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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 22, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 7pm — scientists advising the government say stricter covid measures should be made ready for "rapid deployment", but the prime minister insists plan b for england isn't needed yet. we keep all measures under constant review. we'll do whatever we have to do to protect the public, but the numbers that we're seeing at the moment are fully in line with what we expected. tributes are being paid to cinematographer halyna hutchins, who's died after actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his latest film. the film's director was also seriously injured. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art and the integrity of wanting
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to make cinema. the home secretary backs lost to allow victims of domestic abuse more time to report the crime. the social care watchdog in england warns many people could be left without help this winter because of an "exhausted and depleted" work force. and coming up in half an hour, foreign correspondents based in london give an outsider�*s view of events in the uk in dateline. good evening, and welcome to bbc news. scientists advising the uk government say plans for the reintroduction of stricter coronavirus measures should be ready for "rapid deployment". they say early intervention, like asking more people to work from home, could have the greatest impact on preventing
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viral spread and reduce the need for more stringent and longer—lasting measures. new figures from the office for national statistics suggest that 1.1 million people were infected across the uk last week, the highest number since january. currently there are more than 1000 hospital admissions a day. the government has a new campaign urging those eligible to book their boosterjabs. borisjohnson says there are no plans to implement tighter rules, although the situation is under constant review. here's our health editor hugh pym. winter is approaching, the virus is spreading. calls from experts for more widespread mask—wearing in england, more working from home and vaccine passports are growing, what the government has branded plan b. but borisjohnson said today he wasn't yet ready to activate the plan. we keep all measures under constant review. we'll do whatever we have to do to protect the public, but the numbers that we're seeing
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at the moment are fully in line with what we expected in the autumn and winter plan. and what we want people to do is to come forward and get their jabs. but cases in major european countries like italy are much lower than in the uk, and members of the expert sage committee, according to papers released today, note they have tougher restrictions, including proof of vaccine and testing status. sage says early intervention may reduce the need for tougher measures in future. one member of a government advisory committee, not sage, says plan b or something similar is needed very soon. if we try to rely simply and solely on the vaccine programme to bring things under control this winter, we stand a really high risk of getting into serious trouble. so something's got to be done to communicate with the public and encourage them and, if necessary, i guess, i suppose requires them to do some of these things if we're going to stop getting into a really bad mess again. the latest infection
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survey by the office for national statistics shows that last week in england, one in 55 people had the virus. that was an increase. in wales at one in a5, and northern ireland at one in 130, the trend was said to be uncertain. in scotland, one in 90 had the virus. that was down on the previous week. this map shows in more detail varying infection rates around the uk. the lighter colours show the lowest rates, the darkest colours the highest, including north west england and parts of south wales. covid case increases have been largely driven so far by infections among schoolchildren, though vaccinations of under—16s have only been under way for a month. data for england last week from the 0ns reveals that the sharpest rises in case rates were among children, but there were slight increases recorded, as well, amongst some older age groups. vaccines boost our immunity and l protect us from dangerous viruses. a new government campaign has been launched urging people of all ages
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who haven't had a jan to get one and those eligible to get a booster. and that's been thrown into sharper focus by the latest hospital admission figures, up nearly 20% week on week. sage experts say it's unlikely they'll go higher than the peak injanuary, but planning for possible new measures should begin now. hugh pym, bbc news. let's take a look at the latest figures now on coronavirus, which show that there were 49,298 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means on average in the past week there were 47,415 cases per day. the number of people in hospital with covid has increased to 8238. there were 180 more deaths recorded. that's people who have died within 28 days of a positive test. that takes the average
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number of deaths over the past seven days to 135. 0n vaccinations, 86.3% of people aged 12 and over have now received a first dose, and just over 79% have had two doses of the vaccine. dr kit yates is a senior lecturer in mathematical biology at the university of bath and a member of independent sage. that's a group of scientists that tries to monitor the advice the government is being given by members of sage can sometimes take their own views on where we should be heading. as always you were speaking in a personal capacity here, your assessment of where we stand at the moment. what do you make of the figures and the trends that we are seeing? i figures and the trends that we are seeinu ? ~ ., ., ., seeing? i think we are not in a particularly — seeing? i think we are not in a particularly good _ seeing? i think we are not in a particularly good situation, - particularly good situation, especially when you compare us to comparative european neighbours like italy, france, germany and spain. we are averaging around 47,000 cases a
