Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 23, 2021 11:00am-11:30am BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: court documents show that alec baldwin was told that a prop gun was safe, in the moments before he accidentally killed a crew member on set. get out and get your booster. a fresh push for eligible people in the uk to get theirjabs, amid rising concern over the rates of coronavirus. there'll be half a billion pounds to support families in the chancellor's budget for the uk next week, but the opposition labour party call it a "smokescreen." the coastal town that has received a £41 million donation from the woman behind fisherman's friend cough sweets.
11:01 am
hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the actor alec baldwin was told a gun was safe moments before he fatally shot a crew member on the set of his new film. that's according to new documents filed as part of the police investigation into the death. the hollywood star said in a statement there were "no words" to convey his "shock and sadness". our north america correspondent, david willis, reports. two people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun. we need help immediately. that call to the emergency services, the first public indication of the tragic events that had unfolded in the foothills of northern new mexico. police arrived to find halyna hutchins, an up—and—coming
11:02 am
cinematographer, dead and the film's director, joel souza, badly hurt. their injuries inflicted by the film's star, alec baldwin, who according to court documents, was handed a gun he was told was safe to use, but which was in fact loaded with a live round. in a statement alec baldwin said he was cooperating with the police investigation. this is not the first tragedy of its kind. nearly 30 years ago on the set of the film the crow, brandon lee, the son of martial arts expert bruce lee, died after being shot by a gun firing blanks. safety standards have been tightened on film sets since then, but on the family twitter account brandon's sister posted the message, "no—one should ever be killed by a gun on a film set. "period." unconfirmed reports suggest that several crew members walked off the set in new mexico only hours
11:03 am
before halyna hutchins died in protest at working conditions and concerns about safety. as detectives comb the set for clues, the key question facing them is how did a live round end up in a gun fired by alec baldwin? david willis, bbc news, los angeles. i'm joined now byjim dowdall, who is a film stunt coordinator and former armourer. welcome, thank you forjoining us. what are your thoughts as you contemplate that question about how good a live round have got a gun fired by alec baldwin on set? weill. fired by alec baldwin on set? well, from what i — fired by alec baldwin on set? well, from what i hear _ fired by alec baldwin on set? well, from what i hear and _ fired by alec baldwin on set? well, from what i hear and what - fired by alec baldwin on set? well, from what i hear and what i - fired by alec baldwin on set? -ii from what i hear and what i have read, for a start, i hear that it was an assistant director that handed him the gun and said that it was unloaded. procedurally, that is completely nonsense on a professional film set. completely nonsense on a professionalfilm set. so it completely nonsense on a professional film set. so it goes back to saying where they in new
11:04 am
mexico because, you know, technicians are cheaper down there and all that kind of stuff? i really don't know, the whole thing is very speculative, but the bottom line is you should never, ever have live rounds on a film set, for any reason at all. there is no reason to have live rounds. now, in this country we are monitored and our armourers are very well trained. there are always two armours on set. if they had a gun to the actor, part of the deal is they openly weapon and show him there is nothing in there before they hand it back to him to do whatever the scene is and if he is going to be using the blank ammunition then everybody is aware of that and they are stood at a distance which is safe and so on and so forth, and that is up to the armours and myself as a stunt coordinator, on instance, on a show that i am doing, to make sure everybody is safe on that's it. but from what i garner from what was going on in new mexico, is that the crew were unhappy, there were people sleeping in their cars, and
11:05 am
