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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 22, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the queen returns to windsor castle after spending wednesday night in hospital for what buckingham palace say were "preliminary checks". the actor alec baldwin has shot dead a cinematographer and seriously injured the director on the set of his new film in an incident involving a prop gun. we'll be speaking to a film director who knew the woman who died. england's care watchdog warns there will be a "tsunami of people" without the care they need this winter, unless a staff shortage is tackled. the care minister admits staffing is a worry. it's been a workforce that's under incredible pressure, but of course, that is intensified at this time, particularly as we have
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1.1 million vacancies, there's a lot of competition for labour, so, it is a worry. the assisted dying bill, which would allow terminally ill patients to seek assistance to end their lives, will have its second reading in parliament today. in cricket, scotland are through to the main draw of the t20 world cup for the first time in their history, after comfortably beating oman by eight wickets. hello, my name is ed. when i was little, i had a starter. and coming up this hour... ed sheeran will follow stars like dolly parton, tom hardy and orlando bloom and read a cbeebies bedtime story in reading a book about a boy who has a stutter.
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buckingham palace says the queen is back at windsor castle and in good spirits after spending a night in hospital for "preliminary medical checks". the 95—year—old monarch was said to have been disappointed after being forced to cancel a visit to northern ireland earlier in the week. her hospital admission was not related to coronavirus. here's our royal correspondent sarah campbell. correspondent sarah campbell. it was the day after hosting this reception at windsor castle that buckingham palace announced that on medical advice the queen wouldn't be travelling to northern ireland on wednesday afternoon. she'd been advised to rest for the next few days but was in good spirits. it's now emerged that later that day, the queen was driven to king edward vii hospital in central london to undertake what have been termed preliminary investigations. no details have been
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released as to what exactly the tests were for. what has been made known is this was not covid—related. the queen has undertaken a very busy schedule recently. she attended a service at westminster abbey a week last tuesday and was seen using a walking stick for the first time at a public event. two days later, she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament. in between times, she was carrying out duties at windsor castle, including virtually welcoming the new governor general of new zealand. the images of the queen since her return from the summer break in balmoral have been of an engaged and alert monarch, still enjoying meeting people and carrying out her duties with enthusiasm. but she is now 95 years old and the news that she spent a rare night in hospital will inevitably cause concern. the palace has sought to reassure. she's said to be in good spirits. it's understood that on her return from hospital yesterday afternoon, she was back at her desk and back at work. sarah campbell, bbc news.
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a little earlier, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell told us buckingham palace hasn't always been clear about what's been happening. officials at buckingham palace have not been giving us a complete, reasonable picture of what has been occurring. the media was led to believe on wednesday that the queen was resting at windsor castle, that's what we, the bbc, reported, and other branches of the media reported to our viewers, listeners and readers. in point of fact, she was being brought into a hospital in central london for these preliminary investigations. now, one can understand the palace�*s point of view, it is that the queen is entitled to medical confidentiality, to patient privacy, notwithstanding that she is the head of state and millions of people here and around the world will be concerned to know that she is all right. quite how the palace can have believed that they would have got away with it, as it were, bringing her into a central london hospital, ok, a private hospital,
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but with all the people who would have known what was happening, and of course, they were smoked out last night by the sun newspaper, which reported that she had been brought into hospital. now, here it seems to me is the problem. rumours and misinformation proliferate, thrive, when there is an absence of good, proportionate, trustworthy information, and i think that is what the media will be feeling this morning. now, we're told last night, by buckingham palace, that she is back at her desk, undertaking light duties, and that she's in good spirits, that handy phrase that the palace dusts off at moments such as this. and we must hope that we can rely on what the palace is now telling us. a woman has died and a man has been injured after hollywood actor alec baldwin fired a prop gun on a us film set. police in new mexico said mr baldwin
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discharged the weapon during filming for the 19th century western rust. filming had been taking place on a small ranch which is a popular location for movie productions in the desert close to the city of santa fe. the woman, who has died has been named as 42—year—old halyna hutchins, originally from ukraine. she was working as director of photography. from los angeles, our correspondent david willis has more. according to the santa fe, new mexico sheriffs department, two people were shot on the set of a western film called rust. in an initial statement, the sheriffs department said that officers were dispatched to the film set shortly
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after two o'clock in the afternoon local time, following reports that someone had been shot, and they later confirmed that two people have been shot when a firearm that was discharged by alec baldwin went off, striking the 42—year—old cinematographer halyna hutchins. she was airlifted to hospital but later died at the scene because of her injuries, as well as the 42—year—old director of the film, joel souza, who was wounded and is being treated in hospital and it is said that his injuries are critical. a statement from the production team confirmed that the incident involved the misfire of a prop gun and said that an investigation was underway. alec baldwin is both the star and the producer of rust, which is an independent film based on the story of a western outlaw haaland rust. production of the film has now been
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halted, detectives are interviewing witnesses at the scene. international cinematographers guild confirmed the death of elvis and called it in a statement devastating news. we are supporting a full investigation into this tragic event, this is a terrible loss, and we mourn the passing of a member of our guild jewellers family, they said. so far there has been no word on this incident from alec baldwin orany on this incident from alec baldwin or any of his representatives. halyna hutchins was director of photography on the 2020 action film archenemy. its director, adam egypt mortimerjoins me now. thank you very much for being with us, what is your reaction to this terrible news?— us, what is your reaction to this terrible news? . ., ., terrible news? thanks for having me. i mean, terrible news? thanks for having me. i mean. it's — terrible news? thanks for having me. i mean, it's really _ terrible news? thanks for having me. i mean, it's really unbelievable. - i mean, it's really unbelievable. halyna is, was, and incredible artist who was really just starting artist who was really just starting a career that i think people were
