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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 22, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines — scientists advising the government say stricter covid measures should be made ready for "rapid deployment", but the prime minister insists plan b for england isn't needed yet. we keep all measures under constant review. we'll do whatever we have to do to protect the public, but the numbers that we're seeing at the moment are fully in line with what we expected. tributes are being paid to cinematographer halyna hutchins, who's died after actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his latest film. the film's director was also seriously injured. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art and the integrity of wanting to make cinema.
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and in the last few minutes, alec baldwin has tweeted, expressing his shock and sadness about the accident. we'll have the latest live from los angeles in the next few minutes. also coming up this hour — buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits after returning to windsor castle, having spent wednesday night in hospitalfor "preliminary medical checks". people in leigh—on—sea fell silent earlier today, a week on from the killing of conservative mp sir david amess. the social care watchdog in england warns many people could be left without help this winter because of an "exhausted and depleted" work force. # you will be found...# and from broadway hit to blockbuster, let's find out what mark thinks about dear evan hansen and much more in the film review at 5:45pm.
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reintroducing stricter covid measures should be undertaken now and be ready for rapid deployment. that's according to the government's scientific advisory group, sage. it says that making face coverings compulsory in some places is likely to help reduce the spread of coronavirus. the minutes from sage have been published this afternoon as the uk health security agency says a new mutation that some are calling delta plus may spread more easily than regular delta. meanwhile, fully—vaccinated travellers returning to wales from the end of this month will no longer have to take a pcr test. they'll be able to take a lateral flow test within two days of their arrival. and the government is urging those eligible to book their booster jabs and has launched a fresh campaign to get numbers up. speaking earlier from a vaccination centre, the prime minister said current case levels
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are in line with expectations. so, our autumn and winter plan always predicted that cases would rise around about now. and we're certainly seeing that in the numbers. we're seeing high levels of infection, but they're not outside the parameters of what was predicted or what we thought we'd seen in the autumn and winter plan. but it's very important that people do follow the guidance, follow the guidance on general behaviour, on being cautious on wearing masks in confined places where you're meeting people you don't normally meet. wear a mask, wash hands, ventilation, all that kind of thing. but also get your booster jab, and that's the key message that we want to get across. that's why we've timed it for now because there is some evidence obviously that the vaccine starts to wane, and you get really very, very good
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protection with the booster. i mean, a new study says about 95% protection, so we're seeing the numbers come up. yesterday, i think we did 250,000 across the country. we want to see them ramped up even further. and thanks to everybody for coming forward, but we need to see a lot more. we keep all measures under constant review. we'll do whatever we have to do to protect the public, but the numbers that we're seeing at the moment are fully in line with what we expected in the autumn and winter plan. what we want people to do is to come forward and get theirjabs. we also want young people, we want kids at school to be getting theirjabs with complete confidence, and there'll be booking systems opening from tomorrow in addition to the vaccination programme in schools, so the message is that the boosters are fantastic. i mean, the levels of protection are really very high, but it's also very, very important that you get one
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because the double vaccination provides a lot of protection against serious illness and death, but it doesn't protect you against catching the disease and it doesn't protect you against passing it on so now is the time to get your booster. the latest uk coronavirus figures have been released, which show that another 49,298 cases have been reported, just down from the 52,000 yesterday, and there have been a further 115 deaths within 28 days of a positive case. let's get the latest from our health correspondent naomi grimley. so, still figures very high, and suggestion from scientists that we really should be on the front foot in case more restrictions and protections are needed. yes, the one thin that protections are needed. yes, the one thing that runs _
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protections are needed. yes, the one thing that runs through _ protections are needed. yes, the one thing that runs through all— protections are needed. yes, the one thing that runs through all of- protections are needed. yes, the one thing that runs through all of these i thing that runs through all of these papers _ thing that runs through all of these papers is _ thing that runs through all of these papers is the worry that if they act too late _ papers is the worry that if they act too late down the line, it could mean — too late down the line, it could mean more stringent measures come the dead _ mean more stringent measures come the dead of_ mean more stringent measures come the dead of winter. so what they are really _ the dead of winter. so what they are really saying is let's look at the ground — really saying is let's look at the ground work now for these plan b things— ground work now for these plan b things like — ground work now for these plan b things like working from home or mask— things like working from home or mask wearing, let's get that up and running _ mask wearing, let's get that up and running pretty quickly so that if we need _ running pretty quickly so that if we need to— running pretty quickly so that if we need to deploy it, we can do it within— need to deploy it, we can do it within a — need to deploy it, we can do it within a short space of time. and when _ within a short space of time. and when it— within a short space of time. and when it comes to the detail of those things. _ when it comes to the detail of those things, what's interesting is they think— things, what's interesting is they think work— things, what's interesting is they think work from home could be the biggest _ think work from home could be the biggest single thing to ensure that virus spread is contained. also, though. — virus spread is contained. also, though, they are talking about going back to _ though, they are talking about going back to mandatory mask wearing in some _ back to mandatory mask wearing in some areas. — back to mandatory mask wearing in some areas, this will be public transport _ some areas, this will be public transport. and just one final thing, really— transport. and just one final thing, really interesting that they say ctear— really interesting that they say clear communication is key, consistent implementations that avoid _ consistent implementations that avoid the creation of barriers to adherence. so that's perhaps a nod
