise of _ engine of social. are you worried about the demise of btecs? - engine of social. are you worried j about the demise of btecs? that engine of social. are you worried - about the demise of btecs? that ba disadvantage for some young people? significant. 300,000 young people are doing btecs at the moment, often in the kind of communities government bangs in the kind of communities government hangs on the most they allow children to specialise often in higher education from backgrounds that wouldn't have allowed it previously. we need to make sure we invest in a—levels, which are well—respected, make sure the t levels have the time to bed in full be levels have the time to bed in full he get rid of a qualification like the btec mother cambridge nationals, which should be part of the mix post
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16 and that would be a more grown—up approach to a genuine skills market. what should be the priority for young people? what should the government he young people? what should the government be looking at? you touched on it there but could you expand on it a little bit? where should the government be putting the money and focus for people 16 to 19? on wednesday we got a comprehensive spending review and people will talk about it like spending but ultimately a spending review is about values and the government saying what matters. education is an investment and therefore one of the things we would say, representing school and college leaders across the uk, is you invest in the early years, those children who particularly from disadvantaged grounds have not had early education, particularly post pandemic when we know young people are returning or coming to school for the first time having lost out on a lot of the social skills. it's
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great we are talking about the post—16 sector but education is a continuum and what you put in as foundations early on you will get much later. that would be one thing. the second thing i would say to the government money, its ideological and that's if you are genuine about skills shouldn't we make sure young people at gcse, for example, have the experience of skills and vocational—technical education? and we stop going on about some subjects being much more important than others — modern foreign—language is, history and english, for example? couldn't we have a more nuanced view of a range of subjects that they do at key stage 4, pre—16, because that will leave people wanting to do t levels because they've had that experience in the past.- levels because they've had that experience in the past. thank you for coming _ experience in the past. thank you for coming in _ experience in the past. thank you for coming in and _ experience in the past. thank you for coming in and sharing - experience in the past. thank you for coming in and sharing your i for coming in and sharing your thoughts, jeff barton from the association of school and college leaders. what else awaits young people in this year's budget? let's speak to james smith from the resolution foundation,
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a think—tank that focusses on the living standards of those on low to middle incomes. welcome to breakfast. good to have you with us. we were hearing about some of the reforms that are proposed for education but i wonder if we can talk about something that is quite intangible. when we get to budget week it's easy to talk about money and investment and spending but how do we create opportunity? good morning. well, yes, that is the big question i think for this budget. stepping back, this is the budget. stepping back, this is the budget that the chancellor wanted all the priorities that we were talking about with the election in 2019 that got postponed because of the pandemic but, and he also wants the pandemic but, and he also wants the chancellor in all: so there is a lot on rishi sunak�*s plate as he comes into this budget but really, the big thing he needs to deal with is bottle create opportunity is the focus on the living standards. so we
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have huge cuts in benefits for the reversal of the £20 a week you see cuts and higher inflation and higher inaudible incomes on the end of the distribution and that impact is something that the chancellor has factored into his decision—making this week. he factored into his decision-making this week. ., , factored into his decision-making this week. . , ., factored into his decision-making this week. ., ., . this week. he has quite a balancing act to -la this week. he has quite a balancing act to play this _ this week. he has quite a balancing act to play this week _ this week. he has quite a balancing act to play this week because - this week. he has quite a balancing act to play this week because not i act to play this week because not only are those, the election promises of the manifesto pledges they made about levelling up, then you have a lot of costs associated with covid and paying back that bill and as you said rising energy bills, prices, all of those means it's difficult to know where to prioritise and i suppose notary to prioritise. prioritise and i suppose notary to rioritise. ~ ., prioritise and i suppose notary to rioritise. ~ . ., , ., , , prioritise and i suppose notary to rioritise. . . . , ., , , , prioritise. what has happened is the econom is prioritise. what has happened is the economy is now _ prioritise. what has happened is the economy is now better— prioritise. what has happened is the economy is now better than - prioritise. what has happened is the economy is now better than was - economy is now better than was expected back in march so about 4% at the time so it makes things
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easier in the near terms we expect to hear more about how you can help the nhs through the pandemic, the budget, that will be a key part. the other thing we are hearing not about his the investment giveaways they were talking about with levelling up and getting serious about net zero samosa key policies we are hearing more about, ——so those are key policies. rishi sunak is also trying to raise taxes very quickly and you are hearing less about that today. what he needs to do is help people through the hard winter ahead, to help them with benefit generosity, fuel bills and do what he can to deal with the problems in front of him now. �* , , deal with the problems in front of himnow. , , . him now. and briefly, the disconnect at the moment _ him now. and briefly, the disconnect at the moment as _ him now. and briefly, the disconnect at the moment as we _ him now. and briefly, the disconnect at the moment as we are _ him now. and briefly, the disconnect at the moment as we are told - at the moment as we are told unemployment is going in the right direction but there are more jobs available and it is not translating through the living standards. ida. available and it is not translating
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through the living standards. no, we will see living _ through the living standards. no, we will see living standards _ through the living standards. no, we will see living standards hit - through the living standards. no, we will see living standards hit by - will see living standards hit by higher inflation so the average household will be hit by about £1000 next year in terms of inflation so that will really hit demand and the overall economy but yes, but should be a key priority for rishi sunak this week. , ., , be a key priority for rishi sunak this week-— be a key priority for rishi sunak this week. , . , ., ., ~ ., this week. james, good to talk to ou. we will have full coverage of course of the budget, the budget itself, on wednesday. we will look ahead this week as to what to expect and then crucially in the aftermath workout where the money has been spent, promised the chancellor. full coverage on breakfast. talking about looking ahead... here's tomasz with a look at the weather. good morning to you all. the weather will be a bit of a mixed bag today. sunshine and showers in the forecast and obviously these headlines you often see in the bottom of the screen are just summaries, board brush and don't always reflect the whole picture is because right now
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in fact it is cloudy and wet croissant part of the country, not too many sunny spells because the weather front is crossing western parts of the uk, especially west south—western scotland, but through the afternoon the weather front will break up to showers and i think most of us at least through the afternoon will get some sunshine. a mild day, temperatures 15 and the south, not far off that in the lowlands of scotland. here, blustery with strong winds continuing through the day, blowing in showers, afternoon, evening and overnight, you can see them going. the low pressure is to them going. the low pressure is to the north of the closer you are to that, more vigorous the showers vigorous means more often and heavier. just discovering up showers overnight. tomorrow, the atlantic breezes here and it is here to stay for much of the week. it is not only bringing us the showers but very mild air in the southern climbs so once again, 15 in the south on monday in london, ten or 11
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temporarily cooler there —— southern climes. looking edinburgh, 17 on wednesday, in the south of the 17 soap mild midweek nationwide. that’s soap mild midweek nationwide. that's it. thank soap mild midweek nationwide. that's it- thank you — soap mild midweek nationwide. that's it- thank you very _ soap mild midweek nationwide. that's it. thank you very much. _ there was a really lovely moment on the programme yesterday as the three dads — andy, mike and tim — finished their 300—mile walk in memory of their daughters who all took their own lives. it's a sad reality that they are not the only parents trying to do something positive in their children's memory. kevin hay has been to meet sophie alway, who lost her daughter georgia last year. asa as a child, georgia was the same as every other child, happy, carefree, fighting with her sister. edging into trouble! always laughing and smiling. but edging into trouble! always laughing and smilin.. �* .,, edging into trouble! always laughing and smilin.. �* ., edging into trouble! always laughing and smilinu. �* . . and smiling. but as a teenager, georae
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and smiling. but as a teenager, george galloway _ and smiling. but as a teenager, george galloway began - and smiling. but as a teenager, george galloway began to - and smiling. but as a teenager, i george galloway began to struggle with her mental health fund injuly last year, she took her own life. she was 19 years old. i’m last year, she took her own life. she was 19 years old.— last year, she took her own life. she was 19 years old. i'm not going to live, i she was 19 years old. i'm not going to live. i was _ she was 19 years old. i'm not going to live, i was extremely _ she was 19 years old. i'm not going to live, i was extremely suicidal- to live, i was extremely suicidal myself after georgia died. and you spend a long time — i spent weeks sat on the sofa in the same position, not being able to move, not being able to eat, barely able to drink water, thinking, like, how can i live the rest of my life feeling this way?— can i live the rest of my life feeling this way? our some port urou -s feeling this way? our some port groups are _ feeling this way? our some port groups are small... _ feeling this way? our some port groups are small... 's _ feeling this way? our some port groups are small... 's motheri feeling this way? our some port | groups are small... 's mother set feeling this way? our some port - groups are small... 's mother set up groups are small... '5 mother set up a to help struggling young women in cornwall. we a to help struggling young women in cornwall. ~ ., ., , ., ., cornwall. we aim to provide a safe sace cornwall. we aim to provide a safe space where _ cornwall. we aim to provide a safe space where you — cornwall. we aim to provide a safe space where you can _ cornwall. we aim to provide a safe space where you can come - cornwall. we aim to provide a safe space where you can come and - cornwall. we aim to provide a safe. space where you can come and talk, or not talk, listen orjust be. shall we have one of your bags? the chari has shall we have one of your bags? ila: charity has recently opened a shop in falmouth, as well as raising money to fund growing network of
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support groups around the county the shop doubles as a venue itself. i suffer with ptsd and anxiety so it's been really helpful to come and be around other people who understand that. and having somewhere that is volunteer— run is really nice because there is not a waiting list and you can come and connect with other people. and you can come and connect with other people-— and you can come and connect with other people. and you can come and connect with other --eole. ~ ., , ., i. other people. who understand you. so far there are — other people. who understand you. so far there are nine _ other people. who understand you. so far there are nine georgia's _ other people. who understand you. so far there are nine georgia's voices - far there are nine georgia's voices support groups in cornwall. sophie hopes that one day there will be one in every town in the county. it has been an extraordinary 15 months. what do you think georgia would have made of this? i what do you think georgia would have made of this?— made of this? i think about that a lot so, made of this? i think about that a lot so. and _ made of this? i think about that a lot so. and l _ made of this? i think about that a lot so, and i talk— made of this? i think about that a lot so, and i talk to _ made of this? i think about that a lot so, and i talk to her _ made of this? i think about that a lot so, and i talk to her about - made of this? i think about that a lot so, and i talk to her about it. | lot so, and i talk to her about it. i think that she would love it. i hope that she would love it. i've kind to do everything so all of the purple and when we designed the logo it was all around georgia because her favourite colour was purple so i have always tried to keep it really personal, yeah. i’m
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have always tried to keep it really personal. yeah-— have always tried to keep it really personal, yeah. i'm sure she would be roud. personal, yeah. i'm sure she would be proud. thank— personal, yeah. i'm sure she would be proud. thank you. _ you've just heard from sophie alway there. we'd like to thank sophie for speaking to our reporter, kevin hay. the three dads walking have now raised more than £500,000 for the suicide prevention charity papyrus, and they will be on the breakfast sofa with dan and sally tomorrow morning. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at nine o'clock this morning. good morning, andrew. the budget is looming so we can probably guess who you'll have in the hot seat. first of all, wasn't it a very moving _ first of all, wasn't it a very moving story? moving and uplifting. i'm not— moving story? moving and uplifting. i'm not sure — moving story? moving and uplifting. i'm not sure moving or uplifting will be — i'm not sure moving or uplifting will be rishi sunak today, he has the budget coming next week and i will be _ the budget coming next week and i will be talking to him about all of the big _ will be talking to him about all of the big challenges ahead on cost of living, _ the big challenges ahead on cost of living, inflation and much else. and talking _ living, inflation and much else. and talking to _ living, inflation and much else. and talking to his labour opposite number— talking to his labour opposite number rachel reeves. what is her view on _ number rachel reeves. what is her view on taxable of the big issues facing _ view on taxable of the big issues facing the — view on taxable of the big issues
