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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 21, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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documents seen by the bbc show that countries, including saudi arabia and australia, have lobbied the united nations to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels. buckingham palace has revealed that queen elizabeth spent wednesday night in hospital for preliminary medical checks. she is now back at windsor castle and said to be "in good spirits". the us house of representatives has voted to approve contempt—of—congress charges against steve bannon, the former aide to donald trump, for refusing to cooperate with an inquiry into the storming of the us capitol injanuary. a 25—year—old man has been remanded in custody, charged with the murder of mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali also faces charges of preparing acts of terrorism.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are maya goodfellow, political writer and academic, and ali miraj, who is a columnist at the article. the mail reports on the queen spending last night in hospital, following the cancellation of her visit to northern ireland. the mirror says that the 95—year—old was sent to hospital for preliminary investigation. she came out earlier today. the metro reports on those allegations that terror suspect ali harbi ali, accused of murdering sir david amess, plotted for two years to kill an mp. now charged with murdering sir david
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amess. ministers are considering plans to cut the waiting time for the covid boosterjab to five months, according to the telgraph. on a similartheme, the i says the new vaccines minister is "missing" — saying that maggie throup hasn't made a media appearance for six weeks. the guardian says gps in england are threatening industrial action in protest at the government's attempt to force them to see any patient who wants a face—to—face appointment. inflation is heading toward 5% according to the ft, which says the bank of england are deliberating an interst rate rise. and an indicator of that inflation, according to the star, is that the price of marmite is going up. news which you may, or may not, love to hear. i'm sure other beef spreads or vegetable spreads are available. you want to kick off for us with the first of our papers tonight. 7 the express. first of our papers tonight. 7 the exress. , , ., express. yes, sorry, remind me of the headline? _
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express. yes, sorry, remind me of the headline? " _ express. yes, sorry, remind me of the headline? ' 9,000,000 - express. yes, sorry, remind me of the headline? ' 9,000,000 set i express. yes, sorry, remind me of the headline? " 9,000,000 set to express. yes, sorry, remind me of- the headline? " 9,000,000 set to get the headline? " 9,000,000 set to get the “ob the headline? " 9,000,000 set to get the job earlyf — the headline? " 9,000,000 set to get the job early." this _ the headline? " 9,000,000 set to get the job early." this is _ the headline? " 9,000,000 set to get the job early." this is boris _ the job early." this is boris johnson — the job early." this is boris johnson pushing _ the job early." this is boris johnson pushing the - the job early." this is boris johnson pushing the jcvi . the job early." this is boris| johnson pushing the jcvi to the job early." this is boris - johnson pushing the jcvi to try and johnson pushing thejcvi to try and bring forward these boosterjabs and cut the time that the booster takes place from six months to five months. this means 9,000,000 more people will be able to have this, they want to encourage over �*50s get there boosterjabs as quickly as possible. the over 70 fives take—up rate is half where it should be. this is where the government focus really is on trying to push this, because they don't want another lockdown at any cost. they've got to keep an eye on the economy, rishi sunak knows he's already spent £400,000,000,000 on covid recovery programmes of various kinds — so they do not want to impose more restrictions on the economy, and they are seen very much boosterjabs as the route to preventing that.