therefore that suggests there was a budgetary issue and therefore possibly, and from some of the technicians they were hiring down pair were not as experienced as perhaps they should have been and hadn't done the 10,000 hours or whatever category you want to put them into. it whatever category you want to put them into. , ., ., , �* them into. it is unfortunate, isn't it, that we _ them into. it is unfortunate, isn't it, that we don't _ them into. it is unfortunate, isn't it, that we don't go _ them into. it is unfortunate, isn't it, that we don't go too _ them into. it is unfortunate, isn't it, that we don't go too far- them into. it is unfortunate, isn't it, that we don't go too far into i it, that we don't go too far into the realms of speculation because the realms of speculation because the fact is we simply don't know what led to this happening, but the fact that it has happened is going to send shock waves, notjust the immediate one is, obviously, the trauma of anybody that was involved in that and witnessed it, the trauma of those who have lost a loved one here. what do you think the impact is going to be going forward? i mean, obviously, from america's point of view and the american film business, i think there will be a huge rejig of safety because everybody out there is much more familiar with the rams and
11:06 am
familiarity very often breeds contempt. in this country, i don't think that we could tighten up things much more. we have a really, really good system here. the armourers have all done many, many years of work before they come on and have the responsibility of being in charge of a set. they have a second armour with them and the health and safety executive published all sorts of things to which we all have to adhere when farms are onset, so it is much tighter controlled here, but in america there has to be a serious rejig because of this. find america there has to be a serious rejig because of this.— rejig because of this. and is there- -- _ rejig because of this. and is there... actually _ rejig because of this. and is there... actually any - rejig because of this. and is there... actually any need l rejig because of this. and is l there... actually any need to rejig because of this. and is - there... actually any need to have there... actually any need to have the sorts of weapons? there is so much that can be done with c61, mightjust become a thing that is defunct going forward? that mightjust become a thing that is defunct going forward?— defunct going forward? that is a possibility- _ defunct going forward? that is a possibility- i _ defunct going forward? that is a possibility. i mean, _ defunct going forward? that is a possibility. i mean, it— defunct going forward? that is a possibility. i mean, it is- defunct going forward? that is a possibility. i mean, it is a - defunct going forward? that is a possibility. i mean, it is a lot. possibility. i mean, it is a lot cheaper to have, for instance, an automatic weapon, a machine gun, thatis automatic weapon, a machine gun, that is spitting empty bullets out of the side, you know, from a
11:07 am
submachine gun's point of view, it is much cheaper to have a gun firing blank ammunition that to put all that in electronically, still, you employing two or three people to do a job where the camera could pick it up a job where the camera could pick it up and it is thejob a job where the camera could pick it up and it is the job done. a job where the camera could pick it up and it is thejob done. but a job where the camera could pick it up and it is the job done. but that depends... 0n how much money you have got. you know? if you are on a normal television production, to start thinking that you would have a semiautomatic weapon with empty cases flying out, which is what it would be in real life, to reproduce that electronically would not be cheap. that electronically would not be chea -. �* . that electronically would not be chea -. �* , ., that electronically would not be chea.�* , ., ., cheap. and 'ust going back to the oint of cheap. and just going back to the point of whether _ cheap. and just going back to the point of whether it _ cheap. and just going back to the point of whether it was _ cheap. and just going back to the point of whether it was a - cheap. and just going back to the point of whether it was a life - point of whether it was a life around or not, i spoke to an armour earlier who said it is possible that they could have been some condition and whether it was a blank way lies around because it blank still has the explosive in it, but not the tip. you're shaking your head. why is that? �* u. . tip. you're shaking your head. why is that? �* . ., tip. you're shaking your head. why isthat? , ., , ., is that? because a bullet in it. you don't need — is that? because a bullet in it. you don't need the _ is that? because a bullet in it. you don't need the brains _ is that? because a bullet in it. you don't need the brains of _ is that? because a bullet in it. you don't need the brains of churchill l don't need the brains of churchill to see the difference between a live round and a blank cartridge, where
11:08 am