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to the _ adherence. so that's perhaps a nod to the fact — adherence. so that's perhaps a nod to the fact that maybe some of the messaging around masks has become confused _ messaging around masks has become confused over the summer months. naomi, _ confused over the summer months. naomi, for— confused over the summer months. naomi, for the moment, confused over the summer months. naomi, forthe moment, thank you naomi, for the moment, thank you very much. let's speak to jonathan ball, professor of molecular virology at the university of nottingham. thank you very much forjoining us here on bbc news. let's talk about the sage minutes first of all and to what extent do you agree with these scientists that the government really should get ready to impose restrictions and protections if needed? i restrictions and protections if needed? ~ , restrictions and protections if needed? ,, , , , needed? i think being prepared is very important- — needed? i think being prepared is very important. in _ needed? i think being prepared is very important. in the _ needed? i think being prepared is very important. in the past, - needed? i think being prepared is very important. in the past, we i needed? i think being prepared is i very important. in the past, we have been _ very important. in the past, we have been very— very important. in the past, we have been very much _ very important. in the past, we have been very much call— very important. in the past, we have been very much call out _ very important. in the past, we have been very much call out by— very important. in the past, we have been very much call out by this - been very much call out by this virus _ been very much call out by this virus and — been very much call out by this virus and we _ been very much call out by this virus and we have _ been very much call out by this virus and we have tended - been very much call out by this virus and we have tended to i been very much call out by this| virus and we have tended to act been very much call out by this - virus and we have tended to act when it's too— virus and we have tended to act when it's too late — virus and we have tended to act when it's too late so — virus and we have tended to act when it's too late. so having _ virus and we have tended to act when it's too late. so having some - virus and we have tended to act when it's too late. so having some kind - it's too late. so having some kind of plan _ it's too late. so having some kind of plan for— it's too late. so having some kind of plan for if _ it's too late. so having some kind of plan for if the _ it's too late. so having some kind of plan for if the worst _ it's too late. so having some kind of plan for if the worst does - it's too late. so having some kind . of plan for if the worst does happen makes _ of plan for if the worst does happen makes perfect — of plan for if the worst does happen makes perfect sense, _ of plan for if the worst does happen makes perfect sense, and - of plan for if the worst does happen makes perfect sense, and i- of plan for if the worst does happen makes perfect sense, and i think. makes perfect sense, and i think some _ makes perfect sense, and i think some of— makes perfect sense, and i think some of the _ makes perfect sense, and i think some of the things _ makes perfect sense, and i think some of the things that - makes perfect sense, and i think some of the things that we - some of the things that we are hearing — some of the things that we are hearing about, _ some of the things that we are hearing about, particularly - some of the things that we are - hearing about, particularly working from home — hearing about, particularly working from home if— hearing about, particularly working from home if people _ hearing about, particularly working from home if people can— hearing about, particularly working from home if people can do, - hearing about, particularly working i from home if people can do, clearly if you _ from home if people can do, clearly if you decrease _ from home if people can do, clearly if you decrease the _ from home if people can do, clearly if you decrease the amount - from home if people can do, clearly if you decrease the amount that - if you decrease the amount that people — if you decrease the amount that peopte interact _ if you decrease the amount that people interact with _ if you decrease the amount that people interact with one - if you decrease the amount that i people interact with one another, then you —
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people interact with one another, then you limit _ people interact with one another, then you limit the _ people interact with one another, then you limit the chances - people interact with one another, then you limit the chances the . people interact with one another, . then you limit the chances the virus has a _ then you limit the chances the virus has a finding — then you limit the chances the virus has a finding a _ then you limit the chances the virus has a finding a new— then you limit the chances the virus has a finding a new victim. - then you limit the chances the virus has a finding a new victim. so - then you limit the chances the virus has a finding a new victim. so i - has a finding a new victim. sol think— has a finding a new victim. sol think those _ has a finding a new victim. sol think those sorts _ has a finding a new victim. sol think those sorts of _ has a finding a new victim. sol think those sorts of measures, | has a finding a new victim. so i i think those sorts of measures, it has a finding a new victim. so i - think those sorts of measures, it is important — think those sorts of measures, it is important to — think those sorts of measures, it is important to have _ think those sorts of measures, it is important to have those _ think those sorts of measures, it is important to have those plans - think those sorts of measures, it is important to have those plans in i important to have those plans in place _ important to have those plans in place and — important to have those plans in place and in _ important to have those plans in place and in terms _ important to have those plans in place and in terms of— important to have those plans in place and in terms of mask- important to have those plans in - place and in terms of mask wearing, well, _ place and in terms of mask wearing, well, its— place and in terms of mask wearing, well, it's certainly— place and in terms of mask wearing, well, it's certainly in— place and in terms of mask wearing, well, it's certainly in crowded - well, it's certainly in crowded places— well, it's certainly in crowded ptaces mav— well, it's certainly in crowded places may well— well, it's certainly in crowded places may well have - well, it's certainly in crowded places may well have an - well, it's certainly in crowded . places may well have an impact well, it's certainly in crowded - places may well have an impact and effect _ places may well have an impact and effect on _ places may well have an impact and effect on reducing _ places may well have an impact and effect on reducing transmission - places may well have an impact and effect on reducing transmission but| effect on reducing transmission but ithink— effect on reducing transmission but i think focusing _ effect on reducing transmission but i think focusing still— effect on reducing transmission but i think focusing still on _ effect on reducing transmission but i think focusing still on vaccines - i think focusing still on vaccines is incredibly— i think focusing still on vaccines is incredibly important. - i think focusing still on vaccines is incredibly important. but- i think focusing still on vaccines is incredibly important. but people are havin: is incredibly important. but people are having to _ is incredibly important. but people are having to wait _ is incredibly important. but people are having to wait for— is incredibly important. but people are having to wait for six _ is incredibly important. but people are having to wait for six months l is incredibly important. but people| are having to wait for six months of the moment for their booster. we are already seeing people who were vaccinated nearly a year ago having signs their immunity is waning. how much sooner could that booster vaccine be given, do you think was meant it's a very interesting question, and we have not yet seen the data from for example the boost trial that was held in the uk. that data is far as _ trial that was held in the uk. that data is far as i'm _ trial that was held in the uk. that data is far as i'm aware _ trial that was held in the uk. that data is far as i'm aware is in the public— data is far as i'm aware is in the public domain _ data is far as i'm aware is in the public domain but _ data is far as i'm aware is in the public domain but we _ data is far as i'm aware is in the public domain but we do - data is far as i'm aware is in the public domain but we do know. data is far as i'm aware is in the - public domain but we do know from our basic— public domain but we do know from our basic understanding _ public domain but we do know from our basic understanding of- public domain but we do know from our basic understanding of viruses i our basic understanding of viruses and immunology— our basic understanding of viruses and immunology is— our basic understanding of viruses and immunology is that _ our basic understanding of viruses and immunology is that the - our basic understanding of viruses . and immunology is that the immunity will and immunology is that the immunity witt wane _ and immunology is that the immunity witt wane over— and immunology is that the immunity will wane over time _ and immunology is that the immunity will wane over time and _ and immunology is that the immunity will wane over time and that- and immunology is that the immunity will wane over time and that will- and immunology is that the immunity
