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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 22, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the cinematographer on alec baldwin's new film has died after the actor fired a prop gun which also seriously injured the director. halyna hutchins died in hospital. friends and colleagues have been paying tribute. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema. buckingham palace says the queen spent wednesday night in hospital for "preliminary checks", but is now back at windsor castle and is in good spirits. the care watchdog for england warns staff shortages will leave
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a "tsunami" of people without care this winter unless immediate action is taken. and coming up... ed sheeran joins the a—team of stars who've read a cbeebies bedtime story. the musician will read a book about a boy who has a stutter. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk
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filming had been taking place on a small ranch which is a popular location for movie production in the desert close to the city of santa fe in central new mexico. the woman who's died has been named as 42—year—old halyna hutchins, originally from ukraine. she was working as director of photography. the biography on her website says she was selected as one of american cinematographer s rising stars of 2019. cbs news correspondent laura podesta has been following developments from new york. unfortunately at this point, we don't know what led up to this stunt going horribly wrong yesterday. it happened around 1.50 in the afternoon, mountain time, and the two who were injured were immediately rushed to the hospital. directorjoel souza survived, he has been discharged from hospital at this hour, that's according to an overnight tweet by one of the stars in the movie. but again, we don't know
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what was in the gun, as that gentleman who was just describing, was it a blank that discharged in a way that was able to kill someone? or was potentially live ammunition put into this gun? our affiliate in los angeles has been speaking with experts, hollywood weapons experts, and one man, bill davies, mentioned that in western films, in these historical films, a lot of times, real firearms are used, but what is fake about it is what is put inside the firearm. so, what was put inside this gun, we don't know at this point, that is going to be part of the santa fe county sheriff's office investigation. they are of course going to be interviewing alec baldwin, now that the director has been discharged from the hospital overnight, perhaps they will be talking to him, and everyone else who was on the set that day, the armourer, the person who is in charge of the weapons
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on the set, of course, too. and tell us a bit more about halyna hutchins. _ and tell us a bit more about halyna hutchins, the woman who was killed, an up—and—coming cinematographer, we're _ an up—and—coming cinematographer, we're told. _ an up—and—coming cinematographer, we're told, extremely talented? are so tragic, _ we're told, extremely talented? are so tragic, she was originally from ukraine, — so tragic, she was originally from ukraine, she worked as an investigatorjournalist on british document reproductions prior to working — document reproductions prior to working in— document reproductions prior to working in film, according to her website, — working in film, according to her website, it— working in film, according to her website, it said that she was selected _ website, it said that she was selected as a one of the american cinematographer's rising stars in 2019 _ cinematographer's rising stars in 2019. there is an outpouring on social_ 2019. there is an outpouring on social media talking about what a wonderful person she was, what an artist _ wonderful person she was, what an artist she _ wonderful person she was, what an artist she was, what an eye she had. she had _ artist she was, what an eye she had. she had pictures and videos of her riding _ she had pictures and videos of her riding horses in the days prior to this tragic— riding horses in the days prior to this tragic accident, so clearly she was enjoying her time this tragic accident, so clearly she was enjoying hertime in this tragic accident, so clearly she was enjoying her time in new mexico when _ was enjoying her time in new mexico when she _ was enjoying her time in new mexico when she wasn't working on the film rust _
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members from across the film industry having been paying tribute to halyna hutchins. the actorjoe manganiello, who worked alongide the cinematographer for archenemy said ms hutchins was an incredible talent. earlier here on bbc news, he told us about how he met halyna hutchins and about how he met halyna hutchins and about her talent as a filmmaker. i
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met her at a film festival and after just a few moments of talking to her, ifelt like she had just just a few moments of talking to her, i felt like she had just such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to our andean integrity of wanting to make cinema, and i wanted to work with her, just from talking to her. you find sometimes you find that special connection with somebody, and you know, you're going to be a partnerfor me, and one of the things i love so much about her, she was ukrainian and she had this incredible european sensibility, though on ourfilm, which was quite low—budget, we had a day once where the main actor in a particular scene couldn't show up because he got suddenly sick and we were going to have to make up something brand—new on that day. and when i explained to her, six o'clock in the morning, i said, halyna, when i explained to her, six o'clock in the morning, isaid, halyna, i in the morning, i said, halyna, i am about to go into the trailer, we need something new, we will have to figure it out, she got so excited
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and she said, you mean we're going to shoot it in the european style? meaning that she was so interested in the idea of finding something in the moment, or rising to a challenge, not a challenge because it was something difficult but a challenge in the sense of working with what is around you to transcend the circumstance and turn it into art. and that was the thing that i just loved so much about her and was really looking forward to seeing how she was going to grow as an artist there was no way to get her to compromise on a single shot in your movie, she was going to make it beautiful and fight to get a little extra time or a little extra whatever she needed. it wasjust wonderful to be able to collaborate with somebody like that. we can talk now to ben symonds, the managing director of bare arms, a company which provides training for
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the use of firearms on film and tv sets, for the film and tv industry. thanks so much for being with us. i know we don't have many details on exactly what happened, but what is your hunch about what could have gone wrong here?— gone wrong here? erm, i am not going to speculate — gone wrong here? erm, i am not going to speculate on — gone wrong here? erm, i am not going to speculate on what _ gone wrong here? erm, i am not going to speculate on what could _ gone wrong here? erm, i am not going to speculate on what could have - gone wrong here? erm, i am not going to speculate on what could have gone l to speculate on what could have gone wrong because obviously there is an ongoing investigation, and it will take a long time for these kind of things to come out. thankfully, this kind of incident is quite rare. but normally, when it does happen, it does take a few years for the full courts to come out so we are not expecting any answers soon. but i can talk more in sort of general terms about what can go wrong on set with firearms and how we prevent it. what a lot of people don't realise is that a lot of the firearms we do use onset are real guns, either guns that have been deactivated for guns that have been deactivated for guns that still function as they should do. when we talk about blank ammunition, blank ammunition is the
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same as live ammunition, except without the projectile, the only thing it doesn't have is that little bit at the end which comes out of the end of the gun. guns are inherently dangerous, and even with blanks, blanks can kill and main and her, and so we have to put in a lot of procedures in place to ensure that filming is as safe as possible when these things are being used. so, what are the protocols around filming with these prop guns, or imitation firearms, then? just tell us what are the precautions that you should take on a film set or a tv set? fix. should take on a film set or a tv set? �* , ., , should take on a film set or a tv set? . , ., , , ., should take on a film set or a tv set? , ., set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as _ set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as a _ set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as a real _ set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as a real gun, _ set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as a real gun, so - set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as a real gun, so that i set? a prop gun is treated exactly the same as a real gun, so that if| the same as a real gun, so that if there is a mixup, if there is a mistake onset, if somebody picks up the wrong done, they are all treated in exactly the same way, and that way, firstly, the training, making sure that the performers that are handling them are well trained, so,
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they know how to handle them, they know what is safe and what is not. the second part of that is the education with the rest of the crew, so that they know what is safe to film and what's not. so that is how it starts and that is way before the actual action. it starts and that is way before the actualaction. 0n it starts and that is way before the actual action. on the production itself, you always try and avoid pointing a firearm directly at anybody, and when is loaded and when you're firing, unless there are other things in places such as protective screens, you should never, everfire a black protective screens, you should never, ever fire a black directly at somebody, because anything could be coming out of the end of that barrel, that blank still has a lot of power behind it and it will push out anything that gets stuck in the barrel. so, another of the thing done by armourers is to ensure that the weapon itself is clean, there is nothing lodged in the barrel, so that if a blank is fired, it can't go flinging anything out. and then, it isjust a go flinging anything out. and then, it is just a tight control, making sure that where it can be done, a
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firearm is always pointing away from somebody, never pointing directly at somebody, never pointing directly at somebody, and that can be achieved with camera angles, you can make it look as if it is being pointed at somebody. and then in the modern day, a lot of the firearms effects, the flashes and the banks, are added in with cgi in postproduction. so, if you're using a firearm close up to somebody�*s face, where there is a high chance of them being hurt, you can make that completely safe with a totally fake gun and add on the flash and stuff. however, with certain shots, that will never achieve the correct effect, so, sometimes it has to be using blank ammunition. i sometimes it has to be using blank ammunition-— sometimes it has to be using blank ammunition. i was going to ask you about that because _ ammunition. i was going to ask you about that because we _ ammunition. i was going to ask you about that because we were - ammunition. i was going to ask you about that because we were talking j about that because we were talking to a director earlier on who said more and more they are using cgi to get round this, and not really using pf°p get round this, and not really using prop guns, but you're saying actually you can't always do that? well, you can but it doesn't always look good and it all depends on what
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you're trying to achieve in that particular shot. you're trying to achieve in that particularshot. look you're trying to achieve in that particular shot. look at films such asjohn wick, there is a lot of firearms handling in that, it is all happening very close up to people's faces and bodies, and it's all happening very fast. in those kinds of situations, it's very difficult to implement the safety procedures. what you will tend to fight is all of that is added in in postproduction, it's so quick that you don't notice it. however, if you're having a particularly close—up shot of somebody discharging a firearm, cgi can only really go so far, kate is normally used to add to things rather than create things from nothing. and so, sometimes people just want to see the real thing. sometimes people 'ust want to see the reaming.— sometimes people 'ust want to see the teething.— the realthing. you've outlined how much care you _ the realthing. you've outlined how much care you and _ the realthing. you've outlined how much care you and other— the realthing. you've outlined how much care you and other people i the real thing. you've outlined how. much care you and other people who do this work in the film industry, how much care you take, but obviously, hundreds maybe thousands of films and productions are made every year, which include guns and gun fire, is it fair to say that it can bea gun fire, is it fair to say that it can be a bit uneven, the care that
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is taken around this? h0. can be a bit uneven, the care that is taken around this?— is taken around this? no, i wouldn't sa so,| is taken around this? no, i wouldn't say so. i would _ is taken around this? no, i wouldn't say so, i would suggest _ is taken around this? no, i wouldn't say so, i would suggest that - is taken around this? no, i wouldn't| say so, i would suggest that anybody that's doing this onset is incredibly careful and diligent about what they do. 0bviously incredibly careful and diligent about what they do. obviously i can't comment on what has been happening at the moment, but sometimes mistakes are made. but these kind of situations, when these things happen, it is normally two or three mistakes have happened, that have allowed something like this to occur, because the safety checks that are in place, even if something goes wrong, there is normally something else to catch it, but if two or three things go wrong, that perfect storm scenario, then you can have this kind of incident happen, but thankfully it is extreme e rare. thank you very much indeed. buckingham palace says the queen is back at windsor castle and in good spirits after spending a night in hospital for "preliminary medical checks". the 95—year—old monarch was said to have been disappointed after being forced to cancel a visit to northern ireland earlier in the week. her hospital admission was not related to coronavirus.
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this report from our royal correspondent sarah campbell. it was the day after hosting this reception at windsor castle that buckingham palace announced that on medical advice the queen wouldn't be travelling to northern ireland on wednesday afternoon. she'd been advised to rest for the next few days but was in good spirits. it's now emerged that later that day, the queen was driven to king edward vii hospital in central london to undertake what have been termed preliminary investigations. no details have been released as to what exactly the tests were for. what has been made known is this was not covid—related. the queen has undertaken a very busy schedule recently. she attended a service at westminster abbey a week last tuesday and was seen using a walking stick for the first time at a public event. two days later, she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament. in between times, she was carrying out duties at windsor castle,
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including virtually welcoming the new governor general of new zealand. the images of the queen since her return from the summer break in balmoral have been of an engaged and alert monarch, still enjoying meeting people and carrying out her duties with enthusiasm. but she is now 95 years old and the news that she spent a rare night in hospital will inevitably cause concern. the palace have sought to reassure. she's said to be in good spirits. it's understood that on her return from hospital yesterday afternoon, she was back at her desk and back at work. sarah campbell, bbc news. a little earlier, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell told us that buckingham palace hasn't always been clear about what's been happening. officials at buckingham palace have not been giving us a complete, reasonable picture of what has been occurring. the media was led to believe on wednesday that the queen was resting at windsor castle, that's what we, the bbc, reported, and other branches of the media
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reported to our viewers, listeners and readers. in point of fact, she was being brought into a hospital in central london for these preliminary investigations. now, one can understand the palace's point of view, it is that the queen is entitled to medical confidentiality, to patient privacy, notwithstanding that she is the head of state and millions of people here and around the world will be concerned to know that she is all right. quite how the palace can have believed that they would have got away with it, as it were, bringing her into a central london hospital, 0k, a private hospital, but with all the people who would have known what was happening, and of course, they were smoked out last night by the sun newspaper, which reported that she had been brought into hospital. now, here it seems to me is the problem. rumours and misinformation proliferate, thrive, when there is an absence of good, proportionate, trustworthy information, and i think that is what the media will be
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feeling this morning. now, we're told last night, by buckingham palace, that she is back at her desk, undertaking light duties, and that she's in good spirits, that handy phrase that the palace dusts off at moments such as this. and we must hope that we can rely on what the palace is now telling us. 0ur reporter helen wilkinson is at windsor castle, and we are told that she is in good spirits?— she is in good spirits? that's ritht, she is in good spirits? that's right. ben. _ she is in good spirits? that's right, ben, the _ she is in good spirits? that's right, ben, the royal- she is in good spirits? that's. right, ben, the royal standard she is in good spirits? that's - right, ben, the royal standard flag is flying here at windsor castle, meaning that the queen is in residence, and we are told that the queen is going to be spending today, friday, resting here at windsor castle and perhaps carrying out some light duties following her stay at the king edward vii hospital in central london on wednesday. we know
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now, following that statement from the palace last night, that the queen was taken to the private hospital in central london, it's a hospital in central london, it's a hospital that is used by members of the royal family, she was driven there, it's about a 45 minute drive away from here in windsor to the hospital, and that is where she was seen by a specialist and had liminal investigations. we don't know what those preliminary investigations were concerned with, and i suspect, ben, that we won't get that level of detail from ben, that we won't get that level of detailfrom buckingham palace. but she did spend the night, we understand, for practical reasons, overnight, on wednesday night, and then she returned here to windsor castle where, as i say, we are told she is going to be resting for perhaps a number of days now. but i suspect that given she had those preliminary investigations, depending, of course, on the results of those investigations, she may well need to be seen further by a
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specialist, but again, it depends what the results of those investigations work. but the queen here, this morning, resting here at windsor castle, and as we know, she is intending to attend cop26 in about a week's time, to meet leaders there, and clearly, officials, doctors, medicalteams there, and clearly, officials, doctors, medical teams around the queen, will want her to be at full strength for that event. a new nationwide advertising campaign is being launched in the uk to encourage more people to come forward for covid booster vaccines and the winter flu jab. it comes amid growing calls for the government to re—introduce restrictions in england to slow the spread of the virus and protect the nhs. yesterday, more than 50,000 covid cases were recorded in the uk for the first time since the middle ofjuly. rhaya barton reports.