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what do you make of this, what do you think this tells us the concern there may be about the winter we facing7 i there may be about the winter we facin: ? ., , ., ., facing? i would still argue that this does suggest _ facing? i would still argue that this does suggest that - facing? i would still argue that this does suggest that they - facing? i would still argue that this does suggest that they in | facing? i would still argue that - this does suggest that they in some way understand the severity of what it is, in _ way understand the severity of what it is, in front of us. all the numbers_ it is, in front of us. all the numbers are saying, what a lot of the scientists are saying — to me, it seems— the scientists are saying — to me, it seems incredibly puzzling and alarming — it seems incredibly puzzling and alarming that they are still dragging their heels with their so—called plan b, which is things like introducing masks back in england — like introducing masks back in england and or spaces —— indoor spaces _ england and or spaces —— indoor spaces where it's already happening, and also _ spaces where it's already happening, and also encouraging people to work from homa — and also encouraging people to work from home. whilst i agree that the booster_ from home. whilst i agree that the booster is— from home. whilst i agree that the booster is part of tackling — it's baffling — booster is part of tackling — it's baffling lo _ booster is part of tackling — it's baffling to me that the government doesn't _ baffling to me that the government doesn't want to get ahead of what are very— doesn't want to get ahead of what are very worrying figures, thinking of hospitalisations and deaths. in terms of— of hospitalisations and deaths. in terms of making sure that places are
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properly— terms of making sure that places are properly ventilated, you have schools— properly ventilated, you have schools without proper equipment or c02 monitors that they were promised back in_ c02 monitors that they were promised back in august. we have this really confusing _ back in august. we have this really confusing unwillingness to reach your -- — confusing unwillingness to reach your —— reintroduced masks and indoor— your —— reintroduced masks and indoor spaces which is something that is— indoor spaces which is something that is happening across large parts of europe _ that is happening across large parts of europe still. sol that is happening across large parts of europe still. so i think that yes, — of europe still. so i think that yes, boosters matter, but they could be yes, boosters matter, but they could he doing _ yes, boosters matter, but they could he doing a _ yes, boosters matter, but they could be doing a number of other things to ensure _ be doing a number of other things to ensure that — be doing a number of other things to ensure that there isn't something like another lockdown — even though i don't _ like another lockdown — even though i don't want — like another lockdown — even though i don't want to get around a debate around _ idon't want to get around a debate around that— i don't want to get around a debate around that because it's hard to know— around that because it's hard to know what'll happen in the next few months. _ know what'll happen in the next few months, but they could be taking measures— months, but they could be taking measures to stop the spread and protect— measures to stop the spread and protect people, and they aren't. and one thing _ protect people, and they aren't. and one thing all quickly say is that whenever— one thing all quickly say is that whenever we talk about vaccines, it's really — whenever we talk about vaccines, it's really important to remember that the _ it's really important to remember that the rest of the world isn't vaccinated. we brought up so much of the vaccine _ vaccinated. we brought up so much of the vaccine that is depriving other countries — the vaccine that is depriving other countries of the vaccine, so we can't _ countries of the vaccine, so we can't look— countries of the vaccine, so we can't look to this, we need to make sure everyone is vaccinated around
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the world — sure everyone is vaccinated around the world. ., ., ., the world. point well made. from both the news _ the world. point well made. from both the news desks _ the world. point well made. from both the news desks of— the world. point well made. from both the news desks of the - the world. point well made. from both the news desks of the daily l both the news desks of the daily mail and newsday, that's actually the front page of the daily mail, which is about an earlier booster jabs. the express, which we are now showing, "boosterjabs offer near total protection." the figures on this are quite impressive, aren't they? this are quite impressive, aren't the ? , . v this are quite impressive, aren't the? ,,.,,. they? they are, it's basically sa in: they? they are, it's basically saying that _ they? they are, it's basically saying that a _ they? they are, it's basically saying that a third _ they? they are, it's basically saying that a third dose - they? they are, it's basically saying that a third dose of. they? they are, it's basicallyl saying that a third dose of the pfizerjob will practically give you very high levels of protection, like five cases out of 5,000 people up to a year. so a very high efficacy rate. and that's encouraging. and look, we know that other vaccines as well, astrazeneca is also pretty effective. so the key thing here is, and maia makes a good point about other parts of the world not having
