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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 21, 2021 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the leak reveals saudi arabia, japan and australia asked the un some countries trying to weaken a crucial report on climate change. the leak reveals saudi arabia, japan and australia asked the un to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels. campaigners say its shocking. a small group of coal, oil and meat producing countries are putting the profits of those industries in front of science and in front of the planet. a bitter dispute with poland is dominating an eu summit in brussels. the country's being accused of breaching the bloc�*s core values.
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but it does have some support. european institutions circumvent the rights of the national parliament and governments and modify the treaty without having any legitimate authority to do so. so the polish are right. in the uk a 25—year—old man has appeared in court, charged with the murder of the mp david amess. and as part of our weekly special reports — we'll look at coronavirus in the uk. a huge leak of documents shows that some countries are trying to play down the need to move away from fossil fuels. it reveals that saudi arabia, japan and australia are among nations lobbying the un to change a crucial scientific report on how to tackle climate change. this is important for two reasons. one: the un says fossil fuel use needs to fall sharply to avoid catastrophic climate change.
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and two: in ten days�* time world leaders will gather in glasgow for the cop26 conference, to talk about how to avoid that. here's our climate editorjustin rowlatt the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists response will for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk which passed them the bbc. these un reports are pretty much the bible of climate science. they are used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change, and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. let's look at what this leak reveals. starting with saudi arabia. it's the world's largest oil exporter. an adviser to the saudi oil ministry demands "phrases like �*the need for urgent and accelerated mitigation actions at all scales�* should be eliminated from the report". here's the bbc�*s sameer hashmi on that.
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if you look at saudi arabia, which is not only the largest producer of oil, export or rather of oil in the world, but also the head of opec, and opec plus which also includes russia, and consistently the commentary that has been coming out of opec is that yes, we need to fight together to transition to greener energy, but at the same time let's be realistic. we cannot expect oil demand to go down, in fact they are expecting oil demand to ramp up or increase in the coming years. and most countries are looking at investing more money to produce more oil. whether it's saudi arabia, the uae, kuwait, all these countries are now investing more money because they think that oil prices are going to stay at these high levels for the next seven to eight, or ten years. so this is the time or you can really make good money, because oil demand may hit a peak after seven or eight years as countries globally try to transition to renewable forms of energy.
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so that's saudi arabia. the leak also reveals that a senior australian government official rejects the un's conclusion that closing coal—fired power plants is necessary. that's despite ending the use of coal being one of the stated objectives of the upcoming cop26 conference in glasgow. then there's india — the world's second largest consumer of coal, after china. its prime minister narendra modi is going to cop26. he's previously stated that "we in india are doing our part." but a senior scientist from india's central institute of mining and fuel research, which has strong links to the indian government, says "coal is likely to remain the mainstay of energy production in the next few decades for sustainable economic growth of the country". our correspondent in delhi is vineet kar. it would not be wrong to say that coal is sort of a lifeline for a lot of poor communities to keep, they use coal to keep themselves warm, to cook food. i was recently reading a report that said as many as 4 million people
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are directly or indirectly employed in india's coal industry, and the coal consumption is only going up because of an expanding middle class. they are buying air conditioners, there refrigerators, so the electricity usage is going up. and india continues to import coal. in fact there was a coal shortage in parts of india recently, and there was little stock of strategic reserves of imported coals, and india's coal consumption continues to rise because of that. and in the coming days we can see more new coal mines being opened for use. also in this leak is japan. the documents reveal that it's arguing in favour of something called carbon capture and storage. that's an emerging and currently expensive technology designed to suck c02 out of the atmosphere and store it underground. rupert wingfield hayes has more from tokyo. japan stands out a bit, because
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japan is not a big oil and gas producer, it is a oil and gas consumer. so why is japan not moving to renewable energy instead? that would seem logical to many people, and i think the answer is thatjapan just has a lot of legacy industrial capacity, old industries, big steel industry, big chemicals industry and what we have seen here is the electricity generating industry here is still today building new coal fired power stations. when looked at a brand—new facility south of tokyo the other day, which will go online in 2023, and will run through 2060 or 2070 that will burn coal. now, if that is going to continue to be used, if they are going to essentially get their return on investment they are going to have to find some other way of doing it. and that is to do is carbon capture and storage. and that's the japanese government's argument. i have to say, many climate scientists and the ipcc report suggests this
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is actually not the way to go. as well as lobbying about fossil fuels, these leaked documents show that the world's biggest meat producers are arguing against cutting back. for context — 26% of all global emissions come from food. the draught un report says "plant—based diets can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 50% compared to the average emission—intensive western diet." brazil, the words second largest producer of beef, claims this is incorrect. and argentina, another big beef producer, recommends "avoiding generalisation on the impacts of meat—based diets on low—carbon options". it argues there is evidence that meat—based diets can also reduce carbon emissions. the un doesn't agree with either brazil or argentina. as you heard before, the documents we're talking about were leaked to the charity greenpeace, which passed them to the bbc. here's the head of greenpeace international. i think it'sjust really an insight
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into how a small group of coal, oil and meat producing countries are putting the profits of those industries in front of science and in front of the planet. i think what's shocking, or what needs to be seen is how the depths to which countries like australia, saudi arabia and japan will go to try and stop a focus on the phase out of fossil fuels. that's needed and we also need to see that in the glasgow outcome. this has all raised questions about the impact of this lobbying. the countries we've discussed about are trying to alter chapters in the un's respected climate reports. here's someone who works on them. they are invited to comment on those chapters, and of course many of them are incredibly helpful comments, but of course some of them, as you can tell from the report, really start lobbying. they are trying to influence the science to try and actually perhaps improve their country's standing or their economy.
