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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 23, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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behind the weather front, there will be sunshine and showers, some of them quite heavy for parts of scotland and northern ireland. a breezy day wherever you are. these are mean wind speeds. gusts of wind around the southern and western coasts could reach around 30 or 40mph. another pretty mild day to come, but with more sunshine around, we could see those values reaching around 16c in the mildest spots. it stays unsettled as we move out of sunday into monday. we've got westerly winds across the country, and some weather fronts enhancing showers too. for tuesday, we have lower pressure north of the uk and higher pressure to the south, so quite a north—south divide throughout the day there. for monday, another breezy day. west or south—westerly winds. good spells of sunshine around. most of the showers will be across southern and western areas, one or two getting in towards the east, but it is the eastern side which should tend to see the best of the drier and brighter weather.
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mild in the south, a bit fresher across the north of the uk. through the week, it stays unsettled, our air coming in off the atlantic. a lot of dry weather across the southern half of the uk. it will generally be more unsettled, wetter and windier across the north.
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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment first, the headlines. a welcome from england's city regions outside london — for an announcement of nearly 7 billion pounds to improve their transport networks — but they say more money is needed. a senior government adviser on covid warns the uk could face
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another lockdown at christmas and tells people they shouldn't wait for ministers to take action the warning comes as two of the biggest teaching unions have called for tougher covid measures in schools in england to combat a rise in infections. court documents reveal that alec baldwin was told a prop gun was safe, moments before he accidentally killed a crew member on a film set. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are education editor from the sunday times, sian griffiths and political correspondent from pa, geri scott. tomorrow's front pages starting with. amid rising covid infections,
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the observer says the uk health security agency — formerly public health england — has written to local councils to canvass their level of support for the rollout of �*plan b�* covid rules. the independent has been speaking to health professionals who warn the nhs faces its hardest winter yet — as soaring covid cases combine with a surge in a&e demand. the telegraph says the chancellor will use next week's budget statement to announce plans for a digital overhaul of the nhs — the paper also has a picture of the head armourer on the film set where alec baldwin shot and killed cinematographer halyna hutchins the upcoming budget is also the lead for the express which says plans to beef up border security will be at the heart of the chancellor's speech.
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the times leads on the case of a british soldier who has confessed to murdering a 21—year—old woman while training in kenya in 2012. and as the cop climate summit looms, the mirror claims borisjohnson flew over a thousand miles in two weeks — byjetting between campaign trips and events on a private jet let's start off at the front page and i wonder if you could take us through plan b covid—i9 rules. through plan b covid-19 rules. as ou through plan b covid—19 rules. sis you say, through plan b covid—19 rules. is you say, it is the story about ministers apparently paving the way to bring in new restrictions, these plan b winter covid—i9 rules and it's based on the leak from the uk
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health security agency which has been contacting local councils and asking them to put in their views of whether or not plan b should go ahead now quickly needs to go ahead. and this comes as ministers are saying they don't feel that plan b is needed right now but scientists, some of them are starting towards the infection rates rising so shockingly not that we need extra restrictions to try and lower transmission and avoid the risk of another lockdown and the kind of measures talking about in plan b that things like mandating the use of face masks and credit places requiring vexing passports for mass gatherings and may be working from home and instead of going back to the office. those of the kinds of measures that are being looked at in this plan b that at the moment, the government is saying we don't need to bring it in immediately. i
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government is saying we don't need to bring it in immediately.