Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 21, 2021 10:45pm-11:01pm BST

10:45 pm
so you'll have much a lot worse. so you'll have much more _ a lot worse. so you'll have much more serious problems down the line because _ more serious problems down the line because people aren't getting the treatment they need in hospital, having _ treatment they need in hospital, having been referred by their gp at the right— having been referred by their gp at the right time. also a lot of elderly— the right time. also a lot of elderly patients need to see their gps either at home or in surgery. i don't _ gps either at home or in surgery. i don't know— gps either at home or in surgery. i don't know about you, but if you try to get _ don't know about you, but if you try to get through to your gp, it's a nightmare _ to get through to your gp, it's a nightmare. you have to get first past _ nightmare. you have to get first past the — nightmare. you have to get first past the receptionist, if you can -et past the receptionist, if you can get through to the receptionist after— get through to the receptionist after pressing six options. it's not the test— after pressing six options. it's not the best experience as a punter when youte _ the best experience as a punter when you're dealing with a gp. i love gps: _ you're dealing with a gp. i love gps, my— you're dealing with a gp. i love gps, my mother was a doctor in the nhs for— gps, my mother was a doctor in the nhs for 40 — gps, my mother was a doctor in the nhs for 40 years, so i have a lot of affection _ nhs for 40 years, so i have a lot of affection for — nhs for 40 years, so i have a lot of affection for the nhs — but let's -et affection for the nhs — but let's get real, — affection for the nhs — but let's get real, the provision of care by gps is _ get real, the provision of care by gps is not — get real, the provision of care by gps is not universally consistent in every— gps is not universally consistent in every part— gps is not universally consistent in every part of the country. | gps is not universally consistent in every part of the country.- every part of the country. i was talkin: every part of the country. i was talking to _ every part of the country. i was talking to a _ every part of the country. i was talking to a junior— every part of the country. i was talking to a junior doctor - every part of the country. i was talking to a junior doctor at - every part of the country. i was talking to a junior doctor at a l talking to a junior doctor at a hospital. a couple weeks ago who was saying that he's been doing placements for gps, and most of it has been online. he says he understands why, and it's sensible in a lot of cases, but he worries
10:46 pm
about those things that might be missed like not noticing when someone stands up after they finished the consultation to leave your room, they wince. that immediately tells you something about their bones or something isn't right. doesn't apply to most cases, but one or two they do. i'm sure it was reading a lot of gps, as well. let's move the front of the independent — a lot of it is health related today. i'll come to you in a moment. . related today. i'll come to you in a moment -— moment. . this is a fact that there is a tsunami _ moment. . this is a fact that there is a tsunami of _ moment. . this is a fact that there is a tsunami of unmet _ moment. . this is a fact that there is a tsunami of unmet need, - moment. . this is a fact that there i is a tsunami of unmet need, also the story— is a tsunami of unmet need, also the story of— is a tsunami of unmet need, also the story of the _ is a tsunami of unmet need, also the story of the fact that the vaccine minister— story of the fact that the vaccine minister has basically not been seen in action— minister has basically not been seen in action at— minister has basically not been seen in action at all over the last few days— in action at all over the last few days but— in action at all over the last few days but which is all very odd because _ days but which is all very odd because when he was in that position. _ because when he was in that position, obviously he's now become education _ position, obviously he's now become education minister recently, and good _ education minister recently, and good for— education minister recently, and good for him, he's done a very good 'ob good for him, he's done a very good
10:47 pm
job - _ good for him, he's done a very good job - we _ good for him, he's done a very good job — we haven't seen too much from this vaccine _ job — we haven't seen too much from this vaccine minister for a while. in this vaccine minister for a while. in these — this vaccine minister for a while. in these situations, regular communication is really important and it— communication is really important and it needs to be brought in. i don't _ and it needs to be brought in. i don't think— and it needs to be brought in. i don't think we are getting that at the moment to. to don't think we are getting that at the moment to.— don't think we are getting that at the moment to. to be to maggie, the vaccines minister _ the moment to. to be to maggie, the vaccines minister was _ the moment to. to be to maggie, the vaccines minister was at _ the moment to. to be to maggie, the vaccines minister was at the - vaccines minister was at the dispatch box today answering jonathan ashworth's emergency question. but apart from that, she's not been that visible, sometimes that can be down to people in departments deciding which minister gets put up for things. what do you make of the front of the paper? this is incredibly — make of the front of the paper? ti 3 is incredibly concerning, and is like hospitals — as you said, it depends on where in the country you are, but hospitals are struggling or will potentially be struggling to cope with this big surge in demand. this isn't only covid, but covid will potentially put a huge amount of pressure on the nhs. we are seeing infection rates hit 50,000