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the really interesting thing is, of course, that has no effect. the scientists, the social scientists and the economists who are dedicating their life to working on these reports are following the evidence. they are looking at what is best for the planet, what is best for the peoples of the planet. and it is really interesting because that gives you an incredible trust. so if you go out in the world politicians and the public trust these rules, and trust scientists because they know we are not going to be influenced by australia, brazil, russia or china. let's look ahead to the cop26 climate summit in glasgow — where these scientific reports will be used during negotiations. christiana figueres was responsible for the landmark global climate agreement which was reached at the last big conference in paris in 2015. she's been speaking to the bbc about what would count as success orfailure in glasgow. a failure to begin there would constitute with the collective
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efforts that all countries bring forward, are nowhere near, nowhere near a two degrees maximum temperature rise. ultimately, we have to put the ceiling at 1.5. we are probably not there yet in the real economy, but the real economy is moving fast and furious. so the collective efforts of governments has to be to at least keep 1.5 as the ceiling of temperature rise, keep it alive. we did not know in 2015 that there would be a huge difference between a world that goes to 1.5 degrees and a world that goes to two degrees. we thought there was only a marginal difference. today, thanks to the ipcc report of 2018 we know that there is a world of difference between 1.5 as a maximum temperature rise and two degrees. that is why the entire world is now turning to a target maximum rise
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of 1.5 degrees. these annual conferences where national governments come together are politicalforcing moments. that bring countries together to be transparent about what they had done and especially what they are going to do in the nearfuture. that's why they are so important. in the meantime let's not forget that the real economy continues to move forward, and at many points in time in history such as right now, are actually ahead of governments. (sting) a 25—year old man has been charged with murder, and the preparation of terrorist acts, after the fatal stabbing of the mp — sir david amess. ali harbi ali from north london was arrested following the attack in essex, last friday. sir david, who had been a conservative mp for almost a0 years, died at the scene. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. just over six days after sir david amess mp was stabbed to death in leigh—on—sea, the man accused of murdering him was brought to court.
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the crown prosecution service had authorised counterterrorism detectives to charge him this morning. in the dock at westminster magistrates�* court, ali harbi ali wore a grey sweatshirt and trousers, and black rimmed glasses. he spoke to confirm his name, date of birth and his address in kentish town, north london. and then sat silently for the hearing, which lasted less than a quarter of an hour. sir david was killed in an office at the back of the belfairs methodist church hall, just after midday on friday. he'd been meeting voters as part of a constituency surgery. police officers and paramedics who'd rushed to the scene were unable to save him. a large team of detectives have been working around the clock to find out as much as we can about what happened and why. that work has included searches of a number of london addresses. 0ur advanced forensics teams have
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analysed digital devices and carried out a painstaking review of cctv footage. ali harbi ali, seen here walking in the direction of gospel 0ak station in north london on the day of the murder, was arrested at the church hall in leigh—on—sea. detectives say they are not looking for anyone else. the head of the crown prosecution service's counterterrorism division said, we will submit to the court that this murder as a terrorist connection, namely that it had both religious and ideological motivations. ali harbi ali is a british citizen who was born in south london, and grew up in croydon. as well as the murder of sir david amess, he is accused of preparing a terrorist act. it's alleged that on reconnaissance trips earlier this year, he went to the address of one mp several times and the constituency surgery of another. he also went to the house of commons. after the hearing, he was taken away to prison, where he will be held until his next appearance
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at the old bailey, tomorrow. european leaders are in brussels for a 2—day european council summit and a row with poland is dominating the debates. that's because earlier this month, poland s highest court ruled that parts of eu law are in direct conflict with its own constitution — challenging the foundations of the european union in a way that has never been done before. the case was brought by this man — poland's prime minister. eu leaders have threatened sanctions against poland saying their core values are at stake. this was eu commission president ursula von der leyen on tuesday. this is what all 27 member states have signed up to as part of this union as a sovereign countries and free people. honorable members, we cannot and we will not allow our common values to be put at risk.
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and this was poland's prime minister responding to that. translation: i reject the language . of threats and the fait accompli. i i will not have politicians blackmail poland. blackmail must not be a method of contact with member states. the french president, emmanuel macron urged warsaw to find a solution �*compatible' to european principles. and this is what dutch prime minister, mark rutte said at the start of today's summit. i think we have to be tough, but the question is how do you get there? my argument would be that the independence of the polish judiciary is the key issue which we have to discuss and have to settle, and we pull it has to take the necessary steps. that is non—negotiable. this has to do with the foundations of our democracy is in this part of the world. here we cannot negotiate.