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facing the economy? and finally, clinton, — facing the economy? and finally, clinton, the former secretary of slate _ clinton, the former secretary of slate and — clinton, the former secretary of state and presidential who has a new novel— state and presidential who has a new novel out _ state and presidential who has a new novel out which is a bit of a go at donald _ novel out which is a bit of a go at donald trump, no surprise, and that our own— donald trump, no surprise, and that our own boris— donald trump, no surprise, and that our own borisjohnson. donald trump, no surprise, and that our own boris johnson.— donald trump, no surprise, and that our own boris johnson. andrew, thank ou. one our own boris johnson. andrew, thank you- one o'clock. _ our own boris johnson. andrew, thank you. one o'clock, bbc— our own boris johnson. andrew, thank you. one o'clock, bbc one. _ —— nine o'clock, bbc one. details are still emerging over how the actor alec baldwin accidentally shot dead the cinematographer halyna hutchins on a movie set, but the tragedy has raised wider questions about the use of guns in the film industry. let's talk more about this now with the actor and hollywood stuntman nicholas daines. good morning. good morning. what do ou make good morning. good morning. what do you make of — good morning. good morning. what do you make of what _ good morning. good morning. what do you make of what has _ good morning. good morning. what do you make of what has happened? - good morning. good morning. what do you make of what has happened? we i you make of what has happened? we have been talking about it for a couple of days but many people find it astonishing that something like that could happen. first it astonishing that something like that could happen.— that could happen. first and foremost. — that could happen. first and foremost, this _ that could happen. first and foremost, this is _ that could happen. first and foremost, this is a - that could happen. first and foremost, this is a terrible l that could happen. first and - foremost, this is a terrible tragedy and heartfelt condolences go out to the family— and heartfelt condolences go out to the family of ms hutchins and i'm sure that — the family of ms hutchins and i'm sure that this accident is being felled — sure that this accident is being felled lry— sure that this accident is being felled by the film industry around the world. obviously i cannot
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comment— the world. obviously i cannot comment or speculate on what happened on the set of rust in new mexico _ happened on the set of rust in new mexico until a full investigation is completed by the sheriffs office but in my— completed by the sheriffs office but in my 25 _ completed by the sheriffs office but in my 25 years experience as a stunt performer— in my 25 years experience as a stunt performer and stunt co—ordinator, these _ performer and stunt co—ordinator, these instances are incredibly rare and there — these instances are incredibly rare and there are strict protocols to adhere — and there are strict protocols to adhere to _ and there are strict protocols to adhere to. especially in this country _ adhere to. especially in this count . ~ . adhere to. especially in this count .~ . . , adhere to. especially in this count . ~ ., ., ., country. what are the rules around runs on country. what are the rules around guns on film _ country. what are the rules around guns on film sets? _ country. what are the rules around guns on film sets? you _ country. what are the rules around guns on film sets? you are - country. what are the rules around guns on film sets? you are an - country. what are the rules around i guns on film sets? you are an expert there. forthose guns on film sets? you are an expert there. for those of us who have heard this story and heard what happened and shock obviously was the main reaction but you've been saying how strict everything is around guns on film sets so what rules should have been in place?— on film sets so what rules should have been in place? here in the uk we have very _ have been in place? here in the uk we have very strict _ have been in place? here in the uk we have very strict safety - have been in place? here in the uk we have very strict safety protocols in place _ we have very strict safety protocols in place before you even get a gun in place before you even get a gun in your— in place before you even get a gun in your hand on that. and we work with dedicated specialised armourers who comprehensively train talent in
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the use _ who comprehensively train talent in the use of— who comprehensively train talent in the use of firearms. and this protocol— the use of firearms. and this protocol will start with having to si-n protocol will start with having to sign your— protocol will start with having to sign your weapon in and out, you are given— sign your weapon in and out, you are given fult— sign your weapon in and out, you are given full operational instruction as to _ given full operational instruction as to what weapon you are using and how to _ as to what weapon you are using and how to use _ as to what weapon you are using and how to use it, you are given time with— how to use it, you are given time with the — how to use it, you are given time with the weapon to familiarise yourself — with the weapon to familiarise yourself with it and to practise with— yourself with it and to practise with it — yourself with it and to practise with it and what to do if the gun jams _ with it and what to do if the gun jams or— with it and what to do if the gun jams or if— with it and what to do if the gun jams or if there is blockage during a take _ jams or if there is blockage during a take. now, these dedicated armourers are very visual and they are onset— armourers are very visual and they are onset and they are constantly assessing — are onset and they are constantly assessing who has what weapon and if they need _ assessing who has what weapon and if they need additional training. these firearms _ they need additional training. these firearms are only set to go off seconds — firearms are only set to go off seconds before we do a take and if a cold weapon, that is a new weapon brought— cold weapon, that is a new weapon brought in. — cold weapon, that is a new weapon brought in, a change, bought into an act or— brought in, a change, bought into an act or performer, the armirail will show— act or performer, the armirail will show the — act or performer, the armirail will show the performer it is clear and they will— show the performer it is clear and they will get you to acknowledge that the — they will get you to acknowledge that the weapon is, in fact, safe and clear— that the weapon is, in fact, safe and clear and that you know how to
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use it _ and clear and that you know how to use it and _ and clear and that you know how to use it and they have given you full operational instructions to do that. as far— operational instructions to do that. as far as _ operational instructions to do that. as faras firing operational instructions to do that. as far as firing the firearms onset, you will— as far as firing the firearms onset, you will never aimed directly at somebody onset. you always aim off to the _ somebody onset. you always aim off to the side _ somebody onset. you always aim off to the side and we use canberra —— camera _ to the side and we use canberra —— camera angles to create the illusion and the _ camera angles to create the illusion and the armirail will come over on cut to _ and the armirail will come over on cut to physically take the weapon from _ cut to physically take the weapon from you. — cut to physically take the weapon from you, clear at himself and shout weapon— from you, clear at himself and shout weapon clear —— armourer. so there are lots— weapon clear —— armourer. so there are lots of— weapon clear —— armourer. so there are lots of guidelines here in this country— are lots of guidelines here in this country that make it very safe and we have _ country that make it very safe and we have a — country that make it very safe and we have a good safety record. and ou soke we have a good safety record. fiflc you spoke about camera we have a good safety record. a"lc you spoke about camera angles and some camera trickery may be to make sure it is not pointed directly at anyone and many people will find it astonishing that in the age of cg! and some of the special effects that can be added in relatively simply now that you still need to have a weapon that has a kit and a gun explosion and things like that so why is that still needed? —— has a
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kick. why is that still needed? -- has a kick. �* ., ., , . ., ., , kick. blanks onset create realism and ou kick. blanks onset create realism and you are _ kick. blanks onset create realism and you are going _ kick. blanks onset create realism and you are going to _ kick. blanks onset create realism and you are going to get - kick. blanks onset create realism and you are going to get a - and you are going to get a loud bang. — and you are going to get a loud bang, recoiland and you are going to get a loud bang, recoil and a muzzle flash which _ bang, recoil and a muzzle flash which is — bang, recoil and a muzzle flash which is a — bang, recoil and a muzzle flash which is a visible light due to the combustion of powder. but it depends on what _ combustion of powder. but it depends on what production it is. a lot of fantasy— on what production it is. a lot of fantasy movies will use cgi for those — fantasy movies will use cgi for those kind of effects. but it really does _ those kind of effects. but it really does create realism in movies and drop does create realism in movies and prop gums — does create realism in movies and prop gums can range from non—functional weapons to cap guns and they— non—functional weapons to cap guns and they usually were weapons adapted — and they usually were weapons adapted to firing blanks onset —— prop— adapted to firing blanks onset —— prop guns — adapted to firing blanks onset —— prop guns. is there anything that can be _ prop guns. is there anything that can be done. like a tragic accident, are all— can be done. like a tragic accident, are all kinds — can be done. like a tragic accident, are all kinds of allegations about .un are all kinds of allegations about gun safety onset but what you briefly — gun safety onset but what you briefly say would help to make using .uns briefly say would help to make using guns on _ briefly say would help to make using guns on film sets more safe? hopefully from this accident there will be _ hopefully from this accident there will be good communication and transparency so that we can really
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learn _ transparency so that we can really learn what — transparency so that we can really learn what happened in this terrible tragedy— learn what happened in this terrible tragedy and we can always use that to move _ tragedy and we can always use that to move forward. we need to use these _ to move forward. we need to use these dedicated specialist armourers onset, _ these dedicated specialist armourers onset, they are a fantastic asset to the film _ onset, they are a fantastic asset to the film industry in this country and that's— the film industry in this country and that's why we have such a good track— and that's why we have such a good track record — and that's why we have such a good track record. and and that's why we have such a good track record-— track record. and also using very competent _ track record. and also using very competent professional - track record. and also using very i competent professional performers. we have a registry in this country that supplies these professionals to the film and television industry and many of them have excellent backgrounds and are in using firearms onset.— backgrounds and are in using firearms onset. , ., ., ., firearms onset. stunt co-ordinator and stuntman _ firearms onset. stunt co-ordinator and stuntman nicholas _ firearms onset. stunt co-ordinator and stuntman nicholas daines. - firearms onset. stunt co-ordinator and stuntman nicholas daines. as| and stuntman nicholas daines. as nicholas was saying may be potentially bringing about a change in the rules as a result of that investigation are continuing. you're watching breakfast. we're on on the bbc news channel until nine o'clock this morning. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and kat downes. good morning to you. let's get a full round—up of all the sport with sarah. good morning. full round-up of all the sport with sarah. good morning.— full round-up of all the sport with sarah. good morning. good morning. startin:
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sarah. good morning. good morning. starting with — sarah. good morning. good morning. starting with cricket _ sarah. good morning. good morning. starting with cricket and _ sarah. good morning. good morning. starting with cricket and what - sarah. good morning. good morning. starting with cricket and what a - starting with cricket and what a performance yesterday. great hi mike hi-h performance yesterday. great hi mike high fives _ performance yesterday. great hi mike high fives and a great team showing, you want— high fives and a great team showing, you want that from a world cup opener— you want that from a world cup opener and a blistering start. unbelievable, west indies are the defending champions and with the likes of— defending champions and with the likes of chris gayle in their lineup. _ likes of chris gayle in their lineup, such a power batter, he was the only— lineup, such a power batter, he was the only one — lineup, such a power batter, he was the only one to get to double figures — the only one to get to double figures so big? is for them. the inuuest figures so big? is for them. the inquest begins _ figures so big? is for them. ila: inquest begins now! —— big? 5. england's cricketers had the best possible start to their t20 world cup campaign, thrashing the defending champions west indies in dubai. adil rashid was superb, taking four wickets for just two runs in only 14 balls — england's best t20 bowling figures — and tymal mills marked his return with two wickets as west indies were dismissed for 55. england made light work of their reply — jos buttler wrapping up a six—wicket victory. i thought as a bowling group we bowled exceptionally well. everything fell into plan. moeen did
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well. we bowled exceptionally well. there was a rout at stamford bridge as the premier league's top side chelsea beat bottom—of—the—table norwich 7—0. mason mount hadn't scored since may but he started the hosts off inside the first ten minutes, and that was just a sign of things to come. callum hudson—odoi, reecejames and ben chilwell all got on the scoresheet, before mount finished off the scoring with his first chelsea hat—trick. manchester city are breathing down chelsea's neck, just two points behind them. phil foden was impressive yet again, scoring twice in city's 4—1 win at brighton. and what a turnaround we saw from watford. beaten 5—0 by liverpool last week, they put five past everton — including a hat—trick from josh king, who was on loan at everton last season. it finished 5—2.