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many adults and most children will be offered a free flu vaccine this winter. if you're over 50 or in an at risk group, you'll also need a covid—19 booster. that's the message from the government in their latest coronavirus advertising campaign, urging all those eligible to get both their covid—19 booster vaccines and their winter flu jab as soon as possible. you will start seeing it across tv and social media from tonight, after cases topped 50,000 for the first time in three months. we know from the studies that after your two doses of the covid jab, the immunity starts to wane. it doesn't mean it completely goes, but it lessens. therefore, there is that chance that you won't be immune enough to fight off an infection if you are infected by covid—19. so, therefore, to get the booster just means we're getting you all prepared as we head through to the winter months. and there's a message
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for young people, too. from today, parents of children aged between 12 and 15 will be able to book first dose covid vaccinations online, rather than waiting for them to be delivered at school, with appointments available as soon as tomorrow. the recent rising level of infection has led to calls for the government to look again at reintroducing some restrictions. but, for now, it insists vaccinations are the solution. rhaya barton, bbc news. let's have a look at how the uk is performing in comparison to other european countries, as of yesterday. here are the top 10 european countries for fully vaccinating their citizens. the uk had an early start onjabs, but as you can see it is now 9th place, with 67.8% of the population double jabbed. compare that to portugal
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at the top, at 86.8%. to talk about why cases are lower across europe is ralf reintjes, an epidemiologist at the hamburg university of applied sciences in germany. thank you very much for being with us, what is the picture in germany in terms of cases?— us, what is the picture in germany in terms of cases? good morning from hamburt. in terms of cases? good morning from hamburg- the — in terms of cases? good morning from hamburg. the situation _ in terms of cases? good morning from hamburg. the situation in _ in terms of cases? good morning from hamburg. the situation in germany, i hamburg. the situation in germany, so far, has been pretty good, until about eight or nine days ago. now, the numbers are increasing as well. close to, logically, due to the seasonal pattern of this pandemic. in the uk we have more than 50,000 cases yesterday, so roughly what would be the figure in germany? irate would be the figure in germany? we are would be the figure in germany? - are way below this. so, it is around ten, today, ithink18,000 are way below this. so, it is around ten, today, i think 18,000 cases, but with a larger population, so... but the trend is not so good, but all in all, we are much lower than in the uk.
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all in all, we are much lower than in the uk-— all in all, we are much lower than in the uk. . ., ,, , in the uk. although i think there is more testing. _ in the uk. although i think there is more testing. i _ in the uk. although i think there is more testing, i think _ in the uk. although i think there is more testing, i think i'm _ in the uk. although i think there is more testing, i think i'm right - in the uk. although i think there is more testing, i think i'm right in i more testing, i think i'm right in saying there is more testing in the uk than in a country like germany, but what is the situation there, how worried are people that case numbers are rising, and what do people think is the solution to that? yes. are rising, and what do people think is the solution to that?— is the solution to that? yes, over recent weeks. — is the solution to that? yes, over recent weeks, people _ is the solution to that? yes, over recent weeks, people were - is the solution to that? yes, over recent weeks, people were not . is the solution to that? yes, over| recent weeks, people were not so worried because the situation was relatively stable. now, i think more and more people are getting a bit more worried. until 11th october, testing was at a very, very high level, because tests were free. because this has reduced, and still, at the same time, less tests and more positive results coming out, so, we are at a turning point at the moment. �* , .., , , moment. and in this country there is a debate about _ moment. and in this country there is a debate about vaccinating _ moment. and in this country there is a debate about vaccinating in - moment. and in this country there is a debate about vaccinating in terms. a debate about vaccinating in terms of the booster vaccination, a third vaccination, we are leaving it for six months in this country after the first two vaccinations, some people saying that should be brought
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forward, what is the situation with vaccines in germany?— vaccines in germany? yes, so far, about two — vaccines in germany? yes, so far, about two thirds _ vaccines in germany? yes, so far, about two thirds of— vaccines in germany? yes, so far, about two thirds of the _ vaccines in germany? yes, so far, about two thirds of the population j about two thirds of the population are vaccinated, fully vaccinated, which means two doses. and for elderly and immune compromised individuals, a booster is recommended after six months, after the completion of the initial vaccination. so, we are similar to what you are advising.— vaccination. so, we are similar to what you are advising. many people have said that _ what you are advising. many people have said that actually, _ what you are advising. many people have said that actually, germany i have said that actually, germany has performed better than other european countries in handling the coronavirus, what lessons do you think other countries could learn from the german experience? iterate think other countries could learn from the german experience? we might have done it better— from the german experience? we might have done it better than _ from the german experience? we might have done it better than other _ have done it better than other countries, but not really so well that i would like to give advice on real good lessons which we have
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learned. but one of the things is that you need to take the situation, we all need to take the situation serious, and vaccination is important but it is only one component in reducing the spread of the virus, and their four, component in reducing the spread of the virus, and theirfour, —— therefore we need to be aware that it is still going to be a bumpy autumn and winter.— it is still going to be a bumpy autumn and winter. good to talk to ou, ralf autumn and winter. good to talk to you, ralf reintjes, _ autumn and winter. good to talk to you, ralf reintjes, epidemiologistl you, ralf reintjes, epidemiologist at hamburg university of applied sciences. more than 180 people have died after heavy rainfall triggered flash floods in nepal and india. homes were submerged or crushed by rocks swept into them by landslides in two indian states, uttarakhand and kerala. dozens more people are still missing in both countries as rescuers struggle to reach isolated areas.
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in nepal, the victims included a family of six, among them three children, whose house was buried in a sudden deluge of soil and debris. the man accused of fatally stabbing the conservative mp sir david amess will appear at the old bailey later today. ali harbi ali was arrested following the attack at a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea last friday. the 25—year—old has been charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts. there's a warning that a "tsunami" of people in england who rely on social care will be unable to access support this winter unless a staffing shortage is addressed. a report from the care quality commission says the workforce is "exhausted and depleted", with care providers already having to turn away patients. it says urgent action must be taken to get through the next few months safely. yesterday, the government announced an extra £162 million to boost the adult social care workforce. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. the unmet need of which today's report warns is already a reality for the cooks.
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melvin has a rare brain condition and, unable to get any support, dorothy is caring on her own. he can't get out of a chair on his own. he can't mobilise on his own. he can't go up and down the stairs on his own. he can't wash, dress, shower. it's just full—on 24/7 caring. melvin was sent home by the nhs injune. for a short time, care workers came in, then they said they didn't have enough staff to continue. that was 12 weeks ago. according to the charity carers uk many family carers are being pushed to the edge, like dorothy. i'm on my knees. i'm on my knees with exhaustion. the strain of having to do it all on our own. we're left here with nobody. there's no care package, no accessibility to services. we feel completely and utterly isolated and scared. today's report from the regulator,
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the care quality commission, warns of the serious impact staffing shortages are having across the health and care system in england. job vacancies in care homes have risen from 6% to 10% in five months. nursing homes are de—registering because they can't get nurses. it concludes urgent action is needed. we're calling for, in our report, increased funding to stabilise the adult social care workforce. and that benefits everybody, has a ripple effect, a positive ripple effect right across health and social care. and without that stability, without that stable, adult social care workforce, there's the real risk of a tsunami of unmet need causing instability right across the system. the government has said it is putting £162 million into boosting the recruitment and retention of care staff and that it appreciates their dedication and tireless work. for many years, this has been a workforce that is under incredible pressure.
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but, of course, that is intensified at this time, particularly as we have 1.1 million vacancies, there is a lot of competition for labour, so it is a worry, and that is why we have announced this £162.5 million today which is there to effectively retain and to build extra capacity, and also bring in thousands of new people. whilst welcoming the money, councils and care organisations say it won't be enough. alison holt, bbc news. let's speak now to vic rayner, head of national care forum. thanks for being with us, once again. how do you see the situation in terms of staff in the care sector, are you very pessimistic but actually, it's very hard to fill these shortages?— actually, it's very hard to fill these shortages? well, am very concerned. _ these shortages? well, am very concerned. i— these shortages? well, am very concerned, i think, _ these shortages? well, am very concerned, ithink, about - these shortages? well, am very concerned, ithink, aboutjust. these shortages? well, am very i concerned, ithink, aboutjust how concerned, i think, aboutjust how quickly this situation has escalated. you mentioned the care
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quality commission's report that is out today, and even within its own report, it talks about the increase in vacancies within the sector over the last few months, going up from 6% to 10% in september. and we've just done some research with managers directly in october, and in fact, they're coming back with an average of around 17% vacancies across services. so, it's extraordinarily highly pressured within organisations right now. find within organisations right now. and --eole are within organisations right now. and people are just leaving, aren't they, in large numbers, eitherfor more money, they're going forjobs in tourism, we are told, hospitality, places like amazon, paying them £3 and our more, or is it also that they're just fed up with the work and not really being properly appreciated for the work? i properly appreciated for the work? i mean the workload, rather than the actual work?
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i think this is really important, this is not people saying care is not a great sector to work in and the work is not valuable, the commentary from the care quality commission that staff are exhausted and depleted is absolutely correct and depleted is absolutely correct and there is an ongoing cycle of that, so the more people who leave, those who remain are asked to do more and more work to fill the vacancies. so i think we have a need for some really urgent action. we are calling... the government has provided some additional funding and of course it is welcome but it feels very much like a drop in the ocean. we really need some additional resources going into local government to enable organisations to increase the salary for the workforce, and a direct retention payment to those staff who have worked incredibly hard over the last 18 months during the pandemic. every other uk country has done that but in england we have not acknowledged or recognised what stuff has been
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through. or recognised what stuff has been throu t h. ~ , ., or recognised what stuff has been throuth. ~ ., . through. when you say a direct retention payments, _ through. when you say a direct| retention payments, effectively through. when you say a direct l retention payments, effectively a bonus? if retention payments, effectively a bonus? i. retention payments, effectively a bonus? y., retention payments, effectively a bonus? ., ., bonus? if you look to scotland, wales has _ bonus? if you look to scotland, wales has paid _ bonus? if you look to scotland, wales has paid twice _ bonus? if you look to scotland, wales has paid twice over - bonus? if you look to scotland, wales has paid twice over the l wales has paid twice over the pandemic period and there has been a bonus in northern ireland and we have not even looked about. looking up have not even looked about. looking up the money coming forward yesterday, that can't go anywhere acknowledging the efforts staff have made. ~ ., acknowledging the efforts staff have made. . ., ., , acknowledging the efforts staff have made. . . ., , ., made. what about bringing in more --eole made. what about bringing in more people from — made. what about bringing in more people from abroad? _ made. what about bringing in more people from abroad? the _ made. what about bringing in more people from abroad? the care - people from abroad? the care minister seem to rule out changing the rules on immigration to allow that to happen, but is that a solution?— that to happen, but is that a solution? ~ , , ., ., ., solution? absolutely, eu national staff were quite _ solution? absolutely, eu national staff were quite a _ solution? absolutely, eu national staff were quite a significant - staff were quite a significant component of the care workforce prior to the changes in rules, around about 7% of the staff and looking at specific occupations like nursing it was more like nine or 10%, so absolutely they were a and valued part of the workforce and the changes in the rules have made that much more difficult for that to
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happen. i heard the care minister talking about how this fund might support additional capacity within the sector and thinking about has started work additional hours, i was talking with a member macro he was telling me about the situation, they have a permanent staff cohort of 2000 people —— i was speaking to a member who was telling me. the staff have worked an additional 35,000 hours of overtime in the last month to fill vacancies, so if you broke that down, each member of staff has worked on additional 17.5 hours, half a week extra that month. i do not think they have any more capacity, we need to do something to thank them and make it an attractive pay rate for other people who want to work in care and are thinking they need additional money to run their own right to make it attractive enough for them to come into care. scotland have done that,
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they have just announced a new rate for all care staff of national care forum, that is a commensurate response. provides the care quality commission is talking about a tsunami of unmet need, uncertainty and ., , ., , ., , tsunami of unmet need, uncertainty and . , .,, ., and anxiety, a serious and deteriorating _ and anxiety, a serious and deteriorating condition - and anxiety, a serious and deteriorating condition in. and anxiety, a serious and - deteriorating condition in terms of equipment and staff condition, it paints a pretty nightmarish picture? and unfortunately we are already seeing organisations having to make incredibly difficult decisions about the people they are able to support and whether they can take in in residential settings new residents either from residential settings new residents eitherfrom hospitals or residential settings new residents either from hospitals or within the community and domiciliary care organisations having to decide whether they can take on new people and meet their needs, or in some cases, whether they need to turn
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away people they have previously supported because they cannot offer the right level of care and support unreliable care and support intensive having staff available to meet those needs. i think the difficulty is when you look at it as numbers, it is easy to brush a side, but this is people and their lives and it is having a massive knock—on effect, we can see it already in hospitals, in the lives of unpaid carers, if we are not very careful we will fight it becomes much more disruptive across the economy when people are having to come out of paid employment in all sorts of other sectors to provide unpaid care and we need everybody to deliver the work that is very important to keep these communities going. wc work that is very important to keep these communities going. vic rayner, head of the national— these communities going. vic rayner, head of the national care _ these communities going. vic rayner, head of the national care forum, - head of the national care forum, thank you. let's get more on our top story this hour — what appears to have been a tragic accident on a movie set has resulted in the actor
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alec baldwin shooting dead a member of his film crew. it happened when he discharged what he thought was a prop firearm, which fired a projectile. the cinematographer on the production, halyna hutchins, died of her wounds, while the director, joel souza, was also treated in hospital for injuries. this is where the events took place — the location set for the movie rust, a western. it's not clear what was happening when the gun was fired. reports from the scene suggest mr baldwin was doubled over and distraught as he left the film set. he was later interviewd by detectives, who said the actor provided statements and answered their questions. he came in voluntarily and he left the building after he finished his interviews. no charges have been filed and no arrests have been made. that is the police statement. the australian actor rhys muldoon regularly works with guns on film sets. he's been telling me how something
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like this might have happened. it is absolute speculation at this time, but if we remember the brandon crow incident where it was a blank that misfired and some of the projectile came out, so in a blank there is not actually a bullet in the bullet, if that makes sense, but there is still an explosion, and if the metal casing comes out of the bullet, that is what got brandon crow, and i have to say it sounds like a very similar case. and using blanks is always difficult, because... notjust on movie sets but also, you know, if you talk about real warfare and real guns, guns often misfire, and i havejust recently been working on a movie that had a lot of gunfire, like a very high range of gunfire,
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and i remember the day that the producers actually held a very clearly important meeting and decided to do away with blanks altogether and use basic special effects and cgi, because you can get all of that, you really, truly can in this day and age care all of those things of a gun firing without losing anything. you know, realism is everything in cinema and art, but in this shot, my guess is... the first thought i had on this is that this is a close—up of a gun being fired by the actor very close to the frame of the camera, you know, very close, because you want but eleine very close.