— to bring it in immediately. i don't know about _ to bring it in immediately. i don't know about you, _ to bring it in immediately. i don't know about you, but _ know about you, but there's something very reminiscent of confucian as we approach christmas this time last year as well. one group of people saying this is another group of people saying that. what is your take on this? it is a bit of d ja _ what is your take on this? it is a bit of d ja vu _ what is your take on this? it is a bit of d ja vu and _ what is your take on this? it is a bit of dja vu and i _ what is your take on this? it is a bit of dja vu and i do _ what is your take on this? it is a bit of d ja vu and i do think- what is your take on this? it is a bit of d ja vu and i do think that l bit of d ja vu and i do think that it's not— bit of d ja vu and i do think that it's not a — bit of d ja vu and i do think that it's not a surprise that the councils_ it's not a surprise that the councils are being approached. the scientists_ councils are being approached. the scientists have said that if this is going _ scientists have said that if this is going to — scientists have said that if this is going to be implemented, then we need to— going to be implemented, then we need to get it done quickly and yet there _ need to get it done quickly and yet there is_ need to get it done quickly and yet there is a — need to get it done quickly and yet there is a difference between saying he needs— there is a difference between saying he needs to be introduced now and saying _ he needs to be introduced now and saying that — he needs to be introduced now and saying that we do introduce it needs to be _ saying that we do introduce it needs to be done _ saying that we do introduce it needs to be done rapidly in we really need to be done rapidly in we really need to be _ to be done rapidly in we really need to be on_ to be done rapidly in we really need to be on the front foot with that. it's to be on the front foot with that. it's hot _ to be on the front foot with that. it's not really a surprise, i think, that— it's not really a surprise, i think, that they— it's not really a surprise, i think, that they would have been asked and about— that they would have been asked and about the _ that they would have been asked and about the procedures in place and make _ about the procedures in place and make sure — about the procedures in place and make sure they are not caught on the hop but— make sure they are not caught on the hop but it _ make sure they are not caught on the hop but it does seem to be a little bit contradictory when ministers are saying _ bit contradictory when ministers are saying no, _ bit contradictory when ministers are saying no, we're definitely not going — saying no, we're definitely not going to — saying no, we're definitely not going to plan b, we don't need to, we are _
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going to plan b, we don't need to, we are expecting these rises and cases _ we are expecting these rises and cases i— we are expecting these rises and cases. i suppose it never hurts to be prepared either. moving to the front page of the telegraph and getting a boosterjab page of the telegraph and getting a booster jab to save page of the telegraph and getting a boosterjab to save your christmas. yes, the nhs most senior doctor and thatis yes, the nhs most senior doctor and that is exactly what he is saying and he is saying to the over �*50s, get that booster jab and he is saying to the over �*50s, get that boosterjab because we know that about six months after you've had your second jab, the immunity starts to wane in the thinking is that if older people get their boosterjabs, transmission rates booster jabs, transmission rates will carry boosterjabs, transmission rates will carry on going up and it will help level off those rising infection rates and therefore we may not need plan b and we may not need to lock down of a christmas or take much more drastic measures. i think ministers are also thinking that at the moment, and the half term, schools are closed and transmissions that were happening so rapidly among children, there may be a plateauing
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of that as well. so they're hoping that by maybe they've got a few days grace, they certainly don't want to bring anything and before the climate change summit in glasgow at the weekend. climate change summit in glasgow at the weekend-— the weekend. there is the hope that half term could _ the weekend. there is the hope that half term could be _ the weekend. there is the hope that half term could be a _ the weekend. there is the hope that half term could be a circuit - half term could be a circuit breaker, jerry. is half term could be a circuit breaker, jerry._ breaker, jerry. is really interesting _ breaker, jerry. is really interesting comments | breaker, jerry. is really - interesting comments from breaker, jerry. is really _ interesting comments from members of the jc vi _ interesting comments from members of the jc vi saying that while the problems and we may be seen with the booster— problems and we may be seen with the boosteriab_ problems and we may be seen with the boosterjab roll—outs as i have so many different vaccination programmes going on, whether that's the third _ programmes going on, whether that's the third dose is to people who have lower— the third dose is to people who have lower immune systems, whether it's the booster— lower immune systems, whether it's the booster of the vaccinating 12 to 15 —year—olds, there is a lot of demand — 15 —year—olds, there is a lot of demand on _ 15 —year—olds, there is a lot of demand on those who are at the moment— demand on those who are at the moment and i think the other thing i've moment and i think the other thing we noticed — moment and i think the other thing i've noticed in the last few days is this message of teacher boosterjab when _ this message of teacher boosterjab when its— this message of teacher boosterjab when it's really been ramped up whether— when it's really been ramped up whether it's the prime minister the health _ whether it's the prime minister the health secretary or boris johnson, the video— health secretary or boris johnson, the video on his twitter late last
