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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 21, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. the silent lobbying of the world's biggest polluters — leaked documents seen by the bbc reveal the countries that are trying to water down the science. saudi arabia, japan, australia among those resisting a move away from fossil fuels. a 25—year—old man has appeared in court in london charged with the murder of the british mp sir david amess. was it coincidence that police in florida found brian laundrie�*s remains on the first day his parents had joined the search? the lawyer representing the laundrie family says any suggestion they knew where he was is "hogwash". and a lesson in how not to steal a phone courtesy of the unsuspecting thief from egypt.
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when global leaders meet for climate summits, as they're preparing to do in glasgow in ten days�* time, a special effort is always made to create the appearance of unity. but whether everyone really is singing from the same hymn sheet remains an open question. a leaked trove of documents seen by the bbc reveals that a number of countries have been privately lobbying the intergovernmental panel on climate change in an attempt to influence the conclusions they have drawn. saudi arabia, japan and australia are among those countries that have asking the un to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels. brazil and argentina, two of the biggest producers of beef products, argue strongly against the evidence that moving to a plant—based diet is necessary to cut greenhouse gas emissions. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports.
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the clock is ticking on tackling climate change. the science says unless we start making dramatic cuts to emissions now, we risk very serious consequences. world leaders will be meeting here in glasgow for a crucial climate conference in just ten days. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show some countries are pressuring the un to change its message on the options for tackling the challenge. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn't need to reduce fossil fuel use as quickly as the un suggests. "delete the claim that the focus for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels," saudi arabia tells the un scientists. one aim of the glasgow conference is to phase out coal, but india once it expects it to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades.
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meanwhile, brazil and argentina ask that the evidence that eating meat can help cut greenhouse gas emissions be watered down. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them on to the bbc. i think the comments of these countries demonstrates the depth to which they will go to try and halt progress in tackling climate change. these un science reports, and this is just one part of three, are pretty much the bible of climate science. they're used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change, and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. scientists who've helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on scientists to accept the comments. so, if the comments are lobbying, if they're notjustified by the science, they will not be
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integrated in the ipcc report. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years. there've been terrible floods, including in china, and ferocious wildfires in australia and right around the world. it means, says a veteran of many international negotiations, that most world leaders do understand what is at stake in glasgow. people can see the effects of climate change. - this is all about understanding that even though the challenge - is immense, there really isn't i an alternative to dealing with it. because within my lifetime even, | and certainly in your generation, | the generation coming up below. you is going to be living with this. glasgow wants to show its best face to the world for this conference. it could well be the biggest gathering of world leaders in british history. christiana figueres will be there. she's environmental royalty, having played a crucial role
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in previous climate summits. she says it is vital that governments are involved in the review process. everybody�*s voice has to be there. that's the whole purpose. this is not a single thread, this is a tapestry woven by many, many threads. but there is no time to waste. every second, more carbon dioxide is building up in the atmosphere. what the world needs now is ambition. justin rowlatt, bbc news. ellen wald is the author of saudi inc, a book about the oil economy in saudi arabia. she is a senior fellow at the atlantic council and joins us from jacksonville. good happy with us. sunlight shows what some of governments really think. should we be surprised, the extent of mbappe? i think. should we be surprised, the extent of mbappe?_ extent of mbappe? i really don't think they should _ extent of mbappe? i really don't think they should be _ extent of mbappe? i really don't think they should be surprised i extent of mbappe? i really don't| think they should be surprised at
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all. and it really by the countries that are doing to it's pretty obvious that fossil fuel producing countries want to continue to produce fossil fuels. this countries want to continue to produce fossilfuels. this is how i make a lot of money. there is definitely a financial incentive to settle the office should not be surprised that fossil fuel consuming countries, particularly those that produce a lot of call, are also lobbying because that's beneficial to their economies as well that they are able to continue to purchase fossil fuels at inexpensive process. it's really not having any effect on the science, what is in the bible as adjusting calls that come of the reports, but what about when i go into the room at the start of the summit next week? that crucial meeting that will set the tone of the next two weeks. for that sort of lobbying have an effect there? i think it is exactly applicant is a crucial time when that kind of lobbying could actually have a big effect because we are currently
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experiencing an energy crisis right now where countries are actually having to revert from cleaner sources of fossil fuels like natural gas to dirtier ones like calljust to keep the lights on. and so the role of fossil fuels is suddenly thrust into the spotlight, that if we want to maintain our lifestyle, we want to maintain our lifestyle, we want to provide reliable electricity to everyone at all times, then fossil fuels are part of that picture. and i think a lot of these countries are coming to be making that case at the negotiations because recommending that you just get rid of fossil fuels and replace it with renewables will not provide the kind of reliable electricity that we are used to. i’m the kind of reliable electricity that we are used to.— that we are used to. i'm not underestimating _ that we are used to. i'm not underestimating the - that we are used to. i'm not underestimating the scale l that we are used to. i'm not| underestimating the scale of that we are used to. i'm not - underestimating the scale of the problem oriented the size of the challenge, but tony blairjust said there really is no other alternative because the countries you're about
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that are switching from oil to dirtier fuels like that are switching from oil to dirtierfuels like coal, that are switching from oil to dirtier fuels like coal, those of the same countries that if we missed the same countries that if we missed the 1.53 target and it's nearer to two or three degrees, they are going to face some cataclysmic conditions and not a very long period of time, in the next ten years. yet and not a very long period of time, in the next ten years.— in the next ten years. yet as a --eole in the next ten years. yet as a peeple that — in the next ten years. yet as a people that they _ in the next ten years. yet as a people that they are _ in the next ten years. yet as a people that they are just - in the next ten years. yet as a people that they are just not l people that they are just not entitled to electricity and heat and transportation on demand. those are the choices that we have, and it's the choices that we have, and it's the reality of a situation that we are in, unless we suddenly build massive numbers of nuclear power plants, which does not sin to be on any one's agenda. it may be more beneficial to actually face the reality of the situation as opposed to saying we are going to somehow eliminate all these fossil fuels and replace them with a tonne of renewables that so far in our current technology do not provide reliable electricity. if you want to try to select the people and what
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that means for their lives, that is one tactic to take. but to create these kind of goals that are really unachievable, i think is maybe less meaningful. look at president vladimir putin of russia, who is our jewel of the world path that most important man in natural gas right now. he does not even want to have anything to do with this. ida. now. he does not even want to have anything to do with this.— anything to do with this. no, but he is sendin: anything to do with this. no, but he is sending quite _ anything to do with this. no, but he is sending quite a _ anything to do with this. no, but he is sending quite a big _ anything to do with this. no, but he is sending quite a big allegation, i l is sending quite a big allegation, i think 200 russians are coming so they will be represented. thank you very much indeed for that. another country caught up in the lobbying effort is brazil, one of the biggest producers of beef products and animal feed in the world. behind the scenes, the brazilian government has been lobbying scientists to water down evidence that the world needs to move to a plant—based diet, not that that they have been entirely successful in that. the most recent ipcc report says "plant—based diets can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 50% compared to the average emission—intensive western diet". according to the leak, brazil was arguing that that was incorrect. they wanted the authors to delete or change some passages in the text