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—— but you want that eyeline very close. that is misfired, that has hit the dop and then either... because now hearing that the director as well has been heard, either something has come off the french flag or the black box, right, a part of the camera or diverted and hit the director as well, because normally the director doesn't stand right next to the dop, that's... sometimes they do, sometimes they don't, but in this case it sounds like they did. butjust the thing of blanks when you are actually using actual explosives that close to a face is... imean, ifeelfor... i just feel for everybody on that set. that is the actor rhys muldoon speaking to me earlier. the assisted dying bill, which would allow terminally ill patients to seek assistance to end their lives, is to be debated again in the british parliament today. if passed, it would enable adults
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of sound mind with less than six—months to live, to be provided with life—ending medication. dr gillian wright wrote an open letter to the health secretary opposing the assisted dying bill which was signed by 1700 doctors. she explained why she's against the bill, regardless of if someone is in pain or discomfort. we consider that we should respond as a society to look after patients in that situation, there should be a real drive and a response to excellent and high—quality palliative care, better research for medication that can help these situations, and the response should not be that we help patients take their lives, and the prohibition of killing is one of the fundamentals of civilisation and it is incredibly important we not minimise the shift from preserving life to taking life, and doctors up and down the country are horrified that medicine might change in this way and we might be
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required to tell patients who are coming with a terminal diagnosis to say that the state would help them to take their own life. it devalues ordinary, frail human life and we are not prepared to take part in that. ., , ., are not prepared to take part in that. . , ., , ., . that. that is doctor gillian wright with one side _ that. that is doctor gillian wright with one side of _ that. that is doctor gillian wright with one side of the _ that. that is doctor gillian wright with one side of the argument. i that. that is doctor gillian wright i with one side of the argument. let's get to the other side. i'm nowjoined by canon rosie harper who supports a change in the law on assisted dying. when i was speaking to dr gillian wright earlier her argument was that a civilised society provides rather than takes life —— preserves rather than takes life —— preserves rather than takes life —— preserves rather than take flight. than takes life -- preserves rather than take flight.— than takes life -- preserves rather than take flight. what is your view? this discussion _ than take flight. what is your view? this discussion needs _ than take flight. what is your view? this discussion needs to _ than take flight. what is your view? this discussion needs to be - than take flight. what is your view? this discussion needs to be taken i this discussion needs to be taken with gentleness and tenderness because people have considerable fears, but what we are talking about is nothing to do with killing, it is to do with people who are of sound mind and you wish to be spared the final agonies of their death being unable to make that choice and be
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assisted to do it. it does not change the fact of someone dying, we are talking about people he will most inevitably die anyway but it gives them back their human dignity. there is no killing involved it involves intent. it involves somebody who is going to die anyway hopefully being able to do so more compassionately, part surrounded by the people that they love, surrounded by great music and being able to say farewell without the family being left with the intense memories of agony and without the person themselves having to suffer egregious way. hooter person themselves having to suffer egregious way-— person themselves having to suffer egregious way. person themselves having to suffer ettreiouswa. ., ., ., egregious way. how have you come to these views? — egregious way. how have you come to these views? from _ egregious way. how have you come to these views? from a _ egregious way. how have you come to these views? from a slightly - these views? from a slightly different position _ these views? from a slightly different position from - these views? from a slightly different position from most|
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these views? from a slightly - different position from most other people, i have had the experience of when it works well. i am half swiss, my uncle lives in switzerland and it is part of the culture, they talk about it in the family when they have a terminal diagnosis, would they like to be in hospice, would be like the possibility of assisted dying and it is a conversation in which the doctors are involved. he decided that the prognosis for these final weeks was so horrific he would prefer to choose the moment of dying of his own choice. that is what he did, surrounded with his family, his children and his life and cracked open a wonderful bottle of lime, listen to beautiful music and took the tablets, and to all effects and purposes it was like he had formed sleep —— cracked open a bottle of wine. when i spoke to his wife, my
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aunt, he said she was so profoundly thankful that had been the way he had died, that she did not have emblazoned in her memory a period of time when they were told he would be fitting all the time, vomiting, not controlled, not able to speak to anyone at all sorts of horrendous things and she was just thankful that she lived in a civilised society where they were able to do the living thing, and that made a huge impression on me, notjust that i had had someone who had suffered but that i had seen somebody he would have suffered without access to this legislation. you would have suffered without access to this legislation.— to this legislation. you are a religious _ to this legislation. you are a religious woman, _ to this legislation. you are a religious woman, obviously, to this legislation. you are a - religious woman, obviously, the religious woman, obviously, the religious argument is obviously that life is a gift from god and it is not for us to take that gift away, it is for god. it not for us to take that gift away, it is for god-— not for us to take that gift away, it is for god. it depends what you mean by gift- _ it is for god. it depends what you mean by gift- l — it is for god. it depends what you mean by gift. i had an _ it is for god. it depends what you mean by gift. i had an aunt- it is for god. it depends what you mean by gift. i had an aunt who i it is for god. it depends what you - mean by gift. i had an aunt who gave mean by gift. i had an aunt who gave me a gift but you used to say, terms
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and conditions apply. i do not think thatis and conditions apply. i do not think that is our gift from god, he gives us our life, which we receive with huge thanks and polluted the very best of our ability, and with that gift i think is a genuine level of free will —— and live to the best of our ability. free will —— and live to the best of ourability. he free will —— and live to the best of our ability. he does not say, i am a bit here in the background and will tell you exactly what to do. he gives it to you and you have moral responsibility and agency for how you live. a catholic theologian says there could be a time at the end of your life when you return your gaze to your make and say, i am profoundly thankfulfor to your make and say, i am profoundly thankful for the gift of life and at this time i am choosing to return that to you, that is the way i frame it, theologically. but the other argument that we heard from dr gillian wright is why not improve palliative care, that is the
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obvious alternative, you invest more and have more people giving palliative care. it and have more people giving palliative care.— and have more people giving palliative care. it is interesting how this argument _ palliative care. it is interesting how this argument has - palliative care. it is interesting. how this argument has evolved, palliative care. it is interesting - how this argument has evolved, as if it was either/or. i am 100% in favour of improving palliative care, it is fantastic in many areas but it is a postcode lottery, there is not enough, we can enrich it and really ought to. but perhaps only 1% or 2% of people who would want access to pain relief can't get good enough quality pain relief to be spared to the sorts of agonies we are talking about. i am looking at the recent figures in oregon, interestingly 93 or 94% of people who eventually go down the assisted dying routes are also signed up for palliative care, so it can be and/or, and many of the countries who have had assisted
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dying for a long time have at least as good and not better palliative care as we have in this country. they do not need to be pitted against each other, they can work hand—in—hand and people can have an enriched way of approaching the end of. ., ~' , ., enriched way of approaching the end of. ., ~' i., enriched way of approaching the end of. . ,, . ., ., ,, enriched way of approaching the end of. thank you so much for talking to us, canon rosie _ of. thank you so much for talking to us, canon rosie harper. _ just a reminder, if you need help and advice regarding any of the areas involved in this issue — such as bereavement, emotional distress and support for carers — there are links on the bbc actionline website. while for many, covid has changed their lives forever, for long covid sufferers, the extent of that change is yet to fully unfold. many believe the long—term implications of the disease are not fully recognised and some have taken their treatment into their own hands. one of those groups now says they may have found a breakthrough, though that research is still at an early stage. however, they hope their findings could also benefit people suffering from other long—term health conditions. i'm joined by dr beate jeager, who runs
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a specialist covid clinic in mulheim, western germany. and also by dr asad khan. he is a medical professional who became a long covid sufferer, after contracting the virus from inadequate ppe. he's receiving treatment at the clinic now. firstly, beate jeager, firstly, beatejeager, talk us through the treatment you are offering? through the treatment you are offerint ? ,., ., ., offering? good morning. the treatment — offering? good morning. the treatment l _ offering? good morning. the treatment i am _ offering? good morning. the treatment i am offering - offering? good morning. the treatment i am offering is i offering? good morning. the - treatment i am offering is heparin mediated extracorporeal reciprocation. basically we do this in germany for 37 years now, it is a last resort treatment for patients suffering repeated heart attacks,
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myocardial infarction is after heart transplantation, severe periods of line disease and hypercholesterolaemia. in line disease and h tercholesterolaemia. , hypercholesterolaemia. in very sim . le hypercholesterolaemia. in very simple terms, _ hypercholesterolaemia. in very simple terms, try _ hypercholesterolaemia. in very simple terms, try to _ hypercholesterolaemia. in very simple terms, try to put - hypercholesterolaemia. in very simple terms, try to put that i hypercholesterolaemia. in very i simple terms, try to put that into layman's terms, if you could, how does that treatment work? this treatment does that treatment work? try 3 treatment eliminates clotting factors, cholesterol, bacterial toxins and cytokines, and when we got the first hints in the covid pandemic last year, the signs from the pathologists showing us that covid is a vessel disease, that we have tried to work on this, and since february this year we try to cure long covid patients from all
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over the world.— cure long covid patients from all over the world. let's talk to one, dr asad khan. — over the world. let's talk to one, dr asad khan, you _ over the world. let's talk to one, dr asad khan, you have - over the world. let's talk to one, dr asad khan, you have been - dr asad khan, you have been suffering long covid. tell us about the symptoms you have had on the treatment you have been getting? certainly, thank you. i acquired the illness— certainly, thank you. i acquired the illness on— certainly, thank you. i acquired the illness on a — certainly, thank you. i acquired the illness on a respiratory covid award in november2020, i illness on a respiratory covid award in november 2020, i developed a bearable — in november 2020, i developed a bearable skin rashes, memory loss, information— bearable skin rashes, memory loss, information about the heart, larger incontinence and a disabling condition which made it impossible to sit— condition which made it impossible to sit or— condition which made it impossible to sit or stand due to nausea and dizziness, — to sit or stand due to nausea and dizziness, by august i was losing weight. — dizziness, by august i was losing weight, lying in a darkened room with wine — weight, lying in a darkened room with wine folds and earplugs and i honestly _ with wine folds and earplugs and i honestly did not care if i fell asleep — honestly did not care if i fell asleep and never woke up began. whilst _ asleep and never woke up began. whilst some clinicians have emphasised and believed, others have said you _ emphasised and believed, others have said you willjust get better with time _ said you willjust get better with time or— said you willjust get better with time or a — said you willjust get better with time or a psychological —— empathised and believed. others said they were _ empathised and believed. others said they were waiting for research and could _ they were waiting for research and could not— they were waiting for research and could not do anything in the interim and despite my knowledge and my access, _ and despite my knowledge and my access, it — and despite my knowledge and my
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access, it has been a nightmare to -et access, it has been a nightmare to get the _ access, it has been a nightmare to get the right care, i can only imagine _ get the right care, i can only imagine what it must be like for the average _ imagine what it must be like for the average person. after the treatment it is quite _ average person. after the treatment it is quite simple, it is similar to dialysis. — it is quite simple, it is similar to dialysis, blood is taken out of one arm, _ dialysis, blood is taken out of one arm. run — dialysis, blood is taken out of one arm, run through a machine which cleans— arm, run through a machine which cleans it _ arm, run through a machine which cleans it up — arm, run through a machine which cleans it up blood clots and return to the _ cleans it up blood clots and return to the other ounce, i have had seven cycles— to the other ounce, i have had seven cycles of— to the other ounce, i have had seven cycles of the — to the other ounce, i have had seven cycles of the so far, my blood was so full _ cycles of the so far, my blood was so full of — cycles of the so far, my blood was so full of cotton material that it blocked — so full of cotton material that it blocked the machine on four occasions, they have pulled multiple clots out _ occasions, they have pulled multiple clots out of— occasions, they have pulled multiple clots out of my arm veins and what is really _ clots out of my arm veins and what is really interesting is that all of the usual— is really interesting is that all of the usual clotting blood tests were normal _ the usual clotting blood tests were normal in — the usual clotting blood tests were normal in my case. how the usual clotting blood tests were normal in my case.— normal in my case. how are you feelint normal in my case. how are you feeling now? — normal in my case. how are you feeling now? i— normal in my case. how are you feeling now? i arrived _ normal in my case. how are you feeling now? i arrived in - normal in my case. how are you i feeling now? i arrived in germany normal in my case. how are you - feeling now? i arrived in germany in a wheelchair — feeling now? i arrived in germany in a wheelchair and _ feeling now? i arrived in germany in a wheelchair and almost _ feeling now? i arrived in germany in a wheelchair and almost fainted - feeling now? i arrived in germany in a wheelchair and almost fainted in i a wheelchair and almost fainted in the clinic— a wheelchair and almost fainted in the clinic waiting room, after seven treatments — the clinic waiting room, after seven treatments i can walk short distances, look at a computer screen, — distances, look at a computer screen, read scientific texts again, eat foods — screen, read scientific texts again, eat foods i — screen, read scientific texts again, eat foods i had become intolerant to and thankfully the nausea has gone. i and thankfully the nausea has gone. i have _ and thankfully the nausea has gone. i have more — and thankfully the nausea has gone.
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i have more treatment to go but i feel things — i have more treatment to go but i feel things are moving in the right direction — feel things are moving in the right direction. it seems like i finally have _ direction. it seems like i finally have a — direction. it seems like i finally have a chance of getting my life back— have a chance of getting my life back again. this appears to be a really— back again. this appears to be a really promising treatment, clearly we need _ really promising treatment, clearly we need more resources and funding because _ we need more resources and funding because the last thing i want to see as desperate patients being forced to self— as desperate patients being forced to self medicate with potent drugs like anticoagulants, experience clinicians — like anticoagulants, experience clinicians should feel able to discuss _ clinicians should feel able to discuss these treatments with patients, weighing up the risks and benefits, _ patients, weighing up the risks and benefits, because researchers from cape town— benefits, because researchers from cape town and san francisco have demonstrated micro—clots in the blood _ demonstrated micro—clots in the blood of— demonstrated micro—clots in the blood of long covid sufferers beyond a shadow _ blood of long covid sufferers beyond a shadow of a doubt, it is a myth that long — a shadow of a doubt, it is a myth that long covid under the invisible illnesses— that long covid under the invisible illnesses like mer psychological 'ust illnesses like mer psychological just because certain tests are normal, _ just because certain tests are normal, patients can be very sick with normal— normal, patients can be very sick with normal test and it is quite clear— with normal test and it is quite clear that _ with normal test and it is quite clear that in long covid our tissues are starved — clear that in long covid our tissues are starved of oxygen due to these
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cuts in _ are starved of oxygen due to these cuts in the — are starved of oxygen due to these cuts in the blood vessels, we have not been _ cuts in the blood vessels, we have not been conditioned, we are not anxious— not been conditioned, we are not anxious due to the lockdown and talking _ anxious due to the lockdown and talking therapies and rehabilitation will not _ talking therapies and rehabilitation will not fix this, exercise only makes — will not fix this, exercise only makes us _ will not fix this, exercise only makes us worse and patients who are sick for— makes us worse and patients who are sick for months and months are unlikely— sick for months and months are unlikely to _ sick for months and months are unlikely to get better on their own. a simple _ unlikely to get better on their own. a simple bedside test can demonstrate how ill we are. mine was at 32, _ demonstrate how ill we are. mine was at 32, the _ demonstrate how ill we are. mine was at 32, the normal until rangers 65 to 75~ _ at 32, the normal until rangers 65 to 75. �* , , , , at 32, the normal until rangers 65 to75. ,, _~., to 75. i'm 'ust briefly, dr beate jeater, to 75. i'm just briefly, dr beate jeager, long — to 75. i'm just briefly, dr beate jeager, long covid _ to 75. i'm just briefly, dr beate jeager, long covid is _ to 75. i'm just briefly, dr beate jeager, long covid is a - to 75. i'm just briefly, dr beate - jeager, long covid is a phenomenon we are still struggling to learn about. ., ., ., ., , about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75. about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75- do — about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75- do you — about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75. do you think— about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75. do you think this - about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75. do you think this can - about. -- the normal adult range is 65 to 75. do you think this can be i 65 to 75. do you think this can be ke to 65 to 75. do you think this can be key to understanding _ 65 to 75. do you think this can be key to understanding what - 65 to 75. do you think this can be key to understanding what it - 65 to 75. do you think this can be key to understanding what it is i key to understanding what it is giving to the human body? yes. key to understanding what it is giving to the human body? yes, i think it is a _ giving to the human body? yes, i think it is a key _ giving to the human body? yes, i think it is a key phenomenon - giving to the human body? yes, i think it is a key phenomenon and| giving to the human body? yes, i - think it is a key phenomenon and the professors were the first to demonstrate that it is very difficult to dissolve these clots
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and they now come to join my clinic in the middle of november, they come to revalidate my results from treating by now 100 patients. the good news about it is some people just need one treatment and they can get rid of all symptoms, others need five. i have been treating a patient from the uk who needed 1a treatments, the maximum, but he came in with a wheelchair and he walked out upright on his feet. this is a cruel disease and it affects worldwide for hundred million people, and the mechanical removal of clots is one possibility,
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anticoagulation will also help. we just had to demonstrate that this is a generalised vessel disease and people need quick treatments, because my patients were all very young, very sporty, doing marathons, being caretakers, being children of my patients, being people in the middle of their lives, and they should have it back. dr middle of their lives, and they should have it back. , �* . jeater, middle of their lives, and they should have it back. , �* . jeater, fascinatint middle of their lives, and they should have it back. , �* . jeater, fascinatint to middle of their lives, and they should have it back. , �* . jeater, fascinatint to hear middle of their lives, and they should have it back. , �* . jeater, fascinatint to hear about jeager, fascinating to hear about the treatment, and also dr asad khan, to hear about your treatment, and very good luck with your recovery, let's hope it continues. thank you both for talking to us today. you are watching bbc news. a british—built robot that uses cameras to create abstract art,
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has been released — after egyptian authorities detained it at customs. the robot, called ai—da, was seized by border agents last week, who feared her robotics may have been hiding spy tools. she was due to open and present her work at the great pyramid of giza yesterday. let's get a quick look at the weather forecast with nick miller. hello. the day has got off to a fairly chilly start in that brisk north—westerly wind. the wind will ease later today, but the winds will pick up again over the weekend. we do have a little ridge of high pressure moving in. still plenty of showers around in the day ahead. a frontal system out towards the west will bring some rain at the weekend, especially across western areas. we will look at the weekend in a moment. first of all, on friday, increasing sunshine in northern areas as the day goes on. elsewhere, there will be a lot of cloud around and showers on the west—north—westerly wind, a few of them pushing in towards southern england in the afternoon.