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really going to start to notice. and the fact that she would be killed on a set in an accident like this, it is unfathomable. everybody i have spoken to here in la, as we've been hearing the news today, itjust seems inconceivable, the level of protocol and safety that we tend to have on any production of any size, when you get down to handling weapons, handling guns, it is so involved that the fact that a gun went off and killed halyna is both shocking from an industry point of view and absolutely tragic from the point of view of knowing this amazing artist, who is suddenly not with us. we amazing artist, who is suddenly not with us. ~ ., �* ., ., , amazing artist, who is suddenly not with us. ., ., , ., , with us. we don't have many details, but have you — with us. we don't have many details, but have you got _ with us. we don't have many details, but have you got any _ with us. we don't have many details, but have you got any idea _ with us. we don't have many details, but have you got any idea how - but have you got any idea how something like this could have happened? it something like this could have happened?—
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something like this could have happened? it is hard for me to speculate _ happened? it is hard for me to speculate on — happened? it is hard for me to speculate on it. _ happened? it is hard for me to speculate on it. it _ happened? it is hard for me to speculate on it. it is _ happened? it is hard for me to speculate on it. it is more - happened? it is hard for me to speculate on it. it is more a i happened? it is hard for me to - speculate on it. it is more a sense of not being able to understand how it could happen. generally, what takes place is, if you have a weapon, if you have a gun that is capable of discharging anything, the number of people who are allowed to touch and are in control of it is very, very small and specific, and generally, there would be somebody who's job is to generally, there would be somebody who'sjob is to make generally, there would be somebody who's job is to make sure that it is safe and nobody else is going to handle it before it goes into the actor's hands, and when halyna and i made a movie last year that had a fair amount made a movie last year that had a fairamount of made a movie last year that had a fair amount of gunplay in it, and ourguns didn't fair amount of gunplay in it, and our guns didn't even actually fire anything out of them, they were designed or broken in a way so they wouldn't work, and we would still have multiple sets of hands checking them, and even in the last stage of anything, the actor himself would open it up and take a look at it and everybody was always checking to make sure there was never anything
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to be fired out of it. that's what i mean when i say it is a bit inconceivable. though i don't want to speculate on how this could have happened, and i think we are all hoping to see a really close investigation, it seems that something incredibly sloppy must of taken place. there wasjust something incredibly sloppy must of taken place. there was just a complete lack of care. at the moment when they're needed to be the most care. , , , . when they're needed to be the most care. �* , , ., , when they're needed to be the most care. , , , ., , ., when they're needed to be the most care. , ., care. just tell us a bit more about hal na, care. just tell us a bit more about halyna. who _ care. just tell us a bit more about halyna. who as — care. just tell us a bit more about halyna, who as you _ care. just tell us a bit more about halyna, who as you say _ care. just tell us a bit more about halyna, who as you say you - care. just tell us a bit more about i halyna, who as you say you worked with, as a cinematographer, and as a person? with, as a cinematographer, and as a erson? ., , with, as a cinematographer, and as a erson? . , ., , with, as a cinematographer, and as a erson? . , .,, ., , person? yeah, she was really brilliant as _ person? yeah, she was really brilliant as a _ person? yeah, she was reallyl brilliant as a cinematographer. person? yeah, she was really - brilliant as a cinematographer. one of the funny things about her to was that i met her before i had seen any of her work, i met her at a film festival and withinjust of her work, i met her at a film festival and within just a few moments of talking to her, i felt like she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of a commitment to art and integrity of wanting to make cinema, that i wanted to work with her, just from talking to her.
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sometimes you find that special connection with somebody and you know, you're going to be a partner for me. and one of the things that i love so much about her, she's ukrainian, and she had this incredible european sensibility, so come on ourfilm, which incredible european sensibility, so come on our film, which was quite low—budget and strapped for resources, and we had a day once where the main actor in a particular scene didn't show up because and we were going to have to make up something brand—new on that day. and when i explained to her, six o'clock in the morning, i said, halyna, when i explained to her, six o'clock in the morning, isaid, halyna, i when i explained to her, six o'clock in the morning, i said, halyna, i am about to go to the trailer, and we are going to figure out something new, she got so excited, and she said, you mean we are going to shoot it in the european style? meaning that she was so interested in the idea of finding something in the moment, all rising to the challenge, not a challenge, because it was something difficult, but a challenge in the sense of working with what is
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around you to transcend the circumstances and turn it into our, and that was the thing that ijust love so much about her and was really looking forward to seeing how she was going to grow as an artist. there was no way to get her to compromise on a single shot in your movie, she was going to make it beautiful and fight to get a little extra time or a little extra whatever she needed, and it wasjust wonderful to be able to collaborate with somebody like that. mam wonderful to be able to collaborate with somebody like that. adam egypt mortimer, a terrible _ with somebody like that. adam egypt mortimer, a terrible tragedy, - with somebody like that. adam egypt mortimer, a terrible tragedy, but - mortimer, a terrible tragedy, but thank you very much for your memories of halyna hutchins and working with her. and we can also talk now to the australian actor rhys muldoon, who has used guns on set many times. rhys muldoon, thanks so much for being with us. do you have any idea what could have gone wrong here on this movie set? weill. wrong here on this movie set? well, eah, wrong here on this movie set? well, yeah. sadly. — wrong here on this movie set? well, yeah. sadly. i— wrong here on this movie set? well, yeah. sadly. i do- —
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wrong here on this movie set? well, yeah, sadly, i do. obviously- wrong here on this movie set? well, yeah, sadly, i do. obviously it- wrong here on this movie set? well, yeah, sadly, i do. obviously it is- yeah, sadly, i do. obviously it is absolute speculation at this time, but if we remember the crowe incident, where it a blank that misfired, and some of the projectile came out. in a blank, there is not actually a bullet in the bullet, if that makes sense, but there is still an explosion, and if the metal casing comes out of the bullet, that is what got brandon crow, and i have to say it sounds like a very sulek case. using blanks is always difficult. —— similar case. because notjust on movie sets but if you talk about real warfare and real guns, guns often misfired. and i've just been recently working on a movie that had a lot of gunfire, a very high range of gunfire. and i
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remember the day that the producers actually held a very clearly important meeting and decided to do away with blanks altogether and use basic special effects and cgi, because you can get all of that, you really truly can, in this day and age, get those things of a gun firing without losing anything. like, realism is everything in cinema and art, but in this shot, my guess is, the first thought that i had on this is that this is a close—up of a gun being fired by the actor, very close to the frame of the camera, like, very close, because you want the eye line very close, that has misfired, that has hit the dop, and then either, because now hearing that the
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director is well has been hurt, either something has come off the french flag or the black box, like, a part of the camera, diverted and hit the director as well. because normally the director doesn't stand right next to the dop. sometimes they do, sometimes they don't, but in this case it sounds like they did. butjust the thing of blanks, when you're actually using actual explosives that close to a face is... i mean, i just explosives that close to a face is... i mean, ijust feel for everybody on that set, firstly. because, the amount of directors that i've spoken to, the amount of actors, the amount of... showbiz is, when you go and make a film or you go and make something, you have this strange, weird, dysfunctionalfamily strange, weird, dysfunctional family that strange, weird, dysfunctionalfamily that comes together to make something, and you work hard, and you love each other, so i can't even imagine the pain on that set. but the thing of... the price for