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day. 130 are desk which translates to around 50,000 deaths a year, which is an extra ordinarily high numberfor which is an extra ordinarily high number for disease which is an extra ordinarily high numberfor disease which which is an extra ordinarily high number for disease which we can actually do something about. our case rates are maybe four times higher than germany, maybe ten times higher than germany, maybe ten times higher than germany, maybe ten times higher than france, maybe 20 times higher than france, maybe 20 times higher than france, maybe 20 times higher than spain and are death rates are at least double those of germany and travel those of france and spain. so it compared to other countries in europe, we are not doing a particularly good job. then doing a particularly good “ob. then we have to — doing a particularly good “ob. then we have to at h doing a particularly good “ob. then we have to at some _ doing a particularly good job. then we have to at some point get to a stage where covid—19 is endemic and therefore does that not kind of resume people would get it and the majority of people would get over it because they have had it and they will have built up some kind of resistance to it getting it in future? {131 resistance to it getting it in future? ., , resistance to it getting it in future? . , ., future? of the gap refer to get immunity from _ future? of the gap refer to get immunity from a _ future? of the gap refer to get immunity from a vaccine - future? of the gap refer to get immunity from a vaccine if- future? of the gap refer to get immunity from a vaccine if it's| future? of the gap refer to get l immunity from a vaccine if it's at all possible because i think that's the safest way to get immunity. it is not really make sense to say we should let people get the disease to protect them from getting the
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disease. ,, , �* , ., disease. sure, but it's a combination _ disease. sure, but it's a combination of - disease. sure, but it's a combination of the - disease. sure, but it's a combination of the two, disease. sure, but it's a i combination of the two, a combination of the two, a combination of the two, a combination of having a vaccine which applies to a majority of the population and for those of the vaccination it is not as effective as others or they choose not to vaccinate, they get it and overall the population acquires immunity, not requiring through permanently avoiding getting infected. fiur avoiding getting infected. our schoolchildren _ avoiding getting infected. oi" schoolchildren have not been given the chance to have the vaccine yet. 70% of 12 and 15—year—olds in england had been vaccinated so far because we have done a really bad job of rolling out the vaccine at that age group. ?17%. for job of rolling out the vaccine at that age group. ? 17%. for the knew of the loop it will be done so far so personally of the content we have given everyone because if they have the vaccine a chance to get the vaccine, we should be doing anything we can to suppress cases and to keep them lower and actually it is not really need that much for us to bring the number below one. wearing masks if getting people to work from home where they can, improving ventilation and mitigations and schools like our schoolchildren have
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been so badly impacted by this in terms of how much school they have missed and in terms of losing relatives and we have left them down because we have not do anything to prevent transmission in school and they are suffering at the moment. i think we should be doing more to protect them. he think we should be doing more to protect them-— think we should be doing more to protect them. he would therefore echo what sage _ protect them. he would therefore echo what sage is _ protect them. he would therefore echo what sage is saying - protect them. he would therefore echo what sage is saying in - protect them. he would therefore echo what sage is saying in that l protect them. he would therefore j echo what sage is saying in that it would better introduce or reintroduce measures like the people working from home to my mask wearing an all in close spaces in shops and public areas and transport all the rest of it as a mandate. and for some oblate social distancing as well as the continuation with the vaccination programme now or very soonin vaccination programme now or very soon in order that we don't have to have a more serious and more sustained locked up initially at a later stage. sustained locked up initially at a later stage-— sustained locked up initially at a later stale. ~ , ~ ., later stage. absolutely. i think one ofthe later stage. absolutely. i think one of the lessons _ later stage. absolutely. i think one of the lessons we _ later stage. absolutely. i think one of the lessons we should _ later stage. absolutely. i think one of the lessons we should have - of the lessons we should have learned so far from our mishandling of the pandemic is it early action is always better than late action. 0ur prefer to have plan b now the implement plan c later on, especially given that we don't have a plan see the moment. there are