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a point at st mirren today will be enough to put rangers back on top of the scottish premiership. they slipped below hearts on goal difference after they drew 1—1 at home to dundee. hearts could have gone clear at the top. john souttar put the edinburgh side ahead but poor defending was punished and jason cummings equalised. beth mead became the first woman to score a hat—trick for england at wembley, as they beat northern ireland 4—0 in world cup qualifying, and that took england back to the top of their group. jo currie was watching. commentator: this is a landmark day here at wembley. _ walking into the history books, england women's first ever competitive match at wembley. for semi—professional northern ireland, an opportunity to test themselves against their full—time neighbours. it was lauren hemp who struck first — the woodwork, that is. with the goalkeeper jacqueline burns beaten, only the frame of the goal could deny the lionesses
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an opener. and that set the tone for england's first half. lots of chances created but one way or another, the lionesses couldn't find a breakthrough. a change of ends, however, brought about a change of fortune for england as substitute beth mead, who had only been on the pitch a matter of seconds, acrobatically turned the ball home. and that lead was doubled shortly afterwards. lauren hemp with the ball in, beth england at the back post to make sure. england now on a roll with mead at it again — this time slamming the ball home for her second of the night. commentator: brilliant for england! and she wasn't done yet as she wrapped up the win and her 14—minute hat—trick with this simple finish. job done for the home side. three wins from three in the qualifying campaign. so, in the end, a night to rememberfor england and in particular for beth mead. next up, the lionesses travel to latvia on tuesday, the same night that northern ireland host austria, aiming to put this defeat behind them. jo currie, bbc news. there was a clean sweep for england's rugby league sides in their one—off internationals against france. the men's team had to work harder than the 30—10 scoreline suggests, but a flurry of late
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tries sealed the victory. stand—in captain john bateman scoring twice in perpignan. it was much easier for england's women. they scored seven tries as they cruised to a 40—4 victory. the team all have full—time jobs. they only travelled to france yesterday morning and had to have a covid test at 5am. unbeaten leicester tigers are six points clear at the top of rugby union's premiership table after beating sale sharks. london irish caused an upset as they claimed their first win of the season, by beating last year's premiership runners up exeter chiefs. winger ollie hassell—collins went over for their fifth try as irish recorded their biggest win at sandy park beating exeter by 33—21. elsewhere, there were wins for gloucester and harlequins. great britain have won a second gold medal at the track cycling world championships in france and, once again, it came in the omnium. ethan hayter followed katie archibald's success by dominating the points race, the final event of the four—race contest. it's his first
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individual world title. always a great event, when you have to keep up with four different events across it all. your brain is a bit scrambled with the mathematics involved. ., , ., ., involved. two wheel heptathlon, . reat involved. two wheel heptathlon, ureat fun! involved. two wheel heptathlon, great fun! they— involved. two wheel heptathlon, great fun! they are _ involved. two wheel heptathlon, great fun! they are doing - involved. two wheel heptathlon, great fun! they are doing so - involved. two wheel heptathlon, j great fun! they are doing so well given expectations were solo. laura and jason kenney relaxed post olympics, elinor barker is pregnant with her first olympics, elinor barker is pregnant with herfirst child, so olympics, elinor barker is pregnant with her first child, so she olympics, elinor barker is pregnant with herfirst child, so she isn't there. missing some big names but not doing badly. bind there. missing some big names but not doing badly-— not doing badly. and the madison later so no _ not doing badly. and the madison later so no celebrating _ not doing badly. and the madison later so no celebrating yet - not doing badly. and the madison later so no celebrating yet for - not doing badly. and the madison | later so no celebrating yet for him. get back on those energy drinks! thank you so much, sarah. we will be talking to sarah later. now on bbc breakfast it is time for
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the travel show. this week on the show... having a blast in iceland. someone asked me if it was sped up. it's not. it was just like a sleep slope. that was crazy. chewing the fat in southern spain. offering a helping hand to lost seal pups in ireland. when she came in, she didn't look too great, but now she looks beautiful, one of the prettiest seals i've seen! terrified, but this is what it's all about, so let's give it our best shot. and the 26—mile slog to shake off the post—lockdown blues in paris. hello, and welcome to iceland,
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the little island that did very well against covid, fighting very aggressively from early on, and now is welcoming visitors back to its shores. and in that effort, it's had a little help from a rather unexpected and very volatile source. volcanoes are the rock stars in iceland. # what makes you feel good... or at least a cool place where rock stars can shoot their music videos, which is exactly what icelandic rockers kaleo did during this year's eruption. and like all good rock gods, this volcano was fiery, unpredictable and, above all, knows how to put on a good show. ladies and gentlemen, it's time to introduce you to iceland's newest volcano, fagradalsfjall. or 'bob' as some people
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online like to call it. but what's in a name? it's so new, it hasn't even received an official title yet. it's windy and it's raining, but it's beautiful! since march this year, this hell—raiser has been burning up social media and news outlets across the world. since travel restrictions lifted, over 300,000 people have flocked to iceland to see the longest volcanic eruption in the country for over 50 years. i wanted to see this natural phenomenon for myself. oh, look at this! wow! so, i headed up to the site with guide and self—confessed volcano chaser marco di marco. i was so excited. it was like...| was waiting
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for an eruption in iceland for basically...| mean, i don't want to exaggerate, but basically all my life. even though there were no rivers of fire, the lava fields are out of this world. look at this place. it looks like the surface of an alien planet. all i want to do is clamber up there and explore. but apparently the rock can be actually quite thin and brittle and there can be pockets of lava underneath, so if you walk on it and you fall through, you're in real trouble, so it's not a good idea, unfortunately. what a brilliant place. marco grew up in the shadow of mount etna on sicily, which is where he found his passion for volcanoes. he's spent most of the year guiding tourists around iceland's latest volcano, and has been documenting the eruption for himself. these people are just coming to watch the lava flow. to watch the eruption, yeah, to basicallyjust attend a festival. laughs. that was the thing. like, all these people arejust sitting, like they're watching
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a performance or they're at the theatre or something, but it's nature on show. taking pictures, basically, when the lava is approaching. so when the lava is too hot, they start, like, backing up. like, ok, just wait a sec. but we think of a volcanic eruption as being kind of a disaster. but here, it's almost entertainment. it's totally entertainment. the footage marco shot looks incredible. someone asked me if it was sped up. it's not. it was just like a steep slope. that was crazy. yeah, look how fast it's moving! is it less windy on the american continent? no, i think it's the same wind! i'm at a bridge between two continents where i'm meeting holda, one of the first guides
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to take tourists to this year's volcanic eruption. holda is coming over from the north american side to meet me on the eurasian side. she tells me it's these two tectonic plates which are slowly moving away from each other which causes iceland's abundance of volcanic activity, which is nowhere near as fun as what the ancient icelanders believed. often, when — in the earlier days, we were having volcanic activities, we connected that to evil trolls that were having tantrum episodes. heavy rock music plays. who could forget 2010 when many of our travel plans were grounded by an ash cloud caused by an icelandic volcano. but holda says the timing was perfect. the attention generated turned into a wave of tourism at a time
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when iceland needed it most, after the impact of the economic crash. holda also believes the new eruption is a case of history repeating itself. we think also that iceland is living with us and the nature is often answering back to some of our prayers, if you want to say. now we were having a little bit of problem with the pandemic and everything shutting down and no tourists, and then we have this eruption. it is absolutely necessary for us to create some ways of income, and this...this is the means of iceland actually helping us! as we've seen recently on the canary island of la palma, it's mother nature who holds the cards in this game, and holda says if you do want to visit a volcano, the best way is to see it with a guide. in the beginning, there was a lot of mistakes being done,
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people were getting in trouble. the routes were, like, difficult and the weather was treacherous, and i think that everyone here in iceland just got caught up in making this more safe and more accessible for people, and in that way, to have guided tours up to the volcano. from wedding films like this to live streams and music videos, in a year where travel has been extremely limited, the artistry and creativity this volcano has sparked has given us all a chance to enjoy this eruption from afar. and it really goes to show why iceland has earned the nickname of 'the land of fire and ice'. we all love a good chat, a chance to while away the hours
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catching up, gossiping, orjust having a good old chin wag. at first glance, chatting might seem a strange thing to add to unesco's list of intangible cultural heritage, but it's on a list that already includes neapolitan pizza making, finnish sauna culture and a grass—mowing competition in bosnia and herzegovina. here's why charla alfresco — roughly translated as 'outdoor chatting' — might stand a chance of making the cut.