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relating to "plant—based diets". brazil, which has seen significant increases in the rate of deforestation in the amazon, also disputes the reference to this being a result of recent changes in government regulation, claiming it is incorrect. tabata amaral is a federal deputy of the opposition socialist party in brazil. shejoins us from sao paulo. thank you very much for being with us. he must be a hugely sensitive issue for the brazilian government. i imagine the farming lobby there is quite big and quite noisy and you had to be quite bright to go against them. ? quite grey. yes. had to be quite bright to go against them. ? quite grey.— them. ? quite grey. yes, so thank ou for them. ? quite grey. yes, so thank you forthis _ them. ? quite grey. yes, so thank you for this opportunity. _ them. ? quite grey. yes, so thank you for this opportunity. brazil's i you for this opportunity. brazil's government neglecting of the evidence of climate change is going beyond _ evidence of climate change is going beyond that. we have a government
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that have _ beyond that. we have a government that have a — beyond that. we have a government that have a lid on agencies for monitoring and prevention of those fires, _ monitoring and prevention of those fires, and _ monitoring and prevention of those fires, and we also have seen some accusations — fires, and we also have seen some accusations that the previous government was involved in corruption profiting from illegally for station and exportation of food. so for station and exportation of food. 50 this— for station and exportation of food. 50 this is— for station and exportation of food. 50 this is a — for station and exportation of food. so this is a really hard time for those — so this is a really hard time for those who— so this is a really hard time for those who care about the environment or even_ those who care about the environment or even about our future and our economic— or even about our future and our economic development. we or even about our future and our economic development.- or even about our future and our economic development. we will try one more with _ economic development. we will try one more with your— economic development. we will try one more with your line. _ economic development. we will try one more with your line. it - economic development. we will try one more with your line. it is - economic development. we will try one more with your line. it is not . economic development. we will try one more with your line. it is not a| one more with your line. it is not a very good line. we get some of that. what sort of reaction has been in brazil today to the leaks have materialise? people talking about it? do they want the government to go further when it comes to what they are putting in front of the international community here in glasgow? international community here in glasuow? , international community here in glasuow? ., glasgow? yes so i hope you can hear me now. glasgow? yes so i hope you can hear me nova the — glasgow? yes so i hope you can hear me now. the deforestation _ glasgow? yes so i hope you can hear me now. the deforestation rate - glasgow? yes so i hope you can hear me now. the deforestation rate has. me now. the deforestation rate has gone _ me now. the deforestation rate has gone up _ me now. the deforestation rate has gone up by— me now. the deforestation rate has gone up by a lot under bolsonaro. there _ gone up by a lot under bolsonaro. there is— gone up by a lot under bolsonaro. there is a — gone up by a lot under bolsonaro. there is a study that we just presented showing that, so unfortunately i have to say that our
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president— unfortunately i have to say that our president has been lying. at the international conference but it is important — international conference but it is important that people are doing something here. so actually there is a coatition— something here. so actually there is a coalition that unites governors, mayors, — a coalition that unites governors, mayors, representatives from congress _ mayors, representatives from congress who are actually going to glasgow— congress who are actually going to glasgow to present a report but also to present _ glasgow to present a report but also to present a proposal, so that is to say that— to present a proposal, so that is to say that we — to present a proposal, so that is to say that we are doing something that botsonaro _ say that we are doing something that bolsonaro and his team are actually probably— bolsonaro and his team are actually probably going to present in glasgow. that is not represent my country _ glasgow. that is not represent my country and — glasgow. that is not represent my country and we hope we can put an end to _ country and we hope we can put an end to this— country and we hope we can put an end to this madness pretty soon. the to- 26 end to this madness pretty soon. he top 26 president end to this madness pretty soon. tie: top 26 president was end to this madness pretty soon. ti2 top 26 president was in brazil recently and he met with the vice president. and other key ministers as well. and they assured him that they will reach zero emissions by 2050 and eliminate this illegal deforestation by 2030. do you think we can put trust in the assurances they are giving? h0. we can put trust in the assurances they are giving?— they are giving? no, i don't this situation is _ they are giving? no, i don't this situation is going _ they are giving? no, i don't this situation is going to _ they are giving? no, i don't this
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situation is going to change. - they are giving? no, i don't this i situation is going to change. while we have _ situation is going to change. while we have bolsonaro in power. as i said before, _ we have bolsonaro in power. as i said before, there are pretty serious _ said before, there are pretty serious accusations of corruption involving — serious accusations of corruption involving the previous minister of the environment. that deforestation rates have _ the environment. that deforestation rates have gone up a lot under bolsonaro. all the agencies responsible for the protection of the forest had been receiving a lot of threats— the forest had been receiving a lot of threats from government officials, a lot of cuts in their budget— officials, a lot of cuts in their budget so— officials, a lot of cuts in their budget so there is no logical reason for us _ budget so there is no logical reason for us to— budget so there is no logical reason for us to think this is going to change — for us to think this is going to change while bolsonaro is in power. what _ change while bolsonaro is in power. what i _ change while bolsonaro is in power. what i trust — change while bolsonaro is in power. what i trust right now is in the efforts— what i trust right now is in the efforts of— what i trust right now is in the efforts of mayors and governors and congress _ efforts of mayors and governors and congress to — efforts of mayors and governors and congress to try to put an end to that and _ congress to try to put an end to that and to — congress to try to put an end to that and to present different alternatives and also a different position— alternatives and also a different position to other countries and also in glasgow — position to other countries and also in glasgow-— in glasgow. while i've got you on a se arate in glasgow. while i've got you on a separate issue _ in glasgow. while i've got you on a separate issue time _ in glasgow. while i've got you on a separate issue time cannot - in glasgow. while i've got you on a separate issue time cannot talk - in glasgow. while i've got you on a separate issue time cannot talk to | separate issue time cannot talk to you all on the senate report from yesterday into mr bolsonaro popping handling of the pandemic? report charged with crimes against humanity and it says there was deliberate neglect of indigenous people as
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covid—19 tore across the country into the supposedly protected territories. another report has been referred to the international criminal court in the hague. do you really expect they will pick that up? really expect they will pick that u . ? , , ., ., really expect they will pick that u - ? , , ., ., , , up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thin in up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thing in this _ up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thing in this report _ up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thing in this report and _ up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thing in this report and out - up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thing in this report and out of - up? yes, so it for me, the biggest thing in this report and out of this| thing in this report and out of this commission is to understand that there _ commission is to understand that there are — commission is to understand that there are hundreds of thousands of deaths _ there are hundreds of thousands of deaths that could have been avoided and i'rn _ deaths that could have been avoided and i'm speaking numbers, i speaking science, _ and i'm speaking numbers, i speaking science, and _ and i'm speaking numbers, i speaking science, and that is because of bolsonaro _ science, and that is because of bolsonaro and his team's omission and incompetence and corruption. there _ and incompetence and corruption. there are — and incompetence and corruption. there are serious accusations the government was waiting on vaccines to negotiate a deal that they could profit _ to negotiate a deal that they could profit from and i'm talking about corruption. so for people to have an idea in_ corruption. so for people to have an idea in this — corruption. so for people to have an idea in this report, there are nine separate — idea in this report, there are nine separate offences that the president and many— separate offences that the president and many others are being charged of and many others are being charged of and that— and many others are being charged of and that includes incitement to commit — and that includes incitement to commit crimes, the propagation of pathogenic germs and crimes against