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realism, sometimes, isjust too high. like, is that little bit of the flash from the gun that important? i don't know. like i say, it isjust important? i don't know. like i say, it is just that's where my mind went when i hear that an actor has... when the dop has been shot, that suggests to me a big close—up, like, i don't know if you can see it on the frame, but, like, that kind of shot. it's so horrific. and i do think that blanks will probably go the way of the horse and cart, after this, because i mean, you have had it with brandon lee, and you have now had it on the recent film rust, and it is tragic, and it's also, i would have to say, too, it's some systemic... like, i have no idea who would be to blame for that, because everything that i've ever worked on,
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everything that i've ever worked on, every armour is so careful and so precise, and everything... on the film i recently made, even my plastic gun, my pretend gun, i had to sign out, sign in, every day, every moment is so carefully done. so, that's why this particular case is so incredibly baffling. so, i just hope that the inquiry is really thorough, because it makes a big difference. , , ~ ., ~ difference. rhys muldoon, thank you so much for— difference. rhys muldoon, thank you so much for your _ difference. rhys muldoon, thank you so much for your time _ difference. rhys muldoon, thank you so much for your time and _ difference. rhys muldoon, thank you so much for your time and talking . difference. rhys muldoon, thank you so much for your time and talking us| so much for your time and talking us through all the mechanics of how a film set does work in terms of the use of guns. rhys muldoon there, an actor who has done a lot of work with guns, as he was telling us. we can now hear from the cbs news correspondent laura podesta, who can join us from new york. an absolute tragedy, do we know anymore about the circumstances of what happened and how it could have happened? unfortunately at this point, we
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don't _ unfortunately at this point, we don't know what led up to this stunt going _ don't know what led up to this stunt going horribly wrong yesterday. it happened around 1.50 in the afternoon, mountain time, and the two who— afternoon, mountain time, and the two who were injured were immediately rushed to the hospital. director_ immediately rushed to the hospital. directorjoel souza survived, he has been _ directorjoel souza survived, he has been discharged from hospital at this hour, — been discharged from hospital at this hour, according to an overnight work_ this hour, according to an overnight work by— this hour, according to an overnight work by one — this hour, according to an overnight work by one of the stars in the movie — work by one of the stars in the movie but_ work by one of the stars in the movie. but again, we don't know what was in _ movie. but again, we don't know what was in the _ movie. but again, we don't know what was in the gun, as that gentleman who was— was in the gun, as that gentleman who wasjust describing, was in the gun, as that gentleman who was just describing, was was in the gun, as that gentleman who wasjust describing, was it was in the gun, as that gentleman who was just describing, was it a blank— who was just describing, was it a blank that— who was just describing, was it a blank that discharged in a way that was able _ blank that discharged in a way that was able to kill someone? or was potentially live ammunition put into this gun? _ potentially live ammunition put into this gun? our affiliates in los angeles — this gun? our affiliates in los angeles has been speaking with experts, — angeles has been speaking with experts, hollywood weapons experts, and one _ experts, hollywood weapons experts, and one man, will davies, mentioned that in— and one man, will davies, mentioned that in western films, in these historicai— that in western films, in these historical films, a lot of times, reat— historical films, a lot of times, real firearms are used, but what is fake real firearms are used, but what is take about— real firearms are used, but what is fake about it is what is put inside the firearm. so, what was put inside
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this gun. _ the firearm. so, what was put inside this gun. we — the firearm. so, what was put inside this gun, we don't know at this point, — this gun, we don't know at this point, that— this gun, we don't know at this point, that is going to be part of the santa — point, that is going to be part of the santa fe county sheriff office investigation. they are of course going _ investigation. they are of course going to — investigation. they are of course going to be interviewing alec baldwin, now that the director has been _ baldwin, now that the director has been discharged from the hospital overnight, perhaps they will be talking — overnight, perhaps they will be talking to him, and everyone else who was— talking to him, and everyone else who was on— talking to him, and everyone else who was on the set that day, the armourer. — who was on the set that day, the armourer, the person who is in charge — armourer, the person who is in charge of— armourer, the person who is in charge of the weapons on the set, of course, _ charge of the weapons on the set, of course, too~ — charge of the weapons on the set, of course, too. tell charge of the weapons on the set, of course. too-— course, too. tell us a bit more about halyna _ course, too. tell us a bit more about halyna hutchins, - course, too. tell us a bit more about halyna hutchins, the - course, too. tell us a bit more - about halyna hutchins, the woman who was killed, an up—and—coming am at top river, were told, extremely talented? 50 top river, were told, extremely talented? ., . ,, top river, were told, extremely talented?— talented? so tragic. she was originally _ talented? so tragic. she was originally from _ talented? so tragic. she was originally from ukraine, - talented? so tragic. she was originally from ukraine, she | talented? so tragic. she was - originally from ukraine, she worked as an _ originally from ukraine, she worked as an investigative journalist on british— as an investigative journalist on british documentary production is prior to working in film, according to her— prior to working in film, according to her website, it said that she was selected _ to her website, it said that she was selected as — to her website, it said that she was selected as one of american cinematographer's rising stars in 2019 _ cinematographer's rising stars in 2019. there is an outpouring on social— 2019. there is an outpouring on social media talking about what a wonderful person, she was, what a
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artist _ wonderful person, she was, what a artist she _ wonderful person, she was, what a artist she was, what an eye she had, she had _ artist she was, what an eye she had, she had pictures and videos of riding — she had pictures and videos of riding horses in the days prior to this tragic— riding horses in the days prior to this tragic accident, so clearly she was enjoying her time this tragic accident, so clearly she was enjoying hertime in this tragic accident, so clearly she was enjoying her time in new mexico when _ was enjoying her time in new mexico when she _ was enjoying her time in new mexico when she wasn't working on the film rust _ when she wasn't working on the film rust. . ., ., , ., ., ., ., ,, rust. laura podesta, for now, thank ou ve rust. laura podesta, for now, thank you very much _ rust. laura podesta, for now, thank you very much indeed. _ there's a warning that a "tsunami" of people in england who rely on social care will be unable to access support this winter, unless a staffing shortage is addressed. a report from the care quality commission says the workforce is exhausted and depleted, with care providers already having to turn away patients. it says urgent action must be taken to get through the next few months safely. yesterday, the government announced an extra £162 million to boost the adult social care workforce. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. the unmet need of which today's report warns is already a reality for the cooks.