the top of the brass is crimped or either has a bit of a plastic seal. it will it is a bullet and... either has a bit of a plastic seal. it will it is a bullet and. . .- it will it is a bullet and... could a blank because _ it will it is a bullet and... could a blank because this _ it will it is a bullet and... could a blank because this sort - it will it is a bullet and... could a blank because this sort of - it will it is a bullet and... could - a blank because this sort of damage? well, the problem that happens is if you have a live weapon and you have something lodged in the barrel already and you pretty blank behind it, the only place that... whatever is in that barrel is going to go is out anyway normal ammunition does. what happened on the crow was they had put the bullet out and put the cartridge back in, but they still have the cap on it, so visually it looked like back during lunch someone actually pulled the trigger on this thing in the cap produced enough pressure to push the bullet just into the barrel, but not enough to be seen when you open the gun, so then they put the blank rounds and
11:09 am
there due to the scene with brandon lee and the power of the blank drove the bullet up in the normalfashion and that is what killed him. the bullet up in the normal fashion and that is what killed him.- and that is what killed him. thank ou ve and that is what killed him. thank you very much — and that is what killed him. thank you very much for _ and that is what killed him. thank you very much forjoining - and that is what killed him. thank you very much forjoining us, - you very much forjoining us, sharing your expertise with us. jim dowdall. there are fresh calls from the uk government today for eligible people to go out and get a boosterjab — the chancellor rishi sunak said vaccines were the "first line of defence" against covid and the country could not return to "significa nt economic restrictions. " it comes as scientists call for "plan b" measures in england to be made ready to go if needed. megan paterson reports. the prime minister shared this video on social media last night, reinforcing the message that the next stage of the vaccination rollout is central to the government's covid plans this winter.
11:10 am
but as colder weather approaches, bringing expected winter pressures to the nhs, and covid hospital admissions go up week on week, calls for the return of some restrictions grow louder. there's been too little too late, as far as i'm concerned, from the government regarding keeping urgent care going. the economy won't manage if we don't have people who are well enough to work in the economy, and we also don't have the staff in hospital to do it. so i think plan b is inevitable. in the times newspaper this morning the chancellor, rishi sunak, has reiterated that case numbers are in line with what was expected and restrictions will be reviewed if necessary, saying that a range of options are available, and those are not options that involve lockdowns or very significant economic restrictions. covid boosterjabs and flu vaccinations are the key to protection. the former head of covid vaccine delivery in england,
11:11 am
dr emily lawson, has now returned to the post. credited with the early success of the vaccine rollout, her return indicating ministers anticipate significant strain on the nhs in the coming months. data for england from the 0ns last week shows the sharpest rises in covid case rates were among children, but there were some increases among older age groups as well. the uk has recorded over 40,000 new daily covid cases for the past ten days. experts on sage, who advise the government, say modelling suggests that winter covid admissions are increasingly unlikely to rise above the levels of the peak in january this year, but planning for possible new measures should begin now. megan new measures should begin now. paterson, bbc n well, meanwhile, a leading advisor to the uk government says he fears another "lockdown christmas" as coronavirus cases continue to rise across the country. professor peter 0penshaw is a member of the advisory group on virus
11:12 am
threats known as nervtag. figures from the most recent household survey suggest that 1.1 million people in the uk were infected with the virus last week — the highest number since january. professor 0penshaw told the bbc it is now incumbent on both the government and the general public to take action immediately. well, i am very fearful that we are going to have another lockdown christmas if we don't act soon. we know that with public health measures, the time to act is immediately. there is no point in delaying. if you do delay, then you need to take even more stringent action later. you know, the immediacy of response is absolutely vital if you are going to get things under control. we all really, really want a wonderfulfamily christmas where we can all get back together. if that is what we want, we need to get these measures in place now in order to get transmission rates right down so we can actually get together and see one another over christmas.