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will wane over time and that will be l will wane over time and that will be a gradual— will wane over time and that will be a gradual decrease. _ will wane over time and that will be a gradual decrease. it— will wane over time and that will be a gradual decrease. it does- will wane over time and that will be a gradual decrease. it does not- will wane over time and that will be| a gradual decrease. it does not stay at a particular— a gradual decrease. it does not stay at a particular level— a gradual decrease. it does not stay at a particular level for _ a gradual decrease. it does not stay at a particular level for five - a gradual decrease. it does not stay at a particular level for five or- at a particular level for five or six months _ at a particular level for five or six months and _ at a particular level for five or six months and then - at a particular level for five or| six months and then suddenly at a particular level for five or- six months and then suddenly drop off a cliff — six months and then suddenly drop off a cliff it— six months and then suddenly drop off a cliff. it wau— six months and then suddenly drop off a cliff. it will decline _ off a cliff. it will decline steaditv, _ off a cliff. it will decline steadily, and _ off a cliff. it will decline steadily, and thereforel off a cliff. it will decline i steadily, and therefore if off a cliff. it will decline - steadily, and therefore if you introduce _ steadily, and therefore if you introduce the _ steadily, and therefore if you introduce the booster- steadily, and therefore if you introduce the booster a - steadily, and therefore if you introduce the booster a bit. steadily, and therefore if you - introduce the booster a bit earlier, then i_ introduce the booster a bit earlier, then i don't— introduce the booster a bit earlier, then i don't seem _ introduce the booster a bit earlier, then i don't seem any— introduce the booster a bit earlier, . then i don't seem any immunological reason _ then i don't seem any immunological reason why— then i don't seem any immunological reason why that _ then i don't seem any immunological reason why that would _ then i don't seem any immunological reason why that would not _ then i don't seem any immunological reason why that would not work - then i don't seem any immunological reason why that would not work and i reason why that would not work and provide _ reason why that would not work and provide the — reason why that would not work and provide the source _ reason why that would not work and provide the source of— reason why that would not work and provide the source of recession - reason why that would not work and provide the source of recession thatj provide the source of recession that we are _ provide the source of recession that we are really— provide the source of recession that we are really wanting. _ provide the source of recession that we are really wanting. so _ provide the source of recession that we are really wanting. so i- provide the source of recession that we are really wanting. so i think- we are really wanting. so i think getting — we are really wanting. so i think getting this _ we are really wanting. so i think getting this booster— we are really wanting. so i think getting this booster rolled - we are really wanting. so i think getting this booster rolled out . we are really wanting. so i thinkl getting this booster rolled out as soon _ getting this booster rolled out as soon as— getting this booster rolled out as soon as possible _ getting this booster rolled out as soon as possible is _ getting this booster rolled out as soon as possible is important - soon as possible is important because, _ soon as possible is important because, ves, _ soon as possible is important because, yes, it— soon as possible is important because, yes, it will- soon as possible is important because, yes, it will protect. soon as possible is important. because, yes, it will protect the vulnerable — because, yes, it will protect the vulnerable from _ because, yes, it will protect the vulnerable from disease, - because, yes, it will protect the vulnerable from disease, but i because, yes, it will protect the vulnerable from disease, but iti because, yes, it will protect the - vulnerable from disease, but it does have an _ vulnerable from disease, but it does have an impact _ vulnerable from disease, but it does have an impact on _ vulnerable from disease, but it does have an impact on rates _ vulnerable from disease, but it does have an impact on rates of- vulnerable from disease, but it does have an impact on rates of infectionl have an impact on rates of infection and therefore — have an impact on rates of infection and therefore rates _ have an impact on rates of infection and therefore rates of _ have an impact on rates of infection and therefore rates of transmission| and therefore rates of transmission as wett~ _ and therefore rates of transmission as wett~ so — and therefore rates of transmission as wett~ so it— and therefore rates of transmission as well. so it gives _ and therefore rates of transmission as well. so it gives us _ and therefore rates of transmission as well. so it gives us a _ and therefore rates of transmission as well. so it gives us a whole - as well. so it gives us a whole package _ as well. so it gives us a whole ackaue. ., ~' , as well. so it gives us a whole ackaue. ., ~ , ., as well. so it gives us a whole ackaue. ., ,, , . ., package. how likely are within to have to revisit _ package. how likely are within to have to revisit the _ package. how likely are within to have to revisit the idea _ package. how likely are within to have to revisit the idea of - package. how likely are within to have to revisit the idea of giving | have to revisit the idea of giving 12-17 have to revisit the idea of giving 12—17 —year—olds a second jab sooner than their 18th birthday? timer;r 12-17 -year-olds a second 'ab sooner than their 18th birthday?_ than their 18th birthday? they are still unclear _ than their 18th birthday? they are still unclear on _ than their 18th birthday? they are still unclear on the _ than their 18th birthday? they are still unclear on the policy - than their 18th birthday? they are still unclear on the policy is - than their 18th birthday? they are still unclear on the policy is going | still unclear on the policy is going to be, _ still unclear on the policy is going to be, so— still unclear on the policy is going to be, so i— still unclear on the policy is going to be, so i think— still unclear on the policy is going to be, so i think here _ still unclear on the policy is going to be, so i think here in— still unclear on the policy is going to be, so i think here in the - still unclear on the policy is going to be, so i think here in the uk. still unclear on the policy is going i to be, so i think here in the uk we were— to be, so i think here in the uk we were fantastic— to be, so i think here in the uk we were fantastic with _ to be, so i think here in the uk we were fantastic with a _ to be, so i think here in the uk we were fantastic with a vaccine - were fantastic with a vaccine roll out _ were fantastic with a vaccine roll out then — were fantastic with a vaccine roll out then i — were fantastic with a vaccine roll out. then i think— were fantastic with a vaccine roll out. then i think we _ were fantastic with a vaccine roll out. then i think we rather- were fantastic with a vaccine roll. out. then i think we rather delete and did _ out. then i think we rather delete and did a — out. then i think we rather delete and did a bit— out. then i think we rather delete and did a bit over— out. then i think we rather delete and did a bit over the _ out. then i think we rather delete and did a bit over the summer. i out. then i think we rather deletel and did a bit over the summer. we
