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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 22, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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the actor alec baldwin has described as a tragic accident the fatal shooting he was involved in on a film set. baldwin fired a prop gun that was supposed to be loaded with blanks, but killed one person and injured another. the european union has accused belarus of recruiting migrants in the middle east and pushing them into europe. eu leaders said they will take further action against minsk over the issue. scientists advising the government say stricter covid measures should be made ready for �*rapid deployment�* — but the prime minister insists plan b for england isn't needed yet. buckingham palace has confrmed that queen elizabeth spent a night in hospital in london earlier this week, after undergoing what are said to be �*preliminary medical checks�*.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benedicte paviot who is the uk correspondent at france 2a and the chair of reporters without borders uk advisory board and joe mayes who is the uk politics reporter at bloomberg. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the i reports on the pressure being exerted on the government by its scientific advisory group, to bring in so—called �*plan b�* measures in order to ease covid numbers. a push from rishi sunakfor people to get their boosterjabs is the times�* top story. the ft says the government has recalled a policy aide to do her old job running the vaccination programme. the fatal incident on the set
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of alec baldwin�*s latest film is the mirror�*s top story. it says the actor asked why he had a loaded gun, after he shot and killed halyna hutchins. the telgraph has an interview with foreign secretary liz truss, who says the uk should become less reliant on china. and the mail questions why the queen�*s hospital admission was initially kept a secret by the palace. admission was initially kept so let�*s begin... admission was initially kept benedict, admission was initially kept do you want to kick us at benedict, do you want to kick us off at the front page of the times? this is very interesting, the tone of government comments on what we need to do to protect ourselves seems to be heartening. it to do to protect ourselves seems to be heartening-— be heartening. it does. as we know the figures — be heartening. it does. as we know the figures are _ be heartening. it does. as we know the figures are rising _ be heartening. it does. as we know the figures are rising once - be heartening. it does. as we know the figures are rising once again - the figures are rising once again in the figures are rising once again in the united kingdom. the united kingdom was a world leader in the vaccination programme but of course
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a lot of that is wearing off. and we�*ve got now very interesting political interviews across the board in various papers. this one is the chancellor as he prepares his autumn spending review. he insists that what is the priority? the economy. that is the government priority. his aim at shops, pubs and restaurants must not shut again to deal with covid. he does not want covid to disrupt the economy again. he says the big wall of defence in the uk is indeed the vaccines. the problem is as i said, deaths are rising, covid cases are very significant. we�*ve had over 50,000. we�*ve had the health secretary only days ago warning that it could rise to 100,000. we have 1,000 hospitalisations a day. what�*s interesting here i think is very much that the government with this interview in the times is signalling
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that it�*s absolutely determined not to impose a lockdown. and i think that the polling that the times has done is interesting. 69% of the public would support bringing back the work from home edict was and 76% according to this poll in the times back compulsory masks. 22% at shutting pubs and restaurants without it seems that the population once again is much more prepared to face these kinds of measures to try and avoid a lockdown than the government is. it�*s and avoid a lockdown than the government is. it's interesting. i wonder what _ government is. it's interesting. i wonder what you _ government is. it's interesting. i wonder what you make - government is. it's interesting. i wonder what you make of - government is. it's interesting. i wonder what you make of the i wonder what you make of the chancellor coming over and say you got to get your boosterjob, get it and get it quickly as you can. yes. and get it quickly as you can. yes, that's the key _ and get it quickly as you can. yes, that's the key message _ and get it quickly as you can. yes, that's the key message that's come from the _ that's the key message that's come from the government this week as sergeant— from the government this week as sergeant greenjavits from the government this week as sergeant green javits given that breast _ sergeant green javits given that breast conference this week. clearly the word _ breast conference this week. clearly the word about the low level of uptake — the word about the low level of uptake of— the word about the low level of uptake of all these boosterjabs, with the — uptake of all these boosterjabs, with the waning immunity from the vaccine _ with the waning immunity from the vaccine so — with the waning immunity from the vaccine so they want people to do
