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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 23, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. italy's former interior minister — the right—wing leader matteo salvini — has gone on trial in sicily on kidnapping charges — for refusing to allow a migrant boat to dock two years ago. investigations are continuing into a fatal shooting on an alec baldwin movie set — as the film director injured in the incident — speaks out for the first time. we'll be live in la for the latest. also in the programme... president erdogan of turkey withdraws diplomatic status from ambassadors from ten countries — including the united states — for demanding the release of a prominent activist. concerns over another sharp rise in covid infections in the uk — a prominent government adviser says
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he's fearful about another "lockdown christmas". don't wait for the government to change policy. and the sooner we all act, the sooner we can get this transmission rate down, and the greater the prospect of having a christmas with our families. applause and three dads who lost their daughters to suicide — raise more than half a million pounds for charity. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. watching in the uk in sicily, the former italian interior minister and right—wing leader matteo salvini has gone on trial. he's charged with holding migrants at sea in 2019.
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he denies accusations of kidnapping and dereliction of duty — after a boat carrying 147 migrants was refused permission to dock on the island of lampedusa for nearly three weeks. a number of other ex—government ministers as well as hollywood actor richard gere are expected to give evidence. mark lowen reports. in august 2019, a spanish ngo boat rescued 147 migrants crossing from north africa to europe, and asked to dock in the southern italian island of lampedusa. the hardline anti—migrant matteo salvini was then interior minister and deputy prime minister, and his trademark policy was to close ports to migrant rescue boats. for almost three weeks they were kept on board in boiling heat and terrible conditions. prosecutors say that amounted to kidnapping and deprivation of their rights. mr salvini says the decision was taken by the whole government. he claims he was defending italy.
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the actor richard gere, who was on holiday in italy at the time and travelled to sicily to deliver supplies to the migrants, has agreed to testify at the trial. i grew up a christian, now a buddhist, but i can't imagine jesus christ would be happy with a law that says it is illegal to help people. it makes no sense to me. it is completely crazy. i'm ashamed for all of this planet that it's illegal to help people. if convicted, matteo salvini could in theory face up to 15 years in prison. he's trying to make political capital out of the trial to bring the issue of migration, key to his supporters, back into focus, as it has receded from public debate. "i will go to trial with my head held high, he tweeted", adding, "italy first." mark lowen, bbc news. and speaking outside the court, matteo salvini ridiculed
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the fact that richard gere was going to testify. translation: being put on trial for “ust doinu translation: being put on trial for just doing my _ translation: being put on trial for just doing my duty _ translation: being put on trial for just doing my duty is _ translation: being put on trial for just doing my duty is surreal, - translation: being put on trial for just doing my duty is surreal, i'm i just doing my duty is surreal, i'm sorry for that. richard gere will come, now you tell me how serious is a trial where richard gere comes from hollywood to testify about how bad i am? i hope it lasts as short as possible because there are more important things to take care of. hannah roberts is a journalist covering the story — she explained why preventing a boat from docking was being treated as kidnap. perhaps illegal detention would be a fairer translation of the italian charge but in fact this forms a key part of his defence, that he says the boat was free to leave at any time and it could go to spain, where several towns said they would accept the migrants, but ngos said those on board were in no condition to make the three dayjourney. the other part of matteo salvini's defence is to claim that the government work
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fully on board with this policy in order to bring the eu back to the negotiating table, and it comes to the redistribution of migrants in europe which he feels is very unfair. iiji europe which he feels is very unfair. , ., , ., ., ., unfair. if this goes ahead and he was found _ unfair. if this goes ahead and he was found guilty, _ unfair. if this goes ahead and he was found guilty, what - unfair. if this goes ahead and he was found guilty, what would . unfair. if this goes ahead and he - was found guilty, what would happen as a result? in was found guilty, what would happen as a result? ., , was found guilty, what would happen as a result? . , ., , ., ., as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly. _ as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly. it _ as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly, it is _ as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly, it is normal— as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly, it is normal for - as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly, it is normal for a - as a result? in italy, trials go on endlessly, it is normal for a trialj endlessly, it is normal for a trial to last ten years. in theory he could face up to 15 years in prison. italians tend to shrug their shoulders and they are used to these political trials. matteo savini would get at least two appeals, in the unlikely event that the trial goes that far, of course he would face the same punishment as any normal citizen. a court earlier this year already accepted his defence, that the government was part of the