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mark rutte there urging the eu to take action. so what action can it take. the first option is known as an "infringement", where the commission legally challenges the polish court's judgement and could lead to fines. another option is for the eu to withold funds from poland. poland is unlikely to see any of the eu's covid recovery fund until the dispute is resolved. a third option is the application of article seven of the eu treaty where the rights of member states — including the right to vote on eu decisions — can be suspended. poland is getting some support — notably from its political ally and neighbour hungary. its prime minister viktor orban is also demanding greater political and judicial autonomy for eu member states. here's what he said today. the fact is very clear. the primacy of eu law is not in the treaty at all. so the eu has primacy where it
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has competence, the questions about the confidences. what is going on here is regularly that european institutions circumvent the rights of the national parliaments and governments and modify the treaty without having any legitimate authority to do so. so the polish are right. on the issues and areas where we haven't transferred the regulation, and to create the right to create regulations of the eu citizens, the national law has primacy. no question of that. it is a very simple legal question. our correspondentjessica parker is in brussels. looking through all the different comments today and through the week it's all starting to feel quite familiar so i'm going to stop asking you, anyone giving ground here? it doesn't appear so yet but pretty early on in the discussion in terms of this high level political debate, because we have had eu leaders
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arrive here today. they have had a lot on their agenda, energy prices, coronavirus and my understanding is they have onlyjust now at the european council here in brussels got round to the rule of law discussion. something that actually was not even on the original agenda but because of growing pressure particularly from certain member states it has now popped up. the polish prime minister is going to be invited to take the floor, to visit explain his position, we've heard what his position is over the course of the last week so it seems likely that he will restage that although of course sometimes in the privacy of course sometimes in the privacy of a room and he's there with other political leaders rather than front of the cameras who knows, maybe things would it be different. which is supposed to be touched upon so how long this discussion goes on for, how he did it gets and whether it can really resolve anything i think our big question marks around that. �* , , .,
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think our big question marks around that. �* , ,., , think our big question marks around that. , , that. and this is of course raising auestions that. and this is of course raising questions about _ that. and this is of course raising questions about the _ that. and this is of course raising questions about the european . that. and this is of course raising i questions about the european union and how it functions. as you were talking over seen pictures of angela merkel arriving. talking over seen pictures of angela merkelarriving. in talking over seen pictures of angela merkel arriving. in the last stretch of her time as german chancellor, also french elections next year. so emmanuel macron is battling that out. uncertainty around two of the most important members where does that leave the eu more broadly as it tries to plot the future? i5 tries to plot the future? is an important — tries to plot the future? is an important point _ tries to plot the future? is an important point because - tries to plot the future? is an important point because this| tries to plot the future? is an i important point because this is probably angela merkel�*s last european council, a figure floating around is that it's about her 107th some have calculated. so she is a real veteran of these events but the fact that she is going very soon as outgoing chancellor and as you say the french election next year, that does mean you council summits whilst you have a little bit of flex and movement about who might be in charge of these incredibly important central countries does take away from the prospect of setting a long—standing political direction, however angela merkel trying to make
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her voice heard here. pretty clear in the last week or so and repeats the position tonight that she would prefer the course of dialogue rather than seeing all of this playing out in european courts. and i think the view from germany is that ultimately this is a political discussion that you need to get poland to essentially what were its governing party, to change direction. that's the only way you'll be able to this. others you heard getting impatient and saying we have talked for a long time, we will have to get tough now. jessica parker live with us from brussels. lets turn to the uk. the doctors union — the bma — is accusing the government of �*wilful negligence�* for failing to act to stop a rise in covid—19 infections. this is the chairman. citizens of the uk are suffering at a much higher level than other comparative nations, and therefore if there is a way that we can avoid suffering,
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avoid people becoming hospitalised, avoid people being on ventilators, and avoiding the medallion, it�*s surely a responsibility of government to do that. the government has a responsibility to protect the nation�*s health, it has a responsibility to make sure that the health service has the capacity to care for the patients. now we have a situation where the evidence tells you that you need to be doing something. these are the figures. in the past 2a hours the uk has recorded over 52,000 cases and 115 deaths. daily infections have been over 40,000 for eight days straight. 79% of the population over 12 are now fully vaccinated. yesterday the health secretary ruled out imposing the government�*s so called plan b for tackling covid in england over the winter — which would see mandatory face masks brought back and work from home advice. and here�*s the prime minister
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defending that decision today. but we are within the parameters of what the predictions were, what spi—m and the others said, where we would be at this stage, given the steps we have taken. so we are sticking with our plan. so again, no to plan b. the current strategy in operation is plan a. that involves one vaccine dose to healthy 12 to 15 year olds and boosterjabs to about 30 million people. here�*s the prime minister again. i think the most important thing that people can do now is tojust -et that people can do now is tojust get that— that people can do now is tojust get that boosterjab. get your commit — get that boosterjab. get your commit when you get the call get the 'ab. commit when you get the call get the jab we _ commit when you get the call get the jab. we have done about 4 million booster_ jab. we have done about 4 million boosterjabs already, but as soon as you become — boosterjabs already, but as soon as you become eligible and as soon as you become eligible and as soon as you get— you become eligible and as soon as you get that call everybody should
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be getting that jab. we are in a much _ be getting that jab. we are in a much better position going into the autumn, _ much better position going into the autumn, the winter now than we were 12 months— autumn, the winter now than we were 12 months ago. jonathan blake is in westminster. we spoke about this a couple of nights back, i can ask you much the same questions because it feels like there is still pressure growing on there is still pressure growing on the government to shift here much the government to shift here much the same answers for you, i�*m afraid. let�*s make it a bit more interesting. the pressure does continue, it�*s increased, you heard there the doctor from the british medical association stressing that as the people on the front line against this pandemic working in hospitals, it�*s absolutely their view that plan b needs to happen now. and accusing the government of willful negligence. that is quite strong stuff coming from the bma but the government is standing firm in the government is standing firm in the face of that.— the face of that. suggesting that the face of that. suggesting that the protection _ the face of that. suggesting that the protection against _ the face of that. suggesting that the protection against a - the face of that. suggesting that the protection against a virus - the face of that. suggesting that l the protection against a virus that are in place, largely in the form of
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the vaccine programme are holding up and mean that the country is in a much better position. a slight subplot if you like is the position labour is in getting itself into a little bit of a tangle as to whether it back to the government�*s move to plan b in england. the shadow health secretary suggesting earlier in an interview on times radio that the party was in favour of plan b, later clarified and it seems that they are not calling for that to happen now. nevertheless, cases clearly are going up but the key figure is hospitalisations and just how much pressure the nhs is under, and just how much pressure it can bear. help me understand _ how much pressure it can bear. help me understand the _ how much pressure it can bear. help me understand the government thinking, because it would have known the criticism was coming this way. it knew covid cases would go up as we headed to the winter, why is it sticking to plan a? it as we headed to the winter, why is it sticking to plan a?— it sticking to plan a? it wants to hold plan b _ it sticking to plan a? it wants to hold plan a in — it sticking to plan a? it wants to hold plan b in reserve - it sticking to plan a? it wants to hold plan b in reserve for- it sticking to plan a? it wants to hold plan b in reserve for as - hold plan b in reserve for as long as possible despite the arguments
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that it if pressure becomes unbearable it will then be too late and by the time you introduce further measures and make mass grey mandatory, get people to work from home where possible, the problem is already there. and you are not going to have time to alleviate any of that pressure. i think the government wants to hold out and keep that in reserve, but it does not really want to have to go any further. there were some reports in the newspapers about possible discussions about a plan c, may be restricting households from mixed—income i can tell you that was dismissed, trashed in where they can�*t repeat on television by government sources to me last night. that indicates the strength of feeling against possibly having to go any further. just feeling against possibly having to go any further-— go any further. just to reiterate the government _ go any further. just to reiterate the government position, - go any further. just to reiterate the government position, it - go any further. just to reiterate the government position, it is l go any further. just to reiterate i the government position, it is not saying that it would never bring back things like mandatory facemasks, same based on the cac relations at the moment it is sticking with its current plan a, we will have an in—depth analysis of the government position on this in
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the government position on this in the second half of outside source. good evening. after the very mild weather we have seen at times this week, and the real deluge that some had to contend with last night, today has been a very different sort of day with sunny skies for many. quite a cold feel to the weather. there�*s the curl of cloud that brought very heavy rain to parts of the south during last night. clearing away eastwards in its wake you can see some speckled shower clouds pushing down from the north and that northerly, or northwesterly wind has been feeding some rather chilly air across the uk. so yes it has felt quite cold out there, even given some sunshine. there have been some showers around as well, some of their showers over high ground in scotland have been wintry. the wintry element to though showers tending to ease off, but some rain showers will continue to drift southwards as we go through the night.