11:13 am
take matters into your own hands. don't wait necessarily for government policy. i am very, very reluctant now to go into crowded spaces because i know that roughly one in 60 people in a crowded space are going to have the virus. and if you can, cycle to work, don't go on public transport and just, you know, i think do everything possible in your control to try to reduce transmission. don't wait for the government to change policy. the sooner we all act, the sooner we can get this transmission rate down and the greater the prospect of having a christmas with our families. the us military says it has killed a senior al-qaeda leader in a drone strike in syria. a us central command spokesman says abdul hamid al—matar was targeted in raqqa province. there are no reports of any civilian casualties. the chancellor, rishi sunak, will announce hundreds of millions
11:14 am
of pounds in new spending for projects to support children and families across england in next week's budget. devolved administrations will receive an equivalent funding boost under the plans — described by labour as a "sticking plaster." 0ur political correspondent, peter saull, reports. there are just five days to go until the chancellor opens his red box once again. he says he wants children to get the best possible start in life, so on wednesday there will be a £500 million funding package forfamilies. that includes £100 million to support the mental health of new and soon—to—be parents, a supporting families programme which offers targeted help to the most vulnerable households will get an extra £200 million. and there is also £80 million for a network of new family hubs across england. these family hubs are described as one—stop shops where parents and their children can access all the services they need. they are similar in some respects to sure start centres, which were introduced under
11:15 am
tony blair in the late 1990s. many have closed since the conservatives came to power in 2010. your viewers will make up their own mind, is this just a revamp of an existing policy and why did they allow sure start centres to wither on the vine? i can only assume it is the same approach, to allow early year providers at this point in time to go by the wayside. labour says this new funding rings hollow and is nothing more than a sticking plaster. but the government believe the new hubs are a significant upgrade on sure start, arguing they help children of all ages and their parents. new tram carriages, battery packs for trains and extended cycle highways are just some of the transport projects set to receive a funding boost in next week's budget. it's part of efforts to redress an imbalance between london and other parts of england. our business correspondent, katy austin, has more details. whether you travel for work or leisure, by bus, train
11:16 am
or something else, how easy is it to get about where you live? next week the chancellor will confirm £5.7 billion of funding, more than expected, for projects aimed at improving transport connections in the city regions, including the west midlands, south yorkshire and the tees valley. a few examples are new tram carriages for greater manchester's metro link, battery packs for merseyrail trains and an extended cycle highway for west bradford. a group which champions northern england said investment was welcome, but there was more to do. what we need to see is cities and city regions like greater manchester, for the towns that are there, is that commitment to a london style transport system with better fares and the types of integrated services that people in london already benefit from. the prime minister previously promised £3 billion towards better bus services.
11:17 am
just over a billion of that will build london style improvements to fares and services and other places. there are many areas across the whole country that feel left behind and need levelling up. where there are very infrequent bus services, no evening services and the weekends, and glaring gaps that need to be addressed. rishi sunak says there is no reason people in the north or the midlands should have to wait several times longer than commuters in the capital for the bus or train to arrive. but labour said the government lacked a coherent plan. the headlines on bbc news... court documents show that alec baldwin was told that a prop gun was safe, in the moments before he accidentally killed a crew member on set. get out and get your booster. a fresh push for eligible people in the uk to get theirjabs, amid rising concern over the rates of coronavirus. there'll be half a billion pounds to support families in the chancellor's budget for the uk next week,
11:18 am
but the opposition labour party call it a "smokescreen." police believe a four—year—old girl who disappeared almost a week ago in the australian outback was abducted from her tent. a reward of1 million australian dollars — which is more than half a million pounds — has been offered for information on her disappearance. the bbc�*s sydney correspondent, phil mercer, explained the details surrounding this case. i think this reward, this huge1 million australian dollar reward, is pretty unusual to be offered so early in an investigation. it is an indication, i think, as to how worried the authorities are about cleo smith. she was last seen on a family camping trip about 550 miles to the north of perth just over a week ago and the authorities are of the belief that she was taken sometime during the night. a brief timeline — the family arrived at this campsite north of perth.