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still to come on the travel show — we meet galaxy, the seal pup who's embarking on her biggest adventure yet. this is it. it's actually in half an hour. you need to put yourself in the right mindset. and we are at the paris marathon as one competitor takes part to clear up his post—lockdown blues. so don't go away. right, we are off to ireland next to meet some of its cutest residents. but seal pups that live around the coastline have been having
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an increasingly difficult time. more frequent storms are causing larger numbers of baby seals to be separated from their mothers before they've learnt to fend for themselves. we've been to meet a team of mostly volunteers who have devoted their lives to the rescuing and rehabilitation of lost seal pups. meet galaxy. she has become a bit of a social media star for seal rescue ireland, and we arejoining her on her biggest adventure yet. so in this pool, we've got galaxy, who is just about ready to be released — we will be releasing her tomorrow — and she is a very special seal because this is her second time in rehab. and she was one of the smallest... i just got soaked! galaxy the seal battled through the centre's icu and is the only seal to have been rescued twice.
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but why is it that seals like galaxy even need to be rescued? seals come to us for very many reasons. they get trapped in netting, then we also have orphaning. two seals, a baby and mum could, be out swimming in the ocean a storm rolls in unexpectedly, they are separated, and then the baby will come to the beach lost, looking for his mum, and that is when we will come in and monitorfor a couple of hours to see if she does come back to find him, but often, they don't, so we will take that pup into care. many of the pups are fighting life—threatening injuries and illness. most are just too small to survive on their own. we can put some water on it, it is ok.
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seal rescue ireland's income relies heavily on its visitor centre. so when lockdowns hit, it was a real blow. but now they can once again welcome visitors in small groups with social distancing in place. galaxy! three, two, go. galaxy! she knows the drill. the time has finally come for galaxy to return to the sea. when she came in, she did not look too great but now, she looks beautiful. one of the prettiest seals i've seen. and she is happy and
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she's ready to go. you know, working with wildlife you don't want to get attached to them. they are wild animals and they do bite, so you need to be careful with the,. but you see them go through the rehabilitation journey and you experience all their ups and downs and then, to see them finally go back is just really rewarding to watch. is it a boy or a girl? it is a girl. it's a girl. lovely. so we'll open the cage in a few minutes here and she willjust slowly make her way to the sea. we ask that everyone keep a safe distance from her and let her go at her own pace. 0k!
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this is kind of what we need to keep going. the climte and biodiversity crisis can feel so overwhelming, it can feel like we are just doomed, but having a little wins like this inspires people to pull together and change things. now you may recall last month, we caught up with freddie pearson, a graduate from london. he's had struggles with mental health in the past and says a lack of travel during these last 18 months has had an impact on him and his friends. but he has a plan to take on the post—lockdown blues, and it involves a lot of running.
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i think young people have missed being able to travel and go to new places. for a lot of people, they have been looking at the four walls for a lot of their days or in the same space and every day has kind of merged into one, which has mad things difficult. to go and run around paris, i'll be honest, i will feel like i am in a movie. it is so beautiful and there is so much going on. such an amazing atmosphere. last one in the bag before the marathon. so i start up by the champs—elysses, go past the eiffel tower, so along the seine the river and all the amazing landmarks of paris. given everything going on over the last year, i feel so lucky to be here. big nice sleep ahead of me and raring to go.
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one thing about these things that i love is that lots of freebies. they've stopped. they've stopped — i was the last one! a stamp and not a signature? signature and, like both. what time does this close? until 6:00. thank you. so i turned up to collect my race number and it turns out in france, when you run a race you have to have a medical certificate from your doctor to say that you are fit and able to run, so i've got to do that now in a very short space of time to make sure i can get registered in time to run this marathon tomorrow. uh, asap. it is proving to be a bit of a nightmare. it is a saturday and no—one is in the gp office but i'm just trying to get it sorted. thank you so, so much, i appreciate it. bye bye. so there is a doctor
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and he will check it. yes! merci. we got it! now i'm going to go get my number and then we can race. let's go! so it is the morning of the marathon. the nerves are starting to set in a little bit. but they're good nerves. let's go and hit the road. you start seeing all the people coming out and all the signs for the marathon, you do start to realise that this is it. you can see the finish line. we go in about two minutes. i would be lying if i said i wasn't
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terrified at the prospect of this, but it's good to get living after a life of lockdown and it is good to be doing this in paris. so, first couple of kilometres in the bag. just getting started. just got to put my head down.
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everything about that was unreal. a real battle of the mind over the last 18 months, and we have all had to battle against ourselves. an amazing feeling today. i could not recommend it more to anyone. that is not pretty. finishing time — three hours and two minutes. let's go get a beer! what a great achievement and what a great way to see paris as well. best of luck to freddie in the future.
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that is all we have time for this week. coming up next time — new and improved. we're visiting the recently reopened iconic parisian department store. a velvet barre! —— a velvet beret ! as they say, when in paris! you can find more of our recent adventures on bbc iplayer or on social media. just search for bbc travel show on the major platforms and you will find us there. until next time, wherever you are planning to go to, stay safe, have fun, and we will see you soon.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and katherine downes. our headlines today... the government doubles down on its "skills revolution", confirming it'll spend billions on training and new technical qualifications. millions of letters will be sent to parents in england this week, urging them to use the half term holiday to get their children vaccinated. film directorjoel souza speaks for the first time since being accidentally shot on set
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by alec baldwin. a dream start for england at the t20 world cup. they skittle the defending champions west indies with england captain eoin morgan saying, "the win is as good as it gets". and john and johannes dazzle the judges with their charleston to top this week's strictly leaderboard. former pro flavia cacace—mistry will be here to look back at all the action. well, sunday is looking mild. a bit of rain in the forecast, but sunday spells on the way too. it's sunday the 24th of october. our main story... ministers are to formalise their committment to a "skills revolution" in england, with a series of measures to be unveiled in the chancellor's budget on wednesday. in his autumn statement, rishi sunak will announce £1.6 billion to roll out new "t—levels" for teenagers — and £550 million for adult skills.
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here's our political correspondent nick eardley. what we want to see is a high wage, high skilled economy... the government says it wants to change the way the uk economy works, moving to higher skilled, more productive workforce which earns more money. in this week's budget, the chancellor will have the task of setting out more about how we get there, and key to his plans will be what the government is selling as a skills revolution. rishi sunak will announce £1.5 billion for t—levels in england for up to 100,000 young people to train for vocational qualifications. there will be £500 million for adult skills too and more than £800 million to revitalise colleges in england. the government argues the plans will give people the skills they need to get on in life.
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all students, whatever they are doing, whether it be the t—levels have got 1500 young people, very small, none of them have yet graduated, so it is a bit of a gun from the government because we don't know yet whether those 16—year—olds will want to do t—levels when already there are courses there which appear to have suited them really well. ministers also want to balance the books after huge spending during the pandemic. but despite concerns over the economic picture, the government is making clear there is money to spend on its political priorities. the question is: will it be enough to deliver the big changes that ministers have promised and will the plans work? let's speak to our political correspondent charlotte rose. charlotte, ministers say this investment amounts to £3 billion, but some say it's not enough?
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there has been criticism both that this isn't new money, it is an expansion of existing programmes or that it expansion of existing programmes or thatitis expansion of existing programmes or that it is simply not at the great revolution the government wants. but what i think is important is that skills are critical to two of the government's biggest agendas. levelling up, left behind areas and also moving to a zero carbon economy. the t—levels we have been hearing about our vocational qualifications which are equivalent to three a—levels. the funding for them is aiming to get ten times more students signed up to do those that are doing them at the moment. as we heard that could be a bit of a gamble because at the same time the government is taking money away from btec courses which have been really popular with students in the past. on the adult skills funding which is much more modest amount, i think thatis much more modest amount, i think that is a recognition from the government that if they want to be “p government that if they want to be up to create that high wage high skilled economy there needs to be more opportunities for people to retrain throughout their lives. and
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of course all of these announcements are coming in the context of the budget with the chancellor was to show his party he is focused on balancing the books after big spending splurge during the pandemic and that he has got an eye on the possibility of inflation because that would make the cost of government borrowing increased significantly. government borrowing increased significantly-— government borrowing increased sianificantl. ., . , significantly. thank you. we will be s-ueakin significantly. thank you. we will be speaking on — significantly. thank you. we will be speaking on about _ significantly. thank you. we will be speaking on about 15 _ significantly. thank you. we will be speaking on about 15 minutes' - significantly. thank you. we will be speaking on about 15 minutes' timej speaking on about 15 minutes' time to somebody who can tell is a bit more about those announcements on wednesday from rishi sunak and his education ideas. full coverage here on bbc breakfast. the film director who was accidentally shot on a movie set by the actor alec baldwin has spoken for the first time after leaving hospital. in a statement, joel souza thanked well—wishers for their support, and said he was "gutted" by the loss of his colleague, the cinematographer halyne hutchins, who was killed in the same incident. from hollywood, sophie long reports.
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"we miss you", the simple words of a husband and a son whose lives have been changed forever. in this audio released by the emergency services, you can hear the script supervisor calling for help, describing what happened moments before. two people accidentally shot on a movie set. we need immediate help. we now know that when alec baldwin was handed the weapon, he was told it was safe ? what is called a cold gun. but the shot or shots it released killed cinematographer halyne hutchins and seriously injured directorjoel souza. the person responsible for the safety of all weapons used on the rust set was this woman. the daughter of a legendary hollywood armourer, she had been around guns all her life but a month ago she spoke of her lack of experience in the job. i am still learning. dad has taught me everything.
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loading blanks was the scariest thing to me because i didn't know anything about it. there have been unconfirmed reports of complaints about safety standards on the set and that a number of crew walked out hours before the shooting. at this stage of the investigation we do not know whether hannah gutierrez reid was among those who remained. halyne hutchins honed her craft here. one of her teachers said she had a unique perspective of the world. more than two million letters will be sent to parents and guardians across england from tomorrow, inviting them to book their children in for covid jabs during half—term. health officials are offering vaccinations for those aged 12 to 15, saying it will give them "crucial protection ahead of winter. our correspondent aruna iyengar has more. the biggest rise in covid—19 infections in england is now among 12—to—15—year—olds. that's why health officials are targeting this group
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and urging their parents to book jabs online during half—term. vaccines are being offered in some schools but not all. outside schools there are around 100 vaccination sites offering jabs to teenagers, with more to open shortly. this is the arm we're going be using... in scotland vaccines have been widely available for 12 to 15—year—olds since september. health officials in england are asking families to book in so children and loved ones have crucial protection overwinter. we are starting to think about winter and the best chance of everything being open at christmas, being able to visit your family and mixing between teenagers and grandparents — clearly want children to be immunised to reduce the risk of spreading the virus to their elderly relatives. take a deep breath in... 500,000 teenagers have been vaccinated so far. the decision for some families is difficult.