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melvin has a rare brain condition and, unable to get any support, dorothy is caring on her own. he can't get out of a chair on his own. he can't mobilise on his own. he can't go up and down the stairs on his own. he can't wash, dress, shower. it's just full—on 24/7 caring. melvin was sent home by the nhs injune. for a short time, care workers came in, then they said they didn't have enough staff to continue. that was 12 weeks ago. according to the charity carers uk, many family carers are being pushed to the edge, like dorothy. i'm on my knees. i'm on my knees with exhaustion. the strain of having to do it all on our own. we're left here with nobody. there's no care package, no accessibility to services. we feel completely and utterly isolated and scared. today's report from the regulator,
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the care quality commission, warns of the serious impact staffing shortages are having across the health and care system in england. job vacancies in care homes have risen from 6% to 10% in five months. nursing homes are de—registering because they can't get nurses. it concludes urgent action is needed. we're calling for, in our report, increased funding to stabilise the adult social care workforce. that benefits everybody, has a ripple effect, a positive ripple effect right across health and social care. without that stability, without that stable, adult social care workforce, there's the real risk of a tsunami of unmet need causing instability right across the system. the government has said it is putting £162 million into boosting the recruitment and retention of care staff and that it appreciates their dedication and tireless work. for many years, this has been a workforce that is under incredible pressure. but, of course, that is intensified
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at this time, particularly as we have 1.1 million vacancies, there is a lot of competition for labour, so it is a worry, and that is why we have announced this £162.5 million today which is there to effectively retain and to build extra capacity, and also bring in thousands of new people. whilst welcoming the money, councils and care organisations say it won't be enough. alison holt, bbc news. the assisted dying bill, which would allow terminally ill patients to seek assistance to end their lives, is to be debated again in parliament today. if passed, it would enable adults of sound mind with less than six months to live, to be provided with life—ending medication. i'm joined by baroness meacher, who proposed the assisted dying bill. and i'm alsojoined by dr gillian wright, who wrote an open letter
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to the health secretary opposing it, which was signed by 1,700 doctors. cani can i come to you first of all, baroness meacher, just outline to us why you are proposing this bill? because the current law, which goes back to 1961, prevents anyone helping a dying person to take their lives, even if they're suffering completely unbearably and are pleading and pleading for help to bring their suffering to an end. the sort of suffering, i think it is important to illustrate, somebody might have a wound coming through their cheek, for example, giving off their cheek, for example, giving off the most appalling odour, doctors say that clears the ward, all the other patient have to move out, but that dying person can't get away from it, and there might be vomiting constantly day and night and because they are allergic to medication, the palliative care services unfortunately can't help them.
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certain people with motor neurone disease, they gradually lose every conceivable capacity to move and bits of their body will desperately want to get out of their body, but it doesn't mean anything to them anymore. and of course there is uncontrollable pain, our opponents say, we can control pain, cancer specialists have written to me saying that that is simply not true, there are cancer patients who suffer terrible pain and we can't control it. so, the current law needs desperately to be changed. in my view, no civilised society should allow people to suffer in this way without just enabling allow people to suffer in this way withoutjust enabling them to help themselves to bring their suffering to an end. idr themselves to bring their suffering to an end. , , ., . themselves to bring their suffering to an end. , , . . ., to an end. dr gillian wright, what is our to an end. dr gillian wright, what is your answer— to an end. dr gillian wright, what is your answer to _ to an end. dr gillian wright, what is your answer to that, _ to an end. dr gillian wright, what is your answer to that, people - is your answer to that, people suffering unbearably, says baroness meacher, and some very vivid examples there?— meacher, and some very vivid examples there? meacher, and some very vivid examles there? ~ , , ., ., examples there? absolutely, and our hearts no examples there? absolutely, and our hearts go out — examples there? absolutely, and our hearts go out to _ examples there? absolutely, and our hearts go out to families _ examples there? absolutely, and our hearts go out to families and - hearts go out to families and patients— hearts go out to families and patients who have had distressing symptoms like these. but we consider
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that we _ symptoms like these. but we consider that we respond as a society to look after patients who are in those situations, that there should be a real drive — situations, that there should be a real drive and response to excellent and high _ real drive and response to excellent and high quality relative care, better— and high quality relative care, better research for medication that can help _ better research for medication that can help these situations and the response — can help these situations and the response should not be that we help patients _ response should not be that we help patients take their lives. and the prohibition of killing is one of the fundamentals of civilisation, and it is incredibly important that we don't — is incredibly important that we don't minimise or shift from preserving life to taking life, and doctors _ preserving life to taking life, and doctors up — preserving life to taking life, and doctors up and down the country are horrified _ doctors up and down the country are horrified that it might change in this way, — horrified that it might change in this way, medicine, and that we might— this way, medicine, and that we might be — this way, medicine, and that we might be required to tell patients who are _ might be required to tell patients who are coming with a terminal diagnosis — who are coming with a terminal diagnosis to say that the state would — diagnosis to say that the state would help them to take their own life. would help them to take their own life it _ would help them to take their own life. it devalues ordinary, frail huntan— life. it devalues ordinary, frail human life, and we're not prepared to do— human life, and we're not prepared to do that — human life, and we're not prepared to do that. 1, ., ,, human life, and we're not prepared todothat. ., ,, ~ to do that. baroness meacher, the oint is to do that. baroness meacher, the point is that _ to do that. baroness meacher, the point is that in _ to do that. baroness meacher, the point is that in a _ to do that. baroness meacher, the point is that in a civilised - point is that in a civilised society, everything is about
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preserving life, not taking life, and a need for more palliative care, what to use a2 that? we and a need for more palliative care, what to use a2 that?— what to use a2 that? we strongly su ort what to use a2 that? we strongly support the _ what to use a2 that? we strongly support the best _ what to use a2 that? we strongly support the best possible - what to use a2 that? we strongly i support the best possible palliative care, absolutely we do, along with everybody else. in oregon, who have had this law for 22 years, their hospice movement, who were against the law before it came in, now they are very keen on it because they say it has improved palliative care, because now, doctors and nurses have really good, honest conversations with their patients about their fears and wishes, and the palliative care services can do much more for patients because of this openness. in this country, death is a two bu, you almost don't talk about it. that is my answer to that. in other countries, like australia, that have had a bill very similar to the one we are introducing here, they, too, have invested vastly in palliative care, so they've got better palliative care services, alongside
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assisted dying. and in fact the association of cancer physicians, in their wonderful book, very balanced, they don't come down one side or the other, they say there is no reason why top—quality palliative care and assisted dying shouldn't go along side—by—side without any competition between the two. that is cancer specialists talking. and now, we have 50% of doctors wanting this bill to pass, 39% against, that is a hugein bill to pass, 39% against, that is a huge in the medical profession over the last five years, because they the last five years, because they the profession, are open about the fact that these terrible, terrible deaths are occurring, in a small minority of cases, we're not talking about a great many people here, we're talking about less than 1% of deaths, a patient may have an assisted death. obviously only if they are determined to have that death. this is not about doctors taking somebody�*s life, that is not
