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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 22, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the queen is back at windsor castle after spending a night in a london hospital. buckingham palace say she underwent preliminary medical checks but is in good spirits. the queen has been advised to rest after a busy schedule of public engagements. we'll bring you the latest from windsor. hollywood actor alec baldwin is questioned by police after he accidentally killed a woman with a prop gun on a new mexico film set. halyna hutchin was shot while working on the set as director of photography. the film's director was also injured and was taken to hospital. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art and the integrity of wanting to make cinema. england's social care watchdog warns that staff shortages will leave many people without help this winter.
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as the rate of coronavirus infections in england rises to one in 55, a new campaign is launched to encourage people to get covid booster jabs. a week on from the killing of conservative mp sir david amess, people in essex hold a silence in his memory. and coming up on the bbc news channel... can ireland follow scotland's lead and get through to the next stage of cricket's t20 world cup? they're playing namibia in a winner—takes—all match. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits and back at windsor castle after spending wednesday night in hospital. she was taken in for tests
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after being forced to cancel a trip to northern ireland. her doctors had told her to rest, following a busy round of public engagements. here's our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. windsor, two days ago, early afternoon, a convoy of royal vehicles were seen heading into london. was this the convoy taking the queen to hospital? at around the same time, at windsor castle itself, a very small royal standard was seen to be flying, its presence supporting the palace's claimed that the queen was resting at the castle. in fact, the queen was here, at the private king edward vii hospital in central london. the palace clearly hoped her visit would go unnoticed. it did, until last night, when the sun led with the story that she had spent the night in hospital. that prompted a short statement from the palace. following medical advice to rest for a few days, the queen attended hospital on wednesday
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afternoon... buckingham palace insists that like any citizen, the queen is entitled to privacy over medical issues. the palace will therefore say nothing about the nature of the investigations ordered by her doctors. the one thing we can say is that she seemed completely well on tuesday night when she hosted a reception for global business leaders and others at windsor castle. according to people who saw her, showers relaxed and on good form. that was just the latest in a busy few weeks for her, which had included a visit to cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament on 14th october, her attendance two days earlier at a service at westminster abbey to mark the centenary of the royal british legion, quite apart from the daily and largely unseen work of the monarch, with audiences and boxes of paperwork. {iii monarch, with audiences and boxes of maerwork. _, , monarch, with audiences and boxes of --aerwork. _, , monarch, with audiences and boxes of --aerwork. u, , , paperwork. of course, it is good mornin: , paperwork. of course, it is good morning. isn't — paperwork. of course, it is good morning, isn't it, _ paperwork. of course, it is good morning, isn't it, to _ paperwork. of course, it is good morning, isn't it, to you...? -
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morning, isn't it, to you...? according to the palace, the queen resumed that paperwork last night a few hours after returning from hospital. she is, says the palace, continuing with light duties and remains determined to attend the cop26 summit in glasgow at the end of the month. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's speak to our royal correspondent sarah campbell in windsor. it would seem, then, that the palace doesn't want to overplay the queen's visit to hospital?— visit to hospital? yes, indeed, good afternoon to — visit to hospital? yes, indeed, good afternoon to you. _ visit to hospital? yes, indeed, good afternoon to you. i _ visit to hospital? yes, indeed, good afternoon to you. i can _ visit to hospital? yes, indeed, good afternoon to you. i can say - visit to hospital? yes, indeed, good afternoon to you. i can say that - afternoon to you. i can say that here in windsor the royal standard is flying high above windsor castle this afternoon, which should indicate that the monarch is in residence, that the queen is there, and as we heard, when she returned from the hospital, showers in good spirits and showers undertaking light duties, and as nick was saying, what could that mean? well, the daily duties of the monarchy involve looking through government papers, the red boxes, so she could well be doing that today. and also as nick was saying, other than releasing details, latterly, of the