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more in the way of cloud as well. clearest to the skies down towards the southeast of england. that�*s where we will see the lowest temperatures, may be down to two degrees in a few places. and for tomorrow i think we will generally see a bit more cloud in the mix. that cloud producing some showers at times. those showers will tend to become fewer and further between as the day wears on. the cloud will have some breaks in it, so there will be some sunny spells. best of the sunshine, i think, to be found across the northeastern parts of scotland. the winds will slow the ease as the day wears on, but it will still be quite breezy. breezy enough up to the northeast to make it feel really rather chilly again at eight or nine degrees. a little bit milder than today down towards the southend west of the uk, 12 to 1a degrees. this little ridge of high pressure builds in through the latter part of friday. drying things out and killing of the showers, but into saturday this frontal system starts to approach from the west and as that fund approaches our shores, ahead of it winds a start to come up from the south. that change in the wind direction will bring a change in the feel of the weather.
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milder conditions return on saturday with a lot of cloud. the best of any sunshine in the east, that weather front bringing rain to parts of northern ireland and western scotland particularly where it will also be quite windy. but the southerly wind bringing those milder conditions, so temperatures by this stage 12 degrees in aberdeen, 1a maybe 15 degrees there in plymouth. and as we move into sunday, well that weather front will tended to break apart and become more showery, so there will be some showers across the western side of the uk. not as many showers further east, here we will see some spells of sunshine, but still a brisk southerly wind. and still fairly mild, highs of 1a or 15.
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hello, i�*m ros atkins — this is outside source. a huge legal document seen by bc news shows how some countries are trying to weaken reports on climate change. the leak reveals saudi arabia, japan and australia asked the un to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels. campaigners say its shocking. a small group of coal, oil and meat producing countries are putting the profits of those industries in front of science and in front of the planet. the world health organisation which says it is you�*re to assure that
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scene is fairly amongst all countries of the road will see an extension of the pandemic. as part of our weekly special report for the bbc news website, we will look in depth at wide coronavirus cases in the uk are rising. lots of important covid—19 developments. first, the world health organization has told the bbc the pandemic could drag deep into 2022 because poorer countries aren�*t getting the vaccines they need. here�*s the who�*s dr bruce aylward. the g20 will meet at the end of october, we need them to say where are we against those commitments? and i can tell you today we�*re not on track. we need to really speed it up. or, you know what? this pandemic is going to go on for a year longer than it needs to. here are the numbers. less than 5% of africa�*s population have been vaccinated — that figure is 40%
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on most other continents. last year, an international scheme, called covax, was created to ensure vaccines were made available around the world. with it came many big promises. injune, leaders of the g7�*s wealthiest nations pledged 1 billion doses to the scheme. then in september, there were more promises made at the un general assembly. for example, the us donated another 500 million vaccines on top of what it had already pledged. but then research that same month calculated that of the 1 billion doses pledged, just 15% had been delivered. well, new research out earlier also shows big shortfalls — as our global health correspondent, naomi grimley, explains. a new analysis from a group of charities, called the pupils vaccine a new analysis from a group of charities, called the poeple�*s vaccine alliance, shows the huge gap between what the world�*s richest countries
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have promised to give the poor versus the number of doses delivered so far. the uk and canada have been singled out for particular criticism, as both countries acquired some vaccines from covax for their own populations, even though they had their own supplies. on the one hand every country thatjoined the covax facility was entitled to obtain vaccines, but these two countries obtained many, many doses through bilateral agreements that can be best characterised as hoarding. so the idea then that they would double dip they would double dip and take more vaccines from the covax initiative really is morally indefensible. the uk stressed that it had helped kick—start covax and was one of its most generous financial supporters. the canadian government told us it has now stopped procuring vaccines from covax. as it became clear that the supply that we had secured through our bilateral deals with different companies, like astrazeneca, pfizer and moderna, would be sufficient for the canadian population, we then pivoted the doses that we had
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procured from covax to be donated back to covax so that they could be redistributed. we�*ve mentioned africa�*s lagging vaccination rates. half of the countries on the continent have vaccinated less than 2% of their population. here�*s an infectious diseases epidemiologist in south africa on why. i think fundamentally our vaccine distribution system is broken. you cannot have the situation where the most important tool we have against covid—19 is being decided in terms of who gets it, when they get it, how many doses they get. those decisions are being made by private pharmaceutical companies, and so they are giving preference to their preferred market. and so even if poorer countries place orders, they are buying vaccines, not asking for it to be donated, they are pushed to the back of the queue, and so too is covax. every time covax wants doses,
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it has to go to the back of the queue because companies prefer richer countries to buy their products. dr ayoade alakija is the co—chair of the african union�*s africa vaccine delivery alliance. she joins me from abuja. who do you blame for the fact that africa doesn�*t have the vaccines it needs? we africa doesn't have the vaccines it needs? ~ , . . ., , africa doesn't have the vaccines it needs? ~ , . , ., needs? we blame the countries of the world that are — needs? we blame the countries of the world that are stockpiling _ needs? we blame the countries of the world that are stockpiling and - world that are stockpiling and hoarding vaccines, we blame big pharma for their grades and at this moment and we blame the global health system that has failed us, it is broken and no longerfit health system that has failed us, it is broken and no longer fit for purpose. is broken and no longer fit for --urose. ~ , ., is broken and no longer fit for --urose. ~ purpose. when you interact with those wealthier _ purpose. when you interact with those wealthier countries - purpose. when you interact with those wealthier countries and i purpose. when you interact with | those wealthier countries and say you promise these millions and millions of vaccines, where are they? what are the replies that you get? they? what are the replies that you