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night _ the video on his twitter late last night saying that it's really pushing home this message that as soon as— pushing home this message that as soon as you — pushing home this message that as soon as you are eligible, but you're booster— soon as you are eligible, but you're boosteriab— soon as you are eligible, but you're boosterjab and you don't event wait for an— boosterjab and you don't event wait for an invite — boosterjab and you don't event wait for an invite any more, once you get six months — for an invite any more, once you get six months in — for an invite any more, once you get six months in a week, six months or a little _ six months in a week, six months or a little more. — six months in a week, six months or a little more, you can log on a book at yourself now, as well. that a little more, you can log on a book at yourself now, as well.— at yourself now, as well. that is bein: at yourself now, as well. that is being referred _ at yourself now, as well. that is being referred to _ at yourself now, as well. that is being referred to as _ at yourself now, as well. that is being referred to as the - at yourself now, as well. that is being referred to as the sweet l at yourself now, as well. that is - being referred to as the sweet spot. the sunday times and they will force nhs staff to have to jabs. this the sunday times and they will force nhs staff to have to jabs.— nhs staff to have to “abs. this is based on an h nhs staff to have to jabs. this is based on an interview _ nhs staff to have to jabs. this is based on an interview by - nhs staff to have to jabs. this is based on an interview by a - nhs staff to have to jabs. this is i based on an interview by a political editor with him. where he indicated that ministers are planning to enact laws which would make covid—19 vaccines mandatory for staff. it's quite a controversial step but also commit seems very sensible step and reviewed for imbued with care workers that are required to have the vaccine and it seems very sensible than nhs staff would have to have the vaccine as well.
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apparently there is just a thousand staff have yet to be vaccinated in england and that's about 7% of the workforce. but i guess the other side of it is the civil liberties issue and some people will perhaps refuse to have the vaccine if this was enacted in that within mean that possibly some staff shortages for the nhs. it is a difficult balancing act and an interesting and pretty controversial story in our paper today. tomorrow. is, controversial story in our paper today. tomorrow.— controversial story in our paper today. tomorrow. controversial story in our paper toda .tomorrow. . ., , , today. tomorrow. a worm has been set u . today. tomorrow. a worm has been set u- and he today. tomorrow. a worm has been set up and he will — today. tomorrow. a worm has been set up and he will be _ today. tomorrow. a worm has been set up and he will be interesting _ today. tomorrow. a worm has been set up and he will be interesting to - today. tomorrow. a worm has been set up and he will be interesting to be - up and he will be interesting to be listening into that.— listening into that. yes, to be a fl on listening into that. yes, to be a fly on the _ listening into that. yes, to be a fly on the wall. _ listening into that. yes, to be a fly on the wall. it's _ listening into that. yes, to be a fly on the wall. it's an - listening into that. yes, to be a i fly on the wall. it's an interesting one and — fly on the wall. it's an interesting one and i— fly on the wall. it's an interesting one and i spoke about this as well when _ one and i spoke about this as well when the — one and i spoke about this as well when the care homes were told that they had _ when the care homes were told that they had to — when the care homes were told that they had to have the jab. there are other— they had to have the jab. there are other vaccinations that health staff do have _
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other vaccinations that health staff do have to — other vaccinations that health staff do have to have in order to work in health— do have to have in order to work in health care, — do have to have in order to work in health care, i_ do have to have in order to work in health care, i don't think it's that controversial either to those who are treating them most vulnerable in our society— are treating them most vulnerable in our society to be protected against deadly _ our society to be protected against deadly illnesses and there are civil liberties. — deadly illnesses and there are civil liberties, but no one is forcing you to have _ liberties, but no one is forcing you to have the — liberties, but no one is forcing you to have the jab, you cannot work in thatjob~ _ to have the jab, you cannot work in thatjob~ i— to have the jab, you cannot work in thatjob. i imagine they maid come after— thatjob. i imagine they maid come after me _ thatjob. i imagine they maid come after me at— thatjob. i imagine they maid come after me at twitter again. that is my take — we will turn to the independent and where it all comes down to is, it's all about capacity in the nhs. i mean, it's pretty dramatic headlines and breaking points for the nhs and this is, a description, really for nhs workers on how it's actually like on the ground. doctors and nurses have spoken to the independent and they have painted a picture of a service that this is pretty close to breaking point and
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coronavirus infection rates not around 50,000. those are some very sad stories within this piece saying there's a description of how the six, very sick two—year—old girl called violet was forced to speak on two chairs packed together in a very busy waiting room for 1h hours in stoke—on—trent waiting to be seen in this survey of under 1a nhs surgical teams and they have reduced their operations and people are waiting for things like hip replacements for very long periods of time and it's quite a graphic picture. what is a lake in a number of nhs hospitals of the moment and is the winter approaches and we know things are only going to get a lot more difficult. iii only going to get a lot more difficult. . ., ., , difficult. if we continue to see headlines _ difficult. if we continue to see headlines like _ difficult. if we continue to see headlines like this _ difficult. if we continue to see headlines like this and - difficult. if we continue to see i headlines like this and continue difficult. if we continue to see - headlines like this and continue to hear warnings, that it can actually