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fact that the queen had spent this overnight visit in hospital, the first we understand since 2013, they've given no further details as to what those tests might have been for. will we find out weather she might have to return to hospital, depending on the results of those tests? well, wejust simply depending on the results of those tests? well, we just simply don't know at the moment. i’m tests? well, we just simply don't know at the moment. i'm terribly sor , know at the moment. i'm terribly sorry. we've _ know at the moment. i'm terribly sorry. we've got _ know at the moment. i'm terribly sorry, we've got problems - know at the moment. i'm terribly sorry, we've got problems on - know at the moment. i'm terribly sorry, we've got problems on thej sorry, we've got problems on the line there, sarah campbell reporting there from windsor. the hollywood actor alec baldwin has been questioned by police after he fired a prop gun on a film set, accidentally killing the cinematographer and wounding the director. the weapon was supposed to fire blanks. it happened as they were filming a western in new mexico, as lizo mzimba reports. halyna hutchins was an up—and—coming director of griffey, named a rising star by american cinematographer magazine in 2017, showers considered to be an exceptionally talented
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individual. the investigation into what happened on the set of rust, a 19th—century western, is continuing. police say that alex baldwin, the star of the movie, discharged a prop gun during filming, the director joel souza was seriously hurt, halyna hutchins was flown to hospital by helicopter but died from her injuries. one filmmaker who worked with halyna hutchins on his 2020 action film archenemy described her as a huge talent. i met 2020 action film archenemy described her as a huge talent.— her as a huge talent. i met her before i had — her as a huge talent. i met her before i had to _ her as a huge talent. i met her before i had to work, - her as a huge talent. i met her before i had to work, i - her as a huge talent. i met her before i had to work, i met - her as a huge talent. i met herj before i had to work, i met her her as a huge talent. i met her. before i had to work, i met her at a film festival and within a few moments of talking to her, i felt like she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and the integrity of wanting to make cinema, that i wanted to work with her. ~ . . ., ., cinema, that i wanted to work with her. �* . . ., ., �* , her. according to the film's production _ her. according to the film's production company, - her. according to the film's production company, it - her. according to the film'sj production company, it was her. according to the film's i production company, it was an accident that happened when a prop gun carrying blanks inspired. but this early in the investigation, the police say they haven't reached any
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conclusions and are currently describing it as a shooting investigation.— describing it as a shooting investigation. describing it as a shooting investiuation. ., . , investigation. there are so many safety measures _ investigation. there are so many safety measures and _ investigation. there are so many safety measures and procedures| investigation. there are so many - safety measures and procedures that are supposed to be taken on every single _ are supposed to be taken on every single set— are supposed to be taken on every single set where there is a firearm, so we're _ single set where there is a firearm, so we're still— single set where there is a firearm, so we're still trying to learn what could _ so we're still trying to learn what could have — so we're still trying to learn what could have happened, was there a misstep— could have happened, was there a misstep along the way, did someone forget _ misstep along the way, did someone forget to— misstep along the way, did someone forget to do something, to try to cut corners? we just don't know, we're _ cut corners? we just don't know, we're still— cut corners? we just don't know, we're still learning. it is cut corners? we just don't know, we're still learning.— we're still learning. it is sadly not the first _ we're still learning. it is sadly not the first time _ we're still learning. it is sadlyl not the first time someone has we're still learning. it is sadly - not the first time someone has died from a shooting during filming. in 1993, brandon lee was fatally shot by a gun which everyone thought was only loaded with blank rounds. actor rhys muldoon says he has recently been working on a movie with a large degree of gunfire. the been working on a movie with a large degree of gunfire.— degree of gunfire. the producers actually held _ degree of gunfire. the producers actually held a _ degree of gunfire. the producers actually held a very _ degree of gunfire. the producers actually held a very clearly - actually held a very clearly important meeting and decided to do away with blanks altogether, and use basic special effects and cgi,
