Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 22, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

11:30 pm
bringing us tomorrow. with me are benedicte paviot who is the uk correspondent at france 2a and the chair of reporters without borders uk advisory board and joe mayes who is the uk politics reporter at bloomberg. let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the i reports on the pressure being exerted on the government by its scientific advisory group, to bring in so—called �*plan b' measures in order to ease covid numbers. a push from rishi sunakfor people to get their boosterjabs is the times�* top story. the ft says the government has recalled a policy aide to her old job running the vaccination programme. the fatal incident on the set of alec baldwin's latest film is the mirror's top story. it says the actor asked why he had a loaded gun, after he shot and killed halyna hutchins. the telegraph has an interview with foreign secretary liz truss, who says the uk should become less
11:31 pm
reliant on china. and the mail questions why the queen's hospital admission was initially kept a secret by the palace. we by the palace. may ask that question ourselves. joe, we may ask that question ourselves. joe, do you want to begin this time as a knock at the papers onto the floor? give me a chance to scramble around to pick them up again but do you want to start with the sun if you would?— you want to start with the sun if you would? yes a very emotional icture of you would? yes a very emotional picture of alec — you would? yes a very emotional picture of alec baldwin _ you would? yes a very emotional picture of alec baldwin after- you would? yes a very emotional picture of alec baldwin after this | picture of alec baldwin after this tragic, tragic incident. calling himself heartbroken, doubled over, sobbing after using a prop gun he killed the cinematographer onset, 42 —year—old mother. in his words he said no words can convey my shock and sadness. you think of him, you think of the family, such a tragic incident. it's captured peoples imaginations because it's just incident. it's captured peoples imaginations because it'sjust so
11:32 pm
horrific. so unexpected but film sets are dangerous places. i think that some would die in this way and they have. that some would die in this way and the have. �* �* , that some would die in this way and the have. �* �*, ,., that some would die in this way and the have. �* �*, they have. and it's so sad. if we take that same _ they have. and it's so sad. if we take that same story _ they have. and it's so sad. if we take that same story on - they have. and it's so sad. if we take that same story on the - they have. and it's so sad. if we . take that same story on the mirror, essentially the same story. it's not surprising that the tabloids are leading on the story, is it? it has all the elements you want a tabloid story. you've got famous faces that people will instantly recognise alec baldwin, you've got a tragedy and a mystery as well. the baldwin, you've got a tragedy and a mystery as well-— baldwin, you've got a tragedy and a mystery as well. the mystery is what actually happened. _ mystery as well. the mystery is what actually happened. and _ mystery as well. the mystery is what actually happened. and perhaps - mystery as well. the mystery is what actually happened. and perhaps we | actually happened. and perhaps we will find _ actually happened. and perhaps we will find out in the coming hours and days — will find out in the coming hours and days. what is clear is that it's and days. what is clear is that it's a tragedy — and days. what is clear is that it's a tragedy. the sun was talking about movie _ a tragedy. the sun was talking about movie horror, it is a horror and it's a _ movie horror, it is a horror and it's a living _ movie horror, it is a horror and it's a living horror and tragedy and living _ it's a living horror and tragedy and living nightmare for the family of how later— living nightmare for the family of how later hutchins. this very talented _ how later hutchins. this very
11:33 pm
talented ukrainian cinematographer who was_ talented ukrainian cinematographer who was director of photography clearly _ who was director of photography clearly from everybody who has spoken — clearly from everybody who has spoken to the immediate said she was an extremely talented person. it's shocking _ an extremely talented person. it's shocking i— an extremely talented person. it's shocking i think film sets can be dangerous places that's why there are strict— dangerous places that's why there are strict rules on what happened about— are strict rules on what happened about what went wrong. the living nightmare — about what went wrong. the living nightmare also for alec baldwin. how you ever— nightmare also for alec baldwin. how you ever get over a tragedy like that, _ you ever get over a tragedy like that, i'll— you ever get over a tragedy like that, i'll never know. yes you ever get over a tragedy like that, i'll never know.— that, i'll never know. yes i was readina that, i'll never know. yes i was reading early — that, i'll never know. yes i was reading early about _ that, i'll never know. yes i was reading early about the - that, i'll never know. yes i was reading early about the actor. that, i'll never know. yes i was i reading early about the actor who shot and killed brandon lee, bruce lee's son who died in 93 in a similar accident on film set, he landed on the crow and was released posthumously. the actor who shot him refused to see the film, he didn't want to deal with it. although we carried on acting at a much slower pace because of the terrible memories he must�*ve carried with them for something of which he was not to blame. we don't know the circumstances here. interesting here