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that _ vaccine so they want people to do that. almost using the stick, the threat _ that. almost using the stick, the threat of— that. almost using the stick, the threat of if— that. almost using the stick, the threat of if you don't do that that we might— threat of if you don't do that that we might have to go towards restrictions. this is clearly a very positive — restrictions. this is clearly a very positive interview from sunak in terms _ positive interview from sunak in terms of— positive interview from sunak in terms of saying the economy is a prioritv — terms of saying the economy is a priority. very interesting how sage is a work_ priority. very interesting how sage is a work from home would probably be the _ is a work from home would probably be the most effective of the measures if plan b were to be implemented. i think perhaps heading towards _ implemented. i think perhaps heading towards that but clearly lockdown measures, closing shops, restaurants that is— measures, closing shops, restaurants that is off— measures, closing shops, restaurants that is off the cards it seems according _ that is off the cards it seems according to this interview. providing plan b works if they introduce plan b. i was struck this week by as you say, the governments reluctance to do some of these things at the moment and the tension within government very visible. there is savagejavits say it will be very helpful if conservatives wore face max to send a message that we are in a pandemic, to set an example. his call a kind of laughing it off in the, just as a say we are all good friends in the conservative party, we don�*t need were massed in
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front of each other. even the virus is quite fond of friends because they seem to cluster close together and make it easier to spread. i saw the cli of and make it easier to spread. i saw the clip of that _ and make it easier to spread. i saw the clip of that interview _ and make it easier to spread. i "— the clip of that interview taken outside parliament. but i think if i�*m not mistaken in that statement was actually referring to parliament and to what�*s happening in the house of commons. 0bviously everybody has seen that this has become terribly political. you look to the left of your screen is he a conservative party with barely a mask of sight, you look at the opposition benches and uc mostly mask. and that�*s where this whole positioning of boris johnson who was shaking hands at the beginning of the pandemic who almost died as we know himself from covid. where is become very political unlike for example in that sense from the french president where it is not become, didn�*t become political, it�*s a health thing and
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devising something for he for example encouraging other leaders have encouraged i think that�*s the danger of turning it into a political statement or an economic statement. we have these dire warnings whether it�*s unions, sage itself, whether it�*s the head of the bma this week, how many warnings from scientists does the government need? we know that acting early and more extensively than is thought to be needed is absolutely crucial. and why is there such a disparity in death and in daily new cases with the rest of europe? when i travelled to sweden for the first time in three years after the uk i got a very good real feel for how the rest of the world is looking at the u tech two uk, with some trepidation. take us onto the ftc, top story tomorrow morning, number ten recalls jabs achieve to front line. it�*s jabs achieve to front line. it's third read _
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jabs achieve to front line. it's third read turn _ jabs achieve to front line. it's third read turn of writing the vaccine programme in england. she is probably— vaccine programme in england. she is probably the most highly rated officiat— probably the most highly rated official but on downing street by boris _ official but on downing street by borisjohnson. it's quite a clear signal— borisjohnson. it's quite a clear signal of— borisjohnson. it's quite a clear signal of the concern in the government that the vaccine roll—out of the _ government that the vaccine roll—out of the booster programme is not going _ of the booster programme is not going well so that's why they're bringing — going well so that's why they're bringing her back. she so highly rated. _ bringing her back. she so highly rated, seemjohn bringing her back. she so highly rated, seem john the first time around — rated, seem john the first time around if_ rated, seem john the first time around. if you take in insurance and signal— around. if you take in insurance and signal this— around. if you take in insurance and signal this is— around. if you take in insurance and signal this is a pretty clear one. the ft— signal this is a pretty clear one. the ft talks about the poor virus situation — the ft talks about the poor virus situation cases at 10% and compared to last _ situation cases at 10% and compared to last week. hospital admissions going _ to last week. hospital admissions going beyond the thousand since first time — going beyond the thousand since first time in september. the government has seen all this data and think. — government has seen all this data and think, we've got to do something. why haven't we got to plan b? _ something. why haven't we got to plan b? but clearly in terms of the machinery— plan b? but clearly in terms of the machinery of government they try to -et machinery of government they try to get that— machinery of government they try to get that sorted out to get vaccine boosters — get that sorted out to get vaccine boosters into peoples arms. i guess it would be — boosters into peoples arms. i guess it would be very _ boosters into peoples arms. i guess it would be very frustrating - boosters into peoples arms. i guess it would be very frustrating for - boosters into peoples arms. i guess it would be very frustrating for the l it would be very frustrating for the government not having these plaudits of the successful roll—outs