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because in this day and age, you brilliant truly can get those things of a gun firing without losing anything. of a gun firing without losing an hina. �* . of a gun firing without losing an hinu.�* . ., of a gun firing without losing an hina. . .,, of a gun firing without losing an hin.�* . ., anything. alec baldwin, who is also anything. alec baldwin, who is also a roducer anything. alec baldwin, who is also a producer on _ anything. alec baldwin, who is also a producer on the _ anything. alec baldwin, who is also a producer on the film, _ anything. alec baldwin, who is also a producer on the film, has - anything. alec baldwin, who is also a producer on the film, has spoken | a producer on the film, has spoken to detectives about what happened. meanwhile, the film world is mourning the loss of halyna hutchins and waiting to see what lessons may have to be learned from her tragic death. these amazon buy, bbc news. let's speak to the cbs correspondent laura podesta in new york. and it's a tragedy that's shocked the film industry? absolutely, we are seeing an outpouring on social media now, people who are describing the cinematographer, the 42—year—old who died in this accident, named halyna hutchins, is being someone who was a rising star in this industry, with a great personality, a great eye, just a really tragic loss. we're also
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hearing a bit more on social media from actors and actresses about the director, 48—year—old joel souza, who was injured. he was released from the hospital overnight, according to one actress who was in the film. showers trying to stop the spread of misinformation on twitter and she tweeted out that he had in fact gone home, gone to the hotel, wherever he is staying, in the santa fe area while this film is being shot. it's unclear right now what kind of injuries he suffered. kind of in'uries he suffered. laura, for the kind of injuries he suffered. laura, for the moment, _ kind of injuries he suffered. laura, for the moment, thank _ kind of injuries he suffered. laura, for the moment, thank you - kind of injuries he suffered. laura, for the moment, thank you very i kind of injuries he suffered. laura, - for the moment, thank you very much, laura podesta, in new york. the care regulator for england is warning that the sector faces a "tsunami of unmet need" this winter unless staffing shortages are tackled. the care quality commission has called for immediate measures to fill job vacancies. the government says it is providing £162 million to boost recruitment. alison holt reports. the unmet need of which today's report warns is already a reality for the cooks.
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melvin has a rare brain condition and, unable to get any support, dorothy is caring on her own. he can't get out of a chair on his own. he can't mobilise on his own. he can't go up and down the stairs on his own. he can't wash, dress, shower. take yourtime... it's just full—on, 24/7 caring. melvin was sent home by the nhs injune. for a short time, care workers came in, then they said they didn't have enough staff to continue. that was 12 weeks ago. according to the charity carers uk, many family carers are being pushed to the edge, like dorothy. i'm on my knees. i'm on my knees with exhaustion. the strain of having to do it all on our own. we're left here with nobody. there's no care package, no accessibility to services. we feel completely and utterly isolated. and scared. today's report from the regulator, the care quality commission,
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warns of the serious impact staffing shortages are having across the health and care system in england. job vacancies in care homes have risen from 6% to 10% in five months. and nursing homes are de—registering because they can't get nurses. it concludes urgent action is needed. we're calling for, in our report, increased funding to stabilise the adult social care workforce. and that benefits everybody, it has a positive ripple effect right across health and social care. and without that stability, without that stable, adult social care workforce, there's the real risk of a tsunami of unmet need causing instability right across the system. the government has said it is putting £162 million into boosting the recruitment and retention of care staff and that it appreciates their dedication and tireless work. for many years, this has been a workforce that is under incredible pressure. but, of course, that is intensified at this time, particularly as we have 1.1 million vacancies,
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there is a lot of competition for labour, so it is a worry, and that's why we've announced this £162.5 million today, which is there to effectively retain and to build extra capacity, and also to bring in thousands of new people. whilst welcoming the money, councils and care organisations say it won't be enough. and alisonjoins me now. and alison, will government plans fully solve the problem? i think it is a much more deep—rooted problem and it is not something that is going to be resolved quickly. the money will help, there is no doubt about that, but already, councils and care providers are saying it is not going to stretch far enough. the government says in its announcements that it could bring in tens of thousands of uk workers to the sector, but it is worth remembering that we last had a government