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policy to force the eu to the negotiating table so it seems very unlikely that this trial will end with him going to jail. for unlikely that this trial will end with him going to jail. with him going to “ail. for years ital has with him going to “ail. for years italy has been — with him going to “ail. for years italy has been on — with him going to jail. for years italy has been on the _ with him going to jail. for years italy has been on the front - with him going to jail. for years italy has been on the front line| with him going to jail. for years i italy has been on the front line of the migrant crisis if we can put it like that, that europe has been grappling with, and at times italy have probably felt like they have been left to deal with it themselves, is this part of the public conversation?- themselves, is this part of the public conversation? during the pandemic. _ public conversation? during the pandemic. the _ public conversation? during the pandemic, the immigration - public conversation? during the i pandemic, the immigration debate public conversation? during the - pandemic, the immigration debate has gone out of the political debate. but matteo savini made his name as an anti—immigration force and although this trial is not pleasant, and he will be fearful of the potential guilty sentence, this is an opportunity for him to bring immigration back to the political agenda and re—establish himself at a time when his party has been struggling. they face severe
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competition from the far right. to re—establish themselves as the premier anti—immigration politician in italy. the actor alec baldwin was told the gun he was given was safe — moments before he fatally shot a crew member on the set of his new film. that's according to new documents filed as part of the on—going police investigation into the killing of cinematographer halyna hutchins in new mexico. i'm joined now by our north america correspondent david willis. where are we up to with the investigation?— where are we up to with the investiuation? ,, . , , investigation? several new lines but eo - le investigation? several new lines but people here — investigation? several new lines but people here remain _ investigation? several new lines but people here remain astonished - investigation? several new lines but people here remain astonished that| people here remain astonished that they should have been such an apparently stunning lapse of safety protocols on the set of this film. there is a candlelit vigil due to take place in los angeles tomorrow night in memory of halyna hutchins,
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the cinematographer who lost her life in this incident. detectives have seized guns and ammunition from the set. they are in new mexico. and also the clothing that alec baldwin was wearing at the time of this tragedy. in an affidavit signed by the local sheriff's department, it was revealed that alec baldwin was handed the gun by an assistant director on the film set who did not believe that it was loaded at the time. it has also emerged there were various labour strife on the set in the weeks running up to the tragic incident with about half a dozen crewmembers having walked off the set sighting amongst other things safety concerns, leading up to this tragedy. lode safety concerns, leading up to this traced . ~ ., safety concerns, leading up to this traced . ~ . ., ., tragedy. we have heard from the director for _ tragedy. we have heard from the director for the _ tragedy. we have heard from the director for the first _ tragedy. we have heard from the director for the first time, - tragedy. we have heard from the director for the first time, joel i director for the first time, joel souza. he was injured. that director for the first time, joel souza. he was injured.- souza. he was in'ured. that is
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riuht. souza. he was in'ured. that is right. heh souza. he was in'ured. that is right. he was_ souza. he was injured. that is right. he was injured - souza. he was injured. that is right. he was injured in - souza. he was injured. that is right. he was injured in the i right. he was injured in the shoulder and he issued a statement today that he was gutted, as he put it, by the loss of his friend halyna hutchins. a lot of people still very puzzled about how this could have been allowed to happen. protocols on film sets establish that live ammunition is never to be used. a lot of directors prefer to use real weapons but the sort of project that was fired from this gun is central to detectives enquiries and those enquiries are going on over the weekend. we may get an update from the sheriff's department but it won't be before monday at the earliest. , , ., ., earliest. the tributes that we have seen to halyna _ earliest. the tributes that we have seen to halyna hutchins, - earliest. the tributes that we have seen to halyna hutchins, the - seen to halyna hutchins, the cinematographer who was killed, they keep coming. it underlines how much of a shock this has been felt as by the film community and beyond. trier?