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drag— and did a bit over the summer. we drag our— and did a bit over the summer. we drag our feet— and did a bit over the summer. we drag our feet somewhat _ and did a bit over the summer. we drag our feet somewhat in - and did a bit over the summer. we drag our feet somewhat in a - and did a bit over the summer. we drag our feet somewhat in a policy| drag our feet somewhat in a policy for vaccine — drag our feet somewhat in a policy for vaccine boosting _ drag our feet somewhat in a policy for vaccine boosting and _ drag our feet somewhat in a policy for vaccine boosting and then i drag our feet somewhat in a policy for vaccine boosting and then also| for vaccine boosting and then also took a _ for vaccine boosting and then also took a long — for vaccine boosting and then also took a long time _ for vaccine boosting and then also took a long time to _ for vaccine boosting and then also took a long time to come - for vaccine boosting and then also took a long time to come up - for vaccine boosting and then also took a long time to come up withl for vaccine boosting and then also i took a long time to come up with the policy— took a long time to come up with the policy around — took a long time to come up with the policy around offering _ took a long time to come up with the policy around offering children - took a long time to come up with the policy around offering children the i policy around offering children the vaccination — policy around offering children the vaccination i_ policy around offering children the vaccination. i can _ policy around offering children the vaccination. i can understand i policy around offering children the vaccination. i can understand whyl policy around offering children the i vaccination. i can understand why it was not _ vaccination. i can understand why it was not an— vaccination. i can understand why it was not an easy— vaccination. i can understand why it was not an easy decision, _ vaccination. i can understand why it was not an easy decision, but - vaccination. i can understand why it was not an easy decision, but of. was not an easy decision, but of course _ was not an easy decision, but of course we — was not an easy decision, but of course we have _ was not an easy decision, but of course we have done, _ was not an easy decision, but of course we have done, it's - was not an easy decision, but of| course we have done, it's meant was not an easy decision, but of- course we have done, it's meant that we are _ course we have done, it's meant that we are now— course we have done, it's meant that we are now in — course we have done, it's meant that we are now in the _ course we have done, it's meant that we are now in the autumn, _ we are now in the autumn, approaching _ we are now in the autumn, approaching the _ we are now in the autumn, approaching the winter- we are now in the autumn, i approaching the winter months we are now in the autumn, - approaching the winter months when the virus _ approaching the winter months when the virus will — approaching the winter months when the virus will undoubtedly— approaching the winter months when the virus will undoubtedly find - approaching the winter months when the virus will undoubtedly find it i the virus will undoubtedly find it easier— the virus will undoubtedly find it easier to— the virus will undoubtedly find it easier to spread _ the virus will undoubtedly find it easier to spread and _ the virus will undoubtedly find it easier to spread and we - the virus will undoubtedly find it easier to spread and we are i the virus will undoubtedly find itj easier to spread and we are only the virus will undoubtedly find it i easier to spread and we are only now starting _ easier to spread and we are only now starting to— easier to spread and we are only now starting to give — easier to spread and we are only now starting to give boosters _ easier to spread and we are only now starting to give boosters and - starting to give boosters and vaccinating _ starting to give boosters and vaccinating children. - starting to give boosters and vaccinating children. and i starting to give boosters and i vaccinating children. and getting that uptake _ vaccinating children. and getting that uptake increase _ vaccinating children. and getting that uptake increase is— vaccinating children. and getting that uptake increase is massive. | vaccinating children. and getting i that uptake increase is massive. we know— that uptake increase is massive. we know that _ that uptake increase is massive. we know that children _ that uptake increase is massive. we know that children are _ that uptake increase is massive. we know that children are a _ that uptake increase is massive. we know that children are a big - that uptake increase is massive. we know that children are a big driver. know that children are a big driver of the _ know that children are a big driver of the current— know that children are a big driver of the current cases. _ know that children are a big driver of the current cases. horat- know that children are a big driver of the current cases.— of the current cases. how much it was a do you _ of the current cases. how much it was a do you have _ of the current cases. how much it was a do you have that _ of the current cases. how much it was a do you have that with i was a do you have that with politicians, particularly the government, who have been saying on the one hand it's time for everybody to get back to work but in fact working from home might be more sensible? ~ ., .. ., sensible? well, if the vaccine hold out and they _ sensible? well, if the vaccine hold out and they present _ sensible? well, if the vaccine hold l out and they present hospitalisation and serious — out and they present hospitalisation and serious disease _ out and they present hospitalisation and serious disease and _ out and they present hospitalisation and serious disease and they- out and they present hospitalisation and serious disease and they are i and serious disease and they are still doing — and serious disease and they are still doing well, _ and serious disease and they are still doing well, we _ and serious disease and they are still doing well, we have - and serious disease and they are still doing well, we have to- and serious disease and they are still doing well, we have to keepj still doing well, we have to keep that in— still doing well, we have to keep that in mind, _ still doing well, we have to keep that in mind, is— still doing well, we have to keep that in mind, is not _ still doing well, we have to keep that in mind, is not simply- still doing well, we have to keepl that in mind, is not simply cases, is how—
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that in mind, is not simply cases, is how much— that in mind, is not simply cases, is how much trouble _ that in mind, is not simply cases, is how much trouble it _ that in mind, is not simply cases, is how much trouble it causes i that in mind, is not simply cases, is how much trouble it causes for| is how much trouble it causes for the nhs — is how much trouble it causes for the nhs witt— is how much trouble it causes for the nhs will be _ is how much trouble it causes for the nhs will be fitted _ is how much trouble it causes for the nhs will be fitted to - is how much trouble it causes forj the nhs will be fitted to continue to cause — the nhs will be fitted to continue to cause problems _ the nhs will be fitted to continue to cause problems as _ the nhs will be fitted to continue to cause problems as indeed i the nhs will be fitted to continue to cause problems as indeed we i the nhs will be fitted to continue i to cause problems as indeed we will all the _ to cause problems as indeed we will all the other— to cause problems as indeed we will all the other respiratory— to cause problems as indeed we will all the other respiratory infections . all the other respiratory infections that we _ all the other respiratory infections that we are — all the other respiratory infections that we are expecting _ all the other respiratory infections that we are expecting over- all the other respiratory infections that we are expecting over the i all the other respiratory infections. that we are expecting over the next few months — that we are expecting over the next few months so _ that we are expecting over the next few months. so it's— that we are expecting over the next few months. so it's all— that we are expecting over the next few months. so it's all about - few months. so it's all about ensuring _ few months. so it's all about ensuring that _ few months. so it's all about ensuring that in _ few months. so it's all about ensuring that in the - few months. so it's all about ensuring that in the nhs i few months. so it's all about ensuring that in the nhs can| few months. so it's all about - ensuring that in the nhs can cope. so im— ensuring that in the nhs can cope. so im hopefut— ensuring that in the nhs can cope. so i'm hopeful that _ ensuring that in the nhs can cope. so i'm hopeful that vaccination i ensuring that in the nhs can cope. so i'm hopeful that vaccination if. so i'm hopeful that vaccination if we continue _ so i'm hopeful that vaccination if we continue to _ so i'm hopeful that vaccination if we continue to get _ so i'm hopeful that vaccination if we continue to get those - so i'm hopeful that vaccination ifl we continue to get those vaccines into arms. — we continue to get those vaccines into arms. that— we continue to get those vaccines into arms, that that _ we continue to get those vaccines into arms, that that will - we continue to get those vaccines into arms, that that will save i we continue to get those vaccines into arms, that that will save us l we continue to get those vaccinesl into arms, that that will save us or protect— into arms, that that will save us or protect us— into arms, that that will save us or protect us from _ into arms, that that will save us or protect us from really— into arms, that that will save us or protect us from really serious i protect us from really serious interventions. _ protect us from really serious interventions. but— protect us from really serious interventions. but we - protect us from really serious interventions. but we have i protect us from really serious interventions. but we have to protect us from really serious i interventions. but we have to keep it in mind _ interventions. but we have to keep it in mind if— interventions. but we have to keep it in mind if needed. _ interventions. but we have to keep it in mind if needed.