11:34 pm
from property advisers at the ucla film school was saying a lot of rumours swirling around the industry that corners will being caught. i suspect it will be the american newspapers over the next couple of days that will be digging around in that story and trying to bring us more facts behind it. we will wait to see what they papers have come tomorrow night and sunday night. i suspect we will hear more about the story no doubt. do you want to take us onto the guardian and the subject really that really is the most important at the moment and that is covid and what we are going to do about the rising case numbers, indeed should we do anything about the rising case numbers? some of the public sector warning of consequences if we don't. indeed. you say at — consequences if we don't. indeed. you say at the _ consequences if we don't. indeed. you say at the moment _ consequences if we don't. indeed. you say at the moment but - consequences if we don't. indeed. you say at the moment but of- consequences if we don't. indeed. i you say at the moment but of course it's been— you say at the moment but of course it's been our— you say at the moment but of course it's been our reality here in the united — it's been our reality here in the united kingdom, here on this planet and that— united kingdom, here on this planet and that is— united kingdom, here on this planet and that is the covid pandemic. some people _ and that is the covid pandemic. some people are _ and that is the covid pandemic. some people are behaving as if it's over. we are _ people are behaving as if it's over. we are still— people are behaving as if it's over.
11:35 pm
we are still in it. in cases we know are rising. — we are still in it. in cases we know are rising, hospitalisations are rising. — are rising, hospitalisations are rising. the _ are rising, hospitalisations are rising, the death toll is rising for something — rising, the death toll is rising for something and that's not being an alarmist — something and that's not being an alarmist. look at facts in order to make _ alarmist. look at facts in order to make informed decisions. and the unions _ make informed decisions. and the unions therefore are warning that we face a _ unions therefore are warning that we face a winter of chaos without urgent — face a winter of chaos without urgent action to curb covid it's interesting because it's a joint statement from several unions. trade leaders _ statement from several unions. trade leaders representing 3,000,000 workers. — leaders representing 3,000,000 workers, front—line workers, front-line _ workers, front—line workers, front—line workers who don't like some _ front—line workers who don't like some people have the luxury in that sense _ some people have the luxury in that sense or— some people have the luxury in that sense or not — some people have the luxury in that sense or not blotchy but anyway, the possibility— sense or not blotchy but anyway, the possibility of working from home. some _ possibility of working from home. some of— possibility of working from home. some of whom we should remember have died because _ some of whom we should remember have died because they've been intimidated while doing theirjob. these _ intimidated while doing theirjob. these union leaders are saying it's unison _ these union leaders are saying it's unison unite, and more, they are saying _ unison unite, and more, they are saying it's — unison unite, and more, they are saying it's absolutely the time now
11:36 pm
to impose — saying it's absolutely the time now to impose restrictions of mandatory face masks — to impose restrictions of mandatory face masks. clearly the numbers are, recommendations are not working. many— recommendations are not working. many people are not wearing face mask _ many people are not wearing face mask it's — many people are not wearing face mask. it's interesting the statement has also _ mask. it's interesting the statement has also been signed by the general secretary _ has also been signed by the general secretary. unions are very clearly saying _ secretary. unions are very clearly saying that — secretary. unions are very clearly saying that it is absolutely essential that measures be taken. it's interesting because we remember that sir— it's interesting because we remember that sir patrick vallance had talked about _ that sir patrick vallance had talked about going hard, going early. and yet we _ about going hard, going early. and yet we hear the prime minister as he acknowledges the rising cases, the resin _ acknowledges the rising cases, the resin does. — acknowledges the rising cases, the resin does, hospitalisations, he actually— resin does, hospitalisations, he actually is— resin does, hospitalisations, he actually is saying that they expected these numbers. what is worrying — expected these numbers. what is worrying also is when we hear about the health _ worrying also is when we hear about the health secretary saying that the plan b _ the health secretary saying that the plan b will only be implemented when there is— plan b will only be implemented when there is a _ plan b will only be implemented when there is a unsustainable pressure on there is a unsustainable pressure on the nhs~ _ there is a unsustainable pressure on the nhs. but we are already getting detailed _ the nhs. but we are already getting detailed information from different regions, _ detailed information from different regions, particularly across england but not _ regions, particularly across england but not only. but there is a lot of