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initially both in terms of commissioning the vaccine importing government money behind the research, priming the system, producing vaccines, getting them into peoples arms only for it to fall down on the booster side. yes. what in an — fall down on the booster side. yes. what in an impressive _ fall down on the booster side. 13:3 what in an impressive roll—out it was. what a comprehensive success it was. what a comprehensive success it was notches first but the rate at which it was, the coordination, impressive. so deservedly in a world leading. 0f impressive. so deservedly in a world leading. of course it is important to give people this boosterjob. that roll—out is being criticised for being too slow. the roll—out to 12 to 15—year—old are being criticised for being too slow. and it would seem quite simple measures now. everybody can�*t work from home, thatis now. everybody can�*t work from home, that is very clear. but those who can it seems that would be really helpful. also people wearing masks in public transport. an increasing number of people are not actually
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doing that. again i think it�*s... what about the 5,000,000 people who stubbornly, it�*s their right to choose not to be vaccinated? is not want minister be at the health secretary from downing street. and clips and bulletins and various bulletins that are going to persuade those people to change their minds. and this new ad campaign, it would be really interesting to have some sort of correlation with what affects us truly have. how do we persuade the 5,000,000 people who refuse to have the job? those are the things we need to be looking at. again acting early is crucial. you bring valuable international perspective to this. i was talking to you dateline earlier. dateline is available on the bbc iplayer and broadcast throughout the weekend on the news channel should you have missed it. you can make—up for it.
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benedict, she was saying that she had just come back from france, she went over on the euro store, she left london where lots of people on the due when she was juggling work wearing face masks even though all the signs say you�*re supposed to wear them, the announcements etc. she�*d been on the euro start and she said she didn�*t see a single person not wearing a face mask at top she got off, a man was about to take off his face mask and a security guard was on him within seconds and basically said, you take that mask off and it�*s hundred and ?60 fine, not sure of the exact figure and the man immediately re— affects his face mask was up in france you have the vaccine mandate, not going to restaurants and the rest of it, by the presidents decree. should we look at that in this country or is france just a different culture such a way that what is expected there would be accepted here? iagiliiiie would be accepted here? while being half french, half— would be accepted here? while being half french, half british _ would be accepted here? while being half french, half british of _ would be accepted here? while being half french, half british of course - half french, half british of course it is a different culture. people at
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different rounds. the fact of the matter is there are many things the united kingdom and france have in common. my freedom ends with yours begin. but collective good what is the big deal about wearing a mask? what�*s the big deal about social distancing? what�*s the big deal about if you can working from home? i think the totally... i about if you can working from home? i think the totally. . ._ about if you can working from home? i think the totally. . .— i think the totally. .. i hear it's an erosion _ i thinkthe totally... i hear it's an erosion of— i think the totally. .. i hear it's an erosion of their _ i think the totally. .. i hear it's an erosion of their freedom. l i think the totally. .. i hear it's an erosion of their freedom. i | i think the totally. .. i hear it's - an erosion of their freedom. i was auoin to an erosion of their freedom. i was going to come _ an erosion of their freedom. i was going to come onto _ an erosion of their freedom. i was going to come onto that. - an erosion of their freedom. i —" going to come onto that. liberty. it's going to come onto that. liberty. it�*s interesting that the french are known for being so individualistic. but actually the british, why equate this just with the freedom time being forced to wear a mask is backward about thinking actually, i�*m doing some good by helping not contaminate somebody else. i think
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ventilation and we also get to do it. i thinks that�*s one of the biggest lessons i learned myself which i still don�*t do enough is open those doors, open those windows. i think that is something... maybe that message is it reaching through enough. somebody just heard me and a few people ventilate their flats, their homes a bit more then good, i�*ve done a tiny bit more then good, i�*ve done a tiny bit of good. d0 bit more then good, i've done a tiny bit of good-— bit of good. do you want to take us onto the guardian? _ bit of good. do you want to take us onto the guardian? leaders - bit of good. do you want to take us | onto the guardian? leaders warning of real chaos in public services if urgent action isn�*t taken to reduce the number getting infected. i urgent action isn't taken to reduce the number getting infected. i think the number getting infected. i think the story draws _ the number getting infected. i think the story draws attention _ the number getting infected. i think the story draws attention to - the number getting infected. i think the story draws attention to a - the story draws attention to a really — the story draws attention to a really problematic real—world consequences that will occur if coronavirus takes off as it seems to be doing _ coronavirus takes off as it seems to be doing this winter. that is massive _ be doing this winter. that is massive disruption to workplace as we saw— massive disruption to workplace as we saw it— massive disruption to workplace as we saw it last year. this is a group of trade _ we saw it last year. this is a group of trade unions coming together to represent — of trade unions coming together to represent 3,000,000 workers and they say urgent _ represent 3,000,000 workers and they say urgent action is needed now.