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humanity _ pathogenic germs and crimes against humanity. no one is 100% sure of what _ humanity. no one is 100% sure of what is _ humanity. no one is 100% sure of what is going to happen right now, but there _ what is going to happen right now, but there are many parliamentary members — but there are many parliamentary members and many congress representatives who are working hard to make _ representatives who are working hard to make sure that those charges are carried _ to make sure that those charges are carried through and we can take also some _ carried through and we can take also some legislative initiatives as well that are _ some legislative initiatives as well that are of the most important in my country— that are of the most important in my country and — that are of the most important in my country and fighting fake news and having _ country and fighting fake news and having some revelation in that sense — having some revelation in that sense, ., ., having some revelation in that sense. ., ., ~ ., ., having some revelation in that sense. ., ~ ., ., ., having some revelation in that sense. ., ., ., , sense. tabata amaral came a very aood to sense. tabata amaral came a very good to speak _ sense. tabata amaral came a very good to speak to _ sense. tabata amaral came a very good to speak to someone - sense. tabata amaral came a very good to speak to someone from i sense. tabata amaral came a very l good to speak to someone from the brazilian parliament, think you very much for coming on this evening. thank you very much, bye—bye. let's bring you some breaking news now on former aide to donald trump, steve bannon. the us house of representatives has voted to approve contempt of congress charges against mr bannon
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for refusing to co—operate with an inquiry into the storming of the us capitol injanuary. the house voted 229—202 to hold mr trump's former aide in contempt, with nine republicans voting yes. the issue will now be referred to thejustice department. we'll be bringing you more on this story in the next 20 minutes. a 25—year—old man has been charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts after the fatal stabbing of the mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali from north london was arrested following the attack in essex last friday. sir david, who had been a conservative mp for almost a0 years, died at the scene. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. just over six days after sir david amess, mp, was stabbed to death in leigh—on—sea, the man accused of murdering him was brought to court. the crown prosecution service had authorised counterterrorism detectives to charge him this morning. in the dock at westminster magistrates�* court, ali harbi ali wore a grey sweatshirt and trousers and black—rimmed glasses. he spoke to confirm his name,
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date of birth and his address in kentish town in north london. and then sat silently for the hearing, which lasted less than a quarter of an hour. sir david was killed in an office at the back of the belfairs methodist church halljust after midday on friday. he'd been meeting voters as part of a constituency surgery. police officers and paramedics who'd rushed to the scene were unable to save him. a large team of detectives have been working around the clock to find out as much as we can about what happened and why. that work has included searches of a number of london addresses. 0ur advanced forensics teams have analysed digital devices and carried out a painstaking review of cctv footage. ali harbi ali, seen here walking in the direction of gospel 0ak station in north london on the day of the murder, was arrested at the church hall in leigh—on—sea. detectives say they're not looking for anyone else. the head of the crown
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prosecution service's counterterrorism division said... ali harbi ali is a british citizen who was born in south london and grew up in croydon. as well as the murder of sir david amess, he's accused of preparing a terrorist act. it's alleged that on reconnaissance trips earlier this year, he went to the address of one mp several times and the constituency surgery of another. he also went to the house of commons. after the hearing, he was taken away to prison, where he'll be held until his next appearance at the old bailey tomorrow. stay with us on bbc news. still to come, we'll have the latest from florida, where investigators are leading a search for the missing fiance of murdered us blogger gabby petito. the fbi says its found human remains in a nature reserve.
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the uk government has been accused not doing enough to stop the spread we're continuing with the plan that we set out injuly, which was itself an extension of the road map that began in february. and, yes, we're watching the numbers very carefully every day, and, yes, you're absolutely right, tracey, the numbers of infections are high. but we're within the parameters of what the predictions were, what spi—m and the others said where would be at this stage given the steps that we've taken. so, we're sticking with our plan. i think the most important thing people can do now is just get that booster jab. more shots in there and sorry we had a few technical problems but the prime minister respond to criticism today from the bma that he should be
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doing more to limit the spread of covid—19 in england and boris johnson say the government is taking things seriously and there is no complacency. welcome back. the fbi is working on the assumption they have found fugitive brian laundrie, who was wanted in connection with the murder of his girlfriend, gabby petito. human remains were found yesterday in the carlton reserve in florida close to a backpack and a notebook that police have confirmed did belong to laundrie, but there are other questions. the body was found on the first day that laundrie's parents, chris and roberta, had joined the search, which has led to speculation that maybe they knew more about his whereabouts than they were letting on. many have speculated the timing of the discovery was suspicious. a claim the family's lawyer has dismissed as "hogwash". let's bring in former fbi agent rj toledo. good to have you with us. what questions where you left with after the reporting yesterday? hi.
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the reporting yesterday? hi, kristen, the reporting yesterday? h , kristen, thanks for having me. this is a very clear case and it seems like every day something new and unusual pops up also the fact that the parents decided to get involved in the search and so quickly were led directly to find something of interest was very coincidental and interest was very coincidental and in this arena, coincidences are hard to come by. so we have a lot of questions. br; to come by. so we have a lot of questions-— to come by. so we have a lot of cuestions. j ., ., . . ., , .,, questions. by all accounts he was followed into _ questions. by all accounts he was followed into the _ questions. by all accounts he was followed into the reserve. - questions. by all accounts he was followed into the reserve. this i questions. by all accounts he was. followed into the reserve. this was the first day they joined the search and he is followed into the reserve tjy and he is followed into the reserve byjournalists and he is followed into the reserve by journalists who suggest that and he is followed into the reserve byjournalists who suggest that he was not carrying a bag, but not very long after going into the reserve, he comes across the dry bag that belong to his son and then shortly after that, they found the remains. with a background to it is they had been looking for brian laundrie for five weeks and coincidentally they find him on the first day that they joined the search. as you say, it just looks suspicious. extremely. recall that _ just looks suspicious. extremely. recall that this _ just looks suspicious. extremely. recall that this area _ just looks suspicious. extremely. recall that this area of _ just looks suspicious. extremely.
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recall that this area of this - recall that this area of this reserve is very swampy. is covered by water. we had a big rain season thatjust ended, so the water has come down a bit. so it's possible that whatever it was underwater for a while has somehow appeared now. but again that does not answer the question how the father knew exactly where to go after so much searching has happened, specifically the canines have searched that whole area and not detected a cent. so this is a lot of questions opened up about how great of a searcher he was on the very first day.— on the very first day. well, go on, then, as on the very first day. well, go on, then. as an _ on the very first day. well, go on, then, as an fbi _ on the very first day. well, go on, then, as an fbi investigator - then, as an fbi investigator what would you be thinking at this point then? if your business together, why might they have joined the search a while but they have suddenly lead them straight to where the remains were? i them straight to where the remains were? .., them straight to where the remains were? ., ,~~ ., them straight to where the remains were? ., ., , were? i can only speculate, but i could imagine — were? i can only speculate, but i could imagine a _ were? i can only speculate, but i could imagine a scenario - were? i can only speculate, but i could imagine a scenario where l were? i can only speculate, but i . could imagine a scenario where they probably knew that their son was going in that area ahead of time.