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recruitment campaign 18 months ago, and it didn't manage to achieve that at that point in time. so, there is at that point in time. so, there is a degree of scepticism about whether it will make that big a difference. there is also, £162 million, yes, it is a lot of money, but there are 1.5 million people working in care in different roles, and as one cap provider said to me, that works out atjust over £100 per person. and the idea is that this money will go on overtime, on agency staff to fill in gaps, but it has got a lot to do, because there is real, real pressure on the system, when they're competing for staff with shops, hotels, restaurants, who campaign more. , ., , more. so, if there is a gap in staff numbers. — more. so, if there is a gap in staff numbers. does— more. so, if there is a gap in staff numbers, does that _ more. so, if there is a gap in staff numbers, does that mean - more. so, if there is a gap in staff numbers, does that mean that. numbers, does that mean that friends and relatives of people who need care are going to have to step in? think that's already happening. families are feeling a lot of the
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strain, particularly during the pandemic. carers uk, one of the charities supporting people who look after family, charities supporting people who look afterfamily, says charities supporting people who look after family, says that the strain on people has increased immeasurably during that of time, and certainly look at a hearing stories, we heard from dorothy a moment or two ago, who is having to cope on her own because you can't get the staff to help her out, and certainly we are hearing of those families who are not getting support when they need it. and the problem with that, there is the individual distress, the upset for the family, but also, people are more likely to end up in crisis, and that then means more pressure on the health service as well. �* ,., ., pressure on the health service as well. �* ., ., ,, i. retail sales fell for a fifth consecutive month in september. the office for national statistics says fewer household goods were bought during the period. but sales remain above pre—pandemic levels, and department stores reported an increase in sales of more than 4%. gps in england are threatening industrial action in protest at the government s attempt to force
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them to see any patient who wants a face—to—face appointment. the british medical association s gps committee voted to reject the plan by the health secretary, sajid javid. the doctors union will hold a ballot on measures which could see family doctors take on less work. a silence has been held in leigh—on—sea to remember the mp sir david amess, a week after he was killed at a constituency surgery. ali harbi ali, who is 25, has been charged with his murder and is due to appear at the old bailey in the next hour. our correspondent lebo diseko is in leigh—on—sea. this is an opportunity for people again to pay their respects. absolutely. i am standing outside the church where sir david was holding at surgery last week when he was stabbed and killed, and that two—minute silence was just a short walk from where i am now, shopkeepers and community members coming together to remember him and
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really give their memories of the mp they knew and loved. speaking to people afterwards, what they said to me was that this is personal, one woman said to me it was like a member of herfamily had died. she described to me how when her son passed away, it was sir david that ensured his body was brought back from greece where he had been and really made sure her family always looked after. the local catholic priest saying sir david would have beenin priest saying sir david would have been in and out all of these businesses and talking to people, having lunch with people, laughing with them. he said you cannot think of sir david without remembering that smile, he told me it was easy to make a friend of sir david. the tributes are expected to continue throughout the day, we expect another two—minute silence to be held outside his constituency office later today. held outside his constituency office later toda . ., ~ held outside his constituency office later toda . ., ,, , ., , held outside his constituency office
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later toda . ., ~' ,, , . about one in 55 people in private households in england had covid in the week to october the 16th. that's up from approximately one in 60 the previous week. the figures from the office for national statistics come estimated infections continued to decrease in scotland, and were uncertain in wales and northern ireland. it comes as the goverment launches a new nationwide advertising campaign to encourage more people to come forward for booster vaccines and the winter flu jab. our health correspondent katharine da costa joins me now. new figures out — what's the government strategy now? infections are still high across the uk, the highest since the end of january. it's like that mixed across the country, still rising in england but falling in scotland. in wales and northern ireland things remain slightly less certain. rates are highest among secondary school pupils, one in 13 had the virus in that week to last saturday. some
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good news, from today 12—15 —year—olds in england can book a jab online and with many children breaking up for half term, that may help slow the spread. daily cases passed 50,000 yesterday, the health secretary warned they could reach 100,000 in the coming weeks. hospital admissions and deaths are slowly rising but not at the same rates we saw earlier in the year. scientific advice has been to act early with interventions to avoid stricter restrictions. that is something doctors and health leaders have called for this week but for now the government is sticking with the vaccinations, plan a, and today date they launched a new advertising campaign encouraging people to have vaccinations either at their first doseif vaccinations either at their first dose if they've not had it and also the boosterjab. thejcvi set six months after the second dose is the sweet spot for the booster, they may shorten that to five months to help