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net? they? what are the replies that you iet? , ., . ., , they? what are the replies that you net? .. ,., they? what are the replies that you net? get? the politicians are gas liuuhtin get? the politicians are gas lighting as _ get? the politicians are gas lighting as from _ get? the politicians are gas lighting as from the - get? the politicians are gas lighting as from the high i get? the politicians are gas - lighting as from the high income countries of the world, just like they are gas lighting you in the uk,. the politicians and global leaders know what the signs say. they understand it is good politics to vaccinate as many people around the world as equitably as possible to ensure the variants did not come back and bite us in the back. it is good politics to ensure they do not have continual lockdowns. if we don�*t vaccinate the rest of the world, we will keep going on in this endless cycle of lockdowns and releasing populations. this is what is going on. do releasing populations. this is what is going on-— is going on. do you accept this is not 'ust is going on. do you accept this is not just about — is going on. do you accept this is notjust about the _ is going on. do you accept this is notjust about the supply of- not just about the supply of vaccines. there are also challenges of the administration of those vaccines deliver to africa, and you accept that the african union should take some responsibility for that? that is absolute balderdash. i can
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tell you it is balderdash that it is vaccinations that is the problem. we do not have enough vaccinations. as of this morning, africa has vaccinated 177 million people. the united states has done mr doses for 188 million people, more than the total number of first vaccines in the whole of africa. —— mr doses. it is quite insulting that it would be said that it is because we have a failure of logistics to deliver vaccines into our rooms. it is a supply issue, we do not have the vaccines because high income countries, such as the uk, canada and others, have hoarded them and bought more than ten times what they needin bought more than ten times what they need in some cases for their
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population. need in some cases for their population-— need in some cases for their --oulation. , ., g ., population. the message from joe biden was that _ population. the message from joe biden was that this _ population. the message from joe biden was that this is _ population. the message from joe biden was that this is a _ population. the message from joe biden was that this is a false - biden was that this is a false choice between vaccinating americans and helping to vaccinate the developing world. his spokesperson said that was a false choice. where has the system is broken down? going back if you must i remember being told again and again that the covax system was the mechanism by which the world would help content such as africa, and evidently that�*s not happening in your view. so what has gone wrong? it is happening in your view. so what has gone wrong?— gone wrong? it is 'ust not happening. h gone wrong? it isjust not happening, period. - gone wrong? it isjust not happening, period. we i gone wrong? it isjust not i happening, period. we have gone wrong? it isjust not - happening, period. we have only vaccinated 177 million people and received only around 200 million vaccines for a population of over1 billion. the high income countries of the world are hoarding the vaccines. it is not a supply issue for america orfor the uk or at the
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eu, it is a supply issue of getting the vaccines to the places where we have no vaccinations, not because we are looking for hand—outs or because we are poor, but because there are those who choose to hedge their bets and hold the vaccines for themselves. we have tried to purchase vaccines as an african continent, high income countries have not allowed us to purchase vaccines. it is immoral and it is wrong. vaccines. it is immoral and it is wronu. . , , , ., wrong. finally, this is not the first interview _ wrong. finally, this is not the first interview i _ wrong. finally, this is not the first interview i have - wrong. finally, this is not the first interview i have done - wrong. finally, this is not the | first interview i have done with senior african officials who have said similar things to what you are saying. we have also heard frustration from the who over many months on this issue. these are not new issues, they have been in plain sight for a long time. so what can unlock them?— sight for a long time. so what can unlock them? greater political will and commitment. _ unlock them? greater political will and commitment. we _ unlock them? greater political will and commitment. we have - unlock them? greater political will and commitment. we have the - unlock them? greater political will| and commitment. we have the g20 meeting coming up. again world leaders are going to gather, we have the world health assembly coming up in berlin next week, but we need
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political commitment on this issue. we need politicians to understand that it we need politicians to understand thatitis we need politicians to understand that it is in at that own self interested vaccinate the world, because it would be political suicide to not do that because variants will come back. when you have this new delta plus, it will shut the uk down, it will shut the eu and the rest of the world down. variants are being bred in communities in countries where we are not vaccinating equitably. so it is not one man for himself and god for us all, we have to look after the entire world in an equitable manner. we have to fix the system, or otherwise we will be in an endless cycle of this pandemic. 2022 is too soon, it�*s more like 2023, 2024. is too soon, it's more like 2023, 2024. ., ~ is too soon, it's more like 2023, 2024. . ~ , ., ., is too soon, it's more like 2023, 2024. . ~ i. ., ., , 2024. thank you for “oining us, we a- reciate 2024. thank you for “oining us, we appreciate your _ 2024. thank you forjoining us, we appreciate your time. _
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staying with vaccination rates. the world health orgazination says millions of healthcare workers are still unvaccinated, many of them are working without adequate protective equipment. in africa, fewer than one in ten healthcare workers are jabbed. here�*s the who head. new who working paper estimates that 115,000 health workers may have died from covid—19 betweenjanuary 2020 and may this year. in eastern europe, countries with low vaccination rates are struggling with high covid—19 cases. we�*re going to look at romania and russia — first latvia. it�*s become the first country in europe to reimpose a full covid—19 lockdown. it�*ll last three and a half weeks. only essential shops can open, restaurants can only serve takeaways, and entertainment venues are now closed. latvia has one of the worst vaccination rates in the eu. 50% of the adults are fullyjabbed. and its health minister has
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blamed vaccine hesitancy on disinformation in russian—language media. in romania, doctors are urging the government to follow latvia�*s lead and impose a lockdown. there, the vaccination is even lower. only a third of the population are jabbed. the crisis in hospitals is acute. this is in southern romania. 1,800 people are in icu wards across the country. we�*re told one persion is dying of the virus every five minutes. next, russia. vaccination rates there are also low. just 36.9% of the poulation are jabbed. moscow is telling its unvaccinated over—60s to stay at home for four months. more than 1000 people are dying every day with the virus. our correspondent, oleg boldyrev, is in moscow. the short answer is insufficient vaccinations. doctors tell us that among those who have been hospitalised,