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what we are introducing here. some countries have laws like that, we are not proposing that here. dr gillian wright, it's not about taking life?— taking life? that is really interesting _ taking life? that is really interesting to _ taking life? that is really interesting to hear- taking life? that is really i interesting to hear because taking life? that is really - interesting to hear because one of the examples that baroness meacher cited was— the examples that baroness meacher cited was motor neurone disease, and that that _ cited was motor neurone disease, and that that would be helped by this legislation, but actually a limited measure — legislation, but actually a limited measure such as she has proposed in the house _ measure such as she has proposed in the house of— measure such as she has proposed in the house of lords would not help most _ the house of lords would not help most patients with motor neurone disease _ most patients with motor neurone disease because they don't have sufficient — disease because they don't have sufficient swallow and hand function. what has happened in canada — function. what has happened in canada is, _ function. what has happened in canada is, very similarly legislation... i'm sorry, doctor... piease— legislation... i'm sorry, doctor... please let— legislation... i'm sorry, doctor... please let me _ legislation... i'm sorry, doctor... please let me finish. so, it has been _ please let me finish. so, it has been extended in the last five years. — been extended in the last five years, and so now it is able to include — years, and so now it is able to include those who are physically ill, include those who are physically iii, and — include those who are physically iii, and in— include those who are physically ill, and in two years' time, those who— ill, and in two years' time, those who are — ill, and in two years' time, those who are mentally ill as well. so what _ who are mentally ill as well. so what you — who are mentally ill as well. so what you will have in one side of a hospitai— what you will have in one side of a hospital is— what you will have in one side of a hospital is a — what you will have in one side of a hospital is a suicide prevention programme, and then on the other side of— programme, and then on the other side of the — programme, and then on the other side of the hospital you will have doctors — side of the hospital you will have doctors who are helping patients take their own lives. so, we are
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critically— take their own lives. so, we are critically concerned there is extensive evidence from other countries _ extensive evidence from other countries that this actually leads to the _ countries that this actually leads to the devaluing of life, and it is an incredibly weak law that has been proposed _ cani can i respond, that is simply not as things are. in canada a supreme courtjudgment said somebody court judgment said somebody suffering courtjudgment said somebody suffering unbearably who was not terminally ill, it was contrary to their human rights not to be to take their human rights not to be to take their life. the parliament but i said we will not go overweight with the supreme court immediately, we will introduce a more limited law and if that works we will extend it —— the parliament over the side we will not go all the way. in canada assisted dying was led by a supreme courtjudgment going beyond terminal illness, so it is quite wrong to suggest there is no evidence of any jurisdiction that starts with
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parliament dying on assisted dying as we are proposing, very narrow and modest proposal, moving then to something broader, and it is terribly wrong to pretend, and i'm sorry, misrepresent the situation in canada which was entirely different because it was driven by supreme courtjudgment. because it was driven by supreme courtjudgment-— courtjudgment. gillian wright, where assisted _ courtjudgment. gillian wright, where assisted dying _ courtjudgment. gillian wright, where assisted dying has - courtjudgment. gillian wright, where assisted dying has been| where assisted dying has been introduced it has not been reversed, we heard origen, 22 years, it has not been changed or reversed, does that not suggest that when it is introduced it seems to work, although society seems to think it is acceptable —— we heard about oregon. i is acceptable -- we heard about oreuon. ., . , is acceptable -- we heard about oreuon. ,, . , , ., ., oregon. i think many people do not know the consequences _ oregon. i think many people do not know the consequences of - oregon. i think many people do not know the consequences of assisted | know the consequences of assisted dying in different countries. i was interested to find out an example such as belgium earlier in the year, they assessed what had happened in assisted dying over ten years
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between 2002 and 2012, they looked at the numbers for those who had assisted dying, including both assisted dying, including both assisted and euthanasia, they found one in four patients actually had assisted dying (inaudible). we are concerned there would be a coarsening of attitudes. they were elderly, frail and coma patients and in one situation if doctors become familiar that they start taking life in one situation it becomes acceptable in others, we are incredibly concerned. baroness meacher. _ incredibly concerned. baroness meacher. you _ incredibly concerned. baroness meacher, you were _ incredibly concerned. baroness meacher, you were rolling - incredibly concerned. baroness meacher, you were rolling your incredibly concerned. baroness - meacher, you were rolling your eyes when dr gillian wright talked about belgium? when dr gillian wright talked about bel ium? �* ., when dr gillian wright talked about belaium? �* . ., , ., ., belgium? belgium have always had a ve broad belgium? belgium have always had a very broad bill. _ belgium? belgium have always had a very broad bill, some _ belgium? belgium have always had a very broad bill, some countries - belgium? belgium have always had a very broad bill, some countries in - very broad bill, some countries in europe _ very broad bill, some countries in europe too, — very broad bill, some countries in europe too, including people who do not have _ europe too, including people who do not have mental capacity and so on. although _ not have mental capacity and so on. although they are relevant to this country— although they are relevant to this country we are not proposing such a bill, and _ country we are not proposing such a
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bill, and in — country we are not proposing such a bill, and in oregon the bill has remained _ bill, and in oregon the bill has remained with exactly those restrictions for 22 years and britain _ restrictions for 22 years and britain will do the same, we will not go _ britain will do the same, we will not go down the route of belgium and i not go down the route of belgium and i really— not go down the route of belgium and i really ask— not go down the route of belgium and i really ask the doctor, please, do not misrepresent what is happening because _ not misrepresent what is happening because it _ not misrepresent what is happening because it does not help anybody, concludes —— confuses people. gillian — concludes —— confuses people. gillian wright, earlier you said we need to improve palliative care, but it both a national health service and social care in this country, we know resources are so stretched, and massive staff shortages in both the nhs and social care. isn't that in some ways a dream land when you are talking about much improved palliative care as an alternative? i palliative care as an alternative? i would be really concerned if you thought we should be having assisted dying because it is cost—effective, very concerning. i was talking to an
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oncologist, palliative care is a really important resource and incredibly... it is straightforward incredibly... it is straightforward in terms of people, but what we need to do is improve access. gps need more resources, hospices need more resources. but more resources, hospices need more resources. �* . , resources. but that is the point, ou are resources. but that is the point, you are talking _ resources. but that is the point, you are talking about _ resources. but that is the point, you are talking about more - you are talking about more resources, nobody is making the point that assisted dying should be brought in because it is cost—effective but you are talking about palliative care as an alternative, but are there other resources available in an nhs and social care sector so desperately ha rd—pressed ? social care sector so desperately hard—pressed? i social care sector so desperately hard-pressed?— hard-pressed? i think there is a wisdom in _ hard-pressed? i think there is a wisdom in terms _ hard-pressed? i think there is a wisdom in terms of— hard-pressed? i think there is a wisdom in terms of resources, i hard-pressed? i think there is a l wisdom in terms of resources, we need to decide priorities and sometimes there are relatively inexpensive interventions that can make a huge difference to people.
