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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  October 21, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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at six — a man is charged with the murder of the conservative mp sir david amess. 25—year—old ali harbi ali, a british somalian, appeared in court in london. he's also charged with preparing acts of terrorism. sir david was repeatedly stabbed as he met constituents at a church hall last friday — he died at the scene. we will continue to build our case. if there are members of the public who have further information that might help the investigation, i would urge them to come forward. also on the programme tonight... get your booster jabs says the prime minister, as new daily covid cases rise to more than 50,000 for the first time since july. australia, scorched by bushfires, is one of a number of countries revealed to be lobbying the un for a more gradual move away from the use of fossil fuels.
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the link between obesity and mental health — this man has lost 18 stone. new research underlines the impact on people's well being. and the three dads nearing the end of a 300—mile trek in memory of their daughters who all took their own lives. and coming up on the bbc news channel, scotland's cricket team fight for a place in the twenty20 world cup in oman. good evening and welcome to the bbc�*s news at six. a 25—year—old man has been charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts, after the fatal stabbing of the mp sir david amess.
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ali harbi ali from north london was arrested following the attack in essex, last friday. sir david, who had been a conservative mp for almost a0 years, died at the scene. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. just over six days after sir david amess mp was stabbed to death in leigh—on—sea, the man accused of murdering him was brought to court. the crown prosecution service had authorised counterterrorism detectives to charge him this morning. in the dock at westminster magistrates�* court, ali harbi ali wore a grey sweatshirt and trousers, and black rimmed glasses. he spoke to confirm his name, date of birth and his address in kentish town, north london. and then sat silently for the hearing, which lasted less than a quarter of an hour. sir david was killed in an office at the back of the belfairs methodist church hall, just after midday on friday. he'd been meeting voters as part of a constituency surgery.
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police officers and paramedics who'd rushed to the scene were unable to save him. a large team of detectives have been working around the clock to find out as much as we can about what happened and why. that work has included searches of a number of london addresses. 0ur advanced forensics teams have analysed digital devices and carried out a painstaking review of cctv footage. ali harbi ali, seen here walking in the direction of gospel 0ak station in north london on the day of the murder, was arrested at the church hall in leigh—on—sea. detectives say they are not looking for anyone else. the head of the crown prosecution service's counterterrorism division said, we will submit to the court that this murder has a terrorist connection, namely that it had both religious and ideological motivations. ali harbi ali is a british citizen who was born in south london,
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and grew up in croydon. as well as the murder of sir david amess, he is accused of preparing a terrorist act. it's alleged that on reconnaissance trips earlier this year, he went to the address of one mp several times and the constituency surgery of another. he also went to the house of commons. after the hearing, he was taken away to prison, where he will be held until his next appearance at the old bailey, tomorrow. the time period covered by the charge of preparing a terrorist act goes back to may 2019, and runs up until last month. so the allegation is that ali harbi ali had been preparing some kind of attack for almost two and a half years. the alleged reconnaissance of mps began in march this year. sophie.— in march this year. sophie. daniel, thank yom — the number of new coronavirus infections recorded in the uk in the past 2a hours has surged past 50,000 for the first time sincejuly. the number of people
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in hospital has also risen. the prime minister urged people to come forward for vaccinations and boosterjabs but said the government is sticking with the plan on managing covid in england. borisjohnson said the numbers of infections and deaths being seen are within the parameters of what the predictions were. here's our health editor hugh pym. are you here for your booster? the boosterjab roll—out continues for priority groups including health and care staff, and older patients, it is now at the centre of the government's planning england to combat the spread of virus. i i combat the spread of virus. i i think the most important thing people — think the most important thing people can do now is get that booster— people can do now is get that boosterjab, get the call, get the and czech — boosterjab, get the call, get the and czech. we have done 4 million already _ and czech. we have done 4 million alread . ., and czech. we have done 4 million alread. ., , , ., already. labour says it is not happening — already. labour says it is not happening fast _ already. labour says it is not happening fast enough. - already. labour says it is not happening fast enough. the | already. labour says it is not - happening fast enough. the booster programmer — happening fast enough. the booster programmer slow _ happening fast enough. the booster programmer slow down _ happening fast enough. the booster programmer slow down so - happening fast enough. the booster programmer slow down so much - happening fast enough. the booster l programmer slow down so much that, at this rate, we are not going to complete it until spring of this year. the government needs to