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maybe they communicated that before last month probably after he disappeared. and they would know where to find it. so when the time came that may be the pressure, may be enough time is past that they knew that the sun was not going to come out and maybe he had committed suicide but maybe it's time for them to go in and pinpoint the investigators to where they are imagining that his belongings would be an kind to bring this whole thing to a conclusion. i5 be an kind to bring this whole thing to a conclusion. is it be an kind to bring this whole thing to a conclusion.— to a conclusion. is it possible the arents to a conclusion. is it possible the parents are _ to a conclusion. is it possible the parents are facing _ to a conclusion. is it possible the parents are facing with _ to a conclusion. is it possible the parents are facing with legal - parents are facing with legal jeopardy ahead of the search yesterday? i jeopardy ahead of the search yesterday?— jeopardy ahead of the search esterda ? . , yesterday? i imagine they were feelin: yesterday? i imagine they were feeling pressure _ yesterday? i imagine they were feeling pressure because - yesterday? i imagine they were feeling pressure because of- yesterday? i imagine they were feeling pressure because of myj feeling pressure because of my speculation has been made about what their involvement was early on, and now. so i'm assuming that at this point, they knew that if they are not very forthcoming about everything they knew, that they could be in legaljeopardy and the probably wanted to avoid any issues like that. ,
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probably wanted to avoid any issues like that. g ., ., like that. intriguing. rj toledo, aood to like that. intriguing. rj toledo, good to have — like that. intriguing. rj toledo, good to have you _ like that. intriguing. rj toledo, good to have you with - like that. intriguing. rj toledo, good to have you with us, - like that. intriguing. rj toledo, | good to have you with us, thank like that. intriguing. rj toledo, - good to have you with us, thank you. thank you. the eu's leaders are in brussels for a two—day european council summit, and it's the ongoing row with poland that is overshadowing the meeting. earlier this month, poland's top court ruled that the country's national constitution trumps european law, which is a problem. the commission says it's undermining the very foundations of the eu's legal order", in which eu law takes primacy. 0ur correspondentjessica parker is in brussels. they've had eu leaders arrive here today. they've had a lot on their agenda — energy prices, coronavirus. my understanding is they've only just now at the european council here in brussels got round to rule the law discussion, something that actually wasn't even on the original agenda, but because of growing pressure, particularly certain members states, it has now popped up. i think the polish prime minister, mateusz morawiecki, is going to be invited to take the floor to explain his position. we've heard what his position is over the course of the last week, so it seems likely that he will
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restate that, although of course sometimes in the privacy of a room where he's there with other political leaders rather than in front of the cameras, who knows, maybe things will be different. but it is just something that's supposed to be touched upon at the european council, so how long this discussion goes on for, how heated it gets and whether it can really resolve anything, i think there's some big question marks around that. jessica parker is watching the summit forest there in brussels. if you're going to steal someone's phone, rule number one is to make sure that the phone isn't being used by a journalist for a live broadcast when you commit the crime, because you might inadvertently end up broadcasting your face and identity live to thousands of viewers. and that is allegedly what happened in cairo to this man accused of stealing a reporter's phone while the reporter was live on air. according to egyptian media, the man was arrested after the broadcast went viral. in fact, 6.2 million people
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watching him speed away. stay with us, more good evening. after the very mild weather we've seen at times this week and the real deluge that some had to contend with last night, today, it's been a very different sort of day with sunny skies for many. quite a cold feel to the weather, but there's the curl of cloud that brought very heavy rain to parts of the south during last night, clearing away eastwards. in its wake, you can see some speckled shower clouds pushing down from the north, and that northerly or northwesterly wind has been feeding some rather chilly air across the uk. so, yes, it has felt quite cold out there, even given some sunshine, and there've been some showers around as well. some of those showers over high ground in scotland have been wintry. now, the wintry element to those showers tending to ease off, but some rain showers will continue to drift southwards as we go through tonight with more
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in the way of cloud as well. clearest of these skies down towards the south east of england. that's where we'll see the lowest temperatures, maybe down to two degrees in a few places. and for tomorrow, i think we will generally see a bit more cloud in the mix, that cloud producing some showers at times, but those showers will tend to become fewer and further between as the day wears on. the cloud will have some breaks in it, so there will be some sunny spells. best of the sunshine, i think, to be found across north—eastern parts of scotland. the winds will slowly ease as the day wears on, but it will still be quite breezy, breezy enough up to the northeast to make it feel really rather chilly again at eight or nine degrees. a little bit milder than today down towards the south and the west of the uk — 12—14 degrees. so, this little ridge of high pressure builds in through the latter part of friday. that's what's drying things out, killing off the showers. but into saturday, this frontal system starts to approach from the west, and as that front approaches our shores, ahead of it, the winds start to come up from the south. that change in the wind direction will bring a change in the feel of the weather. milder conditions return on saturday
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with a lot of cloud. best of any sunshine in the east, that weather front bringing rain to parts of northern ireland and western scotland, particularly where it will also be quite windy. but the southerly wind bringing those milder conditions, so temperatures by this stage 12 degrees in aberdeen, 1a, maybe 15 degrees there in plymouth. and as we move into sunday, that weather front will tend to break apart and become more showery, so there will be some showers across the western side of the uk. not as many showers further east. here, we will see some spells of sunshine, but still a brisk southerly wind and still fairly mild. highs of 1a or 15.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. countries have been lobbying to weaken a key un climate report to remove advice that the world needs to phase out fossil fuels. the us house of representative votes to hold donald trump's former aide steve bannon in contempt of congress after he defied a subpoena to testify on the january 6th capitol attack. shares in the indebted chinese property giant evergrande fell by 14% on thursday. the drop comes after the firm revealed a $2.6 billion deal to buy the crisis—stricken company out had fallen through. and we'll be taking you to the south atlantic island of saint helena, where there have been zero cases of covid—19 in the community, to hear what life is like.