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force borisjohnson his hand and implementing plan b? force boris johnson his hand and implementing plan b? potentially. i think ministers _ implementing plan b? potentially. i think ministers sang _ implementing plan b? potentially. i think ministers sang all _ implementing plan b? potentially. i think ministers sang all the - think ministers sang all the pressure _ think ministers sang all the pressure on the nhs is very high, it is sustainable and that is not really— is sustainable and that is not really what the stuff on the front minus _ really what the stuff on the front minus saying in the store they were talking _ minus saying in the store they were talking about is a very well—connected health correspondent the, i_ well—connected health correspondent the, i used _ well—connected health correspondent the, i used to be health correspondent myself and absolutely no doubt _ correspondent myself and absolutely no doubt that he has it from the horse's — no doubt that he has it from the horse's mouth how bad these things are. horse's mouth how bad these things are and _ horse's mouth how bad these things are and we — horse's mouth how bad these things are. and we see the evidence around what's _ are. and we see the evidence around what's going — are. and we see the evidence around what's going on in the nhs but its language — what's going on in the nhs but its language and made worse by the pressures— language and made worse by the pressures of covid—19 and we know from _ pressures of covid—19 and we know from the _ pressures of covid—19 and we know from the first wave, the second wave, _ from the first wave, the second wave. it's — from the first wave, the second wave, it's about protecting the nhs mixture _ wave, it's about protecting the nhs mixture does not get overwhelmed. i agree _ mixture does not get overwhelmed. i agree they'll be the tipping point of it looks like it's going to be overwhelmed, a plan b enacted. let's turn back to the front page _ enacted. let's turn back to the front page of _ enacted. let's turn back to the front page of the _ enacted. let's turn back to the front page of the telegraph - enacted. let's turn back to the | front page of the telegraph and it's all about wednesday and one of the
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announcements, the telegraph says that the chancellor is to spend billions to digitise the nhs. i thought we already were digitised. i think a lot of the nhs is digitised but there is still big pieces that are not in this is looking forward to the budget an extra £5,000,000,000 is apparently going to be unveiled to boost the nhs in a big chunk of it is going for the digital overhaul of the service bring in additional appointments and having patients, records and digitised and the idea that he said, it's only by allowing colleagues to have all the data in one place and the integrated system for social care and the idea is that one man to make more and more efficiency and better decisions. in a number of things in the sunday papers tomorrow
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about the budget. a lot of them technological government seems to be wanting to flag up that's going to spend money on improving efficiencies and bringing in digitise services and quite a lot about skills as well, coming up. yeah. but it kind of feels like this kind of story on the front page is only getting to, the real problems of the nhs has never graphic picture that was on the independent of what is actually going on on the front line, many find it that digitising the service doesn't seem to cut it. how much of a priority is this? i do think the government must be seen as putting _ think the government must be seen as putting money into the health service — putting money into the health service. we just had a massive investment a few weeks ago but if that is— investment a few weeks ago but if that is not— investment a few weeks ago but if that is not alleviating the pressures in the front line, i'm not
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sure _ pressures in the front line, i'm not sure how— pressures in the front line, i'm not sure how well received that is going to be _ sure how well received that is going to be it _ sure how well received that is going to be it is — sure how well received that is going to be. it is interesting to hear about— to be. it is interesting to hear about digital appointments and things— about digital appointments and things like that because gps have been _ things like that because gps have been told — things like that because gps have been told that they have to see more people _ been told that they have to see more people since face—to—face it's the best of— people since face—to—face it's the best of both worlds situation. yes, of course _ best of both worlds situation. yes, of course there are efficiencies that can — of course there are efficiencies that can be made by digitising more of the _ that can be made by digitising more of the health service but we are not 100% _ of the health service but we are not 100% convinced that that is the focus _ 100% convinced that that is the focus that they should be looking at. focus that they should be looking at if _ focus that they should be looking at. , ., . ., , , focus that they should be looking at. if you could 'ust very quickly turned back — at. if you could 'ust very quickly turned back to _ at. if you could just very quickly turned back to the _ at. if you could just very quickly turned back