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young people don't tend to become very ill with covid but they can still pass it on, affecting the wider community and, crucially, their own education if schools have to shut down. over 6,000 people are in hospital with covid, nearly the same number as a year ago. writing in the sunday telegraph today, professor stephen powis, the nhs medical director, is encouraging everyone to take up vaccination offers and booster shots. he says... that is why health officials are keen to get all age groups vaccinated ahead of what could be a challenging christmas. from today, fully vaccinated travellers returning to england can take a lateral flow test — rather than a more expensive pcr test —
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to prove their covid status. the change, which the government has described as a 'huge boost�* for the travel industry, applies to those arriving from non—red—list countries. wales will make the same change to their testing policy next weekend. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker — and leader of the country's largest criminal gang — has been captured following years of failed attempts. antonio ushuga, better known as otoniel, was arrested as part of a joint operation between the army, the air force and police. the 50—year—old faces charges for offences including the murder of police officers, recruiting children and supplying cocaine to the us. artworks by picasso have been sold at auction in las vegas forjust under £80 million. the nine paintings and two ceramics had been a centrepiece at the picasso restaurant in the bellagio hotel for the last 20 years.
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the hotel still has 12 more picassos, so it still can be called the picasso restaurant. we were a bit worried about that. the non—picasso restaurant. i am impressed they had legit picassos on the wall. i! impressed they had legit picassos on the wall. " , ., ,., impressed they had legit picassos on the wall. " , ., ' the wall. 11 they have sold, 12 day have kept. _ the wall. 11 they have sold, 12 day have kept, that _ the wall. 11 they have sold, 12 day have kept, that is _ the wall. 11 they have sold, 12 day have kept, that is lows. _ 11 minutes past eight. let's return to our top story. it's being billed as a "skills revolution" by ministers — £3 billion worth of investment to help people in england learn new skills and get higher—paying jobs. the chancellor rishi sunak will unveil full details in next week's budget, but the plans include more funding for t—levels — a type of vocational qualification.
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we'rejoined now by david hughes from the association of colleges. lovely to see you on the sofa with us this morning. we have been looking at this funding. how do you think it will help, if at all? it’s think it will help, if at all? it's ureat think it will help, if at all? it's great have — think it will help, if at all? it's great have more _ think it will help, if at all? it�*s great have more money we took ape at skills. the transfer are happy to give it a skills revolution, it feels a bit like a skills evolution to me. it is like to have more money but it is not enough. this will help tens of thousands of people but what we need is millions of people to get the training and retraining they need for the jobs out there. we know employers are crying out for people with skills of the schools isn't there at the education isn't there for people to access. 50 there at the education isn't there for people to access.— for people to access. so for it to be a revolution _ for people to access. so for it to be a revolution you _ for people to access. so for it to be a revolution you wanted - for people to access. so for it to be a revolution you wanted to i for people to access. so for it to | be a revolution you wanted to be rolled out for many more people. absolutely. we think there are about 9 million adults without good literacy and numeracy let alone digital skills and to getjobs now you need those skills. to improve productivity and get businesses really firing, we need people with the skills but 9 million might not
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tens of thousands. it is not as exciting as the furlough scheme, or as bold as the furlough scheme. we didn't expect much but we were really hoping for the chancellor to be bold really hoping for the chancellor to be hold on skills. really hoping for the chancellor to be bold on skills.— be bold on skills. talking about caettin be bold on skills. talking about getting these — be bold on skills. talking about getting these tens _ be bold on skills. talking about getting these tens of _ be bold on skills. talking about| getting these tens of thousands be bold on skills. talking about i getting these tens of thousands of people into these skilled qualifications, those qualifications are these new t—levels, so they are kind vocational but also quite highly academic. what do you make of t—levels, do you think they are a good way to go? hate t-levels, do you think they are a good way to go?— t-levels, do you think they are a good way to go? we are a big fan of t-levels and _ good way to go? we are a big fan of t-levels and they _ good way to go? we are a big fan of t-levels and they are _ good way to go? we are a big fan of t-levels and they are really - t—levels and they are really important and very good qualifications but they are only being used by a few thousand students at the moment and the ambition is to go to 100,000. that's ambition is to go to 100,000. that's a really big ambition but actually we still need other qualifications for people to be able to get into nursing and social care and logistics and become his ev drivers. those of the other skills you need and the t—levels don't really deliver on them. i and the t-levels don't really deliver on them.— and the t-levels don't really deliver on them. i have met a few businesses _ deliver on them. i have met a few businesses over _ deliver on them. i have met a few businesses over the _ deliver on them. i have met a few
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businesses over the last - deliver on them. i have met a few businesses over the last week - businesses over the last week because we are looking ahead to what to expect in the budget and the cost of messages businesses can't find the stop with the skills they need and there was probably a time where businesses would take those apprentices and they would work their way up to the business and learn the skills they need is a little, thatjust doesn't happen and they are expecting people to come in with the skills and get they are not being taught the skills, something has to change. i being taught the skills, something has to change-— has to change. i think employers have become _ has to change. i think employers have become a _ has to change. i think employers have become a bit _ has to change. i think employers have become a bit lazy _ has to change. i think employers have become a bit lazy over- has to change. i think employers have become a bit lazy over the| has to change. i think employers i have become a bit lazy over the last 20 years because the labour market was full of very skilled people and they could just bring in people with they could just bring in people with the skills needed but that has changed. brexit has changed it and the pandemic is exhilarated to change and there are fewer people working now, 600,000 fewer people in working now, 600,000 fewer people in work now and that means i have to work now and that means i have to work harder and harder at recruiting and make the jewels were attractive and make the jewels were attractive and they have to help people get the skills and work and this package doesn't do anything for that and doesn't do anything for that and doesn't incentivise employers and mentorship numbers havejust mentorship numbers have just permitted mentorship numbers havejust permitted particularly for younger people. permitted particularly for younger --eole. ~ ., , permitted particularly for younger --eole. ., , ,, , permitted particularly for younger n-eole. ., , ,, people. who is responsible, is at the employer— people. who is responsible, is at the employer or _ people. who is responsible, is at the employer or is _ people. who is responsible, is at the employer or is that _ people. who is responsible, is at
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the employer or is that the - the employer or is that the education system because we know the nature of work has changed and some people are leaving school and couege people are leaving school and college who train for some stuff but not the areas where there are jobs. it is a combination of both. what we need is the investment in colleges to be able to make the training absolutely relevant and up—to—date. there are some brilliant stuff going on there but not enough and the t—levels will help but it's not going to be for everybody. the funding per student isn't adequate so we need more money to train the teachers and pay the teachers better to really get the skills quality that employers are crying out for. you have also said you would like to see some more money going to helping those children who perform behind over the course of the pandemic through lockdown and missing 18 months of education. b5 through lockdown and missing 18 months of education.— through lockdown and missing 18 months of education. as well as all the thin . s months of education. as well as all the things that _ months of education. as well as all the things that go _ months of education. as well as all the things that go with _ months of education. as well as all the things that go with it. - months of education. as well as all the things that go with it. the - the things that go with it. the personal contact with friends and enrichment and extracurricular stuff. we were really hoping and may be the chancellor will announce it
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on wednesday, a package particularly for that group of young people with one or two years left in education to really boost the time they get, more hours and more time to do the learning that will give them the platform to go one on to university and work, an apprenticeship and be productive in the economy, so hopefully wednesday will see more announcements. halal hopefully wednesday will see more announcements.— hopefully wednesday will see more announcements. ., ., ., , ., announcements. how damaging is that 18 months been? _ announcements. how damaging is that 18 months been? i _ announcements. how damaging is that 18 months been? i imagine _ 18 months been? i imagine particularly if you're in the crucial years, your big exams or making the move between school and couege making the move between school and college or sixth form for arriving at university, you missed them and they have gone, haven't they? it is exactly those _ they have gone, haven't they? if 3 exactly those transitions. all the evidence is showing is particularly the young people who are at the lower end of the achievement table, the ones who struggled in school anyway, they have really struggled. lots of them didn't have digital devices so they can turn online so they weren't getting support, they missed out. some of it is about confidence, about am i a learner and can i go on and progress, so it is
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practical skills, try learning how to lay bricks online for use a chainsaw, it is not very easy. just practical time doing the skills has also been lost. are practical time doing the skills has also been lost.— also been lost. are you worried about the _ also been lost. are you worried about the fact _ also been lost. are you worried about the fact that _ also been lost. are you worried about the fact that btecs - also been lost. are you worried about the fact that btecs will | also been lost. are you worried | about the fact that btecs will be done away with because they have been very practical commit these new t—levels have got that academic side of things which yes it does improve skills and it will give people may be more opportunities but for some people the academic side of things is not important, it is learning how to be a plumber or hairdresser or bricklayer. i to be a plumber or hairdresser or brickla er. ~ to be a plumber or hairdresser or bricklayer-— bricklayer. i think we need a combination _ bricklayer. i think we need a combination of _ bricklayer. i think we need a combination of both. - bricklayer. i think we need a combination of both. i - bricklayer. i think we need a combination of both. i kinda j bricklayer. i think we need a - combination of both. i kinda get the feeling the government are just stepping back a bit from this idea, only a—levels and t—levels and there will be some pretext and other qualifications funded, i really hope so. the new education secretary has hinted that it and we will be working hard with him to explain why we need that choice and that breath. we will wait and see. wednesday is
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the day. nice to see you. let's see what the weather has in store for us — here's tomasz with the forecast. good morning. the main message is it is going to be really mild. i got up at 4am and left home there, just out on a jumper, it is very mild at atlantic winds bring us from sewers. basically the weather is coming from here and rotating upwards lining over the uk. this is where the air is coming from, around here. relatively mild airfor is coming from, around here. relatively mild air for the time of year. nothing coming from the north so no cold weather or frost this week. the weather front is across western areas this morning so it is cloudy out towards the west right now, it could even be quite wet in places, but the thinking is this where front will move towards the east and break up the scattered cloud and just a few showers. second
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half of the afternoon is looking bright just half of the afternoon is looking brightjust before sunset, with some showers, but also very breezy towards the north—west particularly in the western isles of scotland, up to gale force. if you look at the weather map you can see the emotion and westerly atlantic wind bringing in the showers. pockets of taller clouds with bursts of rain is what showers are and blowing them through during the course of the night and into tomorrow as well. mild around 12 or 13. the showers continue. it is a big area of the pressure to the north right now and it would need this pressure to move out of the way to change any weather and it will keep on getting the low pressure through the week. the weather isn't going to change an awful lot. monday you can see 16. temporarily cooler in the north. one low pressure moves away into the north and scandinavia and the next one comes in. you can see the arrows are coming in from
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the south—west and southern climes bringing us all of that mild weather. the cold air is way to the north. the next weatherfront pressure on tuesday processing your request of the uk bring outbreaks of rain and strong winds but to the south of that it will be mild and the best of the weather on tuesday, norwich, london, southampton, plymouth, cardiff around 15 or 16 and the low pressure still there, too much on the coast of canada here. all the way towards scandinavia. a big dip in thejet stream here. when we see these big dips these low pressure tend to get locked in here and they spin around and send weather fronts in our direction which means wind and trained but also sunshine in between. the main message this week, mild, breezy, rain at times, not all the time. temperatures peaking around 18. . , the time. temperatures peaking around18. ., ., around 18. pleased to hear there will not be _ around 18. pleased to hear there will not be rain _ around 18. pleased to hear there will not be rain all— around 18. pleased to hear there will not be rain all of _ around 18. pleased to hear there will not be rain all of the - around 18. pleased to hear there will not be rain all of the time. i will not be rain all of the time. half term in wales would be rather
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miserable if it was. you half term in wales would be rather miserable if it was.— miserable if it was. you are convinced _ miserable if it was. you are convinced that _ miserable if it was. you are convinced that weather - miserable if it was. you are - convinced that weather forecast gets worse every time. two small children in a small house in wales for the next week. in a small house in wales for the next week-— in a small house in wales for the next week. . ~ , ., ., , in a small house in wales for the next week. ., ~ , ., ., , ., next week. takes on board games. you will be fine- _ drones have caused a fair amount of controversy in recent years — they brought gatwick airport to a standstill and raised wider questions about privacy. of course, they can also be a force for good — and they're responsible for some beautiful aerial imagery. the civil aviation authority has launched a competition to find the uk's best drone photography — and educate people too. let's see some of the entries.