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the film community and beyond. very much. she the film community and beyond. very much- she was _ the film community and beyond. very much. she was seen _ the film community and beyond. - much. she was seen as an emerging talent. many people have paid tribute to her, talking about her is a bright light, and someone who lit up a bright light, and someone who lit up the room and someone who had enormous potential moving forward. she was also as alec baldwin said, a mother and a wife. as far as the inquiry is concerned, the focus very much on the armourer, the person responsible forfire much on the armourer, the person responsible for fire arms on a film set. the daughter of a legendary hollywood guns expert, she was serving in the role of chief armourerforjust serving in the role of chief armourer forjust the serving in the role of chief armourer for just the second serving in the role of chief armourer forjust the second time in her career. there is no direct evidence to link out of this, i might add, but obviously she is somebody who detectives will be looking to question in order to get
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some sort of timeline as to the events on that tragic day. david, thanks for _ events on that tragic day. david, thanks forjoining _ events on that tragic day. david, thanks forjoining us. _ turkey's president is withdrawing the diplomatic status of ten foreign ambassadors — after they called for the release of a philanthropist, osman kavala. recep tayip erdogan said the ten ambassadors would be declared persona non grata, normally the first step in expelling a diplomat. they include ambassadors from turkey's nato allies — the united states and france. it comes days after the turkish foreign ministry summoned the ten, for what it described as an "irresponsible" statement calling for a just and speedy resolution to the case of osman kavala. ece goksedef from bbc�*s turkish service is following the story. about three of the nato allies and germany is one of the biggest trade partners of germany. turkish officials told me the process will start because the turkish foreign
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minister is... we have got to wait until the morning and see what happens but so far there is an official audit sent to the ministry and this is a very bold move, official order. we will see in the coming days if it is just a bluff or if they will put the order into effect, and if they will, we will probably see retaliation from those countries. ~ ., probably see retaliation from those countries. ~ . ., , probably see retaliation from those countries. ~ . , countries. what has caused the tension? who _ countries. what has caused the tension? who is _ countries. what has caused the tension? who is osma - countries. what has caused the tension? who is osma kavala? j countries. what has caused the - tension? who is osma kavala? why is the demand for the case to be resolved caused such anger on the part of president erdogan? osma kavala is a _ part of president erdogan? osma kavala is a businessman - part of president erdogan? osma kavala is a businessman and - kavala is a businessman and philanthropist who has contact with foreign business people and he has beenin foreign business people and he has been in prison since 2017, charged with financing protests against the government and taking part in a failed coup. he denies all charges.
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the government says all of this is linked to each other. president erdogan says osma kavala is engaged with this powerful group of foreign people and he says they are enemies of turkey for no real reason and they don't want turkey to become more powerful and that is why he reacts with anger every time there is a call from america or any european country to osma kavala, and even though the european court of human rights in 2019 ruled that his detention was based on political reasons and violated his rights, in terms of personal liberty, and demanded his immediate release, turkish courts have not released yet. turkish courts have not released et. �* , , , turkish courts have not released et. , ., turkish courts have not released et. ., ., yet. any response from the nations ofthe yet. any response from the nations of the ten ambassadors? _ yet. any response from the nations of the ten ambassadors? no. - yet. any response from the nations of the ten ambassadors? no. i - yet. any response from the nations| of the ten ambassadors? no. i tried to contact some _ of the ten ambassadors? no. i tried to contact some embassies - of the ten ambassadors? no. i tried to contact some embassies in - of the ten ambassadors? no. i tried l to contact some embassies in ankara and a number of them i could reach but there is no official declaration from them yet. there has not been
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any answers or any replies. the chancellor, rishi sunak, is promising nearly £7 billion to improve transport outside london, in england's city regions. he says a "transport revolution" will bring public services around the country, in line with the capital. the labour mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, has been lobbying the government to provide money for his region to launch a london—style transport system. this feels like a breakthrough today. we have put forward a powerful case for a london style public transport system and this is a big on it. it is not everything we need, so this is the money for the infrastructure, we are also being invited to bid for money for services, more frequent bus services and crucially lower fares and that the bid is still in with the government but if we get that, as well, and i hope we will, we have got everything we need to build a london style public transport system
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on the ground in greater manchester ljy on the ground in greater manchester by may 202a. this is not a day for any negativity. it feels like a real breakthrough for levelling up today, the government feels as though it's listening and buying in to the greater manchester vision, so it's a good day. the headlines on bbc news... italy's former interior minister, the far—right leader matteo salvini, has gone on trial in sicily on kidnapping charges — for refusing to allow a migrant boat to dock two years ago. investigations are continuing into a fatal shooting on an alec baldwin movie set — as the film director injured in the incident — speaks out for the first time — about the accidental killing of a crew member. it's been more than eight months since the militaryjunta took control of myanmar and the situation there is deteriorating. now the un has warned of more mass atrocities, saying that the army is apparently