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some gusts in excess of 30mph, but overall, the wind will be showing signs of easing as the day goes on. single figure temperatures across much of the north and east of scotland. tonight, it will turn quite chilly across eastern parts, where it is largely dry with some clear spells as well as mist and fog. the breeze starts to pick up in the west and there will be one or two showers dotted around as the night goes on, keeping temperatures up, whereas across eastern parts, a touch of frost on the ground, and there may be frost in the air in parts of scotland as we get close to freezing going into tomorrow morning. a frontal system from the west brings some rain and freshening winds over the weekend, but also a wind change to a southerly or south—westerly means temperatures will be heading a few degrees back up again. so, a mixture of cloud and a few brighter spells on saturday. some patchy rain towards scotland, wales, western parts of england, northern ireland.
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for northern ireland and western scotland, that rain will be turning heavier and more persistent in the afternoon. the winds will pick up again and there could be gusts up to 55mph in the western isles. temperatures creeping up. it will still feel quite cool across eastern parts. turning milder in the west, and milder for all on sunday. we will see a weather system gradually pushing further eastwards, taking a few showers as we go on through the day, further showers reaching western scotland and northern ireland in the afternoon, but a few sunny spells here as well. a milder day on sunday, but it will be another windy one.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. buckingham palace says the queen spent wednesday night in hospital for "preliminary checks", but is now back at windsor castle and is in good spirits. a cinematographer dies after alec baldwin fired a prop gun while filming a new western movie in the united states. the director was also injured. halyna hutchins was 42 — friends and colleagues have been paying tribute. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema. the care watchdog for england warns staff shortages will leave a �*tsunami' of people without care this winter, unless immediate action is taken. a new advertising campaign launches to encourage more people to get
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coronavirus booster vaccines and the winter flu jab, as covid case rates continue to rise across the uk. hello, my name's ed. when i was little, i had a stutter. and ed sheeranjoins stars like tom hardy, dolly parton and chris evans to take his turn reading a cbeebies bedtime story. the global pop star will read a book about a boy who has a stutter. buckingham palace says the queen is back at windsor castle — and in good spirits — after spending a night in hospital for "preliminary medical checks". the 95—year—old monarch was said to have been disappointed, after being forced to cancel a visit to northern ireland earlier in the week. her hospital admission was
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not related to coronavirus. here's our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. it was the day after hosting this reception at windsor castle that buckingham palace announced that on medical advice the queen wouldn't be travelling to northern ireland on wednesday afternoon. she'd been advised to rest for the next few days but was in good spirits. it's now emerged that later that day, the queen was driven to king edward vii hospital in central london to undertake what have been termed "preliminary investigations." no details have been released as to what exactly the tests were for. what has been made known is this was not covid—related. the queen has undertaken a very busy schedule recently. she attended a service at westminster abbey a week last tuesday and was seen using a walking stick for the first time at a public event. two days later, she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament.
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in between times, she was carrying out duties at windsor castle, including virtually welcoming the new governor general of new zealand. the images of the queen since her return from the summer break in balmoral have been of an engaged and alert monarch, still enjoying meeting people and carrying out her duties with enthusiasm. but she is now 95 years old and the news that she spent a rare night in hospital will inevitably cause concern. the palace have sought to reassure. she's said to be in good spirits. it's understood that on her return from hospital yesterday afternoon, she was back at her desk and back at work. sarah campbell, bbc news. a little earlier, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell told us buckingham palace hasn't always been clear about what's been happening. officials at buckingham palace have not been giving us a complete, reasonable picture of what has been occurring. the media was led to believe on wednesday that the queen was resting at windsor castle,
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that's what we, the bbc, reported, and other branches of the media reported to our viewers, listeners and readers. in point of fact, she was being brought into a hospital in central london for these preliminary investigations. now, one can understand the palace's point of view, it is that the queen is entitled to medical confidentiality, to patient privacy, notwithstanding that she is the head of state and millions of people here and around the world will be concerned to know that she is all right. quite how the palace can have believed that they would have got away with it, as it were, bringing her into a central london hospital, 0k, a private hospital, but with all the people who would have known what was happening, and of course, they were smoked out last night by the sun newspaper, which reported that she had been brought into hospital. now, here it seems to me is the problem. rumours and misinformation proliferate, thrive, when there is an absence of good, proportionate, trustworthy information, and i think that is what the media will be
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feeling this morning. now, we're told last night, by buckingham palace, that she is back at her desk, undertaking light duties, and that she's in good spirits, that handy phrase that the palace dusts off at moments such as this. and we must hope that we can rely on what the palace is now telling us. let's speak to our reporter helena wilkinson who is outside windsor castle. helena, any more updates from the queen's household?— helena, any more updates from the queen's household? well, ben, the situation here _ queen's household? well, ben, the situation here at _ queen's household? well, ben, the situation here at windsor _ queen's household? well, ben, the situation here at windsor castle - queen's household? well, ben, the situation here at windsor castle is i situation here at windsor castle is pretty much the same as it was yesterday, the royal standard subpoena flying here above the castle, that means that the queen is in residence and we understand she will spend the rest of today and perhaps further days, several more days resting, but also, doing what she did yesterday afternoon, in that
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she did yesterday afternoon, in that she carried are out some light duties, so she did a bit of work, we are told, we understand, yesterday afternoon and she is expected to continue doing that work here at the castle later today, but i think it sounds like the priority for the queen, at the moment, is to fully rest and recoverfrom her queen, at the moment, is to fully rest and recover from her hospital stay. we now know as you heard from nick there, that the queen was in fact taken from windsor castle, driven for about 45 minutes, in a car, to king edward vii hospital in central london. that is a hospital thatis central london. that is a hospital that is used by many members of the royal family, she was there for preliminary investigations, now we don't know what those investigations were concerned with, and i suspect, ben, we are not going to get that he level of detailfrom the ben, we are not going to get that he level of detail from the palace. she stayed overnight, again, we understand the reason for that was for practical reasons, and then the
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queen was brought back here to windsor castle yesterday, where, as i say u she is continuing to rest and perhaps carry out some light work later on today. as sarah mentioned in her report, the queen, of course she is 95 years old, and she has had an incredibly busy she dial, overthe she has had an incredibly busy she dial, over the past week, travelling to cardiff, last week she was also london, at westminster abbey, and on tuesday night here at castle she was hosting a huge event with many business leaders, including the prime minister was here, as well, so she has been very, very busy, and for somebody who is 95 years old, despite the resilience that the queen shows, the focus is now on her resting and of course, the intention is for her majesty to attend cop26 towards the end of this month, and the medical teams round her will clearly want her to be at full strength for that event.
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helena, thank you very much. a woman has died and a man has been injured after hollywood actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on a film set in the united states. police in new mexico said mr baldwin discharged the weapon during filming for the 19th century western rust. filming had been taking place on a small ranch, which is a popular location for movie production, in the desert close to the city of santa fe in central new mexico. the woman who's died has been named as 42—year—old halyna hutchins, originally from ukraine. she was working as director of photography. the biography on her website says she was selected as one of american cinematographer s rising stars of 2019. we don't know what led up to this
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stunt going horribly wrong, it happened round 1.50 in the afternoon, mountain time, and the two injured were immediately rushed to the hospital. directorjoel sousa survived. he has been discharged from the hospital at this hour, that is according to an overnight tweet by one of the stars in the movie. but again, we don't know what was in the gun, was it a blank that discharged in a way that was able to kill someone? 0rwas discharged in a way that was able to kill someone? or was it potentially live ammunition put into this gun? 0ur affiliate in los angeles has been speaking with experts hollywood weapons experts, and one man, bill davis, mentioned that in western films, in these historicalfilms, a lot of times real firearms are used, but what is fake about it is what is put inside the firearm. so what was put inside the firearm. so what was put inside the firearm. so what was put inside this gun? we don't know at this point, that is going to be part of the santa fe county
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sheriff's investigation, they will be interviewing alec baldwin, now that the director has been discharged, from the hospital, overnight, perhaps they will be talking to him, and everyone else who was on the set that day, the armourer of course, the person in charge of the weapons on the set. members from across the film industry having been paying tribute to halyna hutchins. the actorjoe manganiello — who worked alongide the cinematographer for archenemy — said ms hutchins was "an incredible talent and great person", calling it "a horrible tragedy". the directorjames gunn also shared his condolences. he wrote... and adam egypt mortimer, who was the director of archenemy, shared an imagine of the cinematopher
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alongside his message... earlier he told us how he met halyna and about her talent as a film—maker. i met her before i'd seen any of her work, i met her at a film festival, and within a few moments of talking to her i felt like she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art, and like, sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema that i wanted to work with her, just from talking to her. you find sometimes you find that special connection with somebody and, you know, oh, you're going to be a partner for me. earlier he told us how he met halyna and about her and one of the things that i loved so much about her, she's ukrainian, and she had this incredible european
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sensibility, so on ourfilm, which was quite low budget and strapped for resources and we had a day once, where the main actor in the particular scene, didn't, couldn't show up because he got suddenly sick, and we were going to have to make up something brand—new on that day, and when i explained to her 6:00am in the morning, i said "halyna, i'm about to go the trailers with actors that you have, i'm going to write something new and we are going to figure out what to do." she got so excited and she said, "oh, you mean we're going to shoot it in the european style", meaning she was so interested in the idea of finding something in the moment, we're rising to a challenge, not a challenge because there is something difficult but a challenge in the sense of working with what is around you, to transcend the circumstances and turn it into art, and that was the thing ijust loved so much about her, and was really looking forward to see how she was going to grow as an artist. there was no way to get her to compromise on a single shot in your movie, she was going to make it beautiful, and fight to get a little extra time or a little extra whatever she needed, and it was just wonderful to be able to collaborate
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with somebody like that. guns are still widely used in the us film industry, despite advances in special effects and cgi technology, but there are strict controls in place. firearms are subject to both federal law, and the regulations in the state where the filming is taking place. in most cases, this means permits must be applied for. most states also insist weapons handlers be on—set when any weapon is being used during production. live bullets aren't often used, the weapons often have the capacity to fire them. blanks are used instead, to give a realistic impression. ben simmons is the managing director of bare arms, which provides training for the use of firearms on sets, and he is a technical advisorforfilm and tv. earlier he told us how weapons are used on film sets. what a lot people don't realise a
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lot the firearms are real gun, either guns that have been deactivateded or guns that still function as they should do. when we talk about blank ammunition, blank ammunition is the same as live ammunition, except when the projectile, the only thing it doesn't have is that bit at the end which comes out the end of the gun. guns are inherently dangerous and even with blank, they can kill and maim and hurt. and so we have to put in a lot of procedures in place to ensure that filming is as safe as possible when these things are being used. any prop gun is treated the same as a real gun, so if there is a mix up, the if there a mistake on set, somebody picks up a real gun they are treated the same way and that way, firstly the training, making sure that the performers that are handling them are well trained, so they know how to handle them, they know what is safe and what is not. second part of that is
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education piece with the rest of the crew, so they know what is safe to film and what is not, and so that is how it starts and that is way before production can begin. 0n the production can begin. 0n the production itself, you always try and avoid pointing a firearm directly at anybody and when it is loaded and when you are firing unless there is other things in place, such as prospective screens, you will, you should never fire a blank directly at somebody, because you can have anything coming out the end of that barrel, that blank, still has a lot of power behind it, it can push out anything that gets stuck in the barrel. another thing that armourers do is ensure that the weapon itself is clean, there is nothing lodged in the barrel so if a blank is fired it won't fling anything out, and then it isjust a tight control of the angles, making sure that where it can be done, a firearm is always pointing away from somebody, it never points directly at somebody.
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there's a warning that a "tsunami" of people in england who rely on social care will be unable to access support this winter, unless a staffing shortage is addressed. a report from the care quality commission says the workforce is "exhausted and depleted" with care providers already having to turn away patients. it says urgent action must be taken to get through the next few months safely. yesterday the government announced an extra £162 million to boost the adult social care workforce. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. the unmet need of which today's report warns is already a reality for the cooks. melvin has a rare brain condition and, unable to get any support, dorothy is caring on her own. he can't get out of a chair on his own. he can't mobilise on his own. he can't go up and down the stairs on his own. he can't wash, dress, shower. it's just full—on 24/7 caring.
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melvin was sent home by the nhs injune. for a short time, care workers came in, then they said they didn't have enough staff to continue. that was 12 weeks ago. according to the charity carers uk many family carers are being pushed to the edge, like dorothy. i'm on my knees. i'm on my knees with exhaustion. the strain of having to do it all on our own. we're left here with nobody. there's no care package, no accessibility to services. we feel completely and utterly isolated and scared. today's report from the regulator, the care quality commission, warns of the serious impact staffing shortages are having across the health and care system in england. job vacancies in care homes have risen from 6% to 10% in five months. nursing homes are de—registering because they can't get nurses. it concludes urgent action is needed. we're calling for, in our report, increased funding to stabilise
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the adult social care workforce. and that benefits everybody, has a ripple effect, a positive ripple effect right across health and social care. and without that stability, without that stable, adult social care workforce, there's the real risk of a tsunami of unmet need causing instability right across the system. the government has said it is putting £162 million into boosting the recruitment and retention of care staff and that it appreciates their dedication and tireless work. for many years, this has been a workforce that is under incredible pressure. but, of course, that is intensified at this time, particularly as we have 1.1 million vacancies, there is a lot of competition for labour, so it is a worry, and that is why we have announced this £162.5 million today which is there to effectively retain and to build extra capacity, and also bring in thousands of new people. whilst welcoming the money, councils and care organisations say it won't be enough. alison holt, bbc news.