10:48 pm
for the first time since the end of lockdown, and whilst the vaccination programme means things look slightly better, the numbers of people who are dying is also increasing. and i think one of the things that we've learned over the past year and a half is that it's no good acting late, which is what the government seems to do quite often. sol late, which is what the government seems to do quite often. so i think it's incredibly concerning, set against this real problem in the nhs that they are still dragging their heels when it comes to their so—called plan b when there is some very, very seemingly straightforward things that really could be done to reduce infection rates to get ahead of this. because it seems like we are consistently behind it — and you look at other countries and think, whilst things have not been perfect, some governments seem to be able to get ahead of this in times in ways that the english government really isn't doing. and i think this is incredibly concerning for a lot of people. d0
10:49 pm
incredibly concerning for a lot of --eole. ,, incredibly concerning for a lot of --eole. i. . ., incredibly concerning for a lot of --eole. . ., .~ incredibly concerning for a lot of --eole. . ., , people. do you want to take us the front of the — people. do you want to take us the front of the ft, _ people. do you want to take us the front of the ft, which _ people. do you want to take us the front of the ft, which is _ front of the ft, which is actually quite a shocking statistic in an age where we've only seen low rates of inflation and very low rates of interest — suddenly finding a warning that it could be heading towards 5%?— warning that it could be heading towards 5%? ~ , , , , towards 5%? absolutely, this is the bank of england's _ towards 5%? absolutely, this is the bank of england's new _ towards 5%? absolutely, this is the bank of england's new chief - bank of england's new chief economist warning that inflation is likely to rise close to or slightly above 5% early next year. as you said, this is in some ways surprising given where inflation has been, but also incredibly concerning given the state of a lot of people at the moment, with the impact of coronavirus and things like the cuts to universal credit, the impact of things like increased food bills, increased fuel bills — this isn't great in terms of thinking about how people, those of us out there trying to navigate the economy as it is at
10:50 pm
the moment, for a lot of people that already really are struggling, and when we think about these figures, we need to think about the impact on people when there is so little support for people at the moment in terms of coping with rising food and energy prices. find terms of coping with rising food and energy prices-— energy prices. and it'll all plan to thin . s like energy prices. and it'll all plan to things like the _ energy prices. and it'll all plan to things like the debate _ energy prices. and it'll all plan to things like the debate on - energy prices. and it'll all plan to things like the debate on the - energy prices. and it'll all plan to i things like the debate on the energy cap in the spring the next time that's looked at for gas bills and so on. what do you make of it. ? we've become immune to inflation in a sense, it's not been a political issue or a news story in this country for years. .- issue or a news story in this country for years. . that's right, ou to country for years. . that's right, you go back _ country for years. . that's right, you go back to _ country for years. . that's right, you go back to the _ country for years. . that's right, you go back to the 1970s - country for years. . that's right, you go back to the 1970s when i you go back to the 1970s when inflation — you go back to the 1970s when inflation was 10% and higher, and interest— inflation was 10% and higher, and interest rates were very, very high back then — interest rates were very, very high back then. look, this situation here, — back then. look, this situation here, there's a big debate going on i’ili'it here, there's a big debate going on right now— here, there's a big debate going on right now about whether this inflation _ right now about whether this inflation issue is transitory or an indication— inflation issue is transitory or an indication of something more permanent to come. the problem is you have _ permanent to come. the problem is you have rising energy costs as
10:51 pm