11:37 pm
pressure. — but not only. but there is a lot of pressure, not yet unsustainable but it could _ pressure, not yet unsustainable but it could become quite quickly unsustainable. in interesting thing because _ unsustainable. in interesting thing because sustainably it means different things to different parts of the _ different things to different parts of the country. in london of one hospital— of the country. in london of one hospital gets overwhelmed, they are half a _ hospital gets overwhelmed, they are half a dozen maggots... in hospital gets overwhelmed, they are half a dozen maggots. . ._ half a dozen maggots... in the southwest _ half a dozen maggots... in the southwest as _ half a dozen maggots... in the southwest as we _ half a dozen maggots... in the southwest as we were - half a dozen maggots... in the southwest as we were hearing | southwest as we were hearing yesterday from cornwall, the colour has one hospital only, one access to emergency it doesn't take much for a relatively small institution like that in bay county to find itself in an unsustainable position. i suppose thatis an unsustainable position. i suppose that is a bit of a dilemma for the government when it decides when is the right time to press the red emergency button.— emergency button. yes, the government _ emergency button. yes, the government constantly - emergency button. yes, the i government constantly saying emergency button. yes, the - government constantly saying we look at multiple factors when deciding whether to move, they don'tjust look at death, customisations they look at death, customisations they look at death, customisations they look at multiple factors. they don't often specify exactly which ones are, which threshold has to be breached for plan b to be activated.
11:38 pm
if the neck what if i really difficult as they struggled to explain what the harm would be of right now going to plan b, bringing back mandatory face masks war two wearing, working from home and taking the momentum out of this growth of the pandemic. they seem to be focused on the level, the level of hospitalisations that was ok, level of cases, it is ok but not the trend. the trend does seem to be going in the wrong direction as a scientist themselves admit. the dissidents really between those two things was at the trend of where the pandemic is going in the way the government is acting. i think this pressure is only going to grow. you have the unions in the story, doctors making this point as well, it's all going in that direction. it's worth remembering that some public—sector workers disproportionately during the first wave of the pandemic, the number of bus drivers who died because they were directly exposed to passengers often without proper ventilation and all the rest of it because people didn't quite know how the virus
11:39 pm
being spread at that stage. tami being spread at that stage. taxi drivers similar. _ being spread at that stage. taxi drivers similar. if _ being spread at that stage. taxi drivers similar. if i _ being spread at that stage. taxi drivers similar. if i may, i think it was— drivers similar. if i may, i think it was in— drivers similar. if i may, i think it was in the _ drivers similar. if i may, i think it was in the times that pole, it's interesting — it was in the times that pole, it's interesting because it is again a commendable feature of the british population and has actually been doing _ population and has actually been doing that impress a lot of people across— doing that impress a lot of people across the — doing that impress a lot of people across the world of how people were willing _ across the world of how people were willing to _ across the world of how people were willing to stay at home when they could, _ willing to stay at home when they could, to — willing to stay at home when they could, to put mask on, social distance _ could, to put mask on, social distance etc. that is actually not the case, — distance etc. that is actually not the case, was initially the case in france _ the case, was initially the case in france were a much tougher line was needed _ france were a much tougher line was needed i_ france were a much tougher line was needed. i think again it's notjust the vaccine — needed. i think again it's notjust the vaccine but it was really impressive and very noticeable how the british— impressive and very noticeable how the british people actually did go along _ the british people actually did go along with the regulations. i think there _ along with the regulations. i think there is— along with the regulations. i think there is a — along with the regulations. i think there is a much greater obedience and a _ there is a much greater obedience and a sense, and understanding from the population that government is maybe _ the population that government is maybe giving the publishing credit for. g ., . x' maybe giving the publishing credit for. . ,., ., maybe giving the publishing credit for. . ., ., . for. joe, check us onto the artifice ofthe for. joe, check us onto the artifice of the scientific _ for. joe, check us onto the artifice of the scientific advisers _ for. joe, check us onto the artifice of the scientific advisers who - for. joe, check us onto the artifice of the scientific advisers who have j of the scientific advisers who have said basically they don't think we