to the front - at. if you could just very quickly turned back to the front page i at. if you could just very quickly - turned back to the front page of the sunday times and distinctlyjust summarised the fossil fuel funds for us. , , . , summarised the fossil fuel funds for us. i, . summarised the fossil fuel funds for us. very big recently, especially on his environmental— us. very big recently, especially on his environmental credentials - us. very big recently, especially on his environmental credentials but l his environmental credentials but there _ his environmental credentials but there seems to be leaks with fossil fuels companies that are going to have to _ fuels companies that are going to have to be — fuels companies that are going to have to be investigated. yeah, they'll— have to be investigated. yeah, they'll want to look into us because they'll want to look into us because they do— they'll want to look into us because they do not— they'll want to look into us because they do not want to embarrass the
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prime _ they do not want to embarrass the prime minister before the meeting next month. cop26 is big and will be a on a lot of front pages. that's it for the papers this hour. sian and geri will be back at half past eleven for another look at tomorrow's front pages. goodbye for now. a new stage of the pandemic be gamma borisjohnson said this injuly. irate boris johnson said this in july. we will move borisjohnson said this injuly. - will move away from legal restrictions and allow people to make their own informed decisions about how to manage the virus. the lan about how to manage the virus. the [an was about how to manage the virus. the plan was clear, in england, there would be no rules regarding masks or social distancing or vaccine passes for restaurants. instead, the
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emphasis was on the uk vaccine roll—out on personal responsibility. unaccepting that we must learn to live with the virus. three months on, this is how it is going. this week, the uk recorded its highest number of deadly infections since mid july and it's number of deadly infections since mid july and its higher than any of these major european countries. and these major european countries. and these are the uk covid—19 depths of these are the uk covid—19 depths of the same period. they are gradually rising and they are higher than most of the same european countries. all countries are seen for lower deaths than before the vaccine arrived. in this case numbers rise. the uk government is saying this. ilrrui’ith government is saying this. with winter ahead, _ government is saying this. with winter ahead, we _ government is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't - government is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so, winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so. we _ winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so. we are — winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so, we are going to do everything we can to _ so, we are going to do everything we can to maintain our lead by strengthening our vaccination programme as our primary line of defence — programme as our primary line of defence. no programme as our primary line of defence. ., ., , ., defence. no return of rules to contain the — defence. no return of rules to contain the virus, _ defence. no return of rules to contain the virus, instead - defence. no return of rules to contain the virus, instead of. contain the virus, instead of boosters, on vaccinating children and on vaccinating those who have so
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far declined. vaccines are central to what the government calls its plan a. there's also those understanding why infections are going up. let me show you why. it starts the speed of the uk vaccine roll—out. in a moment of the fastest starts in the world and that start a factor now. it starts in the world and that start a factor now-— factor now. at the start of this ear, factor now. at the start of this year. where — factor now. at the start of this year, where patting _ factor now. at the start of this year, where patting ourselves| factor now. at the start of this i year, where patting ourselves on factor now. at the start of this - year, where patting ourselves on the back for how fast the uk run out going, that is ironically become a problem for us now because what it means is that we have this issue of waning immunity. the means is that we have this issue of waning immunity-— waning immunity. the point being that immunity _ waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes _ waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes over - waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes over time. l that immunity wanes over time. here's immunity over a month after vaccination and then after several months. there is a drop. waning immunity can be addressed with boosterjabs but right now, many of eligible people have not had one. and then there's children. in september come uk decided to vaccinate children age 12 and over