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access to vaccines — one of the things our government did was to buy up things our government did was to buy up vaccines in droves, which was a good thing that they did, at least we can go do our duty and try and take —i we can go do our duty and try and take — i know there are some people who are still concerned about it, they are worried for various reasons that they don't feel there's enough done on this. i feel like we need to done on this. i feel like we need to do what we can to make these people feel comfortable to take it will stop we are all in this together, and that is the root, it seems to me, to make sure we don't have any further lockdown so we can go about our business, and the economy can recover. . our business, and the economy can recover. �* , ., ., ., recover. , let's move on to the i, and it's a — recover. , let's move on to the i, and it's a care — recover. , let's move on to the i, and it's a care crisis _ recover. , let's move on to the i, and it's a care crisis that - and it's a care crisis that potentially be affecting take—up, and this is from the head of the care quality commission, the regulator. care quality commission, the regulator-— care quality commission, the reaulator. ~ , , , ., regulator. absolutely, this is a 2-pronged _ regulator. absolutely, this is a 2-pronged way _ regulator. absolutely, this is a 2-pronged way of— regulator. absolutely, this is a 2-pronged way of thinking - i regulator. absolutely, this is a i 2-pronged way of thinking - one regulator. absolutely, this is a - 2-pronged way of thinking - one is 2—pronged way of thinking — one is to really— 2—pronged way of thinking — one is to really think about looking at the
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rates _ to really think about looking at the rates of— to really think about looking at the rates of covid and the pressure that putting _ rates of covid and the pressure that putting on— rates of covid and the pressure that putting on the nhs and the health sector— putting on the nhs and the health sector generally, but another part of this— sector generally, but another part of this which is something we do often _ of this which is something we do often talk— of this which is something we do often talk about, but the solutions are never— often talk about, but the solutions are never forthcoming — the major crisis _ are never forthcoming — the major crisis in _ are never forthcoming — the major crisis in our— are never forthcoming — the major crisis in our care system which is about— crisis in our care system which is about partly— crisis in our care system which is about partly making sure that are another _ about partly making sure that are another democrat enough staff so that we _ another democrat enough staff so that we don't create that pressure on the _ that we don't create that pressure on the nhs as well as obviously the very important thing of making sure people _ very important thing of making sure people are — very important thing of making sure people are cared for in the best possible — people are cared for in the best possible way. it is a major issue and we — possible way. it is a major issue and we really need to see meaningful action— and we really need to see meaningful action on— and we really need to see meaningful action on this. all and we really need to see meaningful action on this-— action on this. all over the shop toniuht, action on this. all over the shop tonight. i'm _ action on this. all over the shop tonight, i'm getting _ action on this. all over the shop tonight, i'm getting my - action on this. all over the shop tonight, i'm getting my eyes . action on this. all over the shop . tonight, i'm getting my eyes mixed —— papers mixed up. the letter i it's about the missing vaccine minister, which at this point will be missing followed up by the missing papers presenter. this is
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unfair on maggie throop, she was there at the dispatch box this afternoon. there at the dispatch box this afternoon-— there at the dispatch box this afternoon. ., �* , ., , �* , afternoon. that's true, it was. it's not easy for— afternoon. that's true, it was. it's not easy for ministers _ afternoon. that's true, it was. it's not easy for ministers when - afternoon. that's true, it was. it's not easy for ministers when they l not easy for ministers when they change roles, they have to take some time to get their feet under the desk in normal circumstances. but these aren't normal circumstances, and the public to expect that ministers should be out there on the airwaves in everyone's face explain what's going on, reassuring the public in explaining why the plan is — and the plan is centred around this third boosterjab. the previous vaccines minister played it to a t — he was very calm and collected in his delivery, worked extremely hard, x businessman, and that was really what led him to his promotion education secretary. i do have an element of sympathy for maggie throop, she's new to the job,