11:40 pm
are going to end up with the level of infection we had injanuary this year but they are still uneasy about the direction in which this is going. the direction in which this is anoin. , the direction in which this is hoin _ , ., , the direction in which this is anoin. , . ,,.,,. going. this headline is basically sa in: the going. this headline is basically saying the scientists _ going. this headline is basically saying the scientists want - going. this headline is basically saying the scientists want to . going. this headline is basically saying the scientists want to go j going. this headline is basically i saying the scientists want to go to plan b. the government was asked this question very specifically today on the daily lobby call and they said the chief medical officer, chief scientific adviser haven't recommended going to plan b at this stage. i guess they are saying that documents raise today clearly there is a lot of focus on get ready for a rapid deployment of plan b. they excepting that's what the scientist wanted. interesting in this report they say that working from home would be the most effective of those plan b measures. presumably because that would significantly reduce contact people and reduce spread of viruses up in the report they say that boosterjobs and the under �*50s until well after christmas was up focus on that slow roll—out, the booster... the direction seems to be
11:41 pm
going towards wanting plan b. page a going towards wanting plan b. pay a rice for going towards wanting plan b. pay a price for being _ going towards wanting plan b. pay a price for being useful, _ going towards wanting plan b. pay a price for being useful, i'm _ going towards wanting plan b. pay a price for being useful, i'm afraid. as old 50 plus a lot of very keen to get our boosters. what's interesting about this, i want your observation on this, the government always says were listening to the size, without a by the science was up the scientist offer advice but they don't make policy. it's a kind of a grey area where advice comes something you have to do or where you can exercise yourjudgement as a political leader perhaps in defiance of the advice. because you run huge political risks if you do that. it’s political risks if you do that. it's clear that _ political risks if you do that. it's clear that we _ political risks if you do that. it's clear that we elect our politician and governing party to make those decisions — and governing party to make those decisions. of course these scientists need to provide the politicians and the prime minister the government, the health secretary and others _ the government, the health secretary and others with the facts. but when you have _
11:42 pm
and others with the facts. but when you have a — and others with the facts. but when you have a chorus literally of whether— you have a chorus literally of whether it's the british medical association, the unions, sage, many scientists— association, the unions, sage, many scientists all— association, the unions, sage, many scientists all within two, four days saying _ scientists all within two, four days saying very — scientists all within two, four days saying very similar if not exactly the same — saying very similar if not exactly the same thing, i think the dilemma for the _ the same thing, i think the dilemma for the government is the, mind the -ap. for the government is the, mind the gap not— for the government is the, mind the gap. notjust in the two but mind the gap _ gap. notjust in the two but mind the gap between what scientists are feeling _ the gap between what scientists are feeling very much that they need and want to— feeling very much that they need and want to tell us because they're doing — want to tell us because they're doing theirjobs, they know that it's the — doing theirjobs, they know that it's the politicians who will make the decision. but it's what's wrong, what's _ the decision. but it's what's wrong, what's the — the decision. but it's what's wrong, what's the harm, what's the problem, what's _ what's the harm, what's the problem, what's the _ what's the harm, what's the problem, what's the damage with actually saying _ what's the damage with actually saying to — what's the damage with actually saying to people we really need you to do _ saying to people we really need you to do what — saying to people we really need you to do what you did so well before and that— to do what you did so well before and that is— to do what you did so well before and that is socially dissidents, work— and that is socially dissidents, work from _ and that is socially dissidents, work from home, work mass? what is the problem,? | work from home, work mass? what is the problem— the problem,? i don't get it. will leave that _ the problem,? i don't get it. will leave that is _ the problem,? i don't get it. will leave that is a _ the problem,? i don't get it. will leave that is a rhetorical - the problem,? i don't get it. will| leave that is a rhetorical question because i don't feel well—placed to answer on behalf of of the british people. it's a good point well made.