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they require a bit of imagination and coordination of care, they require different ways of looking at care with a real drive that this is improving care, it needn't all simply be financed, it needs a whole attitude that disabled and vulnerable terminally ill patients are our priorities and we need to look after them.— are our priorities and we need to look after them. baroness meacher, it needs a change _ look after them. baroness meacher, it needs a change in _ look after them. baroness meacher, it needs a change in attitude? - it needs a change in attitude? finally i can agree on the doctor with something, we definitely need to invest _ with something, we definitely need to invest more in palliative care in this country— to invest more in palliative care in this country and that has happened in countries that have introduced assisted — in countries that have introduced assisted dying, they invest more in palliative _ assisted dying, they invest more in palliative care, so we can agree on that _ palliative care, so we can agree on that the _ palliative care, so we can agree on that. the people who would have assisted — that. the people who would have assisted death are less than 1% of deaths. _ assisted death are less than 1% of deaths, there will not be a change in culture — deaths, there will not be a change in culture because of that. at last the people — in culture because of that. at last the people who suffer most dreadfully before they die will have relief. _ dreadfully before they die will have relief, that is the change that will
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happen — relief, that is the change that will hauen. ., ,, ~ ., relief, that is the change that will ha..en_ ., ,, ~ ., , happen. baroness meacher and dr gillian wright. _ happen. baroness meacher and dr gillian wright, very _ happen. baroness meacher and dr gillian wright, very strongly - happen. baroness meacher and dr gillian wright, very strongly heldl gillian wright, very strongly held opinions on both sides of the debate, thank you so much for debating your points of view this morning on bbc news. thank you. just a reminder, if you need help and advice regarding any of the areas involved in this issue — such as bereavement, emotional distress and support for carers — there are links on the bbc actionline website. sport, and now a full round up from the bbc sport centre. mike bushell is therefore us. you are spot—on, ben. scotland are now promising to shake up cricket's elite by causing more upsets after they reached main draw of the t20 world cup for the first time in their history. they beat oman comfortably in a winner takes all final
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qualification match, as nesta mcgregor reports. scotland believed winning this game could inspire a new generation. a team unified in their quest for a third victory and unified against discrimination. oman at home wanted a good start. that is easier said than done, though. a moment of miscommunication, this runout came with just a single run on the board. but then step forward aqib ilyas to settle those nerves. scotland soon had their revenge. ilyas out for 37. oman bravely fought on, at times hitting and raising the roof. chasing 123, scotland made it look as easy as, well, abc. george munsey finding the boundary. when he went, captain kyle coetzer went big. commentator: humongous! coetzer fell for a1, but scotland eased to the win and a place in the super 12s,
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alongside cricket's biggest names. we heard the new zealand commentator saying "humongous" to describe one of the big scottish hits — no wonder the team are full of confidence going into the super 12 stage having won their qualifying group. i don't think we need to do anything else different. we have won three out of three, beaten top six nation bangladesh, so i don't think we need to change anything. if anything, bangladesh need to change a few things, because they have struggled in this group, like we knew they would. associate cricket is tough and, yeah, i think we just need to keep doing what we're doing. ireland can join scotland in the super 12 stage if they beat namibia today. that gets under way at 11. that's followed at 3pm by sri lanka v netherlands. a win for sri lanka would ensure they top the qualifying group. commentary of both games on 5live sports extra, which is on airfrom 10:1i5am.
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england are involved against the west indies, that starts tomorrow. teams will be fearing west ham as they march on unbeaten in their europa league group. they beat genk 3—0, jarrod bowen, with the third and arguably the best. so the knockout phase beckons with west ham comfortable at the top of their group and yet to concede a goal. rangers have revived their hopes of reaching the knockout stages with a 2—0 against danish side brondby at ibrox, leon balogun scoring his first goalfor the club. manager steven gerrard said it was close to a perfect performance tottenham may be regretting, giving their main players a rest for their latest europa conference match after losing 1—0 to dutch side vitesse. maximillian wittek scored the only goal in the second half. spurs had left out key players including harry kane and son heung—min. the defeat now leaves them third in group g. so a tough night for tottenham,
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and an even worse one, for former spurs bossjose mourinho. his roma side were thrashed 6—1. it's the first time a side he's managed has conceeded six — and he's taken charge of 1,008 matches in his career! andy murray is annoyed with himself. he says his attitude was poor on court, as he lost in the second round of the european open in antwerp. opponent diego schwartzman said it was a pleasure to play against murray, who is one of his idols, but still beat him 6—4 7—6. great britain won three medals on the second day of the track cycling world championships in france. josie knight, neah evans, megan barker and katie archibald claimed the final medal of the night for britain. they comfortably beat canada by five and a half seconds to claim bronze in the women's team pursuit. the men's pursuit team, and rhys britton in the scratch race, also won bronze. that's all the sport for now.