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things we could be doing like sage has suggested which will help to bring cases down and i think other countries are just keeping mask mandates because it is not a huge a position for most people to wear a mask full so the reason we dropped masks was not because it has any economic detriment but purely ideological because the government is afraid of taking tough decisions that are unpopular and was on that last christmas when boris said he was a christmas and actually we have a much better off if he is in from the start it's going to be difficult this year so we are going to take a controlled measure and make sure that we don't put our loved ones at risk. i that we don't put our loved ones at risk. , ., ., ,~' i., ., , risk. i should ask you finally about the reports _ risk. i should ask you finally about the reports there _ risk. i should ask you finally about the reports there are _ risk. i should ask you finally about the reports there are of _ risk. i should ask you finally about the reports there are of a - risk. i should ask you finally about the reports there are of a new- the reports there are of a new variant or at least a variant of the delta very if i can put it that way rather than a completely new one. what assessment is being made of that and what risk is that perceived to pose? i that and what risk is that perceived to ose? ., . ., , that and what risk is that perceived to ose? ~ . ~ , ., to pose? i think we are keeping a close e e to pose? i think we are keeping a close eye on _ to pose? i think we are keeping a close eye on this _ to pose? i think we are keeping a close eye on this sub _ to pose? i think we are keeping a close eye on this sub variant - to pose? i think we are keeping a close eye on this sub variant of. close eye on this sub variant of delta that is called eight y 4.2. it has grown a little bit enters a proportion of cases that have come
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back from secrecy, maybe around 6% of cases in the uk at the moment, which is suggested as got a slight increase in trespass ability over the vanilla variant of delta and that actually could just be a spreading event which is causing it to see the increase. keeping an eye on it but it is not at the moment of any particular concern over delta, so i think nothing to worry about so far but we need to keep an eye on it. ., ., , far but we need to keep an eye on it. doctor yates, senior lecturer at mathematical— it. doctor yates, senior lecturer at mathematical biology _ it. doctor yates, senior lecturer at mathematical biology at _ mathematical biology at the university of bath, thank you very much. the hollywood actor alec baldwin says there are no words to convey his shock and sadness after he shot two people with a gun being used as a prop on the set of his new film. halyna hutchins, who was the film's director of photography, died, and the director, joel souza, was injured. detectives have questioned mr baldwin, but say no—one has been arrested. sophie long has more from los angeles. halyna hutchins described herself as a restless dreamer and adrenaline junkie. the 42—year—old was considered by her peers to be an exceptionally
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talented cinematographer. i met her at a film festival, and within just a few moments of talking to her i felt like she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art, and, like, sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema, that i wanted to work with her. she was on set at the bonanza creek ranch in new mexico when the shootings and deaths depicted on the 19th—century western they were filming became all too real. police say that alec baldwin, the star and co—producer of the movie rust, discharged a prop gun carrying blanks. halyna hutchins was airlifted to hospital, but she died from her injuries. directorjoel souza was also seriously hurt. in a statement, alec baldwin said...
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the incident has rocked hollywood, with many of those in the film industry now morning one of the rising stars and infuriated this could happen on set. and it comes just days after a nationwide strike was averted after a tentative deal between producers and set workers that included an upgrading of safety standards. this isn't the first time someone's been fatally shot during filming. nearly 20 years ago, brandon lee died after being shot by a prop gun on the set of the crow. now people are demanding to know how it could've happened again. there are instances when you do shoot a blank that you can be injured. often what comes out of the muzzle after you've discharge the weapon that has blank ammunition is sometimes some cotton ward, and that coming out at a very high velocity to an individual that's
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really close by can cause significant damage, and in some cases can cause death. an investigation into what happened here is still in its early stages. what we do know is something went terribly, tragically wrong. sophie long, bbc news, hollywood. let's speak to our correspondent peter bowes, who's in los angeles. notwithstanding what happened to brandon lee at 30 odd years ago now, this must have sent shock waves to the industry. this must have sent shock waves to the industry-— the industry. that's a very fair way to describe — the industry. that's a very fair way to describe it. _ the industry. that's a very fair way to describe it. hollywood - the industry. that's a very fair way to describe it. hollywood is - to describe it. hollywood is shell—shocked by what has happened, and it is quite unimaginable in this day and age with intense security and city measures on film sets anyway. they could always be tightened as we have just been hearing, and there are moves to even further tightens that the measures onset, but nevertheless the fact that whatever happens and we really don't know the details yet, there is lots of speculation about the kind of gun that might have been used and
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how it might have been used and what might have gone wrong. the fact is wejust don't might have gone wrong. the fact is we just don't know and an investigation is in the early stages with the very fact that it happened has really left people numb with shock. and a lot of tributes are being paid clearly to halyna hutchins, who lost her life and also thoughts are with the director who has survived this and he was treated in hospital and has been released and clearly when he is able will be talking to investigators, but that inquiry has quite a way to go yet and we are looking at the forensics on the set and looking at the gun and looking at the mechanics of it and looking at the mechanics of it and how it was used to perhaps even revealing any footage if any of the cameras were rolling. a lot of work to be done yet to try to find out what happened in this case and determine perhaps the future of this production and perhaps introduce any measures that can stop it happening in future. . ., measures that can stop it happening in future. ., ~ , in future. peter, thank you very much. the bbc understands the home secretary, priti patel, has agreed the law should be changed to give victims of domestic