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element of sympathy for maggie throop, she's new to thejob, but you have to come up to the kerb quickly in this game, and these are very difficult times. so i think she needs to be front and centre on this, she can't rely on the health secretary or others, she used to tell us what the plan. to secretary or others, she used to tell us what the plan.— secretary or others, she used to tell us what the plan. to be fair to her, i tell us what the plan. to be fair to her. i was — tell us what the plan. to be fair to her, i was looking _ tell us what the plan. to be fair to her, i was looking at her- tell us what the plan. to be fair to her, i was looking at her cv - her, i was looking at her cv and she's got a very impressive in medicine, particularly in this area of vaccination immunisation. so she knows her stuff — there's an argument for the government letting her out of the traps, and sajid javid with all due respect to him is a gentle and amateur, and she's a professional. a gentle and amateur, and she's a professional-— professional. what i would say is i don't think — professional. what i would say is i don't think it's _ professional. what i would say is i don't think it's ideal _ professional. what i would say is i don't think it's ideal for— professional. what i would say is i don't think it's ideal for a - don't think it's ideal for a minister. _ don't think it's ideal for a minister, especially at this particular moment where we are at in relation _ particular moment where we are at in relation to— particular moment where we are at in relation to coronavirus, and given the emphasis the government is putting — the emphasis the government is putting on these boosterjabs — it's not ideal— putting on these boosterjabs — it's not ideal for her to not be publicly visible _ not ideal for her to not be publicly visible. but i often find these
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kinds — visible. but i often find these kinds of— visible. but i often find these kinds of takes not that helpful. yes, _ kinds of takes not that helpful. yes. she — kinds of takes not that helpful. yes, she has a responsibility, but in terms — yes, she has a responsibility, but in terms of— yes, she has a responsibility, but in terms of the government strategy and relation to coronavirus and boosters — and relation to coronavirus and boosters but also more broadly, it doesn't _ boosters but also more broadly, it doesn'tjust fall down to boosters but also more broadly, it doesn't just fall down to one person - this _ doesn't just fall down to one person - this is _ doesn't just fall down to one person - this is a _ doesn't just fall down to one person — this is a problem across the cabin at the _ — this is a problem across the cabin at the moment in terms of being present, — at the moment in terms of being present, having a very clear plan, then— present, having a very clear plan, then implementing that plan so we don't _ then implementing that plan so we don't end _ then implementing that plan so we don't end up in an even worse situation _ don't end up in an even worse situation than we are now. the thing you talk— situation than we are now. the thing you talk about is more for me that it really— you talk about is more for me that it really is— you talk about is more for me that it really isjust you talk about is more for me that it really is just about one dashes in about— it really is just about one dashes in about one person acting about one particular— in about one person acting about one particular way, in about one person acting about one particularway, it's in about one person acting about one particular way, it's about having a coordinated strategy across government to make sure people are protected _ government to make sure people are protected. and i don't feel that is something that is happening right now across the board. let�*s something that is happening right now across the board.— now across the board. let's on to the mail - _ now across the board. let's on to the mail - ill— now across the board. let's on to the mail - i'll give _ now across the board. let's on to the mail - i'll give you _ now across the board. let's on to the mail - i'll give you an - the mail — i'll give you an idea just how quickly front papers can be changed when they have to be. this is the front page read printed off just an hour ago in the newsroom when we were able to get access to the male's front pages, we get some
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help from the papers now which were very grateful, sending overfront pages. within minutes, this is what it had become. as soon as that story broke, to be fair, on the front page of the sun, other papers were onto it. just to give you a flavour, it's also a pathetic attempt to explain my confusion, but i want to underlined people how quickly the papers have to react sometimes. this is an age which, because news moves so fast, papers can be out of date so fast, papers can be out of date so quickly, and although they are printing physical papers to be distributed all over the country in the world, they still have to be light on their feet.— the world, they still have to be light on their feet. absolutely, and this is exactly _ light on their feet. absolutely, and this is exactly as _ light on their feet. absolutely, and this is exactly as you _ light on their feet. absolutely, and this is exactly as you say, - light on their feet. absolutely, and this is exactly as you say, in - light on their feet. absolutely, and this is exactly as you say, in this i this is exactly as you say, in this era of— this is exactly as you say, in this era of rolling 24 hour news, but people are _ era of rolling 24 hour news, but people are accessing their news via a number— people are accessing their news via a number of different sources, for the papers — a number of different sources, for the papers in other news outlets, there _ the papers in other news outlets, there really is a necessity to stay