11:43 pm
let's move on. let's talk about the chancellors budget which i rather hoped rishi sunak would have hoped that was going to be the headline from his interview ahead of the budget this week. it ended up being on page two and also we will talk about on the yorkshire post as well. page two first. sunak and family hubs. sunak the champion of family life. , , , , life. yes, very interesting. he is aoian life. yes, very interesting. he is aoain to life. yes, very interesting. he is going to announce _ life. yes, very interesting. he is going to announce it _ life. yes, very interesting. he is going to announce it would - life. yes, very interesting. he is| going to announce it would seem life. yes, very interesting. he is- going to announce it would seem that there will— going to announce it would seem that there will be 70 family hubs across england _ there will be 70 family hubs across england to — there will be 70 family hubs across england to provide support for new parents _ england to provide support for new parents. this is an initiative that he's going — parents. this is an initiative that he's going to be announcing in the budget— he's going to be announcing in the budget and spending review on wednesday. it's heavily trailed here — wednesday. it's heavily trailed here i— wednesday. it's heavily trailed here. i think between now and wednesday will get even more trail. wednesday will get even more trail. we get _ wednesday will get even more trail. we get so _ wednesday will get even more trail. we get so much before, whether you strip on— we get so much before, whether you strip on some accounts. but he will invest— strip on some accounts. but he will invest half— strip on some accounts. but he will invest half £1,000,000,000 to improve — invest half £1,000,000,000 to improve what it says access to
11:44 pm
support — improve what it says access to support for the families of young children — support for the families of young children. this will be new centres that will— children. this will be new centres that will allow services to be brought _ that will allow services to be brought together in one place from the parenting programme, breast—feeding, mental health support— breast—feeding, mental health support to help parents cope with the demands of a young family. they will also _ the demands of a young family. they will also be _ the demands of a young family. they will also be apparently an extra {200,000,000 for programmes to £200,000,000 for programmes to support— {200,000,000 for programmes to support families through issues that could lead _ support families through issues that could lead to breakdown. well pandemic has put people and young families— pandemic has put people and young families with crying babies amongst all the _ families with crying babies amongst all the other problems, the loss the £20 on _ all the other problems, the loss the £20 on universal credit and food banks— £20 on universal credit and food banks that we don't have time to talk about— banks that we don't have time to talk about our word they will be able to — talk about our word they will be able to cope. obviously a lot of pressure — able to cope. obviously a lot of pressure. welcome news for young parents _ pressure. welcome news for young rarents. �* ., _ , , parents. i've obviously been in this aame too parents. i've obviously been in this game too long _ parents. i've obviously been in this game too long because _ parents. i've obviously been in this game too long because i _ parents. i've obviously been in this game too long because i kind - parents. i've obviously been in this game too long because i kind of. parents. i've obviously been in this i game too long because i kind of feel we've been here before. about 25 years before when new labour was banging on about centres. some of which when austerity came had to be closed and mothballed. there are
11:45 pm
only a few new ideas and we seem to recycle quite a lot of them. why don't we keep things and keep them going rather than keep invent them, close them and reinvent again? i guess things coming full circle office of economic times change in spending governments can do changes. for me this strikes me as almost focus group policy. clearly it's the case that for many people, many families would really like a lot of extra help when it comes to parenting especially when you have a young child, a new baby. it puts enormous pressure on you and your partner. if government will help you i'm sure it will be very popular especially, across the whole country. it especially, across the whole count . ., ~ especially, across the whole count . . . , ., country. it initiative. where you come from _ country. it initiative. where you come from originally? - country. it initiative. where you come from originally? i'm - country. it initiative. where you come from originally? i'm from| come from originally? i'm from jersey and the channel islands. i don't know whatjersey�*s public transport is like but tell us about yoursuppose transport is like but tell us about your suppose is pretty good is it? it looks like rishi sunak, this will
11:46 pm