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joining me now is neil russell, chairman of pj care, which provides of care for adults with degenerative conditions such as dementia, huntington s, parkinson s and those with brain injuries. the company employs 250 staff at its eagle wood site in peterborough and 220 staff at sites in milton keynes. good to have you with us, mr russell. where do you see the problem stemming from, why is there such a shortage in the care system of staff? it such a shortage in the care system of staff? , ., , ., ., ., of staff? it is a combination of issue, obviously _ of staff? it is a combination of issue, obviously we _ of staff? it is a combination of issue, obviously we have - of staff? it is a combination of issue, obviously we have had| of staff? it is a combination of - issue, obviously we have had brexit, so we have lost a large pool of staff coming in from europe, and on top of that we have had two of the hardest years anyone can ever remember particularly in the care sector, working under really difficult conditions, and now we the
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vaccination coming in, people are choosing to leave. they are feeling pressure, some many staff in the care sector have had enough, the majority vast majority of care homes cannot afford to pay or compete with the hospitality sector, and when staff are struggling to put food on the table, they, they are look... go into a job where if they get something wrong, if they are tired and make mistakes they are not going to kill somebody, and taking that stress an pressure away from them becomes more attractive. so faff staff are leaving. in becomes more attractive. so faff staff are leaving.— becomes more attractive. so faff staff are leaving. in which case how do ou staff are leaving. in which case how do you solve _ staff are leaving. in which case how do you solve those _ staff are leaving. in which case how do you solve those problems - staff are leaving. in which case how do you solve those problems you i staff are leaving. in which case how i do you solve those problems you have identified? paying more is often said that, that is what businesses need to do when there is a shortage of staff to attract people to it, especially where there is pressure and huge responsibility on the staff in that sector. iterate and huge responsibility on the staff in that sector.— and huge responsibility on the staff in that sector. we need to pay more. pi in that sector. we need to pay more. pj confidence — in that sector. we need to pay more. p] confidence care, _ in that sector. we need to pay more. p] confidence care, we _ in that sector. we need to pay more. p] confidence care, we are _ in that sector. we need to pay more. p] confidence care, we are in - in that sector. we need to pay more. p] confidence care, we are in a -
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pj confidence care, we are in a fortunate position in we are not tied into local authority income rates, so our income is higher, we can pay a real living wage but if every care home could do that we could compete with the hospitality sector, set prices and enable them to put a pound on their wage, we need to attract new staff into the industry, when people are looking at what, looking at a newjob, 50 pence, a pound and hour will make a difference, being able to pay more will bring more people into the sector, but then we need to afford to retain them, provide them with good benefit, package, provide them with training so they can do the job, provide them with enough colleagues so they can can do it well, and not having to work the amount of overtime staff had to work in the last two years, just to ensure, the people who work in the care industry are incredible. they do a fantasticjojob, care industry are incredible. they do a fantasticjo job, they give and
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they give and they give, and they... some understandably are getting very tired, and they need to take a break. hopefully many who are leaving will come back, because they come back to a job they love, but it's, you know, we need to be able to replace those, without the money to replace those, without the money to attract staff, when you are looking for a newjob, a pound and hour makes a big difference to a lot of people. if hour makes a big difference to a lot of --eole. , , of people. if there is this imminent crisis ahead — of people. if there is this imminent crisis ahead of— of people. if there is this imminent crisis ahead of the _ of people. if there is this imminent crisis ahead of the winter, - of people. if there is this imminent crisis ahead of the winter, do - of people. if there is this imminent crisis ahead of the winter, do you i crisis ahead of the winter, do you think it would be feasible to look beyond our own shores and to try and recruit from elsewhere, to even as a temporary measure to fill that shortage, in the same way that the government has done with the hgv license e? ~ ,,., , .., license e? absolutely, if we can attract staff _ license e? absolutely, if we can attract staff but _ license e? absolutely, if we can attract staff but we _ license e? absolutely, if we can attract staff but we need - license e? absolutely, if we can attract staff but we need to - license e? absolutely, if we can l attract staff but we need to bring people in from everywhere. being caring is not unique to the british,
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many of our staff are from overseas, and we are fortunate some of our european staff have chosen to stay, if we can bring more people in europe, reducing the minimum rate of pay, in order to provide them with, so they can work here, would be an easy place to start, so, care homes can advertise, we can bring people in from across europe, orfurther afield. that will plug the gap. that will enable homes not to have to close beds, they will be able to admit people. the problem isn'tjust the care homes won't be able to admit new residents or closing, because that is happening hospitals won't be able to discharge patient, and therefore hospitals won't be able to admit new patients who need their care, who need hospital care, and that is the knock on effect, and thatis and that is the knock on effect, and
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that is going to affect everybody in the country, it is notjust care homes, this short staff shortage will affect anybody who is going to need hospital treatment, over the next six to 12 months. fik. need hospitaltreatment, over the next six to 12 months.— need hospitaltreatment, over the next six to 12 months. 0k. thank you very much- — the man accused of fatally stabbing the conservative mp, sir david amess, will appear at the old bailey later today. ali harbi ali was arrested following the attack at a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea, last friday. the 25—year—old has been charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts. a new nationwide advertising campaign is being launched in the uk, to encourage more people to come forward for covid booster vaccines and the winter flu jab. it comes amid growing calls for the government to re—introduce restrictions in england to slow the spread of the virus and protect the nhs. yesterday more than 50,000 covid cases were recorded in the uk for the first time since the middle ofjuly. rhaya barton reports.
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many adults and most children will be offered a free flu vaccine this winter. if you're over 50 or in an at risk group, you'll also need a covid—19 booster. that's the message from the government in their latest coronavirus advertising campaign, urging all those eligible to get both their covid—19 booster vaccines and their winter flu jab as soon as possible. you will start seeing it across tv and social media from tonight, after cases topped 50,000 for the first time in three months. we know from the studies that after your two doses of the covid jab, the immunity starts to wane. it doesn't mean it completely goes, but it lessens. therefore, there is that chance that you won't be immune enough to fight off an infection if you are infected by covid—19. so, therefore, to get the booster just means we're getting you all prepared as we head through to the winter months. and there's a message for young people, too. from today, parents of children aged
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between 12 and 15 will be able to book first dose covid vaccinations online, rather than waiting for them to be delivered at school, with appointments available as soon as tomorrow. the recent rising level of infection has led to calls for the government to look again at reintroducing some restrictions. but, for now, it insists vaccinations are the solution. rhaya barton, bbc news. i'm joined now by adam finn, a professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. what is your view on the booster campaign, should the gap between the second dose and the third dose be shortened? 50 i second dose and the third dose be shortened?— shortened? so i think this recent discussion _ shortened? so i think this recent discussion about _ shortened? so i think this recent discussion about the _ shortened? so i think this recent discussion about the gap - shortened? so i think this recent discussion about the gap is - shortened? so i think this recent. discussion about the gap is probably driven largely by logistic considerations, so the focus in the
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nhs england that are trying to get this to run, are trying to match up the number of vaccine doses available and staff available to give them, with the number of people coming through. so i think it is really round that, just trying to get things to run efficiently, that is the reason this is being discussed. obviously, the gap between the first two doses and the third dose is important, in the sense that you don't want to be imnewsing people who don't need to be immunised, but this adjustment would really make very little difference one way or another if it was made. difference one way or another if it was made-— difference one way or another if it was made. . , .. .. ,., was made. 0k. on a practical point, if --eole was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are — was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting _ was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting to _ was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting to hear - was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting to hear about i if people are waiting to hear about being invited for the booster dose, what is the point at which their mown the friday the first two vaccinations begins to wayne, when is the point they need to be extra careful about how they are interacting with people, if there is a point that has been identified. quite, i mean that is the right wray to put the question. there really isn't a point, and to put the question. there really
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isn'ta point, and in to put the question. there really isn't a point, and in fact, the protection against serious illness, thatis protection against serious illness, that is afforded by two doses of either of the or any of the vaccines that we have been using through the year, is really very well maintained, so people now, everyone those who are the most elderly, who got the vaccines earliest in the programme, are still in very good shape when it comes to being protected. and it's a gradual. the beginning if you like of a fall off overtime. there is no need to panic about this, getting a booster is extremely valuable thing to do, once it is offered, and because that will, particularly if you are one of the first in line, the most elderly people, people who are immunised a long time back, that will help increase protection, it is not pass if people are suddenly in a risk situation that they faced last winter, they are already still well protected and this just adds that extra bonus protection on top. lanthem extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to — extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to giving _ extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to giving the _ extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to giving the booster doses, would it not reach more
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people, more quickly, if the doors were thrown up, and a walk in system was operated rather than individually waiting for people to take up the invitation and come in? well, again, that is a question round logistic, and i think the folks that are running this are doing their best to find a way where on the one hand, you clearly want the clinics you have got fully staffed and with plenty of people to immunise, but you equally don't want to inconvenience people by having them all show up on the same day and hang round and not get the vaccines they need. so i think you know, we do have to hand it over them, to work out the best way of doing this. people are saying it has been slow, it has only been going three weeks and they have immunised... people. what i was trying to get at is what should the priority be, to vaccinate as many as possible or more important to vaccinate the right people, those who are most at risk and have a more targeted approach. my and have a more targeted approach. my personal view it is very much the
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latter, i really don't think we should be giving out boosters to everybody willy—nilly, particularly people who don't need them at this point, that is a kind of a waste of vaccine in fact, it is much better to do what we did the first time round and target the people that most need the vaccines first, because that is the way we will get the most impact out of the programme as it goes forward, so yes, i would be in favour of trying to structure this as best we can. professor finn, thank you. let's ta ke let's take a look at them whether with nick miller. weather trends a little milder today. the wind will ease gradually as a day goes on and coming from north—west we see cloud and showers across many areas as we go through the afternoon. north—east scotland becoming dry with increasing amounts of sunshine. eight or nine whereas
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for most of the uk, 10—14. of sunshine. eight or nine whereas for most of the uk, 1044. again with the breeze easing. overnight, freshening up western areas. clear skies to the east, mist and fog patches around with the lowest temperatures across the eastern parts. we will see a touch of frost. some spots in scotland getting two or below freezing. any mist and fog patches clearing, sunny spells out there, patchy rain for parts of rain, some more substantial rain and stronger winds reaching to northern ireland and western scotland later on saturday. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... buckingham palace says the queen spent wednesday night in hospital for "preliminary checks", but is now back at windsor castle and is in good spirits. a cinematographer has died, after actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set
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of his new film in the united states. the director was also injured. friends and colleagues of halyna hutchins have been paying tribute. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema. the care watchdog for england warns staff shortages will leave a "tsunami" of people without care this winter, unless immediate action is taken. a new advertising campaign launches to encourage more people to get coronavirus booster vaccines and the winter flu jab, as covid case rates continue to rise across the uk. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good morning. ireland are underway in their final cricket world cup t20 qualifying group match. it's a winner takes all match. if ireland beat namibia,
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they'll be into the super 12 stage, which starts tomorrow. ireland won the toss and elected to bat. they've just got underway in the last half an hour, ireland are going well, 60 without loss after 6 overs. well, yesterday scotland made it through to the main draw for the first time in their history. they comfortably beat 0man by eight wickets for a place in the super 12's and will play in the same group as india, new zealand and pakistan. scotland are ranked 14th in the world and almost missed out on this tournament altogether after coming within one defeat of being knocked out. i don't think we need to do anything else different. we have won three out of three, beaten top six nation bangladesh, so i don't think we need to change anything. maybe if anything, bangladesh need to change a few things, because they have struggled in this group, like we knew they would. associate cricket is tough and, yeah, i think we just need to keep doing what we're doing. west ham are unbeaten
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in their europa league group after a convincing victory over genk. they beat the belgium side 3—0, jarrod bowen, with the 3rd in the 59th minute. so the knockout phase beckons, with west ham comfortable at the top of their group and yet to concede a goal. rangers have revived their hopes of reaching the knockout stages with a 2—0 against danish side brondby at ibrox. leon balogun scoring his first goalfor the club. manager steven gerrard said it was close to a perfect performance. tottenham may be regretting giving some of their key players a rest for their latest europa conference match, after losing 1—0 to dutch side vitesse arnhem. maximillian wittek scored the only goal in the second half. tottenham had left out harry kane and son heung—min. the defeat now leaves them third in group g. so, a tough night for tottenham and an even worse one, for their former manager, jose mourinho. his roma side were thrashed 6—1 by norweigen side bodo glimt.
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it's the first time a side mourinho has managed has conceeded six. england women host northern ireland in world cup qualifying tomorrow, in their first competitive fixture at the new wembley stadium. leah williamson will continue to captain the side in the absence of steph houghton who's injured. however, head coach sarina wiegman refused to say whether the arsenal defender would get thejob on a more permanent basis. we haven't had staff and the other ones in our group, and they have captained the team before. we just take a little time and whenever the form is well, is fit, first, performs well and comes into the squad i can see how everyone relates and what's best for the team, but for now, she is doing a very good
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job. andy murray says he did not make the right decisions and had a poor attitude on court after losing in the second round of the european open in antwerp. murray lost in straight sets, but took the second set to a tightbreak. his opponent, diego schwartzman, said it was a pleasure to play against murray, who is one of his idols. it was the first time the two had ever played competitively. finally, this week's bbc sports desk podcast looks at the importance of black history month in sport. it includes a wide ranging interview with rugby world cup—winning captain siya kolisi. among the topics is the prevalence of abuse on social media aimed at sports people. kolisi recounted his own experiences of hatred as a black man, married to a white woman in south africa. it's horrible. it's honestly, people call you all kind of things and sometimes i wonder if
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they think we don't have feelings, or this stuff doesn't matter to us, because every now and then, it makes me not appreciate the good parts which is sad because there are always those people, they go so far beyond. you should be getting that kind of heat like that. just in the last few minutes, the rfu have confirmed they've launched an official bid to host the women s rugby world cup in 2025. more on the bbc sport website, and you can listen to the latest sports desk podcast now on bbc sounds. let's return now to our top story and police in the us state of new mexico are investigating, after a woman died and a man was injured when the actor alec baldwin fired a gun on a film set. halyna hutchins, a director of photography, died of her injuries and the film director, joel souza, received emergency care.
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cbs news correspondent laura podesta joins us from new york. what do we know about the circumstances? ie, how did the gun come to be loaded? a lot of people in hollywood and worldwide are asking that question. these firearms that are used on movie sets including westerns are normally real firearms that are then loaded with blanks. it's unclear what kind of projectile was loaded into this gun that created a situation where alec baldwin picked it up and fired it and killed this 42—year—old cinematographer and injured the 48—year—old director, joel souza, who we are told was injured but released from the hospital overnight. after an actress working on the film tweeted about it, that's how we receive the information. we don't know the extent of the injuries, we know that
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the production of this film which is called rust has been paused. following this incident. iterate called rust has been paused. following this incident. we have been hearing — following this incident. we have been hearing tributes _ following this incident. we have been hearing tributes about - following this incident. we have been hearing tributes about the | been hearing tributes about the scimitar giver, halyna hutchins, what more do we know about her? iterate what more do we know about her? we are what more do we know about her? - are hearing tributes, one person said she was at great cinematographer, had realised, was a rising star, she was director of photography on this, originally from ukraine and worked as an investigative journalist on british documentaries prior to working in film and had recently in 2019 been selected by an american cemetery is as a rising star. an outpouring of support for herfamily as a rising star. an outpouring of support for her family in the wake of this tragedy. the director, joel souza, is there an update on his condition? we don't, we have that tweet from
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frances fisher, the actress who was playing alongside alec baldwin in this film, she was actually tweeting in order to clarify some misinformation that was being propagated on twitter and she said no, he has been released from hospital, but did not give any indication if he had undergone surgery or what kind of injuries he had sustained during this accident. will there be some kind of investigation?— will there be some kind of investitation? ~ , , ., investigation? absolutely. the santa fe county sheriffs _ investigation? absolutely. the santa fe county sheriffs office _ investigation? absolutely. the santa fe county sheriffs office is _ fe county sheriffs office is investigating. we know they questioned alec baldwin yesterday. he was photographed looking very distraught, on the phone, pacing the parking lot outside of the sheriffs office. i'm sure they will be interviewing everyone who was around the gun when it was fired yesterday. they are likely going to be reaching out to the director, joel souza now that he is out of the hospital and able to talk to them. and they will want to speak with the armourer, the
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person that was tasked with handling the weapons, the prop weapons on film sets, to figure out what went wrong, what was loaded into this gun in order to make it be a fatal incident. ., ~ in order to make it be a fatal incident. ., ,, , ., in order to make it be a fatal incident. ., ~' , ., ., in order to make it be a fatal incident-— in order to make it be a fatal incident. ., ,, , ., ., , ., incident. thank you for the update. thanks, incident. thank you for the update. thanks. ben- _ the assisted dying bill, which would allow terminally ill patients to seek assistance to end their lives, is to be debated again in parliament today. if passed, it would enable adults of sound mind with less than six months to live, to be provided with life—ending medication. 0ur reporter graham satchell has been speaking to the husband of tina humphrey, who took her own life after being diagnosed with terminal cancer, about why he supports a change in the law. tina humphrey became a household name in 2012. her routines with her rescue dog chandi on britain's got talent stole the hearts of the public. they went all the way to that year's final.
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she was amazing. an amazing woman. she was incredibly intelligent, determined, wonderful person. yes, just an incredible woman. steve and tina met in 2015. it was love at first sight. just a week before their wedding, tina was diagnosed with an aggressive form of skin cancer. her father and her mother had both died of cancer. and she had seen what happens at the end of it and she was determined that wasn't going to happen to her. she desperately wanted to live. she hadn't had much happiness in her life before she met me. then she finally thought she was truly happy and she really, really wanted to live.