— it in mind if needed. professor thank you _ it in mind if needed. professor thank you very _ it in mind if needed. professor thank you very much. - it in mind if needed. professor thank you very much. no i it in mind if needed. professor- thank you very much. no problem. fully—vaccinated travellers arriving in wales from a non—red list country will be able to take a lateral flow test instead of the more expensive pcr test from sunday october the 31st, the welsh government has announced. the welsh government said in a statement...
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they went on to say... in scotland, nhs lanarkshire has moved to the "highest risk level" as its three hospitals are at maximum capacity. the military was already asked to provide additional support at three university hospitals, but the health board said occupancy levels are still "critical". 0ur correspondent alexandra mackenzie says there's pressure right across the nhs in scotland. this is a know we have heard from nhs lanarkshire and they have confirmed that the highest risk level and what they called the
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highest care level and overall pressure on the system. they describe the system there at nhs lanarkshire as unprecedented. the health board said there was sustained pressure across its three university hospitals and that is not showing any signs of easing those of the hospitals they are talking about our hear myers, monk lenz and witchel. the health board describe the situation as relentless. they said it was do to bad shortages, but also a shortage of staff. they said there was a lot of staff sickness, staff were stressed and also there was a lot of self isolation because of the covid—i9 pandemic. now the health board said that their priority is the safety of their patients and also of their staff. so they are working through options to try and increase the number of staff and also to increase the flow of patients and through the hospital.
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the military has already been providing some help. now that's medical help and also with drivers as well. now back in august, nhs lanarkshire had started postponing some of their operations. they are now doing a bit more of that, and some elective cancer operations are also going to be postponed. but the hospital has said they will reschedule those as soon as possible. the headlines on bbc news — scientists advising the government say stricter covid measures should be made ready for "rapid deployment", but the prime minister insists plan b for england isn't needed yet. tributes are being paid to cinematographer halyna hutchins, who's died after actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his latest film. the film's director was also seriously injured. buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits after returning to windsor castle, having spent wednesday night in hospitalfor "preliminary medical checks".
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the hollywood actor alec baldwin has in the last few minutes said there are no words to convey his sadness after he fired a prop gun on set and accidentally killed the film's cinematographer. he's been questioned and released by police. the film director was also wounded by the weapons, which was supposed to fire only blanks. in the tweets, alex badlwin said... it happened as they were filming a western in new mexico, as lizo mzimba reports. halyna hutchins was an up—and—coming director of photography.
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named a rising star by american cinematographer magazine in 2019, she was considered to be an exceptionally talented individual. the investigation into what happened on the set of rust, a i9th—century western, is continuing. police say that alec baldwin, the star of the movie, discharged a prop gun during filming. the directorjoel souza was seriously hurt. halyna hutchins was flown to hospital by helicopter but died from her injuries. film—maker adam egypt mortimer, who worked with halyna hutchins on his 2020 action film archenemy, described her as a huge talent. i met her, before i'd seen any of her work, i met her at a film festival, and within a few moments of talking to her, i felt like she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and the integrity of wanting to make cinema, that i wanted to work with her. according to the film's production company, it was an accident that
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happened when a prop gun carrying blanks misfired. but this early in the investigation, the police say they haven't reached any conclusions and are currently describing it as a shooting investigation. there are so many safety measures and procedures that are supposed to be taken on every single set where there is a firearm, so we're still trying to learn what could have happened, was there a misstep along the way, did someone forget to do something, to try to cut corners? we just don't know, we're still learning. it's sadly not the first time someone has died from a shooting during filming. in 1993, the star of the crow, brandon lee, was fatally shot by a gun which everyone thought was only loaded with blank rounds. actor rhys muldoon says he's recently been working on a movie with a large degree of gunfire. the producers actually held a very clearly important meeting -
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and decided to do away with blanks altogether and use basic special. effects and cgi because, in this day and age, i you can truly can get those things of a gun firing - without losing anything. alec baldwin, who's also a producer on the film, has spoken to detectives about what happened. meanwhile, the film world is mourning the loss of halyna hutchins and waiting to see what lessons may have to be learned from her tragic death. lizo mzimba, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent peter bowes, who's in los angeles. those comments or melon ball when expressing shock many people are feeling. expressing shock many people are feelina. .. , , expressing shock many people are feelin.. , , , ., , feeling. exactly. these statements and tweets really _ feeling. exactly. these statements and tweets really reflect _ feeling. exactly. these statements and tweets really reflect the i feeling. exactly. these statements and tweets really reflect the mood | and tweets really reflect the mood here in los angeles and hollywood
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this morning. the absolute shock and almost disbelief that something in this day and age could happen and i say in this day in age because of intense security measures and city measures especially when it involves firearms and is still not clear to us exactly what kind of gun. it's being described as a prop gun but there are different types of guns that are used on set, and that information likely to emerge during the investigation. but you are right, the statement really reflect the what some people are saying, talking of his shock and sadness regarding as he puts it this tragic accident that took the life of halyna hutchins, a wife, mother and deeply admired colleague of ours. and he says he's fully cooperating with the police investigation to address how this tragedy could have occurred. and we know that he voluntarily went for questioning by the police last night. there have been no charges against him or indeed anyone as this investigation continues. we are getting a little