be in england only think of a let's be in england only think of a let's be honest because transport is devolved to the rest of the uk and certainly default in the channel islands. i get that. but tell us about what the chancellor has offered the yorkshire post. irate about what the chancellor has offered the yorkshire post. we have at trial of a — offered the yorkshire post. we have at trial of a number _ offered the yorkshire post. we have at trial of a number announce - offered the yorkshire post. we have| at trial of a number announce widget £i.2 at trial of a number announce widget £1.2 billion for travel and yorkshire to fund the transport revolution. this is levelling up written all over it. borisjohnson really wants to reduce transport time, waiting time and prices in the midlands and all across the uk. it's £830,000,000 for west yorkshire, 570,000,000 for south yorkshire. sunak is quoted as saying there's no reason why someone working in the north and the midlands should have to wait several times longer for a bus or train compared to a commuter in london. this is about the projects talking about supertramp networks and sheffield is one
11:47 pm
example. it is a clear doing not clear levelling up policy in the hope that this will land nicely. i don't know what the comparison is in france, what is regional public transport like in france or does it exist? it transport like in france or does it exist? . ., , ,, exist? it certainly does exist but the ma'or exist? it certainly does exist but the major difference, _ exist? it certainly does exist but the major difference, were - exist? it certainly does exist but i the major difference, were talking about— the major difference, were talking about different cultures and france in the _ about different cultures and france in the uk _ about different cultures and france in the uk are major difference, is whatever— in the uk are major difference, is whatever you the president is, whether— whatever you the president is, whether it's conservative or socialist, _ whether it's conservative or socialist, the fact is that there is a french— socialist, the fact is that there is a french policy for years now that the government puts .8, point b and draws— the government puts .8, point b and draws a _ the government puts .8, point b and draws a straight line and does the highest _ draws a straight line and does the highest speed trade there's such a commitment to infrastructure in france — commitment to infrastructure in france it— commitment to infrastructure in france it is— commitment to infrastructure in france, it is not a party political thing _ france, it is not a party political thing it— france, it is not a party political thing it is— france, it is not a party political thing it is an absolutely... french people _ thing it is an absolutely... french people what cope. whether it's training — people what cope. whether it's training or motorways there's a real
11:48 pm
commitment to having proper infrastructure. how does a country function _ infrastructure. how does a country function without a? a infrastructure. how does a country function without a?— function without a? a very good auestion function without a? a very good question and — function without a? a very good question and one _ function without a? a very good question and one that _ function without a? a very good question and one that i - function without a? a very good question and one that i guess i function without a? a very good j question and one that i guess is going to be posed by theirs. we are talking about levelling up here. i noticed there was a report in the economist that came out today about cocaptain in devon and which is about to get his rail service restored from next month after about 50 years. although the station has continued to exist because there was a freight line but it's actually going to have passenger trains. there seems to be a big drive by this government to try to reconnect parts of england that have not been connected for a very long time. as you said, it that shouldn't be a part doing that partisan thing any more. thank you both very much come up more. thank you both very much come up pleasure to have you with us. i hope you have a nice, warm pleasant weekend snuggling at home. thank you very much for watching the papers this week. don't forget there's more papers every night and you can find
11:49 pm
them online when ever you need to find them 20 files a day. coming up next it's the midnight news following from the sport and the weather. from all of us here goodbye. good evening, i'm lizzie greenwood—hughes, here with the latest sports news. katie archibald has won britain's first gold medal at this year's world track cycling championships in france. it's been a great yearfor archibald. she won olympic gold in the madison with laura kenny, three gold medals at the european championships earlier this month and she's now world champion in the omnium, where individual riders compete in four different events. i was so nervous at the start of the day. you know it's not every that we have qualifiers at omnium. i was sat there feeling like too
11:50 pm
nervous to eat thinking i'm never going to do this again, this is too much i can't take this feeling. and suddenly i thought, "this is your last race and just, whatever. " obviously it went well enough i think i'll come back again. just one game in the premier league tonight — and arsenal have comfortably beaten aston villa at the emirates. thomas partey got them going midway through the first half with this header. then pierre—emerick aubameyang doubled arsenal's lead just after the break — scoring the rebound after martinez saved his spot kick. emile smith rowe made it three with this deflected finish. jacob ramsey scored a consolation but it ended 3—i. the result moves arsenal up a to ninth place. this is the way we have to play and this is when we are good. when we play with real desire and commitment, we have a clear idea on how we have to attack them and how we can hit them i believe that they can do it.