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the us house of representatives has just voted to approve a contempt—of—congress charge against steve bannon. donald trump's former aide is refusing to cooperate with the congressional inquiry into the january 6th riot, because he says the conversations were protected by executive privelege. the house voted 229 to 202 infavour, including nine republicans who broke with their party to vote in fvour the matter will now be referred to thejustice department. it will be up to the attorney general merrick garland to make the final decision on whether to prosecute him. contempt of congress can be punished by up to a year in prison and a $100,000 fine. lots to get into, tonight with ron christie, former
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adviser to george w bush and amanda renteria, former adviser to hilary clinton's 2016 campaign. welcome to you both. big decision coming up for the attorney general, but the justice department doesn't tend to uphold these cases when there is a contempt of congress case. what about this time? good evenin: case. what about this time? good evening to — case. what about this time? good evening to you. — case. what about this time? good evening to you, christian - case. what about this time? (2222 evening to you, christian and amanda. i think this might be different. this is a situation where mr bannon has exerted a privilege he does not have. it is only held by the president of the united states. mr trump doesn't have it, mr bannon doesn't have it and it to try to evade question in up inquiry, put him in a situation where the general might sayjust this once, we might make a referral and prosecute. from steve bannon sitting at home, i might be worried that thejustice
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department might come with a full freight of the united statesjustice department behind them. and freight of the united states justice department behind them.- freight of the united states justice department behind them. and on top of that, the attorney _ department behind them. and on top of that, the attorney general - department behind them. and on top of that, the attorney general has - department behind them. and on top of that, the attorney general has to l of that, the attorney general has to concern himself about precedent because if people can just ignore subpoenas, what are they worth? that's right, and that's what you're really— that's right, and that's what you're really dealing with here. not to mention. — really dealing with here. not to mention, we have never had a january the 6th— mention, we have never had a january the 6th in_ mention, we have never had a january the 6th in my— mention, we have never had a january the 6th in my lifetime here in the us, and _ the 6th in my lifetime here in the us, and there's something to be said about— us, and there's something to be said about that _ us, and there's something to be said about that moment and how this is quite _ about that moment and how this is quite different. i have to say, there — quite different. i have to say, there has— quite different. i have to say, there has been a lot of talk about where _ there has been a lot of talk about where is — there has been a lot of talk about where is the line, what does congress _ where is the line, what does congress have the ability to bring people _ congress have the ability to bring people in? that's the question here. this doesn't — people in? that's the question here. this doesn't actually meet that target, — this doesn't actually meet that target, what would ever meet that target? _ target, what would ever meet that target? that's an actual question for them — target? that's an actual question for them to take a look at. it�*s target? that's an actual question for them to take a look at.- for them to take a look at. it's a dela in: for them to take a look at. it's a delaying tactic. _ for them to take a look at. it's a delaying tactic, isn't _ for them to take a look at. it's a delaying tactic, isn't it? - for them to take a look at. it's a delaying tactic, isn't it? he's - for them to take a look at. it's a | delaying tactic, isn't it? he's not giving evidence because the president is suing the archive to
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stop them releasing his records. the law will allow that to go forward, and of course, it may run out of time because if we get to the midterms and they haven't reached their conclusions, and these court cases are still running, we may never get to the bottom of the answers? ., ., �* ~' answers? no, i don't think we will. the house — answers? no, i don't think we will. the house of _ answers? no, i don't think we will. the house of representatives - answers? no, i don't think we will. j the house of representatives right now, speaker pelosi has maybe four votes to play work with. the republicans are well poised to take over that chamber. president trump has made a calculated bet that he can run the clock out. the thing for me, and we talked about this before, if you have nothing to hide and there's no... why wouldn't you want to clear your name? so, it seems to be that mr bannon and mr trump
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clearly do not want to be as transparent as they could be with the american people and are hoping the american people and are hoping the clock will run out. i the american people and are hoping the clock will run out.— the clock will run out. i said it was a busy — the clock will run out. i said it was a busy night. _ the clock will run out. i said it was a busy night. elsewhere, | the clock will run out. i said it. was a busy night. elsewhere, the president is in baltimore for a town hall this evening. he's trying to breathe new life until his legislative programme, particularly the reconciliation bill. they can't get the two moderates and unders on board. so they've cut the bill in half from three and a half trillion down to 1.9 trillion. the trouble is we are always talking about the figure and not talking about what's in the bill, so doesn't he have to put some flesh on the bones this evening? put some flesh on the bones this evenin: ? , . put some flesh on the bones this evenin. ? , ., .,, ., evening? yes, and it was important for him to get _ evening? yes, and it was important for him to get out. _ evening? yes, and it was important for him to get out. it's _ evening? yes, and it was important for him to get out. it's good - evening? yes, and it was important for him to get out. it's good that. for him to get out. it's good that he's _ for him to get out. it's good that he's in _ for him to get out. it's good that he's in baltimore and talking about the specific it's of whether it's childcare, _ the specific it's of whether it's childcare, whether it's going to... what _ childcare, whether it's going to... what people need right now. when he -ets what people need right now. when he gets out— what people need right now. when he gets out there and actually talks
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directly — gets out there and actually talks directly to the people, it is meaningful, but time is running out and i_ meaningful, but time is running out and i will— meaningful, but time is running out and i will also say one of the things— and i will also say one of the things in— and i will also say one of the things in his favour is he's also talking — things in his favour is he's also talking about what's happening with the vaccines. right now, people are thinking _ the vaccines. right now, people are thinking about their holiday plans, about— thinking about their holiday plans, about christmas, and there is good news _ about christmas, and there is good news on _ about christmas, and there is good news on the — about christmas, and there is good news on the horizon. but can he actually — news on the horizon. but can he actually meet that good news with making _ actually meet that good news with making sure we can pass a budget? making _ making sure we can pass a budget? making sure we don't fall off a cliff come december? he's got a lot to do— cliff come december? he's got a lot to do to _ cliff come december? he's got a lot to do to really make this tangible for folks— to do to really make this tangible for folks in baltimore and across the country. | for folks in baltimore and across the country-— the country. i thought they were neafina the country. i thought they were nearin: a the country. i thought they were nearing a compromise _ the country. i thought they were nearing a compromise with - the country. i thought they were nearing a compromise with the i the country. i thought they were - nearing a compromise with the figure and what was being thrown out of the bill. we were told that things like child tax credits were going, and now they're back in. now they are talking about reducing the length of time. the problem with that is if you jam it all in there, eventually, programmes run out in the shortest period of time. so what worth is the
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bill? ., �* , , period of time. so what worth is the bill? .,�* _ , bill? you're buying yourself some time, and that's _ bill? you're buying yourself some time, and that's what _ bill? you're buying yourself some time, and that's what we - bill? you're buying yourself some time, and that's what we have . bill? you're buying yourself some l time, and that's what we have seen happen— time, and that's what we have seen happen time and time again. we just saw it— happen time and time again. we just saw it a _ happen time and time again. we just saw it a couple of weeks ago with a 60 day— saw it a couple of weeks ago with a 60 day till— saw it a couple of weeks ago with a 60 day till december three. what you are seeing _ 60 day till december three. what you are seeing is do we have more than 60 days? _ are seeing is do we have more than 60 days? it's an incredibly difficult _ 60 days? it's an incredibly difficult way to govern, but you have _ difficult way to govern, but you have to — difficult way to govern, but you have to do _ difficult way to govern, but you have to do what is possible at this very moment and hope that in that meantime, — very moment and hope that in that meantime, you can build the kind of relationships to bring in a cross in a much _ relationships to bring in a cross in a much longer view. right now, things— a much longer view. right now, things are — a much longer view. right now, things are tough and you see the back—and—forth. when you don't have a lot of— back—and—forth. when you don't have a lot of room — back—and—forth. when you don't have a lot of room to give, and they keep crossing _ a lot of room to give, and they keep crossing the — a lot of room to give, and they keep crossing the line, you take what you can get _ crossing the line, you take what you can get in _ crossing the line, you take what you can get in order to get you through the year— can get in order to get you through the year and get you as far as possible — the year and get you as far as possible so that people have some certainty _ possible so that people have some certainty as we go into the holidays at. . , certainty as we go into the holidays at. ., , ,., ,., certainty as we go into the holidays at. .,, ,., ,., .,, at. there was some reporting last niuht at. there was some reporting last ni . ht that at. there was some reporting last night that joe _