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speed up the process given that prevalence is so high. while the vaccines are doing most of the heavy lifting health experts say things like testing, masks and ventilation remain really important. our top story this lunchtime: the queen is back in windsor castle, and "in good spirits", after an overnight stay in hospital on wednesday. and mps consider a different kind of bill, for fixing the crumbling palace of westminster. coming up on the bbc news channel. can scotland women maintain their 100% start to their world cup qualifying campaign? they're looking to make it three wins from three against hungary at hampden this evening. the house of lords is debating draft legislation on assisted dying. the proposed law would give adults in england and wales, who are terminally ill the right to end their life if doctors
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think they only have six months or less to live. campaigners say a change in the law would give those at the end of their lives greater control over how and when they die. but opponents fear it could leave vulnerable people feeling pressure to end their life. graham satchell reports. tina humphrey became a household name in 2012. her routines with her rescue dog chandi on britain's got talent stole the hearts of the public. they went all the way to that year's final. she was amazing. an amazing woman. she was incredibly intelligent, determined, wonderful person. yes, just an incredible woman. steve and tina met in 2015. it was love at first sight. just a week before their wedding, tina was diagnosed with an aggressive form of skin cancer. her father and her mother had
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both died of cancer, and she had seen what happens at the end of it and she was determined that wasn't going to happen to her. when the time eventually came, tina wanted to be able to say goodbye properly. she wanted to be fully aware and in control at the end. it was exactly a textbook thing of what she had wanted to avoid. because that's what she'd seen her parents go through and she wanted to avoid that. she didn't want to shorten her life, she wanted to shorten her death. that was the important thing, and she wanted it to be peaceful and calm. and it turned out a nightmare for her and for me. the proposed new law being discussed today is short, with few details, but it does say assisted dying
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would only be an option for someone who was terminally ill, mentally competent and in their final months of life. two independent doctors and a high courtjudge would have to assess each request. religious leaders and other critics of the bill are worried. the archbishop of canterbury, for example, says rather than accepting what he calls assisted suicide, we should aim to live in a society that assists people to live. there's no difference in us between compassion, it is our concern about the effectiveness of the safeguards, and the care for the vulnerable, and the fact that not all families are as loving and caring as tina's husband, who is obviously an extraordinary man, and a wonderful man. not all families are like that. this is grace, another rescue dog trained by tina. having grace has helped steve cope with the loss of his wife. he now wants other people
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in tina's position to be able to die with dignity. graham satchell, bbc news. more than 1000 people are dying from covid every day in russia, a figure that makes it the worst—affected in europe. the scale of new infections and deaths has alarmed authorities so much that all workplaces are being shut down for a week from the start of november. many russians are sceptical of the vaccine the country produced, leaving them unprotected. richard galpin has visited one hospital in russia's north—west, and sent this report. another frantic day in hospital number one, here in vologda. the reality of the covid epidemic laid bare. wards in this hospitalfilled with patients on oxygen to try to keep them alive. the vast majority admitted to hospital because they had not taken the virus seriously.
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there are 800 beds in this hospital, and 750 of them are taken, and the vast majority of people who have come here have not been vaccinated. only a quarter of the population in vologda has had the vaccine, a major concern for doctors here. translation: i am very worried about this. - the more unvaccinated people there are, the more patients we have. all the capacity we have in our hospital is dependent on the people being vaccinated. despite all this, the vaccination centre i visited here was quiet. just a few people coming through for the jab, which would save lives. the governor of the region, oleg kuvshinnikov, has been trying to encourage more people to get vaccinated. but many remain wary of the vaccine. like yelena, who is a sceptic.