11:51 pm
six now can you feel a little bit of momentum? yes i do looking forward now and choosing to play leeds and go again. first off we get dominated physically and didn't compete well enough. deserved to go in at half—time, with the laws or losing the game. we change the shape and i like to say it was personality, shape, it was as it was that we just get dominated physically. i don't expect that from my players. it's a busy weekend for the home nations in women's football. tonight scotland left it very late to beat hungary. on the stroke of full time, jen beattie won a big header from a corner which captain rachel corsie nodded scotland's top of the
11:52 pm
group from three — 3. in and they held—on in a nervy few added minutes for the 2—1 victory. but wales' game against group i rivals slovenia ended in a i—all draw. kayleigh green rescued a valuable point before being sent off a second yellow card. the draw leaves them second below favourites france. england play northern ireland tomorrow. northampton leapt up to second place in rugby union's premiership after a bonus point win at home to worcester. courtnall skosan scored a hat trick on his debut. the south africa wing looks a very useful signing for the saints. a massive 66 points to ten was the final score. leinster are top of the united rugby championship after a strong performance at an in—form glasgow. ronan kelleher got the best try of the evening as leinster won 31—15 to keep their 100% record going so far this season. in the night's other match scarlets had a narrow 34—28 win over benneton. formula one now and if today's second practise was anything to go by, then sunday's us grand prix is going to be another fiery contest between lewis hamilton
11:53 pm
and championship leader max verstappen. the two didn't physically clash in austin today, but hamilton annoyed his rival enough to provoke a rude gesture on his way to finishing third fastest compared with verstappen's eighth. his red bull team mate sergio perez was quickest with lando norris second. ireland have been knocked out of the men's t20 world cup — beaten by the lowest ranked side in the tournament as namibia pulled off a shock eight—wicket win. ireland had started well, but lost three wickets in quick succession, finishing on 125 for eight which namibia comfortably made. so they go through to the super 12 stage which starts tomorrow. sri lanka were already through and they thrashed the netherlands to go into england's pool, along with south africa, bangladesh, australia, and the defending champions — west indies who england face tomorrow in their opening match. earlier i asked test match special�*s alex hartley who she fancies for the tournament.
11:54 pm
india are the favourites. they played in their ipl out and buy over the last few months so they really know the conditions. you don't really want to go into a competition like this is as favourites, everybody loves an underdog. it would have got that tapas pool with bangladesh and sri lanka joining the table. but as you know, anything can happen in a competition like this was up in england, they'll just want to get off to a winning start against the west indies and get winning momentum behind them. and one other cricket line today, and england's test match against india which was controversially postponed last month has been rescheduled to take place at edgbaston in july next year. the fifth match of the series at old trafford was called off when india said they were unable to field a team due to fears of further coronavirus cases inside their camp. they lead the series 2—1. finally, it's been another day of records forjockey holly doyle. last year she was third in the bbc�*s sports personality of the year — today she's set a new record of wins for a british female
11:55 pm
rider in one year. she clocked up her 152nd victory in 2021 at doncaster this afternoon — that surpasses her own record of 151 last year. she's now broken the record three years in a row. and that's all the sport for now. hello. a bit of snow of a high ground in scotland. what as we can have in store? actually a return to milder conditions, some brisk winds and some rain at times courtesy of this frontal system that you can see pushing in from the west. it is moving quite slowly, it's running up against high pressure. they will still be a fair amount of dry weather through saturday and where skies have been clear a really chilly start part two across parts of east to scotland for that that is
11:56 pm
where was he the best at right drizzle. quite slowly eastwards across northern island and into western scotland. it be breezy or windy wherever you are but particularly windy in the west scotland with wind gusts in excess of 50mph and expose places. but feeling relatively mild, 12, 13 or 14 feeling relatively mild, 12, 13 or 1a as we head through saturday night there will be a lot of cloud, will see outbreaks moving slowly eastward through scotland, hanging on a cross heart of northern island into northwestern on parts of wales and the southwest as well. a much milder start to sunday morning. a frontal system will continue to trudge its way eastwards through the day. and really i think this weather front is going to break up into showers so won't be raining all the time. but we are going to see some even milder weather if anything spreading northwards across the uk. this is sunday's forecast we will see a lot of cloud to start,
11:57 pm
outbreaks of rain tending to break up outbreaks of rain tending to break up into showers with some sunny spells developing two. a brisk wind once again but because that wind is coming up from the south it is going to feel really quite mild with temperatures getting up until two to 14 temperatures getting up until two to 1a maybe 16 in one or two places. what about the coming week was that we are going to see for the frontal systems pushing in from the west. the potential that warm weather front could become quite slow moving up front could become quite slow moving up towards the north and west of the uk. a bit of uncertainty about that what we can certainly see quite a lot of rain and some northern and western areas. there is a mild weather to come as well with brisk south—westerly winds and the further south—westerly winds and the further south you are the better chance of staying dry at least for a few days and here temperatures could climb all the way to 18 .
11:58 pm
11:59 pm
12:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm nancy kacungira with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the hollywood actor alec baldwin says his "heart is broken" after fatally shooting a cinematographer on a film set in new mexico. the european union accuses belarus of state sponsored people smuggling. we follow one group of migrants, on their way to europe. abortion in mexico — we hearfrom women a month after a landmark ruling which decriminalised it. as european football is expanded, is the global game doing enough to counter climate change?

11 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on