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bit more information, some reporting by variety magazine, the entertainment industry newspaper here in los angeles, who are quoting a local member of the union that represents technicians and other workers that you would find on a film set. saying that a live single round was accidentally fired on the set by the principal actor, alec baldwin. this was a next dental weapon discharge, it says, and also points out that none of its members were actually on the set at the time. this is the international alliance of theatrical stage employees, and they say that local new mexico crewmembers staffed the props sectors, set decoration and construction apartments on this movie. so if this detail is true, it's sheds some new light on the situation. , . . ., situation. yes, and in the direction the investigation _ situation. yes, and in the direction the investigation is _ situation. yes, and in the direction the investigation is going - situation. yes, and in the direction the investigation is going to - situation. yes, and in the direction the investigation is going to go. i the investigation is going to go. this is a field that is not made yet and yet they have had this appalling tragedy. what is likely to happen? and they carry on? do they normally
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would an accident like this happens? well, thankfully, accidents like this are extremely rare. and there was an incident back in the 1990s, a similar incident where someone lost their life through the discharge of a gun. that film was eventually released, but a huge question over this particular field. released, but a huge question over this particularfield. clearly alec baldwin that only an actor stalling in the film but a producer as well, so he is absolutely central to the production and may well harbour at say in terms of what happens next as far as a production company and executives involved in that company, but it could also involve discussions with the distributor as to what is the most appropriate thing to do. and it is clear that no decisions on that will have been made yet, but it's something the producers will have to address in due course. and probably fairly slim because clearly a film set involves large numbers of people who will want to know what they are dealing
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with with a terrible situation and what will happen next.— with with a terrible situation and what will happen next. peter, thank ou ve a what will happen next. peter, thank you very a peter _ what will happen next. peter, thank you very a peter in _ what will happen next. peter, thank you very a peter in los _ what will happen next. peter, thank you very a peter in los angeles. i the care regulator for england is warning that the sector faces a "tsunami of unmet need" this winter unless staffing shortages are tackled. the care quality commission has called for immediate measures to fill job vacancies. the government says it's providing £162 million to boost recruitment. alison holt reports. the unmet need which today's report warns is already a reality for the cooks. melvin has a rare brain condition, and unable to get any support, dorothy is caring on her own. he can't get out of the chair on his own. he can't mobilise on his own. he can't go up and down the stairs on his own. he can't wash, dress, shower. take yourtime... it's just full—on, 24/7 caring. melvin was sent home by the nhs injune. for a short time, care workers came in, then they said they didn't have enough staff to continue. that was 12 weeks ago.
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according to the charity carers uk, many family carers are being pushed to the edge, like dorothy. i'm on my knees. i'm on my knees with exhaustion. the strain of having to do it all on our own. we're left here with nobody. there's no care package, no accessibility to services. we feel completely and utterly isolated. and scared. today's report from the regulator, the care quality commission, warns of the serious impact staffing shortages are having across the health and care system in england. job vacancies in care homes have risen from 6% to 10% in five months. and nursing homes are deregistering because they can't get nurses. it concludes urgent action is needed. we're calling for, in our report, increased funding to stabilise the adult social care workforce. and that benefits everybody, it has a positive ripple effect right across health and social care.
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and without that stability, without that stable, adult social care workforce, there's the real risk of a tsunami of unmet need causing instability right across the system. the government has said it is putting £162 million into boosting the recruitment and retention of care staff and that it appreciates their dedication and tireless work. for many years, this has been a workforce that is under i incredible pressure. but, of course, that is intensified at this time, particularly- as we have 1.1 million vacancies, there's a lot of competition - for labour, so it is a worry, - and that's why we've announced this {162.5 million today, _ which is there to effectively retain and to build extra capacity, and also to bring in- thousands of new people. whilst welcoming the money, councils and care organisations say it won't be enough. five police officers from four forces are facing disciplinary
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action over messages shared on social media about sarah everard's killer. former met police officer wayne couzens is serving a whole—life sentence after kidnapping, raping and murdering ms everard earlier this year. the independent office for police conduct says officers from the metropolitan police, as well as from sussex, dorset and avon and somerset forces, will be subject to misconduct proceedings. the bbc understands that the home secretary has agreed to change the law to allow victims of domestic abuse more time to report to police. priti patel has agreed to extend a current time limit from six months to up to two years in cases of alleged common assault involving domestic abuse. our political correspondent alex forsyth explained the background. it is a change in the law. let me just give you a little bit of background from this. so, as things stand, when there is an alleged common assault that involves domestic abuse, in fact any common assault, there are only six months from when that incident allegedly taking place for police to charge someone.
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now, campaigners say when it comes to cases of domestic abuse, that isn't long enough because it can take a long time for victims to feel able to come forward and of course these investigations can be complicated. so, there's been this push for that time limit, specifically in alleged common assaults involving domestic abuse, to be extended. now, it's my understanding the home secretary, priti patel, has agreed to do that, to allow up to two years rather than six months, which gives victims of domestic abuse longer to report that to police. and i also understand there'll be a renewed push to ensure that police and prosecutors are alive to coercive and controlling behaviour, which is behaviour that can often go along with cases of domestic abuse. and it is my understanding that there will be a change put down to a bill that's currently making its way through parliament, the police crime and sentencing bill, and that will enact this change in the law. and as you might expect, just initial conversations i've been having with campaigners, they say that if the government goes ahead with this, that would be very
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welcome news indeed. buckingham palace says the queen is "in good spirits" and back at windsor castle after spending wednesday night in hospital. she was taken in for tests after being forced to cancel a trip to northern ireland. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. windsor, two days ago, early afternoon, a convoy of royal vehicles were seen heading in the direction of london. was this the convoy taking the queen to hospital? at around the same time, at windsor castle itself, a very small royal standard was seen to be flying, its presence supporting the palace�*s claim that the queen was resting at the castle. in fact, the queen was here, at the private king edward vii hospital in central london. the palace clearly hoped her visit would go unnoticed. it did until last night, when the sun led with the story that she'd spent the night in hospital. that prompted a short statement from the palace.