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abuse more time to report a crime to the police. the current time limit of six months could be extended to two years in cases of alleged common assault involving domestic abuse. well, we can speak now to valerie wise, who's the national domestic abuse lead for victim support. thank you very much forjoining us. is this what you and others have been campaigning for? absolutely. it is shockin: been campaigning for? absolutely. it is shocking that _ been campaigning for? absolutely. it is shocking that many _ been campaigning for? absolutely. it is shocking that many cases, - been campaigning for? absolutely. it is shocking that many cases, 13,000 | is shocking that many cases, 13,000 cases over the last five years, have been dropped because they have run out of time. i think it has to be recognised that it is really difficult to report domestic abuse to the police. sometimes women or men indeed might feel that they will not be believed and sometimes they might feel that they might be living still in an abusive relationship and it could make things worse. there is a whole raft of reasons why it might not be possible to report the incident straight away. and the time start from the day the incident happens. and then be reported and
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the police are investigating it and ran out of time, thatjust means the case gets dropped and the alleged offender is not brought to justice. so i think it is really, really important. it so i think it is really, really important-— so i think it is really, really important. it may it possible there are time limits _ important. it may it possible there are time limits on _ important. it may it possible there are time limits on these _ important. it may it possible there are time limits on these things - important. it may it possible there are time limits on these things at| are time limits on these things at all. i are time limits on these things at all. . . ., are time limits on these things at all. . ., ~ ., all. iagree, i agree. ithink what also should _ all. i agree, i agree. ithink what also should be _ all. i agree, i agree. ithink what also should be brought - all. i agree, i agree. ithink what also should be brought in - all. i agree, i agree. ithink what also should be brought in mind l all. i agree, i agree. ithink what| also should be brought in mind is that sometimes a more serious offence might be looked at, like actual bodily harm or coercive control, but the police or crime prosecution don't think there is enough evidence and so they go to the crime of common assault. and so what it means is i think people are just being able to continue to abuse without anything happening to them. thank you and ijust without anything happening to them. thank you and i just say obviously it is difficult to report to the police, and if you want to just get in touch with us at victim support, you have to report to the police? we are independent from them. indeed, and the website _ are independent from them. indeed, and the website is _ are independent from them. indeed, and the website is available - are independent from them. indeed, and the website is available and - and the website is available and people can contact you and find your
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information, and i think your organisation is listed on the bbc action light as well but i will not swear to that but i think that is certainly worth looking at the action line paid for people who are in the situation. but can ijust pick of something you said? you said that on occasion prosecutors will recommend to the police that they charge at a lower or arguably and i don't mean necessarily more serious but technically defined as a less serious offence because i don't think they can get a prosecution. it or not an argument that that detention of that, you may disagree with the consequence, but the intention is to at least ensure there is a conviction and that that can be one thing that dustup a pattern of domestic abuse, whereas if you take it to a high level, the case does not get that person gets out and then they are to abuse again. it's a difficult trade—off. it is but that's what i say it is so essential this time limit is extended to two years. because by the time the police have looked at a
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more serious offence like actual bodily harm can be decided there is not sufficient evidence, you could find that the clock has been ticking away and the case has to be dropped. that is why it is so essential that this amendment to the policing bill is put into place by the home secretary and is carried. thank you very much. — secretary and is carried. thank you very much, valerie _ secretary and is carried. thank you very much, valerie wise. _ secretary and is carried. thank you very much, valerie wise. thank - secretary and is carried. thank you i very much, valerie wise. thank you. a 24—year—old man has been arrested by detectives investigating the manchester arena attack back in may 2017. he's being detained on suspicion of engaging in the preparation of acts of terrorism. 0ur north of england correspondent judith moritz gave us this update. we know that this man, as you say is 24, was arrested at manchester airport earlier today on his way back into the uk having left the country in april 2017, which is a month before the arena attack. he's now in custody, and as you say, he's being questioned on suspicion of engaging in preparation for acts of terrorism and helping others to do the same.