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every time we saw a new image we were lacking each one. we're joined now by jonathan nicholson from the uk civil aviation authority. some amazing images there. what is so interesting, i think there was a time when we would wonder how they
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were created and we much more about drones but the power of those images remains, pretty incredible. absolutely. which country with the drum and an angle you can get, one of my colleagues refers to it as a 400 foot which is the maximum height you can fly drones from. you can get a completely different view of the world. �* a completely different view of the world. . , ., a completely different view of the world. �* ,. , ., a completely different view of the world. . , ., ., a completely different view of the world. �* , ., ., ., a completely different view of the world. . , ., ., ., ., world. are you pro drone or antique drone. world. are you pro drone or antique drone- pro — world. are you pro drone or antique drone. pro drone. _ world. are you pro drone or antique drone. pro drone. we _ world. are you pro drone or antique drone. pro drone. we have - world. are you pro drone or antique drone. pro drone. we have both - world. are you pro drone or antique i drone. pro drone. we have both taken the view of the — drone. pro drone. we have both taken the view of the way _ drone. pro drone. we have both taken the view of the way to _ drone. pro drone. we have both taken the view of the way to educate - the view of the way to educate people is to be pro something and get them to do it would do it properly and we are invested in the biggerfuture as well, properly and we are invested in the bigger future as well, so flying taxis, drone taxis, drones looking at infrastructure, of those things we want to happen which means we want to do everything safely regardless of what size of it is. we are told that is the future, getting everything delivered by drone but let's talk about the rules right now, what you can and can't do. pretty basic rules, some of the most
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simple ones are don't fly above 400 feet and then don't fly near airfields, you mentioned gatwick, they have restriction zones and then it depends what size of drone. if it is very small it can be very capable, below 250 g, we have more freedoms. one of the things you wanted to try and get over it with this competition is if your drone is bigger, flying in towns or cities, some of those photos will be taken there, you need extra permissions from us and probably a bit of extra training. from us and probably a bit of extra trainina. . ,. , ., , ., training. have you seen an explosion in the popularity _ training. have you seen an explosion in the popularity of _ training. have you seen an explosion in the popularity of them _ training. have you seen an explosion in the popularity of them over- training. have you seen an explosion in the popularity of them over the i in the popularity of them over the last few years? the cost of them is coming down. people, we were talking about people can now see what you can do with a drone and these incredible images you catchy. is everyone going out and buying them? yes. we have seen numbers go up hugely. we have around 300,000 registered users in the uk. some of them have more than one drone. it
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continues to grow. even during covid we have seen sales and to use increase. we have seen sales and to use increase-— increase. taken personal -- commercial— increase. taken personal -- commercial applications, i increase. taken personal --| commercial applications, we increase. taken personal -- - commercial applications, we are looking at some beautiful entrance for the price, estate agents spring to mind, oil rigs, things like that that you need to do inspections, they have very useful commercial applications. they have very useful commercial applications-— they have very useful commercial applications. yes. more and more the are applications. yes. more and more they are used _ applications. yes. more and more they are used to _ applications. yes. more and more they are used to check— they are used to check infrastructure and also dangerous things as well. but humans have to do. going inside really big fuel tanks with themes and inspecting that for safety, used to send people down in suits and respirators and now you just pop a drone down and they can do it more accurately and quicker so it connects the save lives as well as help efficiency. most people just using them for fun and your competition has been going for quite awhile now. what makes a drone photograph, what tips would
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you give to people looking to enter this years competition? i you give to people looking to enter this years competition?— you give to people looking to enter this years competition? i would say look at it is — this years competition? i would say look at it is a _ this years competition? i would say look at it is a great _ this years competition? i would say look at it is a great photo _ this years competition? i would say look at it is a great photo first, - look at it is a great photo first, you have to have something really great to take a picture of and what of drone can do is give you a different angle. everybody stands on the land and takes a picture out to see what the drum can do is go the other way, things like sending a drone out and going back of the land or using the height to get that different angle. just or using the height to get that different angle.— or using the height to get that different angle. just a word even thou:h different angle. just a word even though these _ different angle. just a word even though these all— different angle. just a word even though these all look— different angle. just a word even though these all look so - different angle. just a word even i though these all look so beautiful, people will be all too aware that drones closed gatwick, it was a problem when it flew too close, how likely is it those things will continue because we know some drones have what we call geo— fencing which stops going anywhere they shouldn't. yes. we have seen a reduction in incidence thankfully. people are thick more educated now, we have done a lot of work and we know from our yearly surveys that drone users know more about the rules and fill them, as technology gets more inside
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them, as technology gets more inside the drones, even the cheaper ones, unless you are going to hack them they will actually stop you going into airspace where you shouldn't be, either near airfields or some other area of.— be, either near airfields or some other area of. let's have a look at the winner — other area of. let's have a look at the winner from _ other area of. let's have a look at the winner from 2017 _ other area of. let's have a look at the winner from 2017 and - other area of. let's have a look at the winner from 2017 and sought l other area of. let's have a look at. the winner from 2017 and sought to be about why this is such a winning image. be about why this is such a winning imaue. , be about why this is such a winning imae, , be about why this is such a winning imaue. , ., , ., image. the 'udges looked at this and thou . ht it image. the judges looked at this and thou . ht it is image. the judges looked at this and thought it is a _ image. the judges looked at this and thought it is a completely _ image. the judges looked at this and thought it is a completely different i thought it is a completely different angle but you wouldn't get byjust taking a photo without a drone, and also it gets that classic kind of great photo, even if it wasn't taken by drone, someone standing there, the composition, lighting, everything about it is a great photo and it was taken by a drone as well. how do you get involved if you have a drone and chi have taken some good snaps over the weekend of the autumn colours perhaps?— colours perhaps? when the snow comes as well. colours perhaps? when the snow comes as well- the _ colours perhaps? when the snow comes as well. the competition _ colours perhaps? when the snow comes as well. the competition runs _ colours perhaps? when the snow comes as well. the competition runs to - colours perhaps? when the snow comes as well. the competition runs to the - as well. the competition runs to the end of january. as well. the competition runs to the end ofjanuary. go to our website and it is very easy to post photos.
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thank you for coming in to tell us about that. we thank you for coming in to tell us about that-— thank you for coming in to tell us about that. ~ . , , . about that. we have been very lucky to work with — about that. we have been very lucky to work with a _ about that. we have been very lucky to work with a view _ about that. we have been very lucky to work with a view on _ about that. we have been very lucky to work with a view on this - to work with a view on this programme so we do like that. a new toy rather than just tucking into camera the ground. massive tripod is useful for my height. there are plenty of apples around at the moment — which is good news if you fancy having a go at cider—making. you can crush them by hand, of course — or by machine — but one cidery in herefordshire has gone "old school" by restoring the uk's only horse—drawn apple press. ben sidwell went to take a look — and have a taste. making cider the traditional way. they have been doing it like this in the herefordshire village since the 17th century. but now they are the only horse—drawn cider producers left anywhere in the uk. the only horse-drawn cider producers left anywhere in the uk.— left anywhere in the uk. the mill
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and ress left anywhere in the uk. the mill and press were _ left anywhere in the uk. the mill and press were derelict - left anywhere in the uk. the mill and press were derelict when - left anywhere in the uk. the mill and press were derelict when we | left anywhere in the uk. the mill - and press were derelict when we came 20 years ago but the stones were intact. these massive stones which you can possibly replace. and we gradually put it together and it was miraculous. to produce something which is natural, made in the traditional way, which is natural, made in the traditionalway, it which is natural, made in the traditional way, it is very satisfying. traditional way, it is very satisfying-— traditional way, it is very satisfying. traditional way, it is very satis inc. . �* ~ , satisfying. to produce i'd like this of course we _ satisfying. to produce i'd like this of course we need _ satisfying. to produce i'd like this of course we need a _ satisfying. to produce i'd like this of course we need a powerful - satisfying. to produce i'd like this i of course we need a powerful force. which is where tommy comes in. a 12—year—old gypsy carp who is brought from his home on the black mountains to work depressed. he enjoys it. when you start a mnemonic have to _ enjoys it. when you start a mnemonic have to watch yourself because he will be _ have to watch yourself because he will be over the top of the committee wants to get it done. you start off— committee wants to get it done. you start off on _ committee wants to get it done. you start off on his own very often, if you're _ start off on his own very often, if you're in— start off on his own very often, if you're in the— start off on his own very often, if you're in the way you have to make sure you _ you're in the way you have to make sure you get — you're in the way you have to make sure you get out of the way because he is _ sure you get out of the way because he is easy— sure you get out of the way because he is easy to — sure you get out of the way because he is easy to control have the time. all those _ he is easy to control have the time. all those involved in making the site our volunteers are different backgrounds. it is a former investment banker who now runs his own software company. neville retired to herefordshire after working for many years in the it
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industry in california's silicon valley. it industry in california's silicon valle . , , valley. it is definitely unique. it is a passion _ valley. it is definitely unique. it is a passion to _ valley. it is definitely unique. it is a passion to do _ valley. it is definitely unique. it is a passion to do it _ valley. it is definitely unique. it is a passion to do it this - valley. it is definitely unique. it is a passion to do it this way, i valley. it is definitely unique. it. is a passion to do it this way, not the easiest work, not the highest productivity. but it is definitely a great outfit. the productivity. but it is definitely a great outfit-— productivity. but it is definitely a great outfit. the benefit is to get to drink it- _ great outfit. the benefit is to get to drink it- i— great outfit. the benefit is to get to drink it. i think— great outfit. the benefit is to get to drink it. i think it _ great outfit. the benefit is to get to drink it. i think it would - great outfit. the benefit is to get to drink it. i think it would be - to drink it. i think it would be very remiss— to drink it. i think it would be very remiss of— to drink it. i think it would be very remiss of me _ to drink it. i think it would be very remiss of me to - to drink it. i think it would be very remiss of me to come i to drink it. i think it would be i very remiss of me to come here to drink it. i think it would be - very remiss of me to come here and not try the produce, need to try some of the cider, so cheers. good work, tommy. this weekend they are opening their doors to the public. so people can see for themselves how cider, one of herefordshire's most famous products, used to be produced. this i said it was in hertfordshire, it's actually in herefordshire. every week, presenter ros atkins takes an in—depth look at one of the issues in the news.