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at. there was some reporting last night that joe manchen _ at. there was some reporting last night that joe manchen might - at. there was some reporting last night that joe manchen might be l night thatjoe manchen might be switching sides. he says it is bs. what do you think? i switching sides. he says it is bs. what do you think?— what do you think? i concur with that assessment. _ what do you think? i concur with that assessment. i— what do you think? i concur with that assessment. i know - what do you think? i concur with that assessment. i know joe - what do you think? i concur with - that assessment. i know joe manchen that assessment. i knowjoe manchen and he believes himself to be a moderate democrat. we have tried for many years in the gop to convert him when the democrats were the minority and he didn't want to do it. the notion that senator manchen would participate in a story or have some reporting for a very liberal publication and hinted that he might change parties, it doesn't hold water for me. change parties, it doesn't hold waterfor me. i don't believe it, i don't think he wants to do that, and don't think he wants to do that, and don't forget he hails from a state that donald trump turned by over 30 points. why on earth would he give up points. why on earth would he give up a significant leverage she has as a democrat? just up a significant leverage she has as a democrat?_ up a significant leverage she has as a democrat? just briefly, why would
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ou no to a democrat? just briefly, why would you go to the _ a democrat? just briefly, why would you go to the gap — a democrat? just briefly, why would you go to the gap when _ a democrat? just briefly, why would you go to the gap when you - a democrat? just briefly, why would you go to the gap when you can - you go to the gap when you can dictate everything that goes in the democratic party — — gop? dictate everything that goes in the democratic party - - gop? senator joe manchen — democratic party - - gop? senator joe manchen has _ democratic party - - gop? senator joe manchen has friends _ democratic party - - gop? senator| joe manchen has friends everywhere and people are uncomfortable with his positions. i do think things are heated _ his positions. i do think things are heated right now, but it is important to understand the contact, there is— important to understand the contact, there is a _ important to understand the contact, there is a tonne of pressure on senators _ there is a tonne of pressure on senators. you can imagine some words flying _ senators. you can imagine some words flying that _ senators. you can imagine some words flying that might not have been aligned. — flying that might not have been aligned, but there will be a lot of eyes _ aligned, but there will be a lot of eyes wandering what he means. i�*m eyes wandering what he means. i'm not sure eyes wandering what he means. not sure how eyes wandering what he means. i“n not sure how many friends he has in the republican party. last night, he had sponsored and he said he can pull over ten republicans, and he didn't get any of them. right on cue, we get a vote in texas this week in which the texas legislator
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signed off... it's a thing we sometimes gloss over when we talk about american politics, but you're quite keen on this. it happens in both states, but you always say when we come to election periods, look out for who controls the state because it matters to districts. here's what it means to texas you'll see that the reddest states are the areas of the areas see that the reddest states are the areas of the state that voted for trump by the greatest margin, and in the areas in blue, those are the... here's what the new map would look like. it would pretty much guarantee republicans 66 percent of the congressional seats.(oov)overall, the number of gop—dominated districts would increase from 22 to 25. hispanic majority districts will be reduced from 8 to 7 and african americans will no longer have a majority district in texas. it has already being challenged in the federal courts — one lawsuit claiming it
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discriminates against latino voters who are roughly equal in size to the non—hispanic community in texas. ijust i just feel when you look at that, that's not representative politics. that is politicians choosing their voters. ' :: :: , , that is politicians choosing their voters. ':: :: , , ., , that is politicians choosing their voters. ' :: :: , , ., , , voters. 100% it is, and this is brass knuckle _ voters. 10096 it is, and this is brass knuckle politics. - voters. 10096 it is, and this is brass knuckle politics. the i brass knuckle politics. the districting you've made reference to, the republicans are looking to pick up between three and four seats. my beloved home state of california will lose a seat for the first time since our corporation. texas picked up two. florida picks up texas picked up two. florida picks up one. i was listening before our broadcast to the attorney general of the us and a member of congress said this was racist. i don't agree with gerrymandering any more than amanda does, but that's how our politics
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are right now, and we find a better way to apportion seats in the house of representatives, this is what you will find. unfortunately, people in other sizeable describe evil motivations. the fact is they would do exactly the same thing. it's all about power. do exactly the same thing. it's all about power-— about power. wish we could talk about power. wish we could talk about it further. _ about power. wish we could talk about it further. lovely - about power. wish we could talk about it further. lovely to - about power. wish we could talk about it further. lovely to see i about power. wish we could talk. about it further. lovely to see you both, thanks very much.— about it further. lovely to see you both, thanks very much. good to see ou. shares in the chinese real estate giant evergrande fell 12% today after a multi—billion dollar deal to sell part of the groups property management services fell apart. evergrande faces a looming deadline this saturday to pay interest. if they fail to meet that deadline and are not bailed out by the government, it could have serious implications for the international property market. eeshwar prasad is an economics professor at cornell university. he's former head of the china division at the international monetary fund. very good to have you with us. for those people not followed this story, why is it evergrande so crucial to the public sector in
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china? . , crucial to the public sector in china? ., , ., ., china? evergrande is one of the laruest china? evergrande is one of the largest properties _ china? evergrande is one of the largest properties in _ china? evergrande is one of the largest properties in china. - china? evergrande is one of the largest properties in china. it i china? evergrande is one of the i largest properties in china. it has a number of locations around the country's. given how important this sector is in china, evergrande running out of trouble, the government is very serious about a couple of things. secondly, limiting property, so evergrande... mar; couple of things. secondly, limiting property, so evergrande. . .- property, so evergrande... may be the are property, so evergrande... may be they are trying _ property, so evergrande... may be they are trying to _ property, so evergrande... may be they are trying to teach _ property, so evergrande... may be they are trying to teach the - property, so evergrande... may be they are trying to teach the sector| they are trying to teach the sector a lesson, but we already have an energy crisis in china which is affecting production. what sort of ripple effect does this having across the country? this ripple effect does this having across the country?— across the country? this is a serious concern _ across the country? this is a serious concern because - across the country? this is a i serious concern because there across the country? this is a - serious concern because there are indications that some slightly smaller ones are beginning to come
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underfinancial smaller ones are beginning to come under financial pressure as well. this is time of slowing growth in china. if you try to limit growth in overall credit in the economy as well as try to put the space in the property spectre, there are concerns. but the chinese government seems to believe that it can control the financial effects, but also the economic effects. beijing suddenly seems to feel it has the policy to be able to revive... it seems to feel it has the policy to be able to revive... ..._ be able to revive... it would seem they _ be able to revive... it would seem they are _ be able to revive... it would seem they are heading - be able to revive... it would seem they are heading for- be able to revive... it would - seem they are heading for collapse. they put out a statement saying they have put out no process... they will miss the saturday the deadline. do you think other markets around the world are prepared for this? there will be some _ world are prepared for this? there will be some significant _ world are prepared for this? there will be some significant effects. i world are prepared for this? tiee will be some significant effects. i think there is still some question about whether the government will
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eventually step in. there are certainly some who are betting that the government will not allow the risk that could emanate from the collapse evergrande. the government seems to stick to making sure it's instance to create the notion that investors and companies like evergrande need to be cautious about where they put their money and this motion of discipline is something beijing has been trying to breach. whether they will stick to the alignment remains to be seen. thank ou ve alignment remains to be seen. thank you very much _ alignment remains to be seen. thank you very much for — alignment remains to be seen. thank you very much for your— alignment remains to be seen. thank you very much for your expertise. - stay with us on bbc news because still to come... why salt lake city has been tracking the star signs of its residents. a11i—year—old boy has appeared in court, charged with murdering a five—year—old boy.