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on top _ there really is a necessity to stay on top of— there really is a necessity to stay on top of things because it's responding to how people are consuming their news, as well, which ithink— consuming their news, as well, which i think is— consuming their news, as well, which i think is very— consuming their news, as well, which i think is very difficult in particular for newspapers once you've — particular for newspapers once you've got a front page, the amount of effort _ you've got a front page, the amount of effort and work that then goes into having to that very quickly — i imagine _ into having to that very quickly — i imagine that's an incredibly stressfuljob, is stressfuljust being — stressfuljob, is stressfuljust being on— stressfuljob, is stressfuljust being on the the receiving end here, never— being on the the receiving end here, never mind — being on the the receiving end here, never mind having to write it and put it _ never mind having to write it and put it together. never mind having to write it and put it together-— never mind having to write it and put it together. write it, compose it, and get — put it together. write it, compose it, and get it _ put it together. write it, compose it, and get it out _ put it together. write it, compose it, and get it out there. _ put it together. write it, compose it, and get it out there. just - put it together. write it, compose it, and get it out there. just that l it, and get it out there. just that kind of experience of the days of hot metal are long gone when you could set a page, go down to the print room and you had no chance of updating except with a later addition baby a few hours later. now this all has to happen in seconds. indeed, and certain people, as you know, or launching social media platforms that you might come to. so this is the age of social media,
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things change very fast. unfortunately, sometimes, rather uncharitably — i love newspapers, it's uncharitable to call them the dead —— dead tree press, but things move very fast and the daily mail is reflecting the importance of that story — it is about the queen — and the fact that a lot of their readers throughout the country, and indeed around the world would be very interested in her majesties health. —— her majesty's health. interested in her majesties health. -- her majesty's health.— -- her ma'esty's health. spending the niuht -- her majesty's health. spending the night in _ -- her majesty's health. spending the night in hospital, _ -- her majesty's health. spending the night in hospital, back- -- her majesty's health. spending the night in hospital, back in - the night in hospital, back in windsor castle by lunchtime and doing light work — so she's in good spirits, let's leave it at that. moving to the times, which you are mentioning, trump returning to social media with his own platform. 7 social media with his own platform. 2 �* , social media with his own platform. ? �* , ., social media with his own platform. ? it's got the word truth in the title, which — ? it's got the word truth in the title, which some _ ? it's got the word truth in the title, which some people - ? it's got the word truth in the title, which some people find l title, which some people find quite ironic! his former aide, title, which some people find quite ironic! his formeraide, miller, who's got his own platform and was
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trying to get donald trump to join his platform — but according to miller, trump wanted more zeros than elizabeth taylor had husbands, according to miller. so that didn't work out. donald trump has got a huge following and it's quite scary that even now, there was a poll taken in the last few days that if the election was rerun now, trump would win. so he has got a base, we know that the us is very polarised, very tribal, very divided. at the moment — you could see that in january with the walk up to the capitol hill and the fact that he was chocked off twitter because twitter felt he was inciting violence, and he never got back on. but look, he may be wanting to run again for another presidential term, and he certainly got a base in america, you can't ignore that. we'll have to see how it goes with his new platform.—
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we'll have to see how it goes with his new platform. trump for truth - an intriguing _ his new platform. trump for truth - an intriguing and _ his new platform. trump for truth - an intriguing and snappy _ his new platform. trump for truth - an intriguing and snappy title. - his new platform. trump for truth - an intriguing and snappy title. this | an intriguing and snappy title. this has been alluded to, the politics that brought donald trump to power and he _ that brought donald trump to power and he is _ that brought donald trump to power and he is then sort of sins capitalised on, incredibly divisive and racist — capitalised on, incredibly divisive and racist politics that he's been associated with — that hasn't necessarily gone away in america, so it will— necessarily gone away in america, so it will be _ necessarily gone away in america, so it will be may be alarming, interesting, however you feel about it to see _ interesting, however you feel about it to see how this does. donald trump — it to see how this does. donald trump had _ it to see how this does. donald trump had this history, light, big list of— trump had this history, light, big list of companies under his name in terms _ list of companies under his name in terms of— list of companies under his name in terms of things and failed, like mortgage companies, universities, state _ mortgage companies, universities, state companies — i really don't think— state companies — i really don't think we — state companies — i really don't think we can assume this would go the same — think we can assume this would go the same way because this has already— the same way because this has already been said that there is an audience — already been said that there is an audience for his kind of politics, unfortunately, and one of the