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and that's why she fought it so hard. when the time eventually came, tina wanted to be able to say goodbye properly. she wanted to be fully aware and in control at the end. we went into the garden and tina took a cocktail of pills that she'd saved up. but, tragically, and because of the stupid laws in this country, where she couldn't get advice from a doctor, or a prescription that would ease her passing, her calculations were wrong. it was exactly a textbook thing of what she had wanted to avoid. because that is what she'd seen her parents go through and she wanted to avoid that.
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she didn't want to shorten her life, she wanted to shorten her death. that was the important thing, and she wanted it to be peaceful and calm. and it turned out a nightmare for her and for me. because i want to remember her happy, smiling face. and, instead, ioften remember her tortured face when she was dying. the proposed new law being discussed today is short with few details, but it does say assisted dying would only be an option for someone who was terminally ill, mentally competent and in their final months of life. two independent doctors and a high courtjudge would have to assess each request. critics are worried, particularly about safeguards and coercion. about people feeling pressured to end their own life.
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as a disabled person, i've had people say to me, if my life was like yours, i'd kill myself. i've been told, people like you shouldn't be allowed to have children. so it doesn't take too much of a step to see how disabled people could be seen to not have a value, to not contribute to society, to actually be a cost to society and would be at some point on the list to have their life ended. religious leaders like the archbishop of canterbury have expressed profound disquiet. rather than accepting what they call assisted suicide, we should aim to live in a society that assists people to live. yes, help people to live if they can live a quality of life, _ yes, help people to live if they can live a quality of life, not when they're desperate and it's their own decision to say, you know, it's enough, it's enough for me now. who's the archbishop of canterbury to tell tina that she should suffer longer? you know, it's wrong.
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this is grace, another rescue dog trained by tina. having grace has helped steve cope with the loss of his wife. he now wants other people in tina's position to be able to die with dignity. graham satchell, bbc news. i'm nowjoined by nikki kenward, a campaigner for disability rights and against assisted dying. she is paralysed from guillain—barre syndrome which is a rare condition that affects the nerves. it's good to have you with us. your reaction to the fact this bill is getting a second reading in parliament later? i getting a second reading in parliament later?— getting a second reading in parliament later? i think it's a dangerous _ parliament later? i think it's a dangerous bill. _ parliament later? i think it's a dangerous bill. i _ parliament later? i think it's a dangerous bill. i think- parliament later? i think it's a dangerous bill. i think it's - parliament later? i think it's a | dangerous bill. i think it's also extremely na ve. would you like to me to explain that?— extremely na ve. would you like to me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look at — me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look at the _ me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look at the word _ me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look at the word na ve, - me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look at the word na ve, if- me to explain that? please do, yes. if we look at the word na ve, if we i if we look at the word na ve, if we lived in a world where we cared a
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great deal about disabled people, and valued their worth in society and valued their worth in society and we look after old people properly, felt we could learn from them, they were present in lots of our daily decision—making, if careful or better, if people living at home had better care, then you could look at society and see can we possibly do this? but until that day, it's not safe. it's dangerous. and it's na ve. i understand what people are saying and i was in intensive care five months, not able to move, locked in, not able to speak, in excruciating pain. iwas in hospital a year, i understand
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about going through pain and being afraid. but if you take me being in hospital in that situation, and then bring it forward to a time when heaven forbid a timeless bill became legal, the people around my bed might be having a very different conversation. especially if i had signed an advance directive. a conversation about how much would it cost to keep me alive? a conversation about my worth. a conversation about my worth. a conversation about my family, who would have said if it had happened years ago, and it had been legal, we don't think she'd want to live. let me make something clear to you. i learned from those moments that i
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wanted to be alive. really wanted to be alive. human spirit is a lot stronger than people think. so i would have been disposed of and absolutely terrified. not able to do anything about it. it's too dangerous and it's na veto believe that we live in society where we could cope with this. it’s could cope with this. it's very movint could cope with this. it's very moving to — could cope with this. it's very moving to hear _ could cope with this. it's very moving to hear you _ could cope with this. it's very moving to hear you talk- could cope with this. it's very| moving to hear you talk about could cope with this. it's very - moving to hear you talk about this and your fears around this based on what you went through. i suppose those who support this change in the laws are doing so from the point of care and concern were perhaps someone knows they have a condition that could worsen, they have expressed before it gets to the point where they are unable to communicate that, that they want
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their life to be brought to an end peacefully and to stop them from getting to a situation where they are in more pain and this would simply allow their wishes to be implemented at a point where they can no longer express it themselves? if you are talking about the right to die, the right to die is actually dare i say it a sort of oxymoron. how can you have a right to do something that you don't have anything about? people talk about their choice, but as so many people have said, using your choice, your rights so called, puts other people's choices and rights in jeopardy. i understand, obviously i do, that people are in terrible
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situations, but going along the street asking people their opinions, saying would you like to be like this, which is what they must have done to get these people to say, no i wouldn't, i'd done to get these people to say, no iwouldn't, i'd rather die, obviously they are not going to say that. it's the sort of emotional blackmail. that. it's the sort of emotional blackmail-— that. it's the sort of emotional blackmail. �* , ., , blackmail. are there, is there any sort of middle _ blackmail. are there, is there any sort of middle ground, _ blackmail. are there, is there any sort of middle ground, that - blackmail. are there, is there any sort of middle ground, that if - sort of middle ground, that if certain safeguards and protections were put in place, that would make something like this more acceptable, or is it an outright red line for you? or is it an outright red line for ou? ., ~' , ., or is it an outright red line for ou? . ,, ,., ., or is it an outright red line for ou? . ,, ., ., ., you? thank god we are not good at safeguards. — you? thank god we are not good at safeguards, are _ you? thank god we are not good at safeguards, are we? _ you? thank god we are not good at safeguards, are we? look- you? thank god we are not good at safeguards, are we? look at - you? thank god we are not good at safeguards, are we? look at those | safeguards, are we? look at those kids all over the country. we don't do very well with things like that. we didn't do very well with covid.
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this has just happened to us, covid, is happening. we are looking at it. people are in court fighting because their relatives disappeared, this is mencap saying it, not new, some tens of thousands of disabled people. so i'm sorry, there is no argument until the world is a very different place. i don't see any sign, i was in hospital last yearfor place. i don't see any sign, i was in hospital last year for a short time and i had to be brought home. because they didn't know how to care for disabled people. and all of my doctors talking said they don't know what to do. it’s doctors talking said they don't know what to do. 3 , . doctors talking said they don't know what to do. �*, , . ., ., what to do. it's such an emotive issue, what to do. it's such an emotive issue. l'm _ what to do. it's such an emotive issue, i'm really _ what to do. it's such an emotive issue, i'm really glad _ what to do. it's such an emotive issue, i'm really glad we - what to do. it's such an emotive issue, i'm really glad we have i what to do. it's such an emotive i issue, i'm really glad we have had your thoughts and heard about your experience on this matter. we must
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leave it there, thank you very much. thank you. just a reminder... if you need help and advice regarding any of the areas involved in this issue, such as bereavement, emotional distress and support for carers, there are links on the bbc actionline website. speaking in the house of lords a short while ago, baroness meacher who proposed the assisted dying bill, read out a statement from the veteran labour politician lord field of birkenhead who is dying. just spent a period in a hospice and i'm not well enough to participate entered a's debate. if i had been, i would have spoken strongly in favour of a second reading. i changed my mind on assisted dying when an mp friend was dying of cancer and wanted to die early, before the full horror effects set in, but was denied this opportunity. the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg, has insisted that mps must be able to justify the cost
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of repairing the houses of parliament, to the taxpayer. an extensive survey has revealed thousands of issues with the building, including cracks found in the stonework, widespread water damage, and outdated electrical systems. 0ur political correspondent, peter saull reports. for centuries, it has been a proud symbol of our democracy, but parliament seems rather shy these days, hiding behind a web of scaffolding. inside, they have been assessing the extent of the damage. the lords looks as grand as ever. beneath it in the basement, though, there are scenes like this. more than 50 specialists have spent a combined total of more than 4,500 hours investigating the building, during recess periods. more than 2,000 rooms and spaces were examined, with experts recording thousands of issues with stonework, water damage and outdated electrical systems. it's an absolutely fascinating building, but there are problems there.
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there are water leaks, there are issues with the sewage, there are issues with the electrics. the team who run the building on a day—to—day basis, it is a safe building. but you need to do a project on this scale to really preserve the building for generations to come. the restoration of this building is one of the longest—running sagas in british politics. it has been three and a half years since mps voted to refurbish it, but it is still not clear how long it will take, where the mps and peers will go in the meantime, and how many billions of pounds it will cost. it is going to be an expensive project, and that is why it mustn't be any more expensive than it has to be _ i think the country at large is very proud of the palace of westminster. it is an international symbol, but it is also a statement, isn't it, of our belief in our democracy? that our democracy is something that it is worth being bold about and saying to the world it is something that is important, is great and indeed is beautiful. and i think our building does that.
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but we have a responsibility to taxpayers to keep the costs under control. more surveys will take place over the winter and into next year. some progress has already been made. the elizabeth tower, home to big ben, has been gradually coming out of its shell. but returning the whole palace of westminster to its former glories will be a long, painstaking task. pop—star ed sheeran will be following in the footsteps of dolly parton, eltonjohn and orlando bloom to become the latest famous face to read a bedtime story, on the children's channel, cbeebies. he'll be reading a book about a little boy with a stammer, a speech disorder that the singer also struggled with as a child. hello, my name is ed. when i was little, i had a stutter, and that means that when i spoke, sometimes the words got a bit stuck on the way out. and it made me feel different because i would be in school, the teacher would ask a question
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i knew the answer to, i would put my handed the air and when it came to my turn to answer, i could never get the words out. i used to worry that i could never speak without stuttering, but now i sing and talk to people over time, sometimes lots of people. perhaps you have a stutter too or you know somebody who does. tonight's bedtime story tonight isjust for you, it is about a little boy who had a stutterjust like i did. it is called i talk like a river, byjordan scott and sidney smith. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. weather turns a little milder today. the wind will ease gradually as a day goes on and the breeze coming from north—west we see cloud and showers across many areas as we go through the afternoon. north—east scotland and northern isles becoming dry with increasing amounts of sunshine. eight or nine whereas for most of the uk, 10—14. again with that breeze easing.
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overnight, freshening up again across western areas. cloud and showers around. clear skies to the east, mist and fog patches around with the lowest temperatures across the eastern parts. we will see a touch of frost on the ground. some spots in scotland getting to, or just below freezing. any mist and fog patches clearing, sunny spells out there, patchy rain for parts of wales, some more substantial rain and stronger winds reaching to northern ireland and western scotland later on saturday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits and back at windsor castle, after spending wednesday night in hospital for �*preliminary checks'. a cinematographer has died after being injured by a prop gun fired by actor alec baldwin. the director of the star's new film was also seriously injured in the incident on the film's set in the united states. tributes are now being paid to halyna hutchins, who was a2. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema. the care watchdog for england warns staff shortages will leave a tsunami of people without care
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this winter, unless immediate action is taken. a new advertising campaign launches to encourage more people to get coronavirus booster vaccines and the winter flu jab, as covid case rates continue to rise across the uk. hello, my name's ed. when i was little, i had a stutter. and coming up... ed sheeran joins the a—team of stars who've read a cbeebies bedtime story — the musician will read a book about a boy who has a stutter next month. buckingham palace says the queen is back at windsor castle — and in good spirits — after spending a night in hospital for "preliminary medical checks". the 95—year—old monarch was said to have been disappointed, after being forced to cancel a visit to northern ireland earlier in the week.
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her hospital admission was not related to coronavirus. here's our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. it was the day after hosting this reception at windsor castle that buckingham palace announced that on medical advice the queen wouldn't be travelling to northern ireland on wednesday afternoon. she'd been advised to rest for the next few days but was in good spirits. it's now emerged that later that day, the queen was driven to king edward vii hospital in central london to undertake what have been termed preliminary investigations. no details have been released as to what exactly the tests were for. what has been made known is this was not covid—related. the queen has undertaken a very busy schedule recently. she attended a service at westminster abbey a week last tuesday and was seen using a walking stick for the first time at a public event. two days later, she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament.
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in between times, she was carrying out duties at windsor castle, including virtually welcoming the new governor general of new zealand. the images of the queen since her return from the summer break in balmoral have been of an engaged and alert monarch, still enjoying meeting people and carrying out her duties with enthusiasm. but she is now 95 years old and the news that she spent a rare night in hospital will inevitably cause concern. the palace have sought to reassure. she's said to be in good spirits. it's understood that on her return from hospital yesterday afternoon, she was back at her desk and back at work. sarah campbell, bbc news. a little earlier, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell told us buckingham palace hasn't always been clear about what's been happening. officials at buckingham palace have not been giving us a complete, reasonable picture of what has been occurring. the media was led to believe on wednesday that the queen was resting at windsor castle, that's what we, the bbc, reported, and other branches of the media
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reported to our viewers, listeners and readers. in point of fact, she was being brought into a hospital in central london for these preliminary investigations. now, one can understand the palace's point of view, it is that the queen is entitled to medical confidentiality, to patient privacy, notwithstanding that she is the head of state and millions of people here and around the world will be concerned to know that she is all right. quite how the palace can have believed that they would have got away with it, as it were, bringing her into a central london hospital, 0k, a private hospital, but with all the people who would have known what was happening, and of course, they were smoked out last night by the sun newspaper, which reported that she had been brought into hospital. now, here it seems to me is the problem. rumours and misinformation proliferate, thrive, when there is an absence of good, proportionate, trustworthy information, and i think that is what the media will be feeling this morning. now, we're told last night, by buckingham palace, that she is back at her desk,
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undertaking light duties, and that she's in good spirits, that handy phrase that the palace dusts off at moments such as this. and we must hope that we can rely on what the palace is now telling us. a cinematographer has died and a director has been wounded after hollywood actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on a film set in the united states. police in new mexico said mr baldwin discharged the weapon during filming filming had been taking place on a small ranch, which is a popular location for movie production, in the desert close to the city of santa fe in central new mexico. halyna hutchins who was 42, was working as director of photography on the film. she died in hospital. the biography on her website says she was selected as one of american cinematographer s rising stars of 2019. these images show alec baldwin, visibly distressed, in the car park
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of the santa fe county sheriff's office, shortly after the shooting. police say the actor was questioned after voluntarily appearing at the station and that no charges have been filed. 0ur correspondent laura podesta has been following developments from new york. . these guns, these firearms, that are used on movie set, including westerns are normally real firearms that are loaded with blanks so it is unclear what kind prof geck tile was loaded into this gun, that created the situation where alec baldwin picked it up and fired it, and killed this 42—year—old cinematographer, and injured the 48—year—old directorjoel sousa joel sousa, who we are told was injured but released from the hospital overnight. after, after a, who was
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working on this film tweeted about it, we don't know the extent of his injuries now, we now know the production on this film has been paused followling this incidents. the santa fe county sheriffs office is investigating, we know they questioned alec baldwin yesterday, he was photographed looking very distraught on the phone, pacing the parking lot outside of the sheriff's office, there are i am sure going to be interviewing everyone who was round the gun when it was fired yesterday, they are likely going to be reaching out to the directorjoel sousa joel sousa, now that he is out the hospital and able to talk to them. and they will want to speak with the armourer, that is person who is tasked with handling all of the weapons, all of the prop weapons on film sets to figure out what went wrong, what was loaded into this gun, in orderto, to make wrong, what was loaded into this gun, in order to, to make it be a fatal incident.