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poised to attack. it says military authorities are putting tens of thousands of troops in regions where they've been facing resistance from local fighters. here's what the outgoing un special envoy on myanmar, christina schraaner boorgener had to say. the conflict is intensifying in many parts of the country, and the repression of the military has led to more than 1,180 deaths. the army uses a range of tactics against civilian populations, including burning villages, looting properties, mass arrests, torture and execution of prisoners, gender—based violence and random artillery fire into residential areas. i'm joined now by dr zachary abuza from washington dc. he is a professor at the national war college. what do you make of these warnings from the un and the apparent
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build—up of troops in those specific regions? lode build-up of troops in those specific reuions? ~ . ., build-up of troops in those specific reuions? ~ , ., ., ,, , regions? we should take them very seriousl . regions? we should take them very seriously- it — regions? we should take them very seriously. it has _ regions? we should take them very seriously. it has a _ regions? we should take them very seriously. it has a long _ regions? we should take them very seriously. it has a long history - regions? we should take them very seriously. it has a long history of i seriously. it has a long history of targeting communities that have aligned themselves with either organisations or these peoples defence forces that have sprung up since february, some of which are aligned with the national unity government and some of which aren't. but the fighting that we are seeing now, the new offensive in the north—western part of the country really pretends to be quite bloody. the military is traditionally not faced a lot of opposition to that rule in that region of the country and i think they have been quite shocked at the willingness of the local community to fight and inflict damage to the security forces. it is
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also important to note that there is also important to note that there is a strategic road rate that connects another organisation up to the border with china which is important for the supply of ammunition and weapons so the military really wants to quell dissent in this region. hagar to quell dissent in this region. how unified is the _ to quell dissent in this region. how unified is the opposition to the militaryjunta? do we have resistance fighters trying to restore democracy or are there other armed groups who are seeking other aims? it armed groups who are seeking other aims? , . ., . armed groups who are seeking other aims? , , ., armed groups who are seeking other aims? , ., aims? it is complex. myanmar has a lot of history — aims? it is complex. myanmar has a lot of history of _ aims? it is complex. myanmar has a lot of history of ethnic _ aims? it is complex. myanmar has a lot of history of ethnic armed - lot of history of ethnic armed organisations fighting the central government. there are several very large ones. traditionally the military has been able to divide and conquer these groups and fight one,
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lay off another, and buy others, but since the coup we have seen an unprecedented degree of cooperation and coordination amongst those groups and in addition, you have the national unity government which is a government in exile made up of some members from the last government that was ousted and other society representatives, and then we have since the coup, some 500 different peoples defence forces, just local militias, antique ? anti—coup forces who have taken up arms, and this has taken people by surprise, the emergence of these groups. thanks for “oininr emergence of these groups. thanks forjoining us- _ sport and now a full round up
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from the bbc sport centre. we start with cricket and wins for england and australia on the opening day of the super 12 stage of the t20 world cup. australia played south africa in the first match of the day. aidan markram top scored for south africa with a0 as they posted 119. it ended up being a tight contest with australia clinching the victory with just two balls to spare, steve smith top scoring with 35. with just two balls to spare, it was a much more one—sided game between england and the west indies. the defending champions bowled out forjust 55 in 1a overs. england knocked off the runs comfortably for the loss ofjust four wickets to register an opening win. so a perfect start for england. afterwards, spinner adil rashid was full of praise for their bowling display. adil rashid was full of praise i adil rashid was full of praise thought as a bowling exceptional, i thought as a bowling group we were exceptional, and everything fell into plan. chris woakes and moeen ali, and then myself and time all
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meals, we did exceptionally well. the former west indies coach stuart law told us earlier losing this opening match badly will have wounded the windies. knowing the mindset of the players, they will be embarrassed. they will be out to prove a point because they are better than what they have shown today. they will go away and have a good talk about it tonight and possibly address it tomorrow. they have a bit of time before the next game. by the time they come to wednesday, they should be ready to go. i don't think they need to press the panic button is at this stage. they have got matchwinners all over the park so theyjust need to get into the contest and into the competition, play with a bit more positivity. they are very positive anyway but they need a bit more intent and with that come better at stroke play and better choices, so if they do that they are tough to beat. in the english premier league, chelsea stay top after thrashing norwich 7—0 at stamford bridge. manchester city are up to second in the table,
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they won 4—1 at brighton, three of the city goals came in the opening half an hour. england international phil foden scoring two of them. his manager was delighted with foden's versatility. phil foden is a player who can play in different positions but especially up front, because he has the quality for the control and the speed and the pace and the vision. unfortunately, the last game, he had many chances in front of the keeper, but he could not score but he is young and he is going to improve his finishing. and what a way for claudio ranieri to get his first win as watford boss. after last week's 5—0 hammering at the hands of liverpool, they stuck five of their own past everton today. in his second game since taking charge, ranieri saw his watford side come from behind twice, to win 5—2 at goodison park, the hornets packing a real sting, josh king with a hat—trick. watford are up to 14th.