11:19 am
the young girl went to bed at about eight o'clock in the evening. at 1:30 in the evening she woke up for some water. at 1:30 in the morning she woke up for some water. at 6:00am — so a few hours later — she was gone. and what leads the authorities to believe she was snatched during the night is that the zip had been opened, apparently to a height well beyond that of a four—year—old girl. this is a massive search. the search near the campsite has now been wound down, it is now a broader criminal investigation, not only spanning the state of western australia, which is about ten times the size of the united kingdom, but this is a nationwide hunt forfour—year—old cleo smith. and the authorities in western australia say that her suspected abduction strikes right at the heart of the community. but they do have grave fears for her safety. the leader of italy's far—right northern league
11:20 am
is appearing in court, accused of preventing a migrant boat from docking in italy in 2019. matteo salvini faces charges including kidnapping, and dereliction of duty. nearly 150 migrants were kept in poor conditions for weeks on board a spanish rescue boat after mr salvini refused it permission to dock at the island of lampedusa. over 200 incidents of drink and injection spiking have been reported to police forces across the uk since september. the national police chiefs' council say there have been 198 confirmed reports of people having their drinks spiked, while there were a further 2a reports of someone being injected. two men have been arrested as part of an ongoing investigation into spiking incidents in nottingham. jason harwin is the lead for drugs on the national police chiefs' council. he says police are taking this type of crime seriously. importantly it is about making the environment very hostile
11:21 am
for those who belive they can commit the offence. so what we are certainly doing at the minute is we are looking at licensed premises, working with universities and wider partnerships to firstly make sure more of us are alert within those environments to stop such offences taking place and ultimately making it more of a chance of catching those responsible. the other part ultimately for us is making sure if people do believe they've been a victim of spiking or recent injection issues, it is really important to report that to the police very quickly. 0ne offence is far too many, but the reality is that these are occurring and have been occurring for a length of time. the reality from policing them is probably the heightened awareness and work we have done for long time in this environment to make it hostile and make sure we are catching those responsible. as you touched on earlier, we have been making some arrests for this already. the important thing here is it is about partnership response and, whilst it is individual choice about going out in the night—time economy, we want people to be able to enjoy the night—time economy, we do want people to go about their normal business and to be able to enjoy the night—time economy. businesses need people to do that, and therefore it is an everybody�*s
11:22 am
interest to make sure it is safe and feels as safe as it possibly can. we have been working hard, notjust in the last few weeks, but certainly in terms of policing, recognising lead partners and vicims, butjust as importantly if there is connection between these offences, which are happening in scotland and south of england and wales, we need to work as a collaborative partnership with law enforcement and the wider partnerships to address the issue. and again, stamp it out because it is not good enough. we recognise the impact and we attend a few intend to do more. —— intend to do more. as european leaders gathered for the final day of the eu summit in brussels, migrants, energy prices and poland's ongoing row with the european union were all under discussion. but it was also a day to pay tribute to the woman who s been a pillar, holding the eu together for so long. german chancellor, angela merkel, taking her seat at the table for what s likely to be the last time. tanya dendrinos reports. guten tag. a trip down memory lane, winding the clock down to 2005 winding the clock back to 2005
11:23 am
and angela merkel�*s first eu summit as german chancellor. 0n on friday schumann marched at par for the last time.— on friday schumann marched at par for the last time._ it | for the last time. translation: it has alwa s for the last time. translation: it has always been _ for the last time. translation: it has always been a _ for the last time. translation: it has always been a pleasure - for the last time. translation: it has always been a pleasure for - for the last time. translation: it| has always been a pleasure for me, as it is _ has always been a pleasure for me, as it is for— has always been a pleasure for me, as it is for me now, to answer your questions — translation: this is probably my last european council. _ in this respect i would also like to thank you for the good cooperation at all times of the day and night. after all, that is what europe offers. the full agenda was business as usual in terms of deliberations but there was still time to pay tribute to the woman who has helped steer the eu through economic and migration crises to the covid—19 pandemic.