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this week, he's examining the latest figures on covid infections. here in the new uk, a new stage of the pandemic began when borisjohnson said this injuly. we will move away from legal restrictions and allow people to make their own informed decisions about how to manage the virus. the plan was clear. in england, there would be no rules requiring masks, social distancing, ventilation in schools or vaccine passes for restaurants. instead, the emphasis was on the uk's vaccine roll—out, on personal responsibility, on accepting that we must learn to live with the virus. three months on, this is how it's going. this week, the uk recorded its highest number of daily infection since mid—july, and it's far higher than any of these major european countries. then, these are the uk's covid deaths over the same period. they are gradually rising, and higher than most of these
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same european countries. though all countries are seeing far lower deaths than before the vaccine arrived. and as case numbers rise, the uk government is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so we are going to do everything we can to maintain our lead, by strengthening our vaccination programme as our primary line of defence. so, no return of rules to contain the virus. instead, a re—emphasis on boosters and vaccinating children and those who have so far declined. vaccines are central to what the government calls its plan a. they are also central to understanding why infections are going up. let me show you why. it starts with the speed of the vaccine roll—out. we had one of the fastest starts in the world, and that is a factor now. here isjohn burn—murdoch from the financial times.
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at the start of this year, we were patting ourselves on the back for how fast the uk's roll—out of vaccines was going. that has actually ironically become a bit of a problem for us now, because it means that we have this issue of waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes over time. here, we see immunity a month after vaccination, and then after several months. there is a drop. now, waning immunity can be addressed with boosterjabs, but right now, millions of eligible people have not had one. and then, there's children. in september, the uk decided to vaccinate children aged 12 and over, but many other countries like the us, france and israel started much earlier, and have vaccinated many more children. all of this means the government's handling of the vaccine roll—out is under attack. the booster programme is stalling, with charities describing it as a chaotic failure. only around 13% of children have actually been vaccinated.
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his wall of defence is falling down, at just the point that vaccination is waning. as we are hearing through this report, the government would refute that characterisation, but it is true that the rate of vaccinating children, the rate of boosters and waning immunity are all factors when we look at the rising case numbers. that's not all. social distancing and masks are relevant too. indoor socialising is pretty much at full tilt in the uk. scotland and wales have recently introduced vaccine passports for some larger venues, but in the rest of the uk, they are not needed. as for masks, in scotland, they are legally required in some circumstances. in england, the government does not require them, but some local authorities in england do on public transport. but in reality, that is patchy. go on the underground in london and you will see lots of people without masks. that contrasts with, say, germany, where masks are legally required in certain places, and use is high. and the labour party thinks there's a lesson there.
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i don't understand why we don't mandate mask wearing on public transport. it is absolutely extraordinary. is it too much to ask, really, to ask someone on a crowded bus or tube to wear a mask? but also, forcing people to go back to work or ending any social distancing and ending advice about ventilation, all of these mitigations have been maintained on the continent. their levels are now a fraction of ours. but the data about the impact of masks in the uk is far from straightforward. there is broader large—scale research that shows masks reduce transmission, but asjohn burn—murdoch notes, the data suggests this is not a major driver of case numbers in the uk. here is his tweet.
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and we know that despite some policy differences across the four nations, including some mandatory mask wearing, we are seeing similar covid patterns for all of the uk, and those patterns are leaving some nhs leaders to call for those measures to be brought back. they say it is time for the government's plan b. the government said it would enact plan b if they felt the health service was at risk, and we are saying it is at risk, and we need to take measures now, measures like wearing masks in crowded places, avoiding unnecessary indoor meetings, working from home if you can. there are two government responses that are relevant. the first is that they don't agree with changing tack at this point. obviously, we are looking at data, ministers, scientists, experts are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel that it is the time for plan b right now. and then, there is this from sajid javid. there are many more things we can all do to help contain the spread of this virus, like meeting outdoors where it is possible,
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and if you can only meet indoors, letting in fresh air. like wearing a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces. that advice raised eyebrows, as mrjavid and his conservative colleagues don't wear masks in the house of commons. this is an issue for individuals to interpret and decide. that is not a mistake by the government, it is in line with its emphasis on personal responsibility, on common sense, and on vaccines. the question is, will this approach keep the virus at a sustainable level for the nhs? well, the rate of hospitalisations in the uk throughout the pandemic looks like this. it is rising, but this is nowhere near the first or the second wave. but there are risks here. this is probably the first season where we will have significant amounts of covid circulating as well as flu. people's behaviours have changed. we are mixing more, winter weather is coming along, and people are going into enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season,
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it will make the uk particularly vulnerable to rising covid hospitalisations. and look at this chart. the uk has fewer beds per person than spain, italy, france and germany. that lack of capacity is not caused by covid. that's a far broader discussion about how health care works in the uk. but covid can apply pressure to that capacity. here's the chief executive of nhs england. i think we are in for a tough winter. if we've got covid patients in our beds, obviously, that has an impact on how many elective patients can be in those same beds. but the government is offering reassurances. it says the nhs has the ability to manage and it is not under unsustainable pressure. and as we consider these differing analyses, here is a word of caution on being too definitive from professor paul hunter. at the moment, it's not clear whether what we're seeing at the moment will continue to increase as we move towards christmas or, as some modellers have suggested, will peak sometime this month and then start to decline.
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what is more certain is that we are seeing two relatively clear schools of thought. there is the uk government, with its focus on the vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme began last winter, we have been in a race, a race between the vaccine and the virus. and although we are ahead in that race, the gap is narrowing. the government strategy in july, the strategy now, rests almost entirely on the vaccine, and that's not what the world health organization is recommending. the who's position is that we can't only rely on vaccination at the moment, due to the threat of the virus, that we need to continue to bring transmission of covid—19 down, especially as we enter the winter period. but sincejuly, that is almost exactly what has happened in england. life in many ways has gone back to normal, with the benefits that brings, and the rise in cases that brings too, and now,
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with the nhs warning that a tough winter is coming, so too are tough questions for the government. it believes that for now, vaccines alone can work. this winter will reveal if that's right. now sport. from cycling to cricket and are happy team behind you. england's cricketers made the perfect start to their t20 world cup campaign. they thrashed defending champions west indies by six wickets after bowling them all out
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forjust 55 runs. our sports correspondent joe wilson reports. the cricketers of west indies and england are shared the stance against racism at the t20 world cup. they share memories in this competition. the last final, when carlos braithwaite's magnificent sixes took the trophy away from england. the best of times, the worst of times. but it motivated england. they are now ranked top of the world in this format and from this moment, we saw why. the west indies side was mature. chris gayle, now 42, made 13. success for mills on his england comeback. dwayne bravo, jonny bairstow. caught it. the captain's brain beneath the caps. everything eoin morgan thought worked and how west indies obliged.
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where england's fielders stood west indies batters hit — there! four wickets for adil rashid. 55 all out ? completely the new england. the batting wasn't perfect, though. hosein's agility to catch livingston. four wickets down but in the ninth over it was done. england looks like the world number one. joe wilson, bbc news. manchester united host liverpool in the premier league later, in one of the stand—out fixtures of the season — both will be wanting a result to keep their title bids going and stay with leaders chelsea. they looked superb in their 7—0 domination of norwich. mason mount scored inside the first ten minutes — and that was just a mark of things to come. callum hudson odoi, reece james and ben chilwell all got on the score sheet, before mount finished off the scoring, with his first chelsea hat—trick. manchester city are breathing down chelsea's neck, just two points behind them.
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phil foden scored twice in city's 4—1win at brighton. all of yesterday's football results are on the bbc sport website. england's women continued their unbeaten start to qualifying for the 2023 world cup. they beat northern ireland 4—0, in their first competitive match at the new wembley. 23,000 fans watched as beth mead became the first woman to score a hat—trick for england there. that took them back to the top of their group with three wins from three. northern ireland stay third. max verstappen edged out lewis hamilton in qualifying for the us grand prix, which returns after last year's race was cancelled due to the pandemic. the championship leader was two tenths of a second quicker than hamilton's mercedes, as he claimed his ninth pole of the season. verstappen will also have support from his red bull team mate sergio perez who'll start from third. great britain have won a second gold medal at the track cycling world championships in france — and again it came in the omnium. this time from ethan hayter.
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he followed on from katie archibald's success, by dominating the points race, that's the final event of the four—race contest. it's his first individual world title. so we will end where we started. we knew that cycling was coming. there are cycling but i will start with some cricket. pretty soon people will be moving on to manchester united against liverpool. put the feet up, watch a bit of that. time to say goodbye to ben now — you're off to read the news for andrew marr. now here's tomasz with a final look at the weather. let's have a look at the forecast
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for the week ahead. we know it will be mild across the week and plenty breezy weather. it is breezy out there right now. it is what it is. this is what is happening in the atmosphere right now. this is a sped up atmosphere right now. this is a sped up nation over the few days. dash—mac animation. all the mild air is coming from the south and is here to stay pretty much all through the course of the week. right now a weather front crossing the country will stop through the irish sea and western parts it is starting to brighten up across this part of the country where it is out towards the west, things are starting to cloud over. it will take time for the weather front to move through. there is some deal with first in the morning but by lunchtime this weather front has broken up and we have this scattering of showers with layers of a cloud across the country. breezy, very windy at times around the coastal areas in the
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north—west. some showers could be thundery. 15 degrees and 60 degrees in some spots with mild air from the south. temperatures will drop tonight with the breeze and the air from the south, no lower than 13 degrees first thing in the morning in the south of the country. the very far south. nine degrees across scotland and northern ireland. on monday more of the same. i think it will be a little more sunny tomorrow morning compared to right now because right from the word go sunny spells and a scattering of showers and the breeze procedures the showers dash—mac pussy is the showers dash—mac pussy is the showers further out to sea. dash—mac it pushes the showers out to sea. on tuesday at low pressure spinning up in the atlantic drawing up mild air from the south and outbreaks of rain
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for northern ireland and parts of western scotland and to the south of that it stays dry. temperatures around 15 degrees and maybe 17 in belfast through the afternoon which is way above the average for the time of the year. how mild will it get this week? possibly up to 18 degrees celsius. there will be some sunshine around through the course of this week so not all bad. whatever you're doing, have great week. have you ever fancied getting into golf, but don't have the time to spend all day out on the course? well, maybe try this. speed golf — which originated back in the 19705 — is now established all over the world and was even part of this year's british open. mike's been out to have a go. throughout his professional golf career, luke willett has got used to taking his time.