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change, it needs to get a grip. that a change, it needs to get a grip. at a ceramics class _ change, it needs to get a grip. at a ceramics class as _ change, it needs to get a grip. at a ceramics class as an _ change, it needs to get a grip. at a ceramics class as an adult education centre today, there were some who, in due course, will be eligible for a boosterjab because of their age. they are pleased about that, but say that they would like more information.— that they would like more information. ~ ., ., ., ., information. would have loved to have heard _ information. would have loved to have heard from _ information. would have loved to have heard from my _ information. would have loved to have heard from my gp _ information. would have loved to have heard from my gp as - information. would have loved to have heard from my gp as soon l information. would have loved to l have heard from my gp as soon as information. would have loved to - have heard from my gp as soon as the booster was announced as to when i could have it. that would have been brilliant, yes. iam really could have it. that would have been brilliant, yes. i am really glad the whole programme is out there. i think it would be advisable to do, particularly as i am out and about, you know. — particularly as i am out and about, you know, like to travel.— you know, like to travel. boosters can be booked _ you know, like to travel. boosters can be booked online _ you know, like to travel. boosters can be booked online in _ you know, like to travel. boosters can be booked online in england, | you know, like to travel. boosters i can be booked online in england, six months and one week after a second dose. 0ne mp has complained that some constituents were struggling to get appointments, but nhs sources said the system, overall, was actually working pretty well. in parallel with the national system, gp practices are continuing to run vaccination clinics and centres, but some say the process of contacting people has been difficult. i am also havin: to people has been difficult. i am also having to just _ people has been difficult. i am also having to just deal _ people has been difficult. i am also having to just deal with _ people has been difficult. i am also having to just deal with the - having to just deal with the day—to—day workload, that is huge.
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it is no secret of the demand has gone through the roof recently. lots of evidence to support that. so, we are having to work out what to prioritise, and i think that the booster prioritisation perhaps is falling down the list a bit, because what we are being asked to do. in wales, scotland and northern ireland, there was eligible for boosters are being contacted by letter, text or phone call, with the programme rolled out in stages. take—up of vaccines among older age groups has reached close to 100%, thatis groups has reached close to 100%, that is what figures for first doses in england show. but amongst younger age groups, it is closer to 50%, and a lot lower for age groups, it is closer to 50%, and a lot lowerfor12—15 age groups, it is closer to 50%, and a lot lower for 12—15 —year—olds. age groups, it is closer to 50%, and a lot lowerfor12—15 —year—olds. at that programme only began a month ago. ministers know they need to step up the campaign to get more younger people vaccinated, as part of what they call the wall of defence against the virus. with pleas that if people don't come forward forjabs, restrictions on england may be required. hugh pym, bbc news.
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the latest daily figures show there were 52,009 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — only the second time daily cases have been that high since the middle ofjanuary. which means there were 46,791 cases on average per day, in the past week. the number of people in hospital with covid is slowly rising — it's now 8,142. there were another 115 deaths recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average there were 130 deaths per day in the past week. so what do these numbers mean going forward? 0ur medical editor fergus walsh has been examining the data. amidst all the warnings about rising covid numbers and what the winter ahead may hold, what is remarkable is how highly protective vaccines have proven against severe covid disease. if we compare cases, in blue,
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with hospital admissions, in red, you can see the two tracked each other almost exactly during winter, with daily admission peaking at at more than 4000 patients a day injanuary. but since then, we've had the vaccination programme, that has greatly weakened the link between the two. although admissions are rising. the protective effect of vaccines can be seen even more starkly if we compare cases and deaths, shown in yellow, which are now a 10th of what they were at the peak injanuary, though they too are rising. which is what is worrying many in the medical profession who fear just how high they may go in the months ahead. there are around 5 million adults in the uk who are unvaccinated, and they make up the biggest proportion of those being admitted to hospital with covid. fewer than one in ten adults over 80 are either unvaccinated or have had only one dose, and yet they make up two thirds of that age group who are admitted to hospital.
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the protective effect of vaccines is even stronger the younger you are, with only a tiny proportion of younger adults who are double jabbed ending up in hospital. so, who is catching covid? well, case rates are highest among those under the age of 20. now, although they are far less at risk of severe covid, it does mean that many pupils are off school as a result. the worry is that cases are also rising among older adults, and, although vaccines are highly protective, that protection does wane over time, which is why third booster doses are being recommended. that was our medical editor fergus walsh. saudi arabia, australia and japan are among a number of countries trying to change a crucial scientific report to play down the need to move away from using fossil fuels. that's what's been revealed in a leak of documents seen by the bbc.
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saudi arabia is one