11:24 am
while her legacy will be mixed, known as a pragmatist rather than a visionary, she is still by far the longest serving among current eu leaders. translation: she is someone who, for 16 years, has really _ left her mark on europe. she has helped all 27 of us to make good decisions with a lot of humanity at times that were difficult. i recalled in 2020 july, very prompt the discussion on the financial framework, resilience fund, and in critical moments, angela was that lady, that madam who intervened and helped us to find a solution. her influence spanning far beyond europe. so many people, girls and boys, men and women, have had a role model who they could look up to through challenging times. i know, because i am one of them. the next european council is in december. it is likely to paint a picture of what the next chapter in european history might look like. as this leader, once dubbed queen of europe, departs from her throne. tanya dendrinos, bbc news.
11:25 am
for weeks now we've been showing you images of the ongoing volcanic eruption on the spanish island of la palma. lava and ash have caused chaos, but let's take a look at the impact it's having in the surrounding waters. these pictures — from the spanish national research council — show marine life struggling to cope. volcanic ash has fallen to depths of 400 metres. scientists are concerned about the damage it's doing to the ecosystem. a species of giant owl that had become something of a holy grail for birdwatchers has been spotted in the wild for the first time in 150 years. there hadn't been any sightings of the "shelley's eagle 0wl" since the 1870s — that was until this week, when scientists from imperial college london interrupted one during its daytime nap in a forest in ghana. the pair only saw the bird for about ten seconds —
11:26 am
just enough time to get this photograph. a coastal town has received a £41 million donation from the woman behind fisherman's friend cough sweets. businesswoman doreen lofthouse, who died in march, aged 91, has left her fortune to a charity that strives to develop her hometown of fleetwood. fleetwood town council said it was "overwhelmed "by the generosity." you are watching bbc news. the high demand for lorry drivers and a changing jobs market during the pandemic have seen many people switching careers to become hgv drivers. 0ur reporter ian barmer has been to meet one mum who's just passed her test, to see how she's getting on in her new role... driving is only part of the job. yasmine is now in charge of an 18 tonne truck and let me means making sure the load is safe for the road. with a new class to hgv licence under her belt, yasmin delivers
11:27 am
everything from beer to bathroom suites to dog food.— suites to dog food. going through the test process _ suites to dog food. going through the test process is _ suites to dog food. going through the test process is a _ suites to dog food. going through the test process is a little - suites to dog food. going through the test process is a little bit - the test process is a little bit stressful, but i have done that now and it feels really good to be on the road. ., . and it feels really good to be on the road. ., , ., , ., , ., , the road. yasmin was a show'umper and used to — the road. yasmin was a show'umper and used to drive i the road. yasmin was a show'umper and used to drive the t the road. yasmin was a show'umper and used to drive the horses_ the road. yasmin was a showjumper and used to drive the horses around j and used to drive the horses around in a truck, which meant she already had some experience. she decided she needed a new challenge during lockdown. i needed a new challenge during lockdown. ., . needed a new challenge during lockdown. ., , ., ., needed a new challenge during lockdown. ., ., lockdown. i was one of those young mums sitting _ lockdown. i was one of those young mums sitting at _ lockdown. i was one of those young mums sitting at home, _ lockdown. i was one of those young mums sitting at home, hadn't - lockdown. i was one of those young mums sitting at home, hadn't even | mums sitting at home, hadn't even considered it as a job role at all and then all of a sudden here i am and then all of a sudden here i am and i really enjoy it, so yeah, definitely young mums can do it and your dads. the definitely young mums can do it and our dads. ., , ., , ., definitely young mums can do it and our dads. .,, .,, ., , your dads. the new 'ob has not been straightforward. — your dads. the new job has not been straightforward. yasmin _ your dads. the new job has not been straightforward. yasmin has - your dads. the new job has not been straightforward. yasmin has a - your dads. the new job has not been straightforward. yasmin has a 20 - straightforward. yasmin has a 20 month year old daughter and she admits the easiest option would have been staying at home. instead she chose to work, but it means for now she can't drive long distances, which would take her away from suffolk. i which would take her away from suffolk. ., ., ., , ., suffolk. i have gone from being at home with my _ suffolk. i have gone from being at home with my daughter _ suffolk. i have gone from being at home with my daughter and - suffolk. i have gone from being at| home with my daughter and having suffolk. i have gone from being at - home with my daughter and having her with me pretty much all the time to putting her in child care and having to go to work full—time, but i think