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translation: we live in a small town, and what i see around me| contradicts official statistics. i am told there are no side—effects of the vaccine but i see the opposite. in the vologda cemetery, the grave—diggers are in high demand. the number of burials has doubled from 50 a week, to 100. and amongst those who have been dying here from covid, many will have lost their lives because they believed the vaccine was the danger to them, not the virus, which has killed almost 250,000 people across the country. richard galpin, bbc news, vologda. police in western australia say they believe a four—year—old girl who went missing from a remote campsite last saturday was abducted.
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cleo smith was last seen sleeping next to her younger sister's cot, in a separate part of her family's tent, but in the morning, she was gone. the military have been helping the police look for her. our correspondent, phil mercer, is following the story from sydney. tell us about the search. detectives in western australia to see the disappearance of cleo smith strikes at the heart of the australian community. forseven at the heart of the australian community. for seven days the police supported by military reservists and volunteers and a private helicopters, have been scouring in a remote part of the western australian coastline. this is about 550 miles north of the city of perth. foran 550 miles north of the city of perth. for an entire week they have been scouring bush lines and dunes and beaches, without any clue of this young girl. what the authorities are doing, they are casting a massive net, asking people with dash cams and shop security
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video within a 500 mile radius of the campsite where cleo was last seen, to see if there are clues on the videos. ford you don't cleo was last seen almost a week ago, the police believe she was abducted in the middle of the night during a family camping trip. her mother and stepfather have remained at the campsite during this ordeal for them and one can only imagine the thoughts going through their minds. but the authorities are saying this is notjust but the authorities are saying this is not just a but the authorities are saying this is notjust a search in the immediate 500 mile radius of the campsite, this is a search that involves the whole of the country. phil, thank you very much. the fbi has confirmed that human remains found in a park in florida on wednesday are those of brian laundrie, the fiance of a blogger who was
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murdered in wyoming. the pair had been travelling together when gabby petito, who'd been documenting the trip on social mediam went missing. mr laundrie hadn't been seen since he went hiking alone in september. the palace of westminster is falling apart. a recent survey of parliament has found thousands of problems, from cracks in walls and ceilings, to flooding, warped windows and a network of ageing cables. something needs to be done — but the work could cost many billions of pounds, and mps are reluctant to sign if off. pete saull has been to see how bad the situation is. for centuries, it has been a proud symbol of our democracy, but parliament seems rather shy these days, hiding behind a web of scaffolding. inside, they have been assessing the extent of the damage. the lords looks as grand as ever. beneath it in the basement, though, there are scenes like this. more than 50 specialists have spent a combined total of more than 11,500 hours investigating the building, during recess periods. more than 2,000 rooms
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and spaces were examined, with experts recording thousands of issues with stonework, water damage and outdated electrical systems. it's an absolutely fascinating building, but there are problems there. there are water leaks, there are issues with the sewage, there are issues with the electrics. the team who run the building on a day—to—day basis, it is a safe building. but you need to do a project on this scale to really preserve the building for generations to come. the restoration of this building is one of the longest—running sagas in british politics. it has been three and a half years since mps voted to refurbish it, but it is still not clear how long it will take, where the mps and peers will go in the meantime, and how many billions of pounds it will cost. it is going to be an expensive project, and that is why it mustn't be any more expensive than it has to be _ i think the country at large is very proud of the palace of westminster. it is an international symbol, but it is also a statement,
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isn't it, of our belief in our democracy? that our democracy is something that it is worth being bold about and saying to the world it is something that is important, is great and indeed is beautiful. and i think our building does that. but we have a responsibility to taxpayers to keep the costs under control. more surveys will take place over the winter and into next year. some progress has already been made. the elizabeth tower, home to big ben, has been gradually coming out of its shell. but returning the whole palace of westminster to its former glories will be a long, painstaking task. time for a look at the weather. here's stav da naos. half term for many people, how is it going to be? quite mixed. we are ending the week on a fine note of thanks to high pressure. lovely skies for many, some showers around for england and wales in particular but not as many as the past few days and quite a lot
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