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i told the players to not give up. it is not importantly result, we had to try to do our way but when we lose the ball we have to stay very carefully because five goals against liverpool is too much, and then i'm very happy because we played quickly, forward. and on the other side we kept possession. it was a very good match for us. world number one ashleigh barty won't defend her wta finals title next month because of the quarantine rules she'd face on her return to australia. the finals were last held in 2019, but barty won't travel to guadalajara in mexico for this year's event. the current wimbledon champion says she doesn't want to "compromise" her preparation for her home tournament, the australian open in january. barty hasn't played since losing in the third round of the us open in september. that's all the sport for now.
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three fathers who lost their daughters to suicide — have raised more than half a million pounds for charity, by completing a 300 mile walk. andy airey, mike palmer and tim owen walked between their uk homes in cumbria, greater manchester and norfolk to raise money for suicide prevention. alison freeman has more. three dads who'd walked 300 miles between their three homes. applause. after 15 days, their epic challenge was finally over. tim, mike and andy all lost a daughter to suicide and as well as wanting to raise money for suicide prevention, they want to make it so people found it easier to talk about. throughout the walk, people have opened up to the dads. there's been so many people we talk to that have lost their children, notjust recently, this type
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of thing carries on for decades. we've always got a hole in our lives where our girls are but it has been fantastic to share some time with a lot of people. and their story has caught the imagination not only of the nation, but also of celebrities like nicole kidman and daniel craig, who both donated £10,000. it's incredible to know that people out there that famous are looking at our story and looking at the stories and something must've affected them for it to have caught hold of them and also we're really grateful. we've got some from schoolkids putting their change into poor old andy's back. so, just the small donations, anything is fantastic. the aim has stayed the same throughout — to save lives. we do hope we're playing our part in changing that and raising - awareness of the helpline and letting young people i know that there is hope. you can carry on and fulfil your life. - the men started the walk
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with the aim of raising £3,000 each but with their combined total now well over half a million, they know they are truly helping to save lives. alison freeman, bbc news, norfolk. in just over a week — world leaders will be arriving in glasgow — for the un climate change conference c0 p26. as part of our coverage looking ahead to the summit, we'll be giving you getting some of your questions answered on monday morning at 1130. what do you want to know about the whole of issue of climate what do you want to know change and what will be discussed? we'll be joined by two leading academics kate crowley from the edinburgh climate change centre — and michael grubb from ucl. send an email to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or post your question on social media using the hashtag bbcyourquestions. now it's time for a look at the weather.
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sunshine was in short supply today but it was turning milder slowly with this air flow coming up from the south—west, part two of the weekend, more sunshine around, so it will feel even more mild but there will feel even more mild but there will be burst of rain as well. these weather fronts pushing will be burst of rain as well. these weatherfronts pushing into northern ireland and much of scotland, bringing heavy and persistent rain and this is where we will see the strongest winds. the front pushes slowly eased during the course of tonight and into tomorrow, but it will be a weakening feature and we drag up this mild air continually from the south. much of england and wales will be dry and cloudy, breezy tonight, very mild, and for northern ireland, much of scotland, and then later in the night, western england and wales, we will see this heavy rain slowly pushing its way east. a much milder night to come especially over the eastern side of the country, compared to last night. start breezy and cloudy for sunday,
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some sunshine around, the weather front begins to move east and it weakens so it will start to fragment as it reaches central and eastern parts of england but it won't reach the south—east until after dark. behind the weather front, sunshine and showers, quite heavy for parts of scotland and northern ireland. a breezy day where ever you are, gusts of wind around southern and western coasts could reach around 30—110 mph. again, a mild direction, helped by more sunshine tomorrow afternoon, behind our weather system, looking at highs of around 14—16. parts of east anglia and south—east england will hold off any chance of rain until very late in the day. for monday, we are in between weather systems. it will be a bright day, but a fairly blustery one still. showers around and low pressure coming back from tuesday onwards. it will park itself to the west of the uk and there will be weather systems stalled across the north
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and west as a result. as we move through the week, a lot of dry weather in the second half of the uk. more unsettled across the north.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a senior government adviser on covid warns the uk could face another lockdown at christmas and tells people they shouldn't wait for ministers to take action. do everything possible in your control to try to reduce transmission. don't wait for the government to change policy. the sooner we all act, the sooner we can get this transmission rate down, and the greater the prospect of having a christmas with our families. the warning comes as two of the biggest teaching unions have
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called for tougher covid measures in schools in england to combat

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