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members from across the film industry having been paying tribute to halyna hutchins. the actorjoe manganiello, who worked alongide the cinematographer for archenemy, said ms hutchins was "an incredible talent and great person", calling it "a horrible tragedy". the directorjames gunn also shared his condolences. and adam egypt mortimer, who was the director of archenemy, shared an image of the cinematopher alongside his message... earlier he told us how he met halyna and about her talent as a film—maker.
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i met her before i'd seen any of her work, i met her at a film festival, and within a few moments of talking to her i felt like she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art, and like, sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema that i wanted to work with her, just from talking to her. you find sometimes you find that special connection with somebody and, you know, oh, you're going to be a partner for me. and one of the things that i loved so much about her, she's ukrainian, and she had this incredible european sensibility, so on ourfilm, which was quite low budget and strapped for resources and we had a day once, where the main actor in the particular scene, didn't, couldn't show up because he got suddenly sick, and we were going to have to make up something brand—new on that day, and when i explained to her 6:00am in the morning, i said "halyna, i'm about to go the trailers with actors that you have, i'm going to write something new and we are going to figure out what to do." she got so excited and she said, "oh, you mean we're going to shoot
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it in the european style", meaning she was so interested in the idea of finding something in the moment, we're rising to a challenge, not a challenge because there is something difficult but a challenge in the sense of working with what is around you, to transcend the circumstances and turn it into art, and that was the thing ijust loved so much about her, and was really looking forward to see how she was going to grow as an artist. there was no way to get her to compromise on a single shot in your movie, she was going to make it beautiful, and fight to get a little extra time or a little extra whatever she needed, and it was just wonderful to be able to collaborate with somebody like that. steven hall is a director of photography and second unit director who's worked on films such as fury and war and peace. hejoins me now. how can something like this happen
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when we have post production cgi effects can be added later why does there need to be a firearm that can cause this much damage, actually on set these days?— cause this much damage, actually on set these days? good afternoon, what a tra t ic set these days? good afternoon, what a tragic accident _ set these days? good afternoon, what a tragic accident that _ set these days? good afternoon, what a tragic accident that we _ set these days? good afternoon, what a tragic accident that we were - a tragic accident that we were hearing about this morning, as someone who spends a lot of time on movie and tv sets, using weapons, sometimes 100 plus weapons on big battle scenes, it is surprising that with the protocols we have if place today to protect both ourselves and the actors, that something like this has happened. you are right, it has been quite a thing for the last two or three years to dispense with firing blank, from replica gun, practical guns on set and actually using the technology we have to create exactly the same effect in post, one obviously has to rely on the actor to mime or mimic the
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recoil of the weapon, but everything else can be added in post.— else can be added in post. indeed, and i else can be added in post. indeed, and i mean. _ else can be added in post. indeed, and i mean, when _ else can be added in post. indeed, and i mean, when something - else can be added in post. indeed, and i mean, when something like. else can be added in post. indeed, i and i mean, when something like this happens, the nature of that team, the production they are working, so closely together, for an intense period, i mean, the impact on, of course, on halyna hutchins's family but those who are working on the fill, the distress that must cause must be immense.— must be immense. totally heart-wrenching. - must be immense. totally heart-wrenching. you - must be immense. totally i heart-wrenching. you know, must be immense. totally - heart-wrenching. you know, one heart—wrenching. you know, one should never suffer any sort of hardship, injury, and certainly not death. it is unforgivable and thankfully is incredibly rare, but when it does happen, one has to look at the reasons why this accident happened and of course an accident doesn'tjust happen, something has gone wrong here, and you know, that needs to be investigated fully and
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without speculating on the reasons why this accident has happened, i am sure it will be a very thorough investigation. and steven, for viewers who are not as familiar with, myself included the individual roles, what does a director of photography do, the role she was doing on set? fin a director of photography do, the role she was doing on set?— director of photography do, the role she was doing on set? on a movie, a director of — she was doing on set? on a movie, a director of photography _ she was doing on set? on a movie, a director of photography is _ director of photography is responsible for the visual look of the film, in terms of the photographic look, and working very closely with the production designer who makes an designs the sets or has the sets made, she is part, they, he, are part of a team that bring the visual translation of the director's vision, if you like, to the screen, as a director of photography, one is often not actually operating a camera, but on certain smaller budget films and certainly there are some dop who like to direct themselves so they are operating the camera as well.
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steven hall, many thanks indeed. a two—minute's silence has been held for the conservative mp sir david amess after he was killed at a church in essex last week. the southend west mp was stabbed last friday while holding a constituency surgery at belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea. the silence was observed across southend in his memory. the headlines on bbc news... the queen is back at windsor castle and said to be in good spirits,
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after spending a night in hospital for preliminary investigations. police in the united states are investigating the death of a cinematographer who was injured when actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his new film, also seriously injuring the director. a tsunami of people will be left without the care they need this winter, unless something is done to boost an �*exhuasted and depleted' work force, according to england's care regulator. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dugall. good morning. it's a winner takes all match. if ireland beat namibia, they'll be into the super 12 stage, which starts tomorrow. ireland won the toss and elected to bat.
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they've just got underway in the last hour, we will keep you up—to—date with that and you can follow it on the website. england women host northern ireland in world cup qualifying tomorrow, in their first competitive fixture at the new wembley stadium. leah williamson will continue to captain the side in the absence of steph houghton who's injured. however, head coach sarina wiegman refused to say whether the arsenal defender would get thejob on a more permanent basis. we haven't had steph and the other ones in our group, and they have captained the team before. we just take a little time and whenever the form is well, is fit, first, performs well and comes into the squad i can see how everyone relates and what's best for the team, but for now, she is doing a very good job.
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finally, this week's bbc sports desk podcast looks at the importance of black history month in sport. it includes a wide ranging interview with rugby world cup—winning captain siya kolisi. among the topics is the prevalence of abuse on social media aimed at sports people. kolisi recounted his own experiences of hatred as a black man, married to a white woman in south africa. it's horrible. honestly, people call you all kind of things and sometimes i wonder if they think we don't have feelings, or this stuff doesn't matter to us, because every now and then, it makes me not appreciate the good parts which is sad because there are always those people, they go so far beyond. you should be getting that kind of heat like that. you shouldn't be getting that kind of hate like that.
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you can get more on the website. we will be back later. there's a warning that a "tsunami" of people in england who rely on social care will be unable to access support this winter, unless a staffing shortage is addressed. a report from the care quality commission says the workforce is "exhausted and depleted" with care providers already having to turn away patients. it says urgent action must be taken to get through the next few months safely. yesterday the government announced an extra 162 million pounds to boost the adult social care workforce. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. the unmet need of which today's report warns is already a reality for the cooks. melvin has a rare brain condition and, unable to get any support, dorothy is caring on her own. he can't get out of a chair on his own. he can't mobilise on his own. he can't go up and down the stairs on his own. he can't wash, dress, shower. it's just full—on 24/7 caring.
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melvin was sent home by the nhs injune. for a short time, care workers came in, then they said they didn't have enough staff to continue. that was 12 weeks ago. according to the charity carers uk many family carers are being pushed to the edge, like dorothy. i'm on my knees. i'm on my knees with exhaustion. the strain of having to do it all on our own. we're left here with nobody. there's no care package, no accessibility to services. we feel completely and utterly isolated and scared. today's report from the regulator, the care quality commission, warns of the serious impact staffing shortages are having across the health and care system in england. job vacancies in care homes have risen from 6% to 10% in five months. nursing homes are de—registering because they can't get nurses. it concludes urgent action is needed.
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we're calling for, in our report, increased funding to stabilise the adult social care workforce. and that benefits everybody, has a ripple effect, a positive ripple effect right across health and social care. and without that stability, without that stable, adult social care workforce, there's the real risk of a tsunami of unmet need causing instability right across the system. the government has said it is putting £162 million into boosting the recruitment and retention of care staff and that it appreciates their dedication and tireless work. for many years, this has been a workforce that is under incredible pressure. but, of course, that is intensified at this time, particularly as we have 1.1 million vacancies, there is a lot of competition for labour, so it is a worry, and that is why we have announced this £162.5 million today which is there to effectively retain and to build extra capacity, and also bring in thousands of new people.
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whilst welcoming the money, councils and care organisations say it won't be enough. alison holt, bbc news. let us bring you some breaking news now, on covid. the latest figures from the office now, on covid. the latest figures from the office for now, on covid. the latest figures from the office for national statistics the suggest 1.1 million people in the uk would test positive for covid-19, the people in the uk would test positive for covid—19, the week ending the 16th october. that is the highest number since the end ofjanuary. that is one in 60 people, up from one in 65, the previous week, so thatis one in 65, the previous week, so that is a trend continuing to increase the number of coronavirus infections, this is the latest estimates from the office for
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national statistics, survey, that is a separate set of data from the daily figures that we bring you. but thatis daily figures that we bring you. but that is suggesting that the number of people with covid—19 was one in 60 people, that is 1.7% of the population, and that is up from one in 65 the previous week. we'll bring you more details on that as get it here on bbc news. a new nationwide advertising campaign is being launched in the uk, to encourage more people to come forward for covid booster vaccines and the winter flu jab. it comes amid growing calls for the government to re—introduce restrictions in england to slow the spread of the virus and protect the nhs. yesterday, more than 50,000 covid cases were recorded in the uk for the first time since the middle ofjuly. rhaya barton reports. many adults and most children will be offered a free flu vaccine this winter. if you're over 50 or in an at risk group, you'll also need a covid—19 booster. that's the message from the government in their latest coronavirus advertising campaign, urging all those eligible to get
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both their covid—19 booster vaccines and their winter flu jab as soon as possible. you will start seeing it across tv and social media from tonight, after cases topped 50,000 for the first time in three months. we know from the studies that after your two doses of the covid jab, the immunity starts to wane. it doesn't mean it completely goes, but it lessens. therefore, there is that chance that you won't be immune enough to fight off an infection if you are infected by covid—19. therefore, to get the booster just means we're getting you all prepared as we head through to the winter months. and there's a message for young people, too. from today, parents of children aged between 12 and 15 will be able to book first dose covid vaccinations online, rather than waiting for them to be delivered at school, with appointments available as soon as tomorrow. the recent rising level of infection has led to calls
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for the government to look again at reintroducing some restrictions. but, for now, it insists vaccinations are the solution. rhaya barton, bbc news. let's have a look at how the uk is performing in comparison to other european countries as of yesterday. here are the top 10 european countries forfully vaccinating their citizens. the uk had an early start onjabs, but as you can see it is now 9th place, with 67.8% of the population double jabbed. compare that to portugal at the top, at 86.8%, spain, ireland and italy are also outperforming the uk. earlier i spoke to adam finn, a professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, about whether the gap between people's second vaccine dose and third booster shot, should be reduced
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soi so i think this recent discussion about the gap is probably driven largely by logistic considerations so the focus in nhs england that are trying to get this to run, are trying to get this to run, are trying to get this to run, are trying to match up the number of vaccine doses available and staff available to give them with the number of people coming through, so i think it is really round that, just trying to get things to run efficiently that is the reason this is being discussed. obviously, the gap between the first two doses and the third dose is important, in the sense that you don't want to be immunising people who don't need to be immunised, but this adjustment would really make very little difference one way or another if it was made. difference one way or another if it was made-— difference one way or another if it was made. . , .. .. ,., was made. ok. on a practical point, if --eole was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are — was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting _ was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting to _ was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting to hear - was made. ok. on a practical point, if people are waiting to hear about i if people are waiting to hear about being invited for the booster dose, what is the point at which their mown friday the first two vaccinations starts to wayne, when
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is the point they need to be be extra careful about how much they are interacting with people, if there is such a point identified. —— wane. there is such a point identified. -- wane. . , ., , wane. that is the right way to put the question- _ wane. that is the right way to put the question. there _ wane. that is the right way to put the question. there really - wane. that is the right way to put the question. there really isn't i wane. that is the right way to put the question. there really isn't a| the question. there really isn't a point and in fact the protection against serious illness that is afforded by two doses of either of orany afforded by two doses of either of or any of the vaccines that we have been using through the year, is really very well maintained, so, people now, even those who are the most elderly, who got the vaccines earliest in the programme, are still in very good shape when it comes to being protected, and it's a gradual beginning if you like of a fall off overtime, so there is no need to panic about this, getting a booster is extremely valuable thing to do, onceit is extremely valuable thing to do, once it is offered, and because that will, particularly if you are one of the first in line, the most ellie people, people who were immunised a long time bag ba back, that will help increase protection, it is not
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as if people are suddenly in ace, situation they faced last winter, they are already still well protected and this just adds that extra bonus protection on top. omen extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to — extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to giving _ extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to giving the _ extra bonus protection on top. when it comes to giving the booster doses, would it not reach more people, more quickly, if the doors were thrown up, and a walk in system was operated rather than individually waiting for people to take up the invitation and come in? well, again, that is a question round logistics, and i think the folks that are running this are doing their very best to try and find a way where, on the one hand, you clearly want the clinics you have got fully staffed and with plenty of people to immunise, but you equally don't want to inconvenience people by having them all show up on the same day and hang round an not be able to get the vaccines they need. so i think you know, we do have to hand it over to them to work out the best way of doing this. people are saying it has been slow, it has only been going three weeks and they have immunised
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lots of people. three weeks and they have immunised lots of people-— lots of people. what i was trying to tet autois lots of people. what i was trying to get autois what _ lots of people. what i was trying to get autois what should _ lots of people. what i was trying to get autois what should the - lots of people. what i was trying to get autois what should the priority | get autois what should the priority be, to vaccinate as many people as possible or more important to vaccinate those who are mores a risk and have a targeted approach? mt; and have a targeted approach? iji personal and have a targeted approach? ie’i: personal view and have a targeted approach? m1: personal view it and have a targeted approach? iji1 personal view it is and have a targeted approach? iji1: personal view it is very much and have a targeted approach? ii1 personal view it is very much the latter, i really don't think we should be giving out boosters to everybody willy—nilly, particularly people who don't need them at this point, that is a waste of vaccine, in fact, it is much better to do what we did the first time round, and target the people that most need the vaccines first, because that is the vaccines first, because that is the way it will get the most impact out of the programme as it goes forward. so, yeah, iwould be in favour of trying to structure this as best we can. a man has been arrested on suspicion of possession of drugs with the intent to administer them in lincoln. the 35—year—old was arrested in the early hours of this morning. lincoln police said on their twitter page that the arrest followed some swift and proactive work from them in partnership with staff from a local night club.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. weather turns a little milder today. the wind will ease gradually as the day goes on and coming from north—west we see cloud and showers across many areas as we go through the afternoon. north—east scotland becoming dry with increasing amounts of sunshine. eight or nine, whereas for most of the uk, 10—14. again with the breeze easing. overnight, freshening up western areas. clear skies to the east, mist and fog patches around with the lowest temperatures across the eastern parts. we will see a touch of frost. some spots in scotland getting two or below freezing. any mist and fog patches clearing, sunny spells out there, patchy rain for parts of rain, some more substantial rain and stronger winds reaching to northern ireland and western scotland later on saturday.
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buckingham palace says the queen is in good spirits and back at windsor castle, after spending wednesday night in hospital for "preliminary checks". a cinematographer has died, after being injured by a prop gun fired by actor alec baldwin. the director of the star's new film was also seriously injured in the incident on the film's set in the united states. tributes are now being paid to halyna hutchins, who was 42.
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she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema. the care watchdog for england warns staff shortages will leave a "tsunami" of people without care this winter, unless immediate action is taken. the latest data from the office for national statistics suggests 1.1 million people or one in 60 across the uk had covid in the past week, the highest number since the end of january. and coming up, ed sheeranjoins the a—team of stars who've read a cbeebies bedtime story. the musician will read a book about a boy who has a stutter next month.