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making _ say urgent action is needed now. making the argument we just heard saving _ making the argument we just heard saying we _ making the argument we just heard saying we need mandatory face shops, public _ saying we need mandatory face shops, public transport otherwise is going to be _ public transport otherwise is going to be mass destruction and that will be bad _ to be mass destruction and that will be bad for— to be mass destruction and that will be bad for businesses, bad for workers — be bad for businesses, bad for workers. we need to get ahead of this now— workers. we need to get ahead of this now to— workers. we need to get ahead of this now to start that occurring. it's this now to start that occurring. it's a _ this now to start that occurring. it's a pretty powerful intervention from _ it's a pretty powerful intervention from the — it's a pretty powerful intervention from the world of the trade union world _ from the world of the trade union world makes a powerful point. when the governments been presented with these arguments this week the responses been twofold. it's been this is— responses been twofold. it's been this is a _ responses been twofold. it's been this is a country where we don't like to— this is a country where we don't like to use _ this is a country where we don't like to use government dictate to tell people what to do. that's the first thing — tell people what to do. that's the first thing. the second thing is, we trust _ first thing. the second thing is, we trust people to behave responsibly and off— trust people to behave responsibly and off on— trust people to behave responsibly and off on their own that we shouldn't— and off on their own that we shouldn't need these kind of measures i think being charitable to the government that is what they say in this— the government that is what they say in this argument. i think the responses well why do you value that more _ responses well why do you value that more than _ responses well why do you value that more than with certainty reducing the cases— more than with certainty reducing the cases and death was that we haven't— the cases and death was that we haven't really heard an answer to that _ haven't really heard an answer to that. ., �* ., , ., ., that. you've given me a question to
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ut the that. you've given me a question to put the government _ that. you've given me a question to put the government spokespersons | put the government spokespersons next time. thank you. i showed marked up and down. a very good question, thank you. do you want to take us onto the other story in the guardian? this is the most awful, awful, it seems like there�*s no deliberate on anybody�*s part. a horrible rerun of what happened nearly 30 years ago to brandon lee when he was shot dead on a film set. not the same but very similar circumstances.— not the same but very similar circumstances. , ., . , ., ., , circumstances. just an exceptionally tra . ic circumstances. just an exceptionally tragic case- — circumstances. just an exceptionally tragic case- we _ circumstances. just an exceptionally tragic case. we are _ circumstances. just an exceptionally tragic case. we are still _ circumstances. just an exceptionally tragic case. we are still trying - circumstances. just an exceptionally tragic case. we are still trying to - tragic case. we are still trying to find out — tragic case. we are still trying to find out more details. but your heart _ find out more details. but your heart can't _ find out more details. but your heart can't help but go out to the cinematographers died and obviously with alec— cinematographers died and obviously with alec baldwin must be going through— with alec baldwin must be going through as well. to be part of a situation — through as well. to be part of a situation you hear of injuries or actors — situation you hear of injuries or actors on — situation you hear of injuries or actors on film sets but very rarely do you _ actors on film sets but very rarely do you hear— actors on film sets but very rarely do you hear of debts. but we have seen _ do you hear of debts. but we have seen his— do you hear of debts. but we have seen his hairand do you hear of debts. but we have seen his hair and it's a massive tragedv — seen his hair and it's a massive traced . �* . seen his hair and it's a massive traced. �* . �* ., tragedy. benedict? i'm almost speechless- — tragedy. benedict? i'm almost speechless. it _ tragedy. benedict? i'm almost
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speechless. it surrenders. - tragedy. benedict? i'm almost speechless. it surrenders. i. tragedy. benedict? i'm almost i speechless. it surrenders. ican't speechless. it surrenders. i can�*t imagine what the family

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