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buckingham palace insists that, like any citizen, the queen is entitled to privacy over medical issues. the palace will therefore say nothing about the nature of the investigations ordered by her doctors. the one thing we can say is that she seemed completely well on tuesday night when she hosted a reception for global business leaders and others at windsor castle. according to people who saw her, she was relaxed and on good form. that was just the latest in a busy few weeks for her, which had included a visit to cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament on the 14th of october, her attendance two days earlier at a service at westminster abbey to mark the centenary of the royal british legion, quite apart from the daily and largely unseen work of the monarch, with audiences and boxes of paperwork.
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of course, it's good morning, isn't it, to you...? according to the palace, the queen resumed that paperwork last night, a few hours after returning from hospital. she is, the palace says, continuing with light duties and remains determined to attend the cop26 summit in glasgow at the end of the month. nicholas witchell, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben. very good afternoon to you. the weather has thrown everything at us this week, some wind, rain, cold weather and mild weather. today one of the choir days, sunshine around. to the weekend it will turn a bit milder, quite windy with some rain around at times but not all the time. through the night a of cloud of the fork after meeting with mr american sponsored riddles when we do keep clear skies it will get quite chilly especially in northeast scotland, may be down to minus two celsius in places with a touch of frost. a lot of cloud filtering into
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more from the west with some spots and drizzle for western part of whale. each risk balancing spells of sunshine but for western scott line could see some strong winds and gusts up to 50mph with the rain in the afternoon and also into northern ireland but feeling a little milder thanit ireland but feeling a little milder than it has done in 12—14. look at sunday and there will be some spells of sunshine but also some showers and some of those heavy and thundering in the west but it will still feel mild in the west with heights of 15. this is bbc news. the headlines... scientists advising the government say stricter covid measures should be made ready for "rapid deployment", but the prime minister insists plan b for england isn't needed yet. tributes are being paid to cinematographer halyna hutchins, who's died after actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his latest film. the film's director was also seriously injured.
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buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits after returning to windsor castle, having spent wednesday night in hospitalfor "preliminary medical checks". people in leigh—on—sea fell silent earlier today, a week on from the killing of conservative mp sir david amess. the social care watchdog in england warns many people could be left without help this winter because of an "exhausted and depleted" work force. # you will be found...# and from broadway hit to blockbuster, let's find out what mark kermode thinks about dear evan hansen and much more in the film review at 5.45. time for a look at the sports news. good evening. the posponed fifth match of the test series between england and india's men will be played at
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edgebaston nextjuly. it was controvertially called off when india said they were unable to field a team due to fears of further coronavirus cases inside their camp. they lead the series 2—1. the fixture will be played here at edgbaston from the ist ofjuly as the original venue, old trafford, has other events scheduled to take place. ireland have been knocked out of the men's t20 world cup as namibia pulled off a shock eight—wicket win to reach the super 12s. ireland had started well, but lost three wickets in quick succession, finishing onjust 125 for 8. so it was an easy run chase for namibia. they ended with a great partnership between captain gerhard eras—mas — who brought up his half century — and david wiese with the final boundary to win it. so it's namibia who are into the super 12 stage, which starts tomorrow. newcastle's interim manager, graemejones has said he was upset when he found out steve bruce was departing the club. jones was speaking to the media
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for the first time in his new role ahead of their match against crystal palace. jones took over from bruce following newcastle's loss to tottenham in the club's first game since the takeover by a saudi—backed consortium. he was asked how he reacted when he was told bruce would be leaving by mutual consent. upset, if i'm being honest because i had a great working relationship with steve, good man, never want to be in and around that in football because it means it has not worked because it means it has not worked because we know the speed of football and how quickly need to move on because if you miss a day or a training session you are not as prepared as you could be for tomorrow's game. speaking of managers under pressure, ole gunnar solskjaer has been talking to the media ahead of manchester united's huge match against liverpool on sunday. despite united's dramatic comback in europe midweek, solskjaer — like steve bruce — has come under criticism for their performance in the league. he says, to be a manager, you need great mental strength.
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performances, sometimes they are not really— performances, sometimes they are not really bad, _ performances, sometimes they are not really bad, they are really good but someone _ really bad, they are really good but someone decides the narrative on what _ someone decides the narrative on what people like to think about you. i enjoyed _ what people like to think about you. i enjoyed managing, i enjoy this life i_ i enjoyed managing, i enjoy this life i don't— i enjoyed managing, i enjoy this life i don't think any of us would be in _ life i don't think any of us would be in this— life i don't think any of us would be in this occupation if we did not believe _ be in this occupation if we did not believe in — be in this occupation if we did not believe in ourselves, have strong minds _ believe in ourselves, have strong minds but — believe in ourselves, have strong minds but also level we are doing. an offer to buy the name of bury fc and the stadium at gigg lane has been accepted by the administrator for the club. after months of speculation over the future of the ground and the 136—year—old club, administrator, steven wiseglass, confirmed terms had been agreed with an un—named party for the purchase of the stadium and the �*bury fc�* name. the club was expelled from the football league in august 2019, following financial issues under owner steve dale.