11:28 am
if you enjoy driving lorries it is not something everyone can do, so once you are qualified you want to finish off, you want to get out there. ., . . finish off, you want to get out there. ., , , ., finish off, you want to get out there. .,, , ., ., x: finish off, you want to get out there. .,, , ., ., x; ., there. yasmin is one of 35 trainee drivers taken _ there. yasmin is one of 35 trainee drivers taken on _ there. yasmin is one of 35 trainee drivers taken on by _ there. yasmin is one of 35 trainee drivers taken on by bartram - there. yasmin is one of 35 trainee drivers taken on by bartram since | drivers taken on by bartram since easter to ease the driver shortage and the company believes things are starting to get better.— starting to get better. certainly, what we are _ starting to get better. certainly, what we are seeing _ starting to get better. certainly, what we are seeing is _ starting to get better. certainly, what we are seeing is some - starting to get better. certainly, i what we are seeing is some green shoots— what we are seeing is some green shoots in— what we are seeing is some green shoots in the business, in the industry— shoots in the business, in the industry and, you know, honestly i feel the _ industry and, you know, honestly i feel the corner has been turned. nationally— feel the corner has been turned. nationally and also as a business and for— nationally and also as a business and for bartrum's, you know, we are investing _ and for bartrum's, you know, we are investing in — and for bartrum's, you know, we are investing in staff, putting people through— investing in staff, putting people through their class one and class to licenses _ through their class one and class to licenses and that is really beneficial and it's paying dividends now _ beneficial and it's paying dividends now. ., . . beneficial and it's paying dividends now. ., , beneficial and it's paying dividends now. . , beneficial and it's paying dividends now. ., , ., now. yasmin is already planning to net her now. yasmin is already planning to get her class _ now. yasmin is already planning to get her class one _ now. yasmin is already planning to get her class one hgv _ now. yasmin is already planning to get her class one hgv licence - now. yasmin is already planning to get her class one hgv licence and| get her class one hgv licence and move up to the biggest trucks on the road. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. we've got some mild, breezy autumn weather on the way over the next few days. today it's not looking
11:29 am
too bad for most of us. it should be a generally dry day, although there is some rain in the forecast for north—western parts of the uk. you can see where the rain is here around about lunchtime, just about moving into northern ireland, the western isles of scotland, with the rest of the country predominantly dry. just a few spits and spots fleeting in the breeze. temperatures will be hovering around 14 celsius, and not dropping an awful lot as we go through the course of the night with these mild southerly winds. it will be quite damp out towards the west during the night and early morning on sunday. temperatures will be around 13 in the west. a little bit cooler in the east. 9 celsius first thing there in norwich. but then tomorrow, as the weather front pushes eastwards across the uk, it should break up to leave a scattering of showers and some sunny spells. 0n the whole, not a bad day, and temperatures tomorrow could get up to around 16 celsius in one or two spots.
11:30 am
hello this is bbc news. the headlines court documents show that alec baldwin was told that a prop gun was safe, in the moments before he accidentally killed a crew member on set. get out and get your booster. a fresh push for eligibile people in the uk to get theirjabs, amid rising concern over the rates of coronavirus. there'll be half a billion pounds to support families in the chancellor's budget for the uk next week, but the opposition labour party call it a ”smokescreen”.

11 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on