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vaccinated people make minority amounts of severe cases, even a tiny minority, and most of the people who die are those who choose or did not have access to a vaccine. somehow, more than a year after the creation of russian vaccines, sputnik, then two more were added, russian authorities did not manage to convince enough russians to get vaccinated — moscow has seen two periods of restrictions in spring 2020 and in june and july this year. in both cases, policing was patchy, the adherence was again patchy. the policy communication wasn't sufficient. this is probably the biggest problem in russia, that there very stay with us on outside source — still to come: we�*ll take an in depth look at how the uk government is dealing with coronavirus in the uk — where cases are high
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this term, all primary and secondary school children in england have been having compulsory lessons in relationship education — with older pupils also getting sex education — after the guidance was updated for the first time in 20 years. chi chi izundu reports. we�*re going to be looking today at this really important topic about consent. do we know what consent means? and then also do we think we talk enough about it? sex and relationships education. people, like are forced to send inappropriate things that they don't want to send. the new sex education guidance states that all pupils understand the importance of equality and respect. so they�*ll be taught about relationships, mental wellbeing, the lgbt community, and — like this class in sheffield — what consent means. i believe that consent means to let someone do something _ and to give permission. #everyones|nvited. #metoo. #shewasjustwalkinghome. schools in scotland and northern ireland
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shape their own policy, whilst classes will be compulsory in wales from 2022. the last time sex education guidance was updated was back in the year 2000, when teenagers didn�*t have as easy access to mobile phones, to the internet or to the sexually explicit content that you can find online. now this compulsory upgrade to the curriculum is hoping to address those changes and the issues that they brought up. so whilst the internet can be problematic, this online sex education charity called fumble says that is the place teenagers are looking for information. we were really delighted to see relationships and sex education becoming compulsory, but we are conscious that the internet currently responds with loads of unhealthy content, loads of unsafe content. and increasingly, we hear that young people are using pornography as sex education because they�*re not finding answers to their questions anywhere else. some parents are against their children learning certain aspects of this curriculum.
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we want to get the children to understand what�*s ok, what�*s not ok. this is outside source, live from the bbc newsroom. every week on the programme we produce an in—depth look at one of the week�*s stories for the bbc website and for iplayer in the uk. this week we�*re looking at the rising coronavirus cases the uk. here in uk, a new stage of the pandemic began when borisjohnson said this injuly. we pandemic began when boris johnson said this in july-— pandemic began when boris johnson said this in july. we move away from leaal said this in july. we move away from legal restrictions _ said this in july. we move away from legal restrictions allow _ said this in july. we move away from legal restrictions allow people - said this in july. we move away from legal restrictions allow people to - legal restrictions allow people to make their own informed decisions about how to manage the virus. the alan was about how to manage the virus. the plan was clear. in england there would be no rules requiring masks, social distancing, ventilation in schools or vaccine passes for restaurants. instead the emphasis
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was on the uk�*s vaccine roll—out, on personal responsibility, on accepting that we must learn to live with the virus. three months on, this is how it is going. last week the uk recorded its highest number of daily infection since mid july, far higher than any of these major european countries. these are at the uk's european countries. these are at the uk�*s over debts over the same period, they are gradually rising and are higher than most of the same european countries, though all countries are seen far lower desk than before the vaccine arrived. as case numbers rise, the uk government is saying this. ipupiith case numbers rise, the uk government is saying this-— is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow _ is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it _ is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. _ is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so - is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so we - is saying this. with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so we are l we can't blow it now. so we are going _ we can't blow it now. so we are going to — we can't blow it now. so we are going to do _ we can't blow it now. so we are going to do everything we can to maintain — going to do everything we can to maintain our lead by our vaccination programme — maintain our lead by our vaccination programme as our primary line of defence — programme as our primary line of defence. no programme as our primary line of defence. ., ., , ., defence. no return of rules to contain the — defence. no return of rules to contain the virus, _ defence. no return of rules to contain the virus, instead - defence. no return of rules to contain the virus, instead of. defence. no return of rules to - contain the virus, instead of heavy emphasis on blisters, vaccinated children, and vaccinating those who
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have so far declined. vaccines are central to what the government calls its plan a. i also to understand why infections going up. it is that of the speed of the uk�*s vaccine roll—out. it had one of the fastest arts in the world, and that�*s not as arts in the world, and that�*s not as a factor now. fist arts in the world, and that's not as a factor now-— a factor now. at the start of this ear, i a factor now. at the start of this year. i think— a factor now. at the start of this year, i think we _ a factor now. at the start of this year, i think we were _ a factor now. at the start of this year, i think we were patting . year, i think we were patting ourselves on the back for how fast the uk�*s roll out of vaccines was going. that has ironically become a bit of a problem for us now, because it means we have this issue of waning immunity. the it means we have this issue of waning immunity.— it means we have this issue of waning immunity. the point being that immunity _ waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes _ waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes over - waning immunity. the point being that immunity wanes over time. l waning immunity. the point being . that immunity wanes over time. here we see immunity a month after vaccination, and then after several months, there is a drop, and there is the biggest drop of the uk pubs most use astrazeneca vaccine. many of any... in september, the uk