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reasons — unfortunately, and one of the reasons we can see this has happened as he _ reasons we can see this has happened as he was— reasons we can see this has happened as he was banned from twitter and facebook, — as he was banned from twitter and facebook, so trying to find that way for him _ facebook, so trying to find that way for him to— facebook, so trying to find that way for him to connect with those people in that— for him to connect with those people in that very— for him to connect with those people in that very direct way again i imagine— in that very direct way again i imagine is— in that very direct way again i imagine is part this. sol in that very direct way again i imagine is part this. so i imagine the plan — imagine is part this. so i imagine the plan for— imagine is part this. so i imagine the plan for this is the next month, they'll— the plan for this is the next month, they'll be _ the plan for this is the next month, they'll be inviting users and rolled out to _ they'll be inviting users and rolled out to the — they'll be inviting users and rolled out to the rest of the public next year. _ out to the rest of the public next year. so — out to the rest of the public next year. so we _ out to the rest of the public next year, so we willjust have to wait and see — year, so we willjust have to wait and see if— year, so we willjust have to wait and see if there is a great popularity for this are not. this double-page — popularity for this are not. this double-page from _ popularity for this are not. try 3 double—page from the world section of the times has some cracking stories — it's got that story about trump, great pictures of the protests by netflix staff who walked out over dave chapelle's jokes about trans people, we've got a story aboutjoe biden and his desperate attempts to get his bills through the house of representatives — and on the right. we've got possibly my favourite of the night, king juan carlos of spain given hormones by spies to calm his six drive,
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according to the times. a remarkable range of international news. that biden range of international news. that ltiden story _ range of international news. that ltiden story is _ range of international news. that ltiden story is a _ range of international news. that biden story is a huge _ range of international news. trust biden story is a huge one because he's trying to get his infrastructure bill through the house at the moment, which is passed by the senate in the august, $1.2 trillion and for such a bill. house democrats want that to be bumped up to $4.5 trillion which would be the biggest infra— structure investment since the new deal in the 1930s. but a couple of democrats with isn't dust within his own parties are within republican swing states and they're worried about how this will all be paid for, and the perception with their right—leaning voters as to how this will go down. so it's really touch and go if this will get through. it’s really touch and go if this will get throu~h. v . really touch and go if this will get throu~h. �*, ., . ., ., through. it's a challenging time for president biden _ through. it's a challenging time for president biden because _ through. it's a challenging time for president biden because he's - through. it's a challenging time for president biden because he's got l through. it's a challenging time for| president biden because he's got to deliver on this, otherwise there's not much else from his campaign that is on this scale. ._ is on this scale. . absolutely, and i think it
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is on this scale. . absolutely, and i think it is _ is on this scale. . absolutely, and i think it is really _ is on this scale. . absolutely, and i think it is really important - is on this scale. . absolutely, and i think it is really important when | i think it is really important when you look— i think it is really important when you look at— i think it is really important when you look at some of the things that biden— you look at some of the things that biden has— you look at some of the things that biden has been trying to do — some things— biden has been trying to do — some things that — biden has been trying to do — some things that are arguably what america _ things that are arguably what america desperately needs, so when we think— america desperately needs, so when we think about certain forms of investment, it is really important, not least — investment, it is really important, not least because of what happened with covid — not least because of what happened with covid. so i think this will be, all eyes _ with covid. so i think this will be, all eyes will — with covid. so i think this will be, all eyes will be on this because, as has been _ all eyes will be on this because, as has been said, this is the big battle — has been said, this is the big battle, and one that he would ideally — battle, and one that he would ideally need to win.— battle, and one that he would ideally need to win. lets and on the front of the — ideally need to win. lets and on the front of the daily _ ideally need to win. lets and on the front of the daily star— ideally need to win. lets and on the front of the daily star - _ ideally need to win. lets and on the front of the daily star - a _ ideally need to win. lets and on the front of the daily star - a shortage i front of the daily star — a shortage of marmite due to the supply chain issues —— let's and. a quick survey of this, a lovely way to end this7. i do like it. . of this, a lovely way to end this?. i do like it- -_ i do like it. . look, my heart goes out to marmite _ i do like it. . look, my heart goes out to marmite lovers, _ i do like it. . look, my heart goes out to marmite lovers, if- i do like it. . look, my heart goes out to marmite lovers, if it was i out to marmite lovers, if it was crunchy peanut butter that the price was rising, there would be a serious crisis on my side. but i'm not a marmite lovers. i’ilil