well, _ you have rising energy costs as well, you — you have rising energy costs as well, you also now have rising wages as well, _ well, you also now have rising wages as well, which is all very well because _ as well, which is all very well because people are getting paid more but it'll— because people are getting paid more but it'll get eroded in prices, as well, _ but it'll get eroded in prices, as well, and — but it'll get eroded in prices, as well, and you've got the chief economist coming out saying that yes, inflation is likely to hit 5%, and what — yes, inflation is likely to hit 5%, and what that means is the bank of england _ and what that means is the bank of england will take an rate decision in november — most bank of england watchers _ in november — most bank of england watchers are predicting something ntight— watchers are predicting something might happen next year, then it's december, — might happen next year, then it's december, now it's potentially coming — december, now it's potentially coming to november. this is definitely ramping up, it has to get a grip— definitely ramping up, it has to get a grip on— definitely ramping up, it has to get a grip on the inflation target. they're — a grip on the inflation target. they're talk about what'll happen, 2.75 they're talk about what'll happen, 2~75 - _ they're talk about what'll happen, 2~75 - it's— they're talk about what'll happen, 2.75 — it's not huge, but at a time when _ 2.75 — it's not huge, but at a time when people _ 2.75 — it's not huge, but at a time when people are suffering more generally, that all mean higher interest— generally, that all mean higher interest mortgage rates, on top of tax rises _ interest mortgage rates, on top of tax rises and other things coming down _ tax rises and other things coming down the — tax rises and other things coming down the track. so it won't be easy. i down the track. so it won't be easy. i wish _ down the track. so it won't be easy. i wish 5% _ down the track. so it won't be easy. i wish 5% inflation applied to our
10:52 pm
paper review, sadly it doesn't, we are out of time. they'll be at 11:30 pm, support and newsday will be with you from the top of the hour. hi there, good evening, i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. we start with scotland, who are into the second stage of the t20 world cup for the first time after comfortably beating hosts oman by eight wickets in their winner—takes—all final match. they're now into the super—12s and will play in the same group as india, new zealand, and pakistan. nesta mcgregor reports. scotland believed winning this game could inspire a new generation. a team unified in their quest for a third victory and unified against discrimination. oman at home wanted a good start — that's easier said than done.
10:53 pm
a moment of miscommunication. this run came with just a single run on the board. then those nerves are settled. scotland soon had their revenge. oman bravely fought on, at times hitting and raising the roof. chasing one, two, three, scotland made it look as easy as well, a—b—c. finding the boundary, the captain went big. humongous! scotland eased to the win. and a place in the super twelves alongside cricket's biggest names. mr mcgregor, bbc news,. actually huge. they went to this world cup with high expectations. however, there was very little margin for error going into the
10:54 pm
group stages qualify for the super 12. if they lost today, there's a chance they didn't make more than 120, oman would've gone instead of bangladesh. though it was a high—pressure situation, but overjoyed to see the scottish boys get over the line. and bangladesh are also through after beating papua new guinea by 84 runs. skipper mohammed mahmudullah reaching 50 as they set their opponents, who were already eliminated, a target of 182. but papua new guinea didn't get anywhere near that — they were all gone for 97. to football next — where it was a goodnight for the two british clubs in action in the europa league. west ham maintain their unbeaten run, beating genk 3—0. the pick of the goals came from jarrod bowen, coming just 72 seconds after issa diop put them 2—0 up. the hammers sit comfortably at the top of group h. —— west ham sit comfortably. rangers revived their hopes
10:55 pm
of reaching the knockout stages of the competition after beating danish side brondby 2—0. leon balogun gave them the lead at ibrox with his first goal for the club before kemar roofe added a second that was orginally ruled out for offside, but was then given by var. tottenham were made to pay for leaving their start players at home, as their under—strength side was beaten in the europa conference league tonight at vitesse arnhem. —— star players. the dutch side winning 1—0 thanks to maximillian wittek, who scored 12 minutes from time. harry kane and son heung—min were amongst the players missing for spurs, who now sit third in their group. and there was disapointment, too, for the former tottenham boss, jose mourinho, who suffered one of the heaviest defeats of his managerial career. for the first time one of his sides conceded six goals, as roma lost 6—1 at norwegian side bodo glimt, who pulled off the surprise result of the night in the conference league.