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like his rivals on the pga tour, working out his angles, distance to the fairway, making sure he's in the swing of things before eventually... that was until he found speed golf. now there is no time to lose as he runs the eight kilometres around the course with his time combined with his score. this autumn he became britain's speed golf open men's champion, completing his first round of 18 holes in 37 minutes, with a score of 77, so five over par. it's put a spring in his game again and helped him have more time home with his three young daughters. it means i can play a round of golf, 18 holes, before 6:30. i'm home before they've woken up and then have breakfast with them and they won't even have known what i've been doing in the morning so it's great.
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i've had a run, played golf, ifeel like king kong. when i found speed golf, i have to say i wasn't too sure about golf at that point, i'd been playing so much, you really do sink a lot, and that's when i found speed golf and i were just do sink a lot, and that's when i found speed golf and ijust can't get enough of it. and i don't mean speed golf, i mean golf in general. speed golf has also changed yvonne's approach to the sport she loves, and this herfirst open championship. i'm quite busy and i don't like standing around, it's not proper exercise standing around in a golf course waiting for five hours to doa round. my score is no worse and there is no time to moan, you just got to run. the great thing about speed golf, unlike normal golf, i suppose you don't need all the equipment that you normally have to carry around. often the speed golfers go
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round the whole course with just one club, and, he's off already. how many times in sport do we over think things and get too be about instinct. whoo, forget to run. you can overthink it, you can get a little bit stuck in your head. running round, it takes the mental side out of it, you just play. this year speed golf open also featured one of the world's first amputee players, scott richardson, ten years after a motorbike accident ended his racing days. i come from a bit of a speed background, that's why i'm an amputee, from racing in the isle of man, so maybe this is the halfway house for me. running is pretty horrible as an amputee, anyway. but the golf breaks it up stop before you know it, you've run 200, 250 yards and you're on your next shot, it's a bit of a distraction, really. unlike the contenders for the title here in oxfordshire, i was
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representing the once—a—year golfer, and yet, i was managing to hit the ball better than ever before. yards and you're on your next shot, it's a bit of a distraction, really. unlike the contenders for the title here in oxfordshire, i was representing the once—a—year golfer, and yet, i was managing to hit the ball better than ever before. that's one of the best rounds ever. i'm near the flag and the hole but i am in a bunker. and yet still no time to stop. oh, onto the green? just like with the pros, it felt like the pressure had been lifted but there is no time to bask in pride, even when, by fluke, you beat the new champion to a hole. at times, even the spectators and officials couldn't keep up on their buggies, especially when on the heels of a former world champion, rob hogan, a professional and a tommy fleetwood pressure had been lifted but there is no time to bask in pride, even when, by fluke, you beat the new champion to a hole. at times, even the spectators and officials couldn't keep up on their buggies, especially when on the heels of a former world champion, rob hogan, a professional and a tommy fleetwood lookalike from ireland. my first speed golf tournament, they asked me, was i a runner? and i said, literally i only run for the bus.
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and i had my golf shoes on, two days out of 12. and i became a runner, i think i've got to become a runner again because these guys are getting a little bit faster than me, i hear. given the speed of play, speed golf can fit in around the more leisurely paced game. it's not aiming to replace that but hopes to attract a new generation of younger players. golf can sometimes have stereotype of just for old people but for this, you know, for anyone can do it. a lot faster and, yes, a lot more kind of energetic and a bit more endorphins going as well. just like that, in a time less than your normal lunchbreak, say, we were back at the clubhouse, where the new speed golf champion was crowned. it was a big night on strictly last night — in fact we saw some massive scores at the top of the leaderboard, with a few tens handed out — but some couples just couldn't find a way to wow the judges. let's take a look. # she can kill with a smile... # i never felt this way... #
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she sings milord. john and johannes with the charleston. and we'rejoined now by strictly royalty, our resident expert flavia cacace—mistry. we finished with john we finished withjohn and johannes with the we finished with john and johannes with the charleston, they are top of the leaderboard.— the leaderboard. every week he is re the leaderboard. every week he is pretty flawless- — the leaderboard. every week he is pretty flawless. whenever - the leaderboard. every week he is pretty flawless. whenever he - the leaderboard. every week he is | pretty flawless. whenever he does anything that is very free like a charleston where you can really let 90, charleston where you can really let go, he's absolutely incredible. he is so in sync withjohannes which is amazing, there is not that thing where you can tell he is a celebrity, he is a pro so early on. and dances like morning where there is a lot of technique, that is what he can really try and work and improve and move on so hopefully we'll see that get better and better 20 is doing something like this with
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so much for a minute, he completely shines stop and rightly so to be at the top. shines stop and rightly so to be at the to -. , , ., , shines stop and rightly so to be at theto. i, .,, ., the top. they seem to be having the best time. rose _ the top. they seem to be having the best time. rose was _ the top. they seem to be having the best time. rose was also _ the top. they seem to be having the best time. rose was also a - the top. they seem to be having the best time. rose was also a highlight with the viennese waltz. absolutely. she was my — with the viennese waltz. absolutely. she was my favourite. _ with the viennese waltz. absolutely. she was my favourite. i _ with the viennese waltz. absolutely. she was my favourite. i think - she was my favourite. i think overall if you put the music, the performance and the characterisation, it was the perfect routine for me, it was everything. i love the music and the way she interpreted it and the styling and the acting and also when she is on hold with giovanni, the move is one. she is completely there with him. she is completely there with him. she could work a little more on the head position, it would be absolutely amazing. for me overall, it was my favourite. it’ll;
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favourites was aj and kai. she has such long legs. favourites was a] and kai. she has such long legs-— favourites was a] and kai. she has such long legs. when you have long le . s such long legs. when you have long leas ou such long legs. when you have long legs you really _ such long legs. when you have long legs you really have _ such long legs. when you have long legs you really have to _ such long legs. when you have long legs you really have to extend - such long legs. when you have long legs you really have to extend your| legs you really have to extend your toes and point your toes to create the beautiful long lines as she is really starting to do that. feet are so important. it is amazing to see her, i love watching especially for the ladies how their feet get stronger and their ankles get stronger and their ankles get stronger and their lines get longer and it starts to look more beautiful as the weeks go on and she is really mastering that.— mastering that. that's the top of the leaderboard. _ mastering that. that's the top of the leaderboard. the _ mastering that. that's the top of the leaderboard. the runners i mastering that. that's the top of| the leaderboard. the runners and riders that the top. down at the bottom we have got a few people who could be in trouble this week. let's have a look at dan. he did pretty well but still down in the bottom three. this is his viennese waltz with
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nadia to she's always a woman and he dedicated the performance to his wife. he got the highest score of 28 points but still not enough. ii you points but still not enough. if you look at him _ points but still not enough. if you look at him as _ points but still not enough. if you look at him as an _ points but still not enough. if you look at him as an individual - points but still not enough. if you look at him as an individual he i points but still not enough. if you | look at him as an individual he has come on so far and absolutely improving every single week but we have other contestants were also improving and who are very, very good. hejust has improving and who are very, very good. he just has to improving and who are very, very good. hejust has to keep pushing. he is doing a brilliantjohnny himself compared to the others he will have to keep pushing. it was a really good routine. he was first, which is incredibly difficult and he made no mistakes, he looks quite relaxed. there are lots of things you can still work on in ballroom and he still has a long way to go and he still has a long way to go and has lots of things he can improve on overtime so it will be nice to see where he gets two. mar; nice to see where he gets two. may be will work — nice to see where he gets two. may be will work its _ nice to see where he gets two. may be will work its way up the leaderboard. he looks very elegant
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last night. problems for sarah and for ugo. why did they do the rumba? everyone has a bad time with it. it is a difficult dance. i think they both did incredibly well with a difficult dance. but the others who are different dance styles were really strong. i thought that the rumba i said i was beautiful and one of the otherjudges mentioned it can be portrayed in very different styles, it can be sensual and passionate on more balletic and beautiful and elegant and hers was definitely beautiful and elegant and classy so i personally really loved it but it doesn't give you that sort of attraction to look at a routine and be engrossed intimate so that's where the danger a little bit. i
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thought again ugo did beautifully for the rumba but compared to the other stars of dance dash—mac styles of dance which are a little more dynamic it is very difficult. so we willjust have to see what happens. but micoud you think will go? it will be very difficult and it depends what happens and how the votes change. there could be a bit of a shock about you goes down into the bottom two in the dance off. i do not know whether sarah and ugo will stay there one will be voted and one we are not expecting ends up in the bottom two. it is and one we are not expecting ends up in the bottom two.— in the bottom two. it is halloween week next week. _ in the bottom two. it is halloween week next week. amazing - in the bottom two. it is halloween week next week. amazing with i in the bottom two. it is halloween week next week. amazing with allj week next week. amazing with all those costumes and the make up and the drama. thank you so much for coming in to talk to us. strictly
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back tonight at quarter past seven on bbc one and we can find out who will stay to dance for another week. best of luck to dan but that is it from breakfast.
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this is bbc news. our top stories... uk college leaders describe the chancellor's decision to allocate £1.6 billion for t—levels skills training for 16 to 19—year—olds as "a good start". it isa it is a bit ofa it is a bit of a gamble from the government because we don't know yet whether those 16—year—olds will want to do t—levels when already there are courses there which appear to have suited them really well. colombia's most wanted drug trafficker is captured — after a joint operation by the armed forces, and the police. a candle—lit vigil to remember halyna hutchins, the film—maker killed on the set of an alec baldwin movie. sold, congratulations. and gone for 110 million dollars — a las vegas hotel auctions off
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its collection of picasso artworks.

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