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crisis on my side. but i'm not a marmite lovers.— crisis on my side. but i'm not a marmite lovers. i'll stay neutral on this one. marmite lovers. i'll stay neutral on this one- the _ marmite lovers. i'll stay neutral on this one. the more _ marmite lovers. i'll stay neutral on this one. the more serious - marmite lovers. i'll stay neutral on. this one. the more serious question is, all food could go up in the next few months, the ft reports that inflation could hit 5%. absolutely, and some of— inflation could hit 5%. absolutely, and some of this _ inflation could hit 5%. absolutely, and some of this is _ inflation could hit 5%. absolutely, and some of this is where - inflation could hit 5%. absolutely, and some of this is where the - inflation could hit 5%. absolutely, i and some of this is where the supply chain shortages, but it will be really— chain shortages, but it will be really tough for a lot of people — if you _ really tough for a lot of people — if you look— really tough for a lot of people — if you look at the increase in fuel prices _ if you look at the increase in fuel prices and — if you look at the increase in fuel prices and the fact that things like universal— prices and the fact that things like universal credit, the minor uplift, people _ universal credit, the minor uplift, people are — universal credit, the minor uplift, people are having that money taken away from _ people are having that money taken away from them, a lot of people will be really _ away from them, a lot of people will be really struggling over the next few months, and seeing those food prices _ few months, and seeing those food prices slowly creep up really won't be helpful— prices slowly creep up really won't be helpful for a lot of households that are — be helpful for a lot of households that are already really struggling. so i that are already really struggling. so i think— that are already really struggling. so i think much more needs to be done _ so i think much more needs to be done to— so i think much more needs to be done to make sure people are able to have help _ done to make sure people are able to have hel. ~ �* ., , ., have help. we've got used to very low interest _ have help. we've got used to very low interest rates _ have help. we've got used to very low interest rates for _ have help. we've got used to very low interest rates for a _ have help. we've got used to very low interest rates for a long - have help. we've got used to very low interest rates for a long time, inflation is creeping up, it's due
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to rise to 5% in q1 next year, and the chief economist of england is saying the interest rate conversation now is really accelerating at the bank and they've got a monetary policy in november, and he's hinting that there might be and he's hinting that there might be a rise, we don't know, nobody knows. but certainly a consensus amongst most economists was until this point, it would happen at some point in q1 next year. even if it goes up to .5 .7 %, the point she's making is important — costs are rising, people broadly across the spectrum, both on fuel, it'll have to be looked at in april next year by the regulator, so we will have to see. thank you both very much, great to speak to you, thanks for poking with
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all the unexpected things i threw at you, some intentionally and some not. thank you too for your company. the papers are here every night, and if you miss us live, you can find us online. but for now, goodnight. hi there, good evening, i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. we start with scotland, who are into the second stage of the t20 world cup for the first time after comfortably beating hosts oman by eight wickets in their winner—takes—all final match. they're now into the super—12s and will play in the same group as india, new zealand, and pakistan. nesta mcgregor reports. scotland believed winning this game could inspire a new generation. a team unified in their quest for a third victory and unified against discrimination. oman at home wanted a good start — that's easier
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said than done, though. a moment of miscommunication. this run came with just a single run on the board. but then, step forward aqib ilyas to settle those nerves. scotland soon had their revenge — ilyas out for 37. oman bravely fought on, at times hitting and raising the roof. chasing one, two, three, scotland made it look as easy as, well, a—b—c. george munsey finding the boundary. when he went, captain kyle coetzer went big. humongous! coetzer fell for 41, scotland eased to the win and a place in the super 125, alongside cricket's biggest names. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. it's absolutely huge. they went to this world cup with high expectations. however, there was very little margin for error going into the group stages
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to qualify for the super 12s. if'd they lost today, there was a chance if they didn't make more than 120, oman would've gone through instead with bangladesh. so it was a high—pressure situation, but overjoyed to see the scottish boys get over the line. and bangladesh are also through to the main draw after beating papua new guinea by 84 runs. skipper mohammed mahmudullah reaching 50 as they set their opponents, who were already eliminated, a target of 182. but papua new guinea didn't get anywhere near that — they were all gone for 97. to football next — where it was a goodnight for the two british clubs in action in the europa league. west ham maintain their unbeaten run, beating genk 3—0. the pick of the goals came from jarrod bowen, coming just 72 seconds after issa diop put them 2—0 up. west ham sit comfortably at the top of group h. rangers revived their hopes of reaching the knockout stages