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the assisted dying bill, which would allow terminally ill patients to seek assistance to end their lives, is to be debated again in parliament today. if passed, it would enable adults of sound mind with less than six—months to live, to be provided with life—ending medication. 0ur reporter graham satchell has been speaking to the husband of tina humphrey, who took her own life after being diagnosed with terminal cancer, about why he supports a change in the law. tina humphrey became a household name in 2012. her routines with her rescue dog chandi on britain's got talent stole the hearts of the public. they went all the way to that year's final. she was amazing. an amazing woman. she was incredibly intelligent, determined, wonderful person. yes, just an incredible woman. steve and tina met in 2015. it was love at first sight. just a week before their wedding, tina was diagnosed with
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an aggressive form of skin cancer. her father and her mother had both died of cancer. and she had seen what happens at the end of it and she was determined that wasn't going to happen to her. she desperately wanted to live. she hadn't had much happiness in her life before she met me. then she finally thought she was truly happy and she really, really wanted to live. and that's why she fought it so hard. when the time eventually came, tina wanted to be able to say goodbye properly. she wanted to be fully aware and in control at the end. we went into the garden and tina took a cocktail of pills that she'd saved up. but, tragically, and because of
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the stupid laws in this country, where she couldn't get advice from a doctor, or a prescription that would ease her passing, her calculations were wrong. it was exactly a textbook thing of what she had wanted to avoid. because that is what she'd seen her parents go through and she wanted to avoid that. she didn't want to shorten her life, she wanted to shorten her death. that was the important thing, and she wanted it to be peaceful and calm. and it turned out a nightmare for her and for me. because i want to remember her happy, smiling face. and, instead, ioften remember her tortured face when she was dying.
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the proposed new law being discussed today is short with few details, but it does say assisted dying would only be an option for someone who was terminally ill, mentally competent and in their final months of life. two independent doctors and a high courtjudge would have to assess each request. critics are worried, particularly about safeguards and coercion. about people feeling pressured to end their own life. as a disabled person, i've had people say to me, if my life was like yours, i'd kill myself. i've been told, people like you shouldn't be allowed to have children. so it doesn't take too much of a step to see how disabled people could be seen to not have a value, to not contribute to society, to actually be a cost to society and would be at some point on the list to have their life ended. religious leaders like the archbishop of canterbury have expressed profound disquiet.
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rather than accepting what they call assisted suicide, we should aim to live in a society that assists people to live. yes, help people to live if they can live a quality of life, not when they're desperate and it's their own decision to say, you know, it's enough, it's enough for me now. who's the archbishop of canterbury to tell tina that she should suffer longer? you know, it's wrong. this is grace, another rescue dog trained by tina. having grace has helped steve cope with the loss of his wife. he now wants other people in tina's position to be able to die with dignity. graham satchell, bbc news.
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speaking in the house of lords this mornig, baroness meacher who proposed the assisted dying bill, read out a statement from the veteran labour politician lord field of birkenhead in which he says he is dying. just spent a period in a hospice and i'm not well enough to participate in today's debate. if i had been, iwould have spoken strongly in favour of a second reading. i changed my mind on assisted dying when an mp friend was dying of cancer and wanted to die early, before the full horror effects set in, but was denied this opportunity. a lot of figures here to take on better latest figures for the office of national statistics suggests one in 13 children in school years 7—11 in 13 children in school years 7—11 in england were estimated to have tested positive for covid—19 this week. that's 7.8% of children in
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those school years, 7—11 in england. the next highest group of primary school—age children, in 26 children aged 2—6. the infections in adults, estimated infections aged 35—49, increased to 1.5 of the age group this week. up from 1.2% last week. the rate for older teenagers up 1.2% compared with 1.1% last week. positive news, older adults seeing much lower rates. 1% and below. those are the latest statistics from the office for national statistics. the point has been made we are approaching half term holidays. children already on half term holidays and it will become evident whether that makes an difference. we
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will watch that trend. 0ur statisticians will be looking at that and picking up any details and bring them to you here. as we've been hearing, police in the us state of new mexico are investigating after a woman died and a man was injured when the actor alec baldwin fired a gun on a film set. halyna hutchins, a director of photography, died of her injuries and the film director, joel souza, received emergency care. ben simmons is the managing director of bare arms, which provides training for the use of firearms on sets, and he is a technical advisorforfilm and tv. earlier, he told us how weapons are used on film sets what a lot people don't realise is a lot the firearms are real guns, either guns that have been deactivated or guns that still function as they should do. and when we talk about blank ammunition, blank ammunition is the same
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as live ammunition, except without the projectile in, the only thing it doesn't have is that bit at the end which comes out the end of the gun. guns are inherently dangerous, and even with blanks, blanks can kill and maim and hurt. and so we have to put in a lot of procedures in place to ensure that filming is as safe as possible when these things are being used. any prop gun is treated the same as a real gun, so if there is a mix up, if there's a mistake on set, if somebody picks up the wrong gun, they are treated exactly the same way, and that way, firstly the training, making sure that the performers that are handling them are well trained, so they know how to handle them, they know what is safe and what is not. second part of that is the education piece with the rest of the crew, so that they know what is safe to film and what is not, and so that is how it starts and that is way before production can begin. 0n the production itself, you always try and avoid pointing
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a firearm directly at anybody, and when it is loaded and when you are firing, unless there is other things in place, such as protective screens, you will, you should never, ever fire a blank directly at somebody, because you can have anything coming out the end of that barrel. that blank still has a lot of power behind it, it can push out anything that gets stuck in the barrel. another thing that armourers do is to ensure that the weapon itself is clean, there is nothing lodged in the barrel, so that if a blank is fired, it's not going to fling anything out, and then it is just a tight control of the angles, making sure that where it can be done, a firearm is always pointing away from somebody, it never points directly at somebody. police in western australia have called off a search for a four—year—old girl, who they believe was abducted. chloe smith went missing from a remote campsite last saturday. she was last seen sleeping next to her younger sister's cot, in a separate part of her family's
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tent, but in the morning, she was gone. the military have been helping the police look for her. 0ur correspondent phil mercer gave us this update. police believe that she was asleep in the tent that her family was staying in. that about 1:30am last saturday morning, localtime, her mother saw cleo asleep in a separate room of the tent, next to the cot occupied by her younger sister. at 6am, when the family got up, cleo was missing and the police believe that the tent had been unzipped and cleo was taken away. so, almost exactly a week later, police say that this search at the campsite, about 540 miles to the north of perth, will be suspended and what they are looking at now is to get security vision from businesses within a 500—mile
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radius of this campsite, so now the inquiry is spanning a vast area of western australia and beyond. how to care for migrants is once again proving a divisive issue across the european union, with some of its member states accusing belarus, which is not part of the eu, of trying to flood them with people desperate to get into europe. we've looked at the political issues, but now let's hear from some of those making the dangerous journey. 0ur correspondent paul adams has been to meet one of those groups, and he sent this special report. trapped in the forest on the eu's eastern frontier, a group of syrians exhausted and afraid. "we are absolutely shattered," the voice says. "we have been walking since four in the morning." but how did they get here? two weeks earlier, theirjourney
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starts with a tearful farewell in northern iraq. and an optimistic selfie at the airport. "we are leaving for belarus," says idris. we went to erbil. the city is full of travel agents catering for would—be migrants. the first step, a visa. murad isn't giving anything illegal, but he still doesn't want to be identified. if you have passports, we send it to the belarus tourism companies and they send us invitations. so when people come to you, they are not... you know they are not going to belarus for a holiday? of course. you know they are going to europe? yeah. next, a smuggler. he is preparing to take a group through belarus to europe.
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translation: if you are using a smuggler, it is going to cost| you a lot at the borders. it will cost between $9,000 and $12,000. by now, idris and his friends have reached the bela russian capital, minsk. the airport is jammed with people making the same journey. the group has been told to go to a hotel and wait for instructions. are you worried about the journey? translation: of course we are. we are crossing - the border illegally. we don't know what will happen. we can't trust anyone, | not even our smuggler. we are putting our. faith in god's hantz. we are putting our. faith in god's hands. in may, the president of belarus, alexander lukashenko, threatened to flood the eu with drugs and migrants. revenge, it seems, for eu sanctions. soon thousands were
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crossing into lithuania. we went to see the border for ourselves. the guards here still catching dozens of migrants every day. lithuania says belarus is actively helping them to cross illegally. in some places, the border is little more than a gap in the forest. we can see some belarussian border guards coming right now. until the crisis began, there was regular communication between the two sides, but after president lukashenko threatened to allow migrants into the eu, all of that cooperation stopped and people started to flood across this border, and you can see just how easy it was. but thousands of migrants are now in detention, more than 700 here in a former prison. this, for some, is where hopes and dreams come to an abrupt end. they can apply for asylum, but most won't get it. after several days of silence, idris
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and his friends are back in touch, heading into poland. he couldn't film, but says belarussian soldiers loaded 50 migrants onto a truck, took them to the border and showed them the way. out of the forest and into the eu, in cars arranged by smugglers. with the help of belarus and at the cost of $7,000 each, idris and his friends have made it. they'll apply for asylum and see what happens next. paul adams, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the queen is back at windsor castle and said to be in good spirits, after spending a night in hospital for preliminary investigations. police in the united states are investigating the death of a cinematographer who was injured when actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on the set of his new film, also seriously injuring the director.
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1.6 million people, or around one in 60 across the uk, had coronavirus in the past week according to the latest official data. that's the highest number since the end of january. a group of muslim women from bradford have been given a taste of army life. they were invited by the 4th armoured brigade in york, also known as the black rats, to see how they operate. it's hoped community activities like this will inspire more muslims, especially women, tojoin the british armed forces. the bbc asian network's shabnam mahmood has more. 0h! excellent. put through their paces, army—style. these women from bradford are trying out some military exercises. among them, selena, who is a data analyst, and iram, a beauty therapist. it is scary. it's something i've not done before, but it is exciting and it's an achievement.
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when you get up that six foot wall and to the other side, yeah, it does feel good. we've done an assault course and we've been going under trenches, overa rope, climbing walls, i've had a few falls, got soaked, but i'm sure it'll be fine. currently there are around 500 muslims in the army, but only a tiny fraction of that figure are women. it is something the military is hoping to change. it's really, really important to get different people in, _ because we need different people that think in different _ ways so that, actually, _ we can be the army of the future. activity days like this, tough as they seem, are part of a drive to get more muslim to learn about the army and its operations and perhaps to encourage a few to pursue a career in the british armed forces. i've actually enjoyed today. by the end of today i probably... if i was much younger, i would have joined the army, because i know there are so many different career aspirations. at this stage in my life, probably not, because i'm quite
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established in a career. i think at the age of 16, i probably would have at least considered it as an opportunity, because you have a perception of what the army is and coming here and seeing all the opportunities available to you, it has definitely opened up my eyes. after today i would definitely lookj into it, yeah, just because they've got so many amazing experiences and, you know, all these _ different opportunities, - so i would definitely look more into it, yeah. nice and fast, let's go, let's go! more boot camp style training has been planned over the coming months to target muslim women from across yorkshire tojoin the military. shabnam mahmood, bbc news, york. the fossilised remains of the largest tricera—tops dinosaur ever discovered have been bought for almost $8 million at an auction in paris. the three—horned, eight metre long skeleton called big john was unearthed in the american state of south dakota. the bbc�*s tim allman has the story.
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# big john, big john...# when you see him in all his glory, the nickname makes perfect sense. a giant of the late cretaceous period and a discovery that's almost unprecedented. translation: these auctions - are absolutely rare and exceptional, simply because the raw material is rare. we often find dinosaur fossils, but it is more difficult to find connected, complete, or almost complete fossils. the remains of big john consists of more than 200 bones, around 60% of his body, that had to be painstakingly reassembled by specialists in italy. translation: what's here? there's mostly the vertebrae, the lowerjaw of the skull and the leg bones, so it's really a nightmare to reassemble because they're quite fragile and quite heavy bones at the same time.
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the triceratops dates back more than 65 million years, a plant—eating dinosaur, one of the dominant creatures of its era. so, a large turnout for this auction and, in at the end, big john went for a big price... bangs gavel. applause. ..almost five times the estimate. the buyer happy, but wanting to keep a low profile. it's been acquired by an american collector and that individual - is absolutely thrilled with the idea of being able to bring a piece - like this to his personal use. although these fossilised remains are now part of a private collection, the auction houses says the buyer may lend them out to a museum or gallery for public viewing. # big bad john. either way, big john is coming home. tim allman, bbc news.
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popstar ed sheeran will be following in the footsteps of dolly parton, eltonjohn and orlando bloom to become the latest famous face to read a bedtime story, on the children's channel, cbeebies. he'll be reading a book about a little boy with a stammer, a speech disorder that the singer also struggled with as a child. hello, my name is ed. when i was little, i had a stutter, and that means that when i spoke, sometimes the words got a bit stuck on the way out. and it made me feel different, because i would be in school, the teacher would ask a question i would know the answer to, i would put my handed the air and when it came to my turn to answer, i couldn't get the words out. i used to worry that i would never be able a speak without stuttering, but now i sing and talk to people all the time, sometimes lots of people. perhaps you have a stutter too, or you know someone who does. well, tonight's bedtime story tonight isjust for you, it is about a little boy who had a stutterjust like i did.
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it is called i talk like a river, byjordan scott and sidney smith. jordan scott is the author of the book i talk like a river that ed sheerin reads from. he says he hopes the decision to share the experience of people who stutter will bring greater empathy from those who don't. well, as a child i stuttered, i struggled quite a lot, and i still stutter today. it's a big part of my life, and in this book, i wanted to share that gift of my father's story that he gave me, when he told me that the way that i talk, the way that i stutter, it's like the river. that changed my life. it allowed me to see my stutter
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as natural, where often times stuttering is seen as unnatural. you know, i think there's more people talking about stuttering. for me, i've experienced that as an adult, more people than when i was a child. i think people, as they gain a better understanding of stuttering, i have definitely noticed more patience and empathy. in a moment, the bbc news at one with martine croxall, but first it's time for a look at the weather. the rest of today is looking pretty similar to yesterday but more cloud around for many of us, particularly england and wales with a few scattered showers. we have a ridge of high pressure right across the country and that will keep things
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largely settled. good sunny spells around. here is the ridge of high pressure which has been moving from the south—west. we are between weather systems, this arriving just in time for the weekend. quite a bit of sunshine around in the day, further showers for england and wales. pretty well scattered, many places escaping and stay dry. variable amounts of cloud. quite a breezy afternoon and early evening. particularly across northern and eastern parts of the uk. those temperatures reach highs around 13 or 14. when you factor in the wind, it will feel cooler than that. this evening and overnight, many places will stay dry, showers fade away, much of england and wales and eastern scotland stays dry over night but we will see this weather front arrive across the far west bringing increasing cloud, increasing breeze in one or two showers. not quite as cold as further east where we could see pockets of frost, one or two locations of eastern scotland,
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eastern england. we are seeing the area via pressure, this frontal system will arrive on saturday, that will bring cloud and outbreaks of rain and it will drive in my old south—westerly, temperatures on the rise saturday and sunday. and wales later in the day. more persistent rain, we will see the strongest of the wind here, mean wind speeds, could see gusts up to 40 or 50. feeling wind speeds, could see gusts up to 40 or50. feeling mild. 14 wind speeds, could see gusts up to 40 or 50. feeling mild. 14 or 15. double figures across—the—board. double figures across—the—boa rd. into double figures across—the—board. into sunday, the frontal system pushes further east. more places seeing cloud or longer spells of rain, may be the odd shower across western scotland and northern ireland. blustery for most but when coming from the south—west. should
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feel mild. top temperatures around 16. best of the weather in the east of the country.
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the queen is back at windsor castle after spending a night in a london hospital. buckingham palace say she underwent preliminary medical checks but is in good spirits. the queen has been advised to rest after a busy schedule of public engagements. we'll bring you the latest from windsor. hollywood actor alec baldwin is questioned by police after he accidentally killed a woman with a prop gun on a new mexico film set. halyna hutchin was shot while working on the set as director of photography. the film's director was also injured and was taken to hospital. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art and the integrity of wanting to make cinema. england's social care watchdog warns that staff shortages will leave many people without help this winter.

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