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in just a few hours' time, scotland women will be taking on hungary in their world cup qualifier, hoping to make it three wins from three. a victory would put them six points clear of their nearest competitors ukraine, athough spain still currently top the group. scotland are hoping to qualify for back to back world cups. meanwhile, wales women are in slovenia for their match later in the world cup qualifiers. they began their campaign with wins over kazakhstan and estonia last month, putting them level with france at the top of their group — they also have six points from their two games so far. england women host northern ireland tomorrow in their first competitive fixture at the new wembley stadium. leah williamson will continue to captain the side in the absence of steph houghton who's injured. however, head coach sarina wiegman refused to say whether the arsenal defender would get the job on a more permanent basis or not. we have not had staff and the other
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ones in our group, they have kept into this team before. so we just take a little time and when everyone performs well or his first fit performs well or his first fit performs well or his first fit performs well comes in the squads, and then i can see what is best for the team. but for now leah is doing a very good job. more on all the stories. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. jane, thank you so much. there's renewed pressure on ministers to come up with a long term plan, to help schools in england recover from the pandemic. earlier this year, the governments education recovery commissioner, sir kevan collins, resigned in protest, saying the funding earmarked was inadequate. now, the department for education says it's to spend millions of pounds, helping pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds unable to attend school due to covid, access lessons with hew laptops and tablets. here's our education editor, bra nwen jeffreys.
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this was once a coal town. but ashington�*s pits closed in the 19805. the rail line had already gone. it's been hard to build hope around education, and the pandemic has set back children in the northeast even further. years, i think we are talking years. we are not talking about covid catch up that will happen in the autumn term. good morning! are you all right this morning? schools are an anchor for the families supporting parents who see the effect on children. they seem to be more irritable in the classroom. like their tempers seem to be more high and they are not engaging properly. and they are not even working nicely as a group anymore. in the youngest pupils, speaking and language have suffered in isolation.
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they want to feed children a rich diet of education. but parents i slid it in the pandemic have struggled, so teachers are having to help toilet train pupils. we have some children who are still in nappies, still in pull—ups and notjust in our early years setting. in our key stage 1 setting as well. and that's highly unusual. i have five units and i am adding two more, how many have i got altogether... in maths, primary pupils in the northeast fell behind by more than five months last year. government cash has paid for some tutoring here and help with the transition to secondary. excellent, so the power is? and the variable is? perfect, well done. many year sevens came to summer school. part of a huge effort already by schools to help get children back
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on track with their learning. but the worry is that without a sustained effort over many years they won't have quite the same chances as the richest bits of the country. the catch up funding so far has helped with their laptops and for year 11, the school day has been made longer. the school put, like, an extra lesson on. half an hour after school that has helped catch up. it has definitely had a big impact on our grades. and our marks that we are going to get because we obviously missed half of year ten. ashington is do to get a rail line. newjobs are on the horizon, but it's the long term recovery of schools that will make its future. branwenjeffreys, bbc news, ashington.
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a two minute silence has been held in leigh on sea in essex, close to where the conservative mp, sir david amess was stabbed to death last friday. from today, mps are able to have trained security guards on hand when they hold surgeries with the public in their consitutuencies. the offer of extra protection has been made by the commons speaker sir lindsay hoyle and the home secretary priti patel. our correspondent lebo diseko gave us this update from leigh—on—sea. i'm standing outside the church where sir david was holding that surgery last week when he was stabbed and killed, and that two—minute silence was just a short walk from where i am now, shopkeepers and community members coming together to remember him and really give their memories of the mp they knew and loved. speaking to people afterwards, what they said to me was that this is personal. one woman said to me it was like a member of herfamily had died. she described to me how, when her son passed away,
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it was sir david that ensured his body was brought back from greece where he had been and really made sure herfamily was looked after. the local catholic priest saying sir david would have been in and out all of these businesses and talking to people, having lunch with people, laughing with them. he said you cannot think of sir david without remembering that smile, he told me it was easy to make a friend of sir david. the tributes are expected to continue throughout the day, we expect another two—minute silence to be held outside his constituency office later today. the green party is calling for every household to be given £320 to help pay for higher energy bills. the policy was unveiled as the party's annual conference gets underway in birmingham. our political correspondent lone wells sent this update from the conference.
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one message that really came across from the co—leaders was how much of a key moment this is for the green party who have a record number of councillors in england and wales. their sister party is in government in scotland and of course the government is gearing up to host cop26. they also touched on points like the rising cost of living and the energy crisis we are seeing at the moment with gas prices higher than they have been and people seeing rising energy bills which has got all parties talking about the need to move away from a reliance on fossil fuels and the big policy announced today was that the green party would like to give every household £320 to cope with these additional bills which they say would be paid for by a one—off tax on landlords to raise £9 billion. they have laid out what their vision is. the challenge for the green party is getting seats on the table in positions of power. both leaders emphasising the want to be seen notjust as a pressure group but a serious electoral party and win more seats also in the houses of parliament as well.
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they face a couple of challenges. one of the key ones being the fact that at the moment we are seeing some of the more radical green groups like extinction rebellion dominate the headlines when it comes to the green agenda at the moment and those groups both the co—leaders have actively distanced themselves from as part of their election campaign as well. secondly we are seeing all major political parties trumpet their green policies with the uk conservative government just this week announcing their net zero strategy so with all parties talking about this, and this of course being the green party's usp, they are having to fight a little bit harderfor that acknowledgement and for those seats around the tables in the halls of power. some breaking news to bring you now, and greater manchester police are
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saying that they have arrested a 24—year—old man from manchester on suspicion of engaging in the preparation of acts of terrorism or assisting others in preparation of acts of terrorism. under the terrorism act. this is detectives who are investigating the manchester arena attack which of course is currently the subject of an inquiry thatis currently the subject of an inquiry that is looking into the events surrounding that attack. of course many people died at the ariana grande date concert. a 24—year—old man from manchester arrested in connexion with the manchester arena attack. the headlines on bbc news... scientists advising the government say stricter covid measures should be made ready for �*rapid deployment�* — but the prime minister insists plan b for england isn't needed yet. tributes are being paid to cinematographer, halyna hutchins, who's died after actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his latest film. the film's director was also seriously injured. and buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits after returning to windsor castle,
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having spent wednesday night in hospitalfor �*preliminary medical checks' and coming up on bbc news, there's a heart ache for ireland's cricketers who are knocked out of the t20 world cup before the super 12 stage. they were beaten by the lowest ranked team namibia in eight shock eight wicket defeat. sri lanka when the group and go into england's pool in the main draw. and we'll also be looking ahead to england's opening game against west indies which is tomorrow. plus, it is a big weekend in women's world cup football qualifiers. with all the home nations in action. that's all coming up on sports day at 6.30. now, though on bbc news it's time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode.

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