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logan mwangi, also known as logan williamson, was found in a river in sarn near bridgend injuly. logan's mother, angharad williamson, has also been charged with his murder and will appear in court tomorrow. jordan davies reports. friends of logan said he was kind, funny and clever. a happy little boy. his body was found in the river ardmore injuly. today, a 14—year—old boy appeared in court charged with his murder. the 14—year—old appeared before a districtjudge at cardiff magistrates�* court. he answered yes to confirm his name, but cannot be identified because of his age. he was told he faces a very serious charge and will be subject to a curfew which we monitored by a tag. — — will be monitored. late afternoon, police said logan's mother, 30—year—old williamson, has also been charged with his murder. she was already charged with
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perverting the course ofjustice. 39—year—old john cole, logan's stepfather, has also been charged with murder and perverting the course ofjustice. logan's body was found after concerns were raised about his whereabouts. he was taken to hospital, where it was confirmed he'd died. flowers, teddy bears and cards were left near the scene in the days after his death and tributes were paid. his friends said they were heartbroken. a really sweet boy, a happy—go—lucky child. a provisional trial date has been set forjanuary next year. the judge said the 14—year—old boy has been remanded into the care of the local authority and would appear next in crown court.
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do you ever wish you could transport yourself to an alternate universe, where the covid pandemic had never happened? turns out that there is such a place where you don't have to pretend. it's an island in the middle of the south atlantic ocean — a british overseas possession called saint helena. the population isn't huge — 6,500 — but its isolation has meant it has reported zero, yes, zero community cases of covid—19. the few cases there have been have all been among arriving passengers, and all of them were caught in quarantine, so there's been no community spread. right now, flights reach the island once every three weeks, so it's not somewhere you can go for quick weekend break. mattjoshua is head of tourism for saint helena. he told me that the collapse of tourism to the island has been difficult for its economy. this has meant that many businesses have been closed, including the two
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biggest hotels on the island. economically, the last 18 months... we've remained covid free, so that is to say no community spread. we had one or two positive cases, no severe symptoms, but we've been at the doldrums. i’m severe symptoms, but we've been at the doldrums-— the doldrums. i'm entirely sympathetic _ the doldrums. i'm entirely sympathetic about - the doldrums. i'm entirely sympathetic about the - the doldrums. i'm entirely - sympathetic about the economic situation. it sounds dire for the hotels and people affected, and particularly bad timing given that you are getting things going with tourism. but, but, we've not had to suffer what we've had to suffer with covid. there hasn't been the concerns for the community. do you even own a mask? 50. concerns for the community. do you even own a mask?— even own a mask? so, the great thin , even own a mask? so, the great thing. and _ even own a mask? so, the great thing, and there _ even own a mask? so, the great thing, and there is _ even own a mask? so, the great thing, and there is a _ even own a mask? so, the great thing, and there is a great - even own a mask? so, the great l thing, and there is a great balance to this, is it something that is really good at isolation. we've been
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exiled here for generations. our most famous exile was napoleon, of course. so, what have we done? we have had 18 months of almost... we've carried on with our pubs, restaurants being opened, churches, spurts of events, even street festivals. no masks and no real social distancing — — sports events. you've been eating peanuts off the bar, you've had cinemas, and i am sympathetic in some respects, but it sounds like heaven! have you had people trying to get in, saying if we can survive the quarantine, we cannot months of freedom?- we can survive the quarantine, we cannot months of freedom? well, if ou are cannot months of freedom? well, if you are interested _ cannot months of freedom? well, if you are interested in _ cannot months of freedom? well, if you are interested in coming. - cannot months of freedom? well, if you are interested in coming. i -
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cannot months of freedom? well, if you are interested in coming. i am i you are interested in coming. i am interested! — you are interested in coming. i am interested! get _ you are interested in coming. i am interested! get on _ you are interested in coming. i am interested! get on a _ you are interested in coming. i am interested! get on a flight - you are interested in coming. i am interested! get on a flight and - you are interested in coming. i am i interested! get on a flight and come here. how interested! get on a flight and come here- how do _ interested! get on a flight and come here. how do you _ interested! get on a flight and come here. how do you get _ interested! get on a flight and come here. how do you get there? - interested! get on a flight and come here. how do you get there? they i interested! get on a flight and come | here. how do you get there? they do a fli . ht here. how do you get there? they do a flight around _ here. how do you get there? they do a flight around a _ here. how do you get there? they do a flight around a monthly _ here. how do you get there? they do a flight around a monthly basis. - a flight around a monthly basis. it's a direct flight to the island. it's a direct flight to the island. it looks idyllic. i think we will have to go there on holiday. and you do have to suffer the quarantine for two weeks. i'm going to share with you a piece of personal information. my star sign is scorpio, and they tell me i am quite typical of a scorpio. we're quite independent, passionate, sometimes a bit controlling — and stubborn. and in salt lake city, utah, scorpios are least likely to be vaccinated. they have ranked the star signs according to what proportion of those people have had a jab. and, yes, the stubborn old scorpios, it would appear, are bottom of the pile. top of the list, leos, who it says are "radiantly joyful and liberal."
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and compliant by the looks of it. although i have been doublejob. jeff eason is a manager at salt lake county health's department. it's a good roost. it's been talk about on twitter and on social media quite a lot, was that the idea — — double—jabbed? quite a lot, was that the idea - - double-jabbed?_ quite a lot, was that the idea - - double-jabbed? double-“abbed? absolutely, and we are double-jabbed? absolutely, and we are extremely _ double-jabbed? absolutely, and we are extremely excited _ double-jabbed? absolutely, and we are extremely excited there's - double-jabbed? absolutely, and we are extremely excited there's been | are extremely excited there's been so much attention. it's all about the conversation.— so much attention. it's all about the conversation. why are scorpios bottom of the _ the conversation. why are scorpios bottom of the pile? _ the conversation. why are scorpios bottom of the pile? i'm _ the conversation. why are scorpios bottom of the pile? i'm feeling - the conversation. why are scorpios bottom of the pile? i'm feeling a i bottom of the pile? i'm feeling a bit defensive. is it because they come later in the year? is it because the over 12 haven't had their vaccine yet?— their vaccine yet? there is certainly _ their vaccine yet? there is certainly that _ their vaccine yet? there is certainly that potential. i i their vaccine yet? there is - certainly that potential. i want to point out we are applying us statistics to a population the size of salt lake county. my wife is also a scorpio. she has received both of her vaccines, and i have to be careful here. mr;
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her vaccines, and i have to be careful here.— her vaccines, and i have to be careful here. my wife shares her ain. careful here. my wife shares her pain- what's _ careful here. my wife shares her pain. what's the _ careful here. my wife shares her pain. what's the sample - careful here. my wife shares her pain. what's the sample size? i careful here. my wife shares her- pain. what's the sample size? what's the total sample size you got here? we have about 670,000 salt lake county residents that have been fully vaccinated, and that's the number we're using. i fully vaccinated, and that's the number we're using.— number we're using. i love the disclaimer— number we're using. i love the disclaimer at _ number we're using. i love the disclaimer at the _ number we're using. i love the disclaimer at the bottom - number we're using. i love the disclaimer at the bottom of i number we're using. i love the| disclaimer at the bottom of the number we're using. i love the i disclaimer at the bottom of the list that says covid—19 is backed by science in no way influenced by horoscopes. science in no way influenced by horoscopes-— science in no way influenced by horoscopes._ let's i science in no way influenced by i horoscopes._ let's talk horoscopes. absolutely. let's talk about some _ horoscopes. absolutely. let's talk about some of _ horoscopes. absolutely. let's talk about some of the _ horoscopes. absolutely. let's talk about some of the other- horoscopes. absolutely. let's talk about some of the other star i horoscopes. absolutely. let's talk| about some of the other star signs on the list. virgos, i'm quite surprised that they are as low. they're quite practical and humble, aren't they? they don't tend to break rules. i'm surprised they're at the bottom.— break rules. i'm surprised they're at the bottom. , ., . ., at the bottom. understandable. what i'm excited about _ at the bottom. understandable. what i'm excited about is _ at the bottom. understandable. what i'm excited about is the _ at the bottom. understandable. what i'm excited about is the fire _ at the bottom. understandable. what i'm excited about is the fire types i i'm excited about is the fire types at the top, and being an aries, i was extremely excited to see that.