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decided to vaccinate children aged 12 and over, but many other countries like the us, france and israel started much earlier and have vaccinated many more children. all of this means the government�*s roll—out is under attack. the roll-out is under attack. the booster programme - roll—out is under attack. the booster programme is roll—out is under attack. tt;e: booster programme is stalling, with charities describing it as a chaotic failure. only around 13% of children have actually been vaccinated. his wall of defence is falling down at just the point that vaccination is whining. has just the point that vaccination is whinina. : , :, just the point that vaccination is whinina. : , ., , just the point that vaccination is whinina. : , . , ., whining. as we have been hearing, the government _ whining. as we have been hearing, the government would _ whining. as we have been hearing, the government would refute - whining. as we have been hearing, the government would refute that l the government would refute that characterisation, but is this true that the rate of that is anything children, the rate of boosters, and waning immunity are all factors when we look at the rise in case numbers. social distancing out masks are factors too. scotland and wales have recently reintroduced vaccine passports for some larger venues,
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but in the rest of the uk they are not needed. as for a mask, they are legally required in some circumstances in scotland. in england, the government doesn�*t require them, but some local authorities do on public transport. in reality about that is patchy. that contrasts with germany, where masks are illegally required in certain places and use is high. the labour party think there is a lesson there. t labour party think there is a lesson there. :, :, , ., , there. i do not understand why we don't mandate _ there. i do not understand why we don't mandate mask _ there. i do not understand why we don't mandate mask wearing - there. i do not understand why we don't mandate mask wearing on i there. i do not understand why we - don't mandate mask wearing on public don�*t mandate mask wearing on public transport. is it too much to ask someone on a crowded bus or tube to wear a mask? also, forcing people to go back to work or ending any social distancing or advice about ventilation, all of these mitigations had been maintained on the contrary, the levels are now fractionally better.—
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fractionally better. there is of course broader _ fractionally better. there is of course broader large-scale i fractionally better. there is of - course broader large-scale research course broader large—scale research that shows masks reduce transmission, but the data right now suggests this is not a major driver of case numbers in the uk. we know that despite some policy differences across the foreign nations, including some mandatory mask wearing, we are seeing similar covid patterns for the all of the uk. those patterns are leading some nhs leaders to call for a range of some measures to be brought back. they say it�*s time for the government�*s plant b. they say it's time for the government's plant b. they say it's time for the government's alant b. government's plant b. the government said it would — government's plant b. the government said it would enact _ government's plant b. the government said it would enact plan _ government's plant b. the government said it would enact plan b _ government's plant b. the government said it would enact plan b if _ government's plant b. the government said it would enact plan b if it's - said it would enact plan b if it�*s out the health service is at risk, and we are saying it is at risk and we need to take measures now like wearing masks in crowded places. working from home if you can. there are two government _ working from home if you can. there are two government responses -
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are two government responses relevant to this, the first is that it does not agree with changing tack at this point. it does not agree with changing tack at this point-— at this point. obviously we are lookin: at this point. obviously we are looking at _ at this point. obviously we are looking at data, _ at this point. obviously we are looking at data, minut - at this point. obviously we are i looking at data, minut ministers, scientists. — looking at data, minut ministers, scientists, experts are looking at data on _ scientists, experts are looking at data on an — scientists, experts are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't _ data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel— data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel it _ data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel it is time for plan b right— don't feel it is time for plan b right now _ don't feel it is time for plan b right now-— don't feel it is time for plan b riaht now. , :, , :, right now. then listen to this from sa'id right now. then listen to this from sajid javid- — right now. then listen to this from sajid javid. there _ right now. then listen to this from sajid javid. there are _ right now. then listen to this from sajid javid. there are many i right now. then listen to this from sajid javid. there are many more | sajid javid. there are many more thins sajid javid. there are many more things that _ sajid javid. there are many more things that we — sajid javid. there are many more things that we can _ sajid javid. there are many more things that we can all— sajid javid. there are many more things that we can all do - sajid javid. there are many more things that we can all do to i sajid javid. there are many more things that we can all do to help| things that we can all do to help contain the spread of this virus, like meeting outdoors where it is possible, and if you can only meet indoors, letting in a fresh air, like wearing a face covering in crowded and close spaces. that is vice raised — crowded and close spaces. that is vice raised eyebrows _ crowded and close spaces. that is vice raised eyebrows as _ crowded and close spaces. that is vice raised eyebrows as mr i crowded and close spaces. that is vice raised eyebrows as mrjavid l crowded and close spaces. that is i vice raised eyebrows as mrjavid and his conservative colleagues do not wear masks in the house of commons. this is an issue for individuals to interpret and decide. that is not a mistake from the government, it is in line with his emphasis on personal responsibility, and common sense and vaccine. the question is, all this approach keep the virus that a sustainable level for the
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nhs? the rate of hospitalisations in the uk throughout the pandemic lookalikes lists. it it is nowhere near the first or second wave. tt is near the first or second wave. it is arobabl near the first or second wave. it is probably the _ near the first or second wave. it is probably the first _ near the first or second wave. tit 3 probably the first season where we will have significant amounts of covid circulating as well as flu. people�*s behaviours have changed, we are mixing more, winter is coming along, everybody is going into enclosed spaces. it along, everybody is going into enclosed spaces.— along, everybody is going into enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season, _ enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season, it _ enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season, it will _ enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season, it will make i enclosed spaces. if this winter is a bad flu season, it will make the i enclosed spaces. if this winter is a | bad flu season, it will make the uk particularly vulnerable to rising covid hospitalisations. the uk has fewer beds per person than in spain, italy, france and germany. that lack of capacity is not caused by covid, thatis of capacity is not caused by covid, that is a broader discussion about how health care works in the uk. but how health care works in the uk. but how they can apply pressure to that capacity. here is the chief executive of nhs england. t capacity. here is the chief executive of nhs england. i think we are in for a terrific— executive of nhs england. i think we are in for a terrific winter _ executive of nhs england. i think we are in for a terrific winter for - are in for a terrific winter for supper— are in for a terrific winter for supper with we have got covid