10:56 pm
now premier league managers have been coming out in support of steve bruce, following comments made by the ex—newcastle boss who left his role at st james park by mutual consent yesterday. the 60—year—old suggested that the toll it taken on him and his family meant it might be his lastjob in football. when it gets to an unacceptable level, what i think steve's point was, then someone with the level of respect in the game he's got — for him to say that it must have gone too far, because he's a wise, rounded fella, in his life as well as his career, i think, someone i definitely trust with advice — so if he is saying it, there must be some strength in what his words are. we have to think about one of the most experienced managers in england history is telling you that — you can'tjust ignore that. something that has to change, it has to start to change.
10:57 pm
i know what happened in this case because it| happened with me in chelsea, in monaco, something - also in leicester. and i am very close to him, and give support if i can. i great britain have won three medals on day two at the track cycling world championships in roubaix, in france. josie knight, neah evans, megan barker, and katie archibald claimed the final medal of the night for britain. they comfortably beat canada by five—and—a—half seconds to claim bronze in the women's team pursuit. earlier, oliverwood, charlie tanfield, ethan vernon, and ethan hayter won bronze in the men's team pursuit beating the reigning champions denmark by almost two seconds. and it was bronze again in the men's 60—lap scratch race. 22—year—old rhys britton showed his endurance and determination, finishing third behind france's donavan grondin and belgium's tuur dens.
10:58 pm
and in tennis — andy murray's been knocked out in the second round of the european open in antwerp. he lost to second seed diego schwartzman 6—4 7—6. the world number 14 came from 4—1 down to take the first set, before winning a tight battle in the second. and that's all for me and the team at the bbc sport centre. goodnight. good evening. after the deluge many of us saw last night, today turned into a drier, brighter, but colder day of weather, with a scattering of showers. and as we go through this evening and tonight, we will see more of those showers pushing southwards, with some extra cloud as well. the clearest of the skies likely to remain down towards the south east. that's where we'll see the lowest of the temperatures. maybe down to two degrees in some spots in the countryside. tomorrow, then, we will see quite a lot of cloud in the mix. that cloud producing some showers at times. the showers becoming fewer and further between by the afternoon,
10:59 pm
with the best of the sunshine up towards the north east of scotland. but some sunny spells developing elsewhere. it will be a relatively windy day, but those winds slowly easing a little as the afternoon wears on. top temperatures still struggling for some, 8—9 celsius towards the north east of scotland. maybe 13—14 down towards the south and the west of the uk. into the weekend, it is going to turn a little bit milder, but we will see cloud and some outbreaks of rain at times, particularly in the west. it will also be quite windy.
11:00 pm
welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... as extreme weather grips the world, the bbc learns of countries lobbying for a more gradual move away from fossilfuels. india has been experiencing the effects of climate change first—hand. recent floods have killed more than 150 people. our reporter is on the ground with the latest. in this one small village alone, more than 100 homes were completely destroyed, and just as many were left damaged. as the river rose earlier in the week, people say they ran for their lives. borisjohnson urges people to get vaccinated — as the daily number of new covid infections in the uk surges
11:01 pm
to more than 50,000. a 25—year—old man is remanded in custody, charged with the murder

9 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on