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but many other countries like the us, france and israel started much earlier and vaccinated many children. all of this means that the governments handling of the vaccine roll—out is under attack. the roll-out is under attack. the booster programme - roll—out is under attack. the booster programme is stalling with charities— booster programme is stalling with charities describing _ booster programme is stalling with charities describing it _ booster programme is stalling with charities describing it as _ booster programme is stalling with charities describing it as a - booster programme is stalling with charities describing it as a chaotic i charities describing it as a chaotic failure _ charities describing it as a chaotic failure only— charities describing it as a chaotic failure. only 13% _ charities describing it as a chaotic failure. only 13% of— charities describing it as a chaotic failure. only 13% of children - charities describing it as a chaotic failure. only 13% of children have| failure. only 13% of children have actually _ failure. only 13% of children have actually been _ failure. only 13% of children have actually been vaccinated. - failure. only 13% of children have actually been vaccinated. his - failure. only 13% of children have| actually been vaccinated. his wall of defence — actually been vaccinated. his wall of defence is _ actually been vaccinated. his wall of defence is falling _ actually been vaccinated. his wall of defence is falling down - actually been vaccinated. his wall of defence is falling down and - of defence is falling down and adjust — of defence is falling down and adjust the _ of defence is falling down and adjust the point _ of defence is falling down and adjust the point where - of defence is falling down and - adjust the point where vaccination is waning — adjust the point where vaccination is waning its _ adjust the point where vaccination is waninu. �* , adjust the point where vaccination is waninu. . , ., adjust the point where vaccination is waninu. . , . ., ., , is waning. as we are hearing to this re ort, is waning. as we are hearing to this report. the — is waning. as we are hearing to this report, the government _ is waning. as we are hearing to this report, the government would - is waning. as we are hearing to this | report, the government would refute that characterisation, but it is true that the rate of vaccinating children in the rate of boosters and waning immunity are all factors may look at the rising case numbers. that is not all. social distancing and masks relevant too. indoor socialising are at full tilt to the uk. scotland and wales every introduced vaccine passports for some larger venues by the rest of the uk, they are not needed. as for masks, and scotland, they are
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legally required in some circumstances and in england, the government doesn't require them but some local authorities in england due on public transport. the reality is that it is patchy, gone the other kind in london and you'll see lots of people without masks and that contrast with germany where masks are legally required in certain places in the labour party thinks there is a lesson there. i places in the labour party thinks there is a lesson there.- there is a lesson there. i do not understand _ there is a lesson there. i do not understand what _ there is a lesson there. i do not understand what we _ there is a lesson there. i do not understand what we do - there is a lesson there. i do not understand what we do not - there is a lesson there. i do not - understand what we do not mandate mass wearing a public transport. is it too much to ask really to ask someone on a crowded bus or tube to wear a mask? someone on a crowded bus or tube to weara mask? but someone on a crowded bus or tube to wear a mask? but also forcing people to go back to work or ending any social distancing or advised by ventilation. all of these have been maintained and on a fraction of hours. ., , ., ., hours. though it is far from straightforward. _ hours. though it is far from straightforward. there - hours. though it is far from straightforward. there is i hours. though it is far from - straightforward. there is broader large—scale research to reduce
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transmission but as they note, the data right now suggests that this is not a major driver of case numbers in the uk. here he despite some policy differences, including some mandatory mask wearing, we are seeing similar covid—19 patterns for all of the uk. in those patterns are leading some nhs leaders to call for a range of measures to be brought back. they say it is time for the government's plan b. say it is time for the government's lan b. , , ., plan b. they said they would enacted if the photos — plan b. they said they would enacted if the photos at _ plan b. they said they would enacted if the photos at risk— plan b. they said they would enacted if the photos at risk and _ plan b. they said they would enacted if the photos at risk and we _ plan b. they said they would enacted if the photos at risk and we are - if the photos at risk and we are saying it is at risk and we need to take measures now, measures like wearing masks in crowded places, avoiding unnecessary indoor meetings, working from home if you can stop right there to responses relevant to this, that it does not
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agree with changing tactic this point. agree with changing tactic this oint. ~ ., agree with changing tactic this oint, . ., ., ., “ agree with changing tactic this oint. ~ ., ., ., ., ., point. we are looking at data and ministers experts are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel that it is the time for plan b right now. and then, there is this from sajid javid. there are many more things we can all do to help contain the spread of this virus, like meeting outdoors where it is possible, and if you can only meet indoors, letting in fresh air. like wearing a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces. that advice raised eyebrows, as mrjavid and his conservative colleagues don't wear masks in the house of commons. this is an issue for individuals to interpret and decide. that is not a mistake by the government, it is in line with its emphasis on personal responsibility, on common sense, and on vaccines. the question is, will this approach keep the virus at a sustainable level for the nhs? well, the rate of hospitalisations in the uk throughout the pandemic looks like this. it is rising, but this is nowhere near the first or the second wave.