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back to you, ben. thank you. a new nationwide advertising campaign is being launched to encourage more people to come forward for covid booster vaccines and the winter flu jab. it comes amid growing calls for the government to re—introduce restrictions in england to slow the spread of the virus and protect the nhs. yesterday more than 50,000 covid cases were recorded in the uk for the first time since the middle ofjuly. let's get some analysis. joining me now is dr deepti gurdasani, clinical epidemiologist and senior lecturer at queen mary university. thanks for being with us once again. those case figures yesterday, 52,000, how worried are you by the rising case numbers? filter? 52,000, how worried are you by the rising case numbers?— rising case numbers? very worried. we are seeing _ rising case numbers? very worried. we are seeing higher _ rising case numbers? very worried. we are seeing higher than - rising case numbers? very worried. we are seeing higher than 50,000| we are seeing higher than 50,000 cases and we are not even into winter yet. cases and we are not even into winteryet. oursignificant winter yet. our significant pressures on winteryet. oursignificant pressures on the nhs and the cases
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are sadly translating into hospitalisations and deaths, even if than without vaccination, we see about 1000 deaths per week and 1000 hospitalisations per day and the british medical association says they are really struggling and very overstretched. this is not a good situation ahead of winter. but we are told may _ situation ahead of winter. but we are told may be _ situation ahead of winter. but we are told may be as _ situation ahead of winter. but we are told may be as many - situation ahead of winter. but we are told may be as many as - situation ahead of winter. but we are told may be as many as half. situation ahead of winter. but we l are told may be as many as half of those cases of schoolchildren and half term might bring a reduction in case numbers?— half term might bring a reduction in case numbers? pace waiting children are at an all-time _ case numbers? pace waiting children are at an all-time high, _ case numbers? pace waiting children are at an all-time high, we _ case numbers? pace waiting children are at an all-time high, we know - are at an all—time high, we know from the office of national statistics that one in secondary school age are infected and it is flowing back to the community and cases are rising in all age groups, including 60 plus. half—turn will help but they need to be serious plans for what will happen after half term. a very small percentage
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of adolescents in england have received a first dose compared to scotland and we have no mitigations in school apart from rapid testing of adolescents, so unless we bring back masks, ventilation and contact bubbles, contract tracing in schools which will not happen now, we will be back in the same position at the half term. ~ . ., . ., half term. what about changing the re . ime half term. what about changing the reaime for half term. what about changing the regime for the _ half term. what about changing the regime for the third _ half term. what about changing the regime for the third booster - half term. what about changing the regime for the third boosterjab, i half term. what about changing the regime for the third boosterjab, it| regime for the third boosterjab, it has to be six months after the first two, what about bringing it forward to five months, would that make sense? ~ , ,., , to five months, would that make sense? ~ , , , .,, sense? absolutely, the problem with the booster roll-out _ sense? absolutely, the problem with the booster roll-out has _ sense? absolutely, the problem with the booster roll-out has not - sense? absolutely, the problem with the booster roll-out has not been - the booster roll—out has not been that people have not been coming forward, it has been really chaotic and eligible people have not been contacted. in countries like singapore you need your booster before six months, rather than what we are having now, but the problem is that the government really needs to sort out the uptake quickly. dr deepti gurdasani, thank you very
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much for your time. the royal cornwall hospitals trust has declared a critical incident due to the pressures it's facing. the trust reported up to 100 people were waiting to be seen in a&e on wednesday, a department with a0 beds. families, friends and neighbours were urged to contact the hospital if they could help someone waiting for home care leave the ward early. now to australia — where the search for a four—year—old girl who went missing from a campsite north of perth on saturday has been called off by police. officers say they believe cleo smith — who disappeared from a remote campsite almost a week ago — has been abducted. joining me now with the latest is our correspondent phil mercer. tell us more about the case and why the search has been called off. it the search has been called off. it is almost seven days since cleo smith went missing and police believe she was asleep in the tent that her family was staying in, at
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about 1:30am last saturday morning local time her mother saw her asleep in a separate room of the tent next to the culture occupied by her younger sister. at 6am when the family got up, cleo was missing and police believe that the tent had been unzipped and cleo was taken away. almost exactly a week later police say this search at the campsite about 540 miles to the north of perth will be suspended and what they are looking at is to get security vision from businesses within a 500 mile radius of the campsite, so now the inquiry is spanning a vast area of western australia and beyond. this spanning a vast area of western australia and beyond. this story has tl’lt ed the australia and beyond. this story has gripped the australian _ australia and beyond. this story has gripped the australian media? - australia and beyond. this story has gripped the australian media? the i gripped the australian media? the western gripped the australian media? tie: western australian police
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gripped the australian media? ti9 western australian police say gripped the australian media? ti9: western australian police say this disappearance of a four—year—old child really strikes at the heart of the western australian community. these sorts of stories are very rare in australia so when they occur they make headline news, and it has brought many volunteers to join this exhaustive air and sea search of this campsite so far to the north of perth in western australia, police being supported not only by community volunteers but defence reservists too and private —— private helicopters, but no sign of cleo smith has been found so far despite one of the biggest searches western australia has seen in recent times. :, ., western australia has seen in recent times. . ~' , ., , . times. thank you very much, phil mercer in sydney. _ there's a warning that a "tsunami" of people in england who rely on social care will be unable to access support this winter, unless a staffing shortage is addressed. a report from the care quality commission says the workforce is "exhausted and depleted" with care providers already having
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to turn away patients. it says urgent action must be taken to get through the next few months safely. yesterday the government announced an extra £162 million to boost the adult social care workforce. joining me now is anita astle mbe, who is the director of national care association and managing director at wren hall nursing home. thank you very much for being with us. tell us about the staffing shortages, we read lots of stories about people going to retail, hospitality that are essentially paying more, is itjust the money or are they fed up with the workload in care homes? well, i don't think we have got anita astle, actually, she seems to have frozen in our screen. i am sorry, we will try to get back to her as soon as we can. yes, anita
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astle, thank you for being with us. why are so many people leaving the care home sector, do you think? maw; care home sector, do you think? many reasons. care home sector, do you think? many reasons- they — care home sector, do you think? many reasons. they had _ care home sector, do you think? many reasons. they had just _ care home sector, do you think? titan; reasons. they had just been through 18 months of a pandemic, like everyone, but where many people were furloughed and at home, our staff were all working through the pandemic, many of them were affected by covid and many of them were working short—staffed because of colleagues affected by covid. there was blame apportioned and cursed after covid entering care homes, there was blame when we were told we needed to advance care plan is for