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of the competition after beating danish side brondby 2—0. leon balogun gave them the lead at ibrox with his first goal for the club before kemar roofe added a second that was orginally ruled out for offside, but was then given by var. tottenham were made to pay for leaving their star players at home, as their under—strength side was beaten in the europa conference league tonight at vitesse arnhem. the dutch side winning 1—0 thanks to maximillian wittek, who scored 12 minutes from time. harry kane and son heung—min were amongst the players missing for spurs, who now sit third in their group. and there was disapointment, too, for the former tottenham boss, jose mourinho, who suffered one of the heaviest defeats of his managerial career. for the first time one of his sides conceded six goals, as roma lost 6—1 at norwegian side bodo glimt, who pulled off the surprise result of the night in the conference league. now premier league managers
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have been coming out in support of steve bruce, following comments made by the ex—newcastle boss who left his role at st james park by mutual consent yesterday. the 60—year—old suggested that the toll it taken on him and his family meant it might be his lastjob in football. when it gets to an unacceptable level, what i think steve's point was, then someone with the level of respect in the game he's got — then for him to say that, it must have gone too far, because he's a wise, rounded fella, in his life as well as his career, i think, someone i definitely trust for advice — so if he's saying it, there must be some strength in what his words are. we have to think about one of the most experienced managers in england history is telling you that on a letter. you can'tjust ignore that.
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for me, it's a very serious statement. it's something that has to change, it has to start to change. i know what happened in this case because it| happened with me in chelsea, in monaco, something - also in leicester. and i am very close to him, and give support if i can. i great britain have won three medals on day two at the track cycling world championships in roubaix, in france. josie knight, neah evans, megan barker, and katie archibald claimed the final medal of the night for britain. they comfortably beat canada by five—and—a—half seconds to claim bronze in the women's team pursuit. earlier, oliverwood, charlie tanfield, ethan vernon, and ethan hayter won bronze in the men's team pursuit beating the reigning champions denmark by almost two seconds. and it was bronze again in the men's 60—lap scratch race. 22—year—old rhys britton showed his endurance and determination, finishing third behind france's donavan grondin and belgium's tuur dens.
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and in tennis — andy murray's been knocked out in the second round of the european open in antwerp. he lost to second seed diego schwartzman 6—4 7—6. the world number 14 came from 4—1 down to take the first set, before winning a tight battle in the second. and that's all from me and the team at the bbc sport centre. goodnight. hello. where skies have been clear, temperatures have been allowed to drop, but there is quite a lot of cloud in the mix as well. that cloud spilling down from the northwest in places producing some outbreaks of showery rain. so, many of us starting friday morning with lots of cloud. some showers here and there. showers tending to become fewer and further between through the day, and there will be some sunny breaks. best of the sunshine, though, across northeast scotland into orkney and shetland. it will stay quite windy here. the winds easing a little elsewhere. temperatures for most a little up
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on where they were on thursday. 12—14 celsius, still decidedly chilly in the northeast of scotland. as we head through friday night, we will see extensive cloud spilling in from the west, some mist and hill fog, spots of drizzle, but eastern scotland and eastern england, holding on to clear skies, at least for a time, allowing it to get to really quite chilly. temperatures in a few places could get quite close to freezing. but generally speaking, the weekend is a milder affair. we will see some rain at times, particularly in the west on saturday. a mix of sunshine and showers on sunday.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... as extreme weather grips the world, the bbc learns of countries lobbying for a more gradual move away from fossil fuels. india has been experiencing the effects of climate change first—hand. recent floods have killed more than 150 people. our reporter is on the ground with the latest. in this one small village alone, more than 100 homes were completely destroyed, and just as many were left damaged. as the river rose earlier in the week, people say they ran for their lives. also in the programme: buckingham palace reveals that queen elizabeth spent wednesday night in hospital for preliminary medical checks, she's now back at windsor castle.
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borisjohnson urges people to get vaccinated —

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