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but there are risks here. this is probably the first season where we will have significant amounts of covid circulating as well as flu. people's behaviours have changed. we are mixing more, winter weather is coming along, and people are going into enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season, it will make the uk particularly vulnerable to rising covid hospitalisations. and look at this chart. the uk has fewer beds per person than spain, italy, france and germany. that lack of capacity is not caused by covid. that's a far broader discussion about how health care works in the uk. but covid can apply pressure to that capacity. here's the chief executive of nhs england. i think we are in for a tough winter. if we've got covid patients in our beds, obviously, that has an impact on how many elective patients can be in those same beds. but the government is offering reassurances. it says the nhs has the ability to manage and it is not under
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unsustainable pressure. and as we consider these differing analyses, here is a word of caution on being too definitive from professor paul hunter. at the moment, it's not clear whether what we're seeing at the moment will continue to increase as we move towards christmas or, as some modellers have suggested, will peak sometime this month and then start to decline. what is more certain is that we are seeing two relatively clear schools of thought. there is the uk government, with its focus on the vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme began last winter, we have been in a race, a race between the vaccine and the virus. and although we are ahead in that race, the gap is narrowing. the government's strategy injuly, the strategy now, rests almost entirely on the vaccine, and that's not what the world health organization is recommending. the who's position is that we can't only rely on vaccination
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at the moment, due to the threat of the virus, that we need to continue to bring transmission of covid—19 down, especially as we enter the winter period. but sincejuly, that is almost exactly what has happened in england. life in many ways has gone back to normal, with the benefits that brings, and the rise in cases that brings too, and now, with the nhs warning that a tough winter is coming, so too are tough questions for the government. it believes that for now, vaccines alone can work. this winter will reveal if that's right. hello, it was very cloudy today across the country. the temperatures slowly coming up a little bit, though, and into tomorrow, it will feel a bit milder. that's because we will have more sunshine around, but there will be some showery bursts of rain, too. we could see this weather front which is bringing some very wet
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weather to northern ireland, much of central and western scotland through this evening and overnight, but it will slowly move its way eastwards, eventually, by the end of the night, reaching parts of western england and wales. and we should see clear spells and showers following on behind there for northern ireland. ahead of it, for much of england and wales, it will be dry, breezy, and very mild, much milder than what it was last night. so, we start sunday off on a mild note, a lot of cloud around, a little bit of sunshine, too. that weather front begins to weaken and fragment as it moves eastwards, eventually reaching the east and south—east of england later in the day. behind it, sunshine and showers, some of these heavy for northern ireland and scotland. and it is going to be a pretty blustery day, these are mean wind speeds, gusts reaching 30, a0 miles an hour, round some southern and western coasts. and it will be mild, with top temperatures reaching 16 degrees.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. investigations are continuing into a fatal shooting on the set of an alec baldwin movie — as the film director injured in the incident — speaks out for the first time. the italian right—wing politician matteo salvini goes on trial in sicily on kidnapping charges — for refusing to allow a migrant boat to dock two years ago. president erdogan of turkey withdraws diplomatic status from ambassadors from ten countries — including the united states — for demanding the release of a prominent activist. concerns over another sharp rise in covid infections in the uk —
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a prominent government adviser says he's fearful about another

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