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people and do not resuscitate orders were put in place, we were criticised about that. then care staff have been mandated to have vaccines when their colleagues in the nhs have not been mandated, they are aggrieved about that, then obviously we have the impact of brexit, eastern europeans leaving the country and so vacancies across all work roles and other work sectors paying more. lots of reasons why people are leaving the care sector and we need to redress that quickly. sector and we need to redress that cuickl . ., ., ,, ., ~ quickly. how do we redress that? a government — quickly. how do we redress that? a government minister, _ quickly. how do we redress that? a government minister, care - quickly. how do we redress that? a| government minister, care minister gillian keegan, was ruling out the idea of allowing more social care workers to come in from abroad, but would that be the easiest and quickest way? it
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would that be the easiest and quickest way?— would that be the easiest and auickest wa ? .., , ., ._ quickest way? it could be one way, but it is about _ quickest way? it could be one way, but it is about time _ quickest way? it could be one way, but it is about time that _ quickest way? it could be one way, but it is about time that care - but it is about time that care professionals, that is what our care staff are, professionals, are recognised for the complexity of their job. recognised for the complexity of theirjob. many people think that theyjust wipe bottoms, but they do far more than that. they give emotional support, far more than that. they give emotionalsupport, physicalsupport, emotional support, physical support, thatis emotionalsupport, physicalsupport, that is both physically and emotionally draining on them. it is about time we recognised the value and shared to the value of these workers and paid then realistic wages. i think it is shocking they can stack shelves in a supermarket, they can drive a vehicle and get paid significantly more. i they can drive a vehicle and get paid significantly more.- paid significantly more. i was readin: paid significantly more. i was reading that _ paid significantly more. i was reading that for _ paid significantly more. i was reading that for example - paid significantly more. i was reading that for example bay| paid significantly more. i was - reading that for example bay can paid significantly more. i was reading that for example bay can get £3 or e4 more and our working for
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somebody like amazon, and that is what they are doing. we somebody like amazon, and that is what they are doing.— somebody like amazon, and that is what they are doing. we get so much criticism that — what they are doing. we get so much criticism that people... _ what they are doing. we get so much criticism that people. .. our— what they are doing. we get so much criticism that people... our workers i criticism that people... our workers are absolutely exhausted. the cqc report uses that word, saying people are exhausted. they are exhausted and they need support, well—being support. that is very difficult to come by and so there is a lot we can do to show our care professionals how much we value then, but until we do that we will continue to lose them. :, ., do that we will continue to lose them. ., ,, ,., do that we will continue to lose them. . ~' ,. , do that we will continue to lose them. ., ,, y., , . do that we will continue to lose them. :, ,, , . ., them. thank you very much for your time, them. thank you very much for your time. anita — them. thank you very much for your time, anita astle, _ them. thank you very much for your time, anita astle, director - them. thank you very much for your time, anita astle, director of - them. thank you very much for your time, anita astle, director of the i time, anita astle, director of the national parent association. pop star ed sheeran will be following in the footsteps of dolly parton, eltonjohn and orlando bloom to become the latest famous face to read a bedtime story,
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on the children's channel cbeebies. he'll be reading a book about a little boy with a stammer — a speech disorder that the singer also struggled with as a child. hello, my name is ed. when i was little, i had a stutter, and that means that when i spoke, sometimes the words got a bit stuck on the way out. i did make me feel different because i would be in school, the teacher would ask a question i knew the answer to, i would put my handed the answer to, i would put my handed the air that i could never get the words out. i used to worry that i could never speak without stuttering, but now i sing and talk to people over time, sometimes lots of people. perhaps you have a stutter too or you know somebody who does. the bedtime story tonight is just for you, it is about a little boy who had a stutterjust like i did. it is called i talk like a
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river, byjordan scott and sidney smith. jordan scott is the author of the book i talk like a river, that ed sheeran reads from. he says he hopes the decision to share the experience of people who stutter will bring greater empathy from those who don't. well, as a child i stuttered, i struggled quite a lot, and i still stutter today. it's a big part of my life, and in this book i wanted to share that gift of my father's story that he gave me when he told me that the way that i told, the way that i stutter, it's like the river. that changed my life. it allowed me to see my stutter as natural, whereas often times stuttering is seen as a unnatural. i think there's more people talking about stuttering.
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for me, i've experienced that as an adult than when i was a child. for me, i've experienced that as an adult, more people than when i was a child. i think people, as they gain a better understanding of stuttering, i have definitely noticed more patience and empathy. jordan scott, the author of i talk like a river, which ed sheeran will be reading on cbeebies. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. the windmill is later today but pick up the windmill is later today but pick up again over the weekend, a ridge of high pressure, still plenty of
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showers around. —— the winds will ease later today. looking at the weekend weather in a moment but we had to get through friday first. increasing sunshine across north—east scotland and the northern isles as the day goes on, but cloud elsewhere and showers on this once north—westerly winds, a few pushing into southern england through the afternoon. these are average wind speeds, gusts in excess of 30 mph also, overall the winds will show signs of easing as the day goes on, single figure temperatures across much of the north and east of scotland, ten to 14 degrees for many others. it will turn quite chilly across eastern parts where it is largely dry, clear spells and patches of mist and fog, the breeze starts to pick up in the west, showers dotted around as the night goes on, keeping temperatures up, whereas across eastern parts a touch of frost on the ground and may be first in the air across parts of scotland as we get close to freezing
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going into tomorrow. —— maybe frost in the air. rain and freshening winds over the weekend the wind changed to a southerly south—westerly mean temperatures will head back up a few degrees. a few bright or sunny spells through saturday, patchy rain toward scotland, wales, western parts of england and northern ireland and for northern ireland in western scotland but rain turning heavier and more persistent through the afternoon. winter picking up again for the western isles, we could see gusts of 50 or 55 mph. temperatures creeping up, still feeling quite cool across eastern parts after a chilly start with a chance of a touch of frost and wants any early mist and fog patches have cleared away, milder for all on sunday, the weather system gradually pushes further east, taking showers through the day, further showers reaching western scotland and northern ireland into the afternoon but sunny
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spells too. milder on sunday, but another windy day.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the cinematographer on alec baldwin's new film has died after the actor fired a prop gun which also seriously injured the director. halyna hutchins died in hospital. friends and colleagues have been paying tribute. she had such a strong vibe, such a sense of commitment to art and sort of the integrity of wanting to make cinema. buckingham palace says the queen spent wednesday night in hospital for "preliminary checks", but is now back at windsor castle and is in good spirits. the care watchdog for england warns staff shortages will leave

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