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now, we know that he's from the fallowfield area of manchester, which is the same area of the city as the abedi family, and you may remember there was criticism earlier this week of that fact that ismail abedi, the bomber�*s brother, has been able to leave the country in defiance of a court order demanding that he gives evidence to the public inquiry. there's been speculation as to where he is. well, i can tell you that the man arrested today is not ismail abedi. greater manchester police say that four years after the attack, they are continuing to pursue lines of investigation relating to it. the man accused of murdering the mp sir david amess will face trial in march next year. ali harbi ali, who's 25, is also charged with the preparation of terrorist acts. a two—minutes' silence has been held in leigh—on—sea in essex close to where sir david was killed at his constituency surgery last friday. the care regulator for england is warning that the sector faces a "tsunami of unmet need" this winter unless staffing shortages are tackled.
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the care quality commission has called for immediate measures to fill job vacancies. the government says it's providing £162 million to boost recruitment. buckingham palace says the queen is "in good spirits" and back at windsor castle after spending wednesday night in hospital. the queen, who is 95, was taken in for tests after being forced to cancel a trip to northern ireland. she returned home yesterday lunchtime and was said to have resumed light paperwork duties last night. the prime minister has said today that "everybody sends her majesty our very, very best wishes". at 7:30pm, it's dateline london, but first a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. here's lizzie greenwood—hughes. hello, i will mostly be discussing cricket to start with. ireland have been knocked out of the men's t20 world cup as namibia pulled off a shock eight—wicket win to
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reach the super 12s. that is the main draw in a tournament. namibia the lowest ranked side there. drew savage watch the action for us. it doesn't get any better than this for namibia. through to the super 12 for the first time. a day for ireland to forget. they'd begun well enough — paul stirling and kevin 0'brien had the scoreboard moving nicely, against the side ranked 19th in the world. but things slowed down dramatically for ireland after the power play, stirling out for 38. from 61—1 in the eighth over, the wickets kept falling, ending up on 125—8. it wasn't enough. kevin 0'brien�*s acrobatics kept ireland in it for a while. that brought david wiese to the crease. three days ago, he'd helped namibia to their first world t20 win. now he was at it again. so was gerhard erasmus,
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with a captain's innings. the party was starting in the stands for namibia, and it wasn't long before it spread to the pitch. wiese put ireland out of their misery with an over to spare. namibia look forward to taking their place in the super 12s. drew savage, bbc news. well, in today's other result, sri lanka easily beat the netherlands. it means they progress into england's pool in that super 12 stage, along with south africa, bangladesh, australia and the defending champions west indies, who england face tomorrow in their opening match. earlier, i asked test match special�*s alex hartley who the favourites are as the tournament's main phase gets under way. india are the favourites as they have played in the ipl and other conditions. we don't want to go into this not knowing as everybody feels like they are not all. anglin have the toughest pool with bangladesh and sri lanka during their table and as you know anything can happen in a
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competition like this in england want to get off to him winning start tomorrow against the west indies and try and get wing women behind them. who would you have your money on if you were doing about? you who would you have your money on if you were doing about?— who would you have your money on if you were doing about? you never know when a competition _ you were doing about? you never know when a competition like _ you were doing about? you never know when a competition like this _ you were doing about? you never know when a competition like this was - when a competition like this was that there are upset. i think india are favourites and england also and i want to see those two in the final. well, one other cricket line today, and england's match against india, which was controversially postponed last month, has been rescheduled to take place at edgbaston injuly next year. the fifth match of the test series at old trafford was called off when india said they were unable to field a team due to fears of further coronavirus cases inside their camp. they lead the series 2—1. newcastle's interim manager, graemejones, said he was upset when he found out steve bruce was departing the club. jones was speaking to the media for the first time in his new role ahead of their match against crystal palace. jones took over from bruce following newcastle's loss to tottenham in the club's first game since the takeover by a saudi—backed consortium. he was asked how he reacted when he was told bruce would be leaving by mutual consent.