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what sort of reaction have you had to it in salt lake?— to it in salt lake? we've had an enormous _ to it in salt lake? we've had an enormous out _ to it in salt lake? we've had an enormous out streaming - to it in salt lake? we've had an enormous out streaming of- to it in salt lake? we've had an i enormous out streaming of positive attitudes and discussions, and that's what it's about. it is about creating unity and having a great discussion. do creating unity and having a great discussion-— discussion. do you think it's brou . ht discussion. do you think it's brought more _ discussion. do you think it's brought more people - discussion. do you think it's. brought more people forward discussion. do you think it's i brought more people forward for discussion. do you think it's - brought more people forward for a vaccine? i brought more people forward for a vaccine? . . , brought more people forward for a vaccine? . ., , ., , vaccine? i certainly hope it does. riuht vaccine? i certainly hope it does. right now. _ vaccine? i certainly hope it does. right now. we — vaccine? i certainly hope it does. right now, we are _ vaccine? i certainly hope it does. right now, we are at _ vaccine? i certainly hope it does. right now, we are at 5696 - vaccine? i certainly hope it does. | right now, we are at 5696 vaccine right now, we are at 56% vaccine coverage in residence. we're very excited about that but would love to see an improvement. did excited about that but would love to see an improvement.— see an improvement. did you say ou're an see an improvement. did you say you're an aries? _ see an improvement. did you say you're an aries? i _ see an improvement. did you say you're an aries? i am. _ see an improvement. did you say you're an aries? i am. what i you're an aries? i am. what characteristic _ you're an aries? i am. what characteristic is _ you're an aries? i am. what characteristic is that? i you're an aries? i am. what characteristic is that? an i you're an aries? i am. what i characteristic is that? an over achiever. _ characteristic is that? an over achiever. is — characteristic is that? an over achiever, is what _ characteristic is that? an over achiever, is what they... i characteristic is that? an over achiever, is what they... wellj characteristic is that? an over i achiever, is what they... well you certainl achiever, is what they. .. well you certainly over— achiever, is what they... well you certainly over overachieved - achiever, is what they... well you certainly over overachieved with i certainly over overachieved with this list. jeff, great to have you. if you're watching here. the ten o'clock news is coming very shortly
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and laura will be here for world viewers. thanks for watching. hello again. thursday was a much chillier kind of day, but there was plenty of sunshine to be found. sunny skies here in redcar and cleveland, with the brisk winds travelling across the north sea, whipping up some sea spray. now, this year, this autumn's been very, very mild. it's been quite unusual to see a day with temperatures below average, but that's what we have on thursday, with temperatures dropping from 19 in heathrow on wednesday to 12 or so through thursday afternoon. now, looking at friday's forecast, we're looking at this strip of cloud that'sjust getting into northern scotland. that's this occlusion you can see here. it's going to be sliding its way southwards while working out into the north sea. ridge of high pressure across western areas. between and betwixt, we have northwesterly winds bringing a lot of cloud and showers to north—western areas.
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now, the showers are going to be really quite frequent for north west england, around cheshire, merseyside, greater manchester, north wales and the north west midlands. so much so that it's probably going to be quite cloudy and even damp for some across these areas. but otherwise, sunny spells around again, but with a bit more cloud than we had on thursday. temperatures similar, though — highs between 9—16 degrees celsius. now, through friday evening and overnight, those showers will tend to fade away. we'll initially have some clear spells, and then we'll start to get south—westerly winds picking up. so, it will start to turn a bit milder across western areas through the night, but that is likely to leave some mist and fog patches falling around our coasts and hills. so, might be quite a murky start to saturday across some of the western and southern coasts and hills in particular. through saturday, though, this milder air is going to be pushing its way in. it's also going to be bringing some rain to northern ireland — there's a weather front moving in here — and the rain getting into western scotland as well. otherwise, a murky start with mist and fog patches.
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could keep some of those over the high ground even into the afternoon, but for central and eastern areas, should brighten up with some sunny spells poking through the cloud. temperatures are rising. we're looking at highs between 13—15 degrees celsius. these temperatures across northern areas are again pushing back above average for the time of year. on into sunday's forecast, generally it's a showery kind of day. the showers are going to be most frequent across north—western areas where it's likely to be quite cloudy. the best of any sunshine and breaks in the cloud more for eastern areas, eastern areas of scotland, probably north east england the favoured spots for seeing sunny skies. temperatures about 13—15 degrees celsius. then into monday, we've got this pattern in the jet stream. this here is a trough, this dip you can see here, and that's going to encourage showers to form on monday. now, initially, those showers are likely to form across western areas of the uk on monday because that's where the trough is, but through the day, as it pushes eastward, so those showers will migrate to eastern areas of scotland,
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probably into parts of eastern england, particularly the south east of england, where some of them could be quite heavy, perhaps an odd rumble of thunder. temperatures between 11—15 degrees celsius. 1a is about average for this stage of october in london. now, beyond that, deeper into next week, well, we are going to have south—westerly winds. we will have a weather front bringing some potentially prolonged outbreaks of rain with the risk of some localised flooding building in, with high rainfall totals likely across some of our western mountains. however, there's uncertainty about exactly where the heaviest rain is going to be. however, it will be mild, it will be quite windy through much of next week. that's your latest weather. bye for now.
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tonight at ten — the man accused of killing the conservative mp sir david amess appears in court charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts. ali harbi ali, who's 25 and a british national, was said to have carried out reconnaissance on other mps and on the houses of parliament. sir david was repeatedly stabbed as he met constituents in essex last friday and he died at the scene. we will continue to build our case. if there are members of the public who have further information that might help the investigation, i would urge them to come forward. the suspect will be brought to the old bailey tomorrow. also on the programme... the public is urged to get booster jabs as the daily number of new infections surges to more than 50,000. saudi arabia is among the countries
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accused of trying to change a major report calling for less reliance on fossil fuels.

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