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patients — supper with we have got covid patients in our beds. —— in for a tough _ patients in our beds. —— in for a tough winter~ _ patients in our beds. -- in for a tough winter-— patients in our beds. -- in for a tou~h winter. , tough winter. the government says the nhs has _ tough winter. the government says the nhs has the _ tough winter. the government says the nhs has the ability _ tough winter. the government says the nhs has the ability to _ tough winter. the government says the nhs has the ability to manage l the nhs has the ability to manage and not under unsustainable pressure. as we consider these differing analyses, here is a word of cautious caution from being too definitive to stop what we�*re seeing at the memory in its buttressing... what is more certain is that we are seeing two relatively clear schools of thought. there is the uk government with its focus on the vaccine. , : government with its focus on the vaccine. , . :, , :, ., vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme _ vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme began - vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme began at i vaccine. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme began at last i vaccine programme began at last winter, we have been in a race between the vaccine and the virus. and although we are ahead in that race, the gap is narrowing. the government's _ race, the gap is narrowing. the government's strategy in july, race, the gap is narrowing. the government's strategy injuly, the government�*s strategy injuly, the strategy now rests almost entirely
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on the vaccine. that is not what the world health organisation is recommending. the world health organisation is recommending.— world health organisation is recommendinu. . :, , recommending. the who position is that we can't — recommending. the who position is that we can't only _ recommending. the who position is that we can't only rely _ recommending. the who position is that we can't only rely on _ that we can't only rely on vaccination at the moment to suppress— vaccination at the moment to suppress the virus, that we need to continue _ suppress the virus, that we need to continue to— suppress the virus, that we need to continue to keep transmission down, especially— continue to keep transmission down, especially as we enter the winter period _ especially as we enter the winter aeriod. ,, : g , especially as we enter the winter aeriod. ,, . . , ., , especially as we enter the winter aeriod. ,, . i , ., period. since july, that is almost exactly what _ period. since july, that is almost exactly what has _ period. since july, that is almost exactly what has happened i period. since july, that is almost exactly what has happened in i exactly what has happened in england. life in many ways has gone back to normal, with the benefits and a rise in cases that brings too. now of the nhs were warning that a tough winter is coming, so to come tough winter is coming, so to come tough questions for the government. it believes four now that vaccines can work, this winter will reveal if thatis can work, this winter will reveal if that is right. you can find more analysis for me and the outside source team elsewhere on the bbc. we tackle multiple subjects through the week. you can find those videos on the bbc iplayer. you can also subscribe to audio versions via bbc sounds. that is at from this
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edition. thanks very much for watching. we will see you soon, all the best. good evening. after the very mild weather we have seen at times this week, and the real deluge that some had to contend with last night, today has been a very different sort of day with sunny skies for many. quite a cold feel to the weather. there�*s the curl of cloud that brought very heavy rain to parts of the south during last night. clearing away eastwards in its wake you can see some speckled shower clouds pushing down from the north and that northerly, or northwesterly wind has been feeding some rather chilly air across the uk. so yes it has felt quite cold out there, even given some sunshine. there have been some showers around as well, some of their showers over high ground in scotland have been wintry.
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the wintry element to though showers tending to ease off, but some rain showers will continue to drift southwards as we go through the night. more in the way of cloud as well. clearest to the skies down towards the southeast of england. that�*s where we will see the lowest temperatures, may be down to two degrees in a few places. and for tomorrow i think we will generally see a bit more cloud in the mix. that cloud producing some showers at times. those showers will tend to become fewer and further between as the day wears on. the cloud will have some breaks in it, so there will be some sunny spells. best of the sunshine, i think, to be found the winds will slow the ease as the day wears on, but it will still be quite breezy. breezy enough up to the northeast to make it feel really rather chilly again at eight or nine degrees. a little bit milder than today down towards the south and west of the uk, 12 to 1a degrees. this little ridge of high pressure builds in through the latter part of friday. drying things out and killing of the showers, but into saturday this frontal system starts to approach from the west and as that front approaches our shores, ahead of it winds a start to come up from the south. that change in the wind
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direction will bring a change in the feel of the weather. milder conditions return on saturday with a lot of cloud. the best of any sunshine in the east, that weather front bringing rain to parts of northern ireland and western scotland particularly where it will also be quite windy. but the southerly wind bringing those milder conditions, so temperatures by this stage 12 degrees in aberdeen, 1a maybe 15 degrees there in plymouth. and as we move into sunday, well that weather front will tended to break apart and become more showery, so there will be some showers across the western side of the uk. not as many showers further east, here we will see some spells of sunshine, but still a brisk southerly wind. and still fairly mild, highs of 1a or 15.
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this is bbc news, i�*m shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm — "get your boosterjabs," says the prime minister as new daily covid cases rise to more than 50,000 for the first time since july. but we are within the parameters of what the predictions were, what spi—m and the others said, where we would be at this stage, given the steps we have taken. so we are sticking with our plan. the booster programme has slowed down so much that, at this rate, we're not going to complete it until spring of next year. a 25—year—old man is remanded in custody charged with the murder of mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali, from north london, also faces charges of

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