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upset, if i'm being honest, because i had a great working relationship with steve. a good man. you never want to be in and around that in football because that means it hasn't worked, but we know the need to move on in football because if you miss a day, if you miss a training session, you're not as prepared for tomorrow's game as you could be. an offer to buy the name of bury fc and the stadium at gigg lane has been accepted by the administrator for the club. after months of speculation over the future of the ground and the 136—year—old club, administrator steven wiseglass confirmed terms had been agreed with an unnamed party for the purchase of the stadium and the bury fc name. the club was expelled from the football league in august 2019 following financial issues under owner steve dale. wales' women have just got their match under way in world cup qualifying. they're away in slovenia to face a side who'll provide their toughest test of this qualifying campaign so far. wales have beaten bottom sides estonia and kazakhstan in ther opening two matches.
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they're five minutes in there, and it's 0—0. scotland also kick off against hungary in the next ten minutes. finally, it's been another day of records forjockey holly doyle. last year, she was third in the bbc�*s sports personality of the year. today she's set a new record of wins for a british female rider in one year. she clocked up her 152nd victory in 2021 at doncaster this afternoon. that surpasses her oen record of 151 last year. she's now broken the record three years in a row. that's all the sport for now. now it is time for the weather with being rich. good evening. the weather has thrown a little bit of everything at us this week, some wet weather, some squally winds, some mild conditions, some chilly conditions.
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today has been one of the quieter days of the week, with sunshine in some places, but a lot of cloud in others. and that cloud, as you can see from the earlier satellite and radar picture, has been producing some showers. and we will keep a lot of cloud as we head through this evening and tonight. it could turn a bit misty and murky over hills in the west and more generally down towards the south. still some spots of rain and drizzle. where we have clear skies for any length of time, particularly in north east scotland, temperatures will drop away, maybe all the way down to —2 celsius with a touch of frost. but despite a chilly start to saturday for some, the weekend generally speaking will be mild and quite windy, with some rain at times courtesy of this frontal system moving its way quite slowly in from the west. it will be making slow progress. it's running up against this area of high pressure, and that will keep things largely dry across the bulk of england and wales. a few spots of drizzle in the west, quite a lot of cloud around. the best of any sunshine in the east. southern and eastern parts of scotland will see some sunny spells as well, but for northern ireland and western scotland, slowly but surely this rain will creep its way in. some of that rain will be heavy, accompanied by a strong southerly winds.
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now, those are the average wind speeds. we could see gusts in western scotland of 50 mph or more. but because the winds are coming up from the south, it is going to feel a bit milder, 12—14 degrees. we move through saturday night, our weather front staggering a little further eastwards, rain through northern ireland into western scotland. eventually some of that rain will get down into england and wales overnight and into the first part of sunday. what we will also see on sunday is some even milder air being scooped up from the south. notice the orange colours here on the chart. so, certainly a mild—feeling day on sunday. quite a lot of cloud around and some showers, some of which will be heavy, possibly thundery in the west. some sunny spells as well, but confirmation of another windy day and another pretty mild one. temperatures in parts of north east scotland could get to 15—16 degrees. similar values further south through northern ireland and parts of england and wales. we look ahead to next week, it stays relatively mild. there will be some outbreaks of rain at times. some of that rain heavy and persistent, particularly up towards the north and the west.
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laughter. hello and welcome to the programme which brings together leading uk commentators with the foreign correspondents who write, blog and broadcast from the dateline: london. this week: the british led the world in vaccination; why is it now leading europe — with the highest rate of covid? why in the climate battle, net zero is too high. and 12 angry men and women fear being pole—axed. joining us: maria margaronis, editor—at—large for the us magazine, the nation, is just completing work on a documentary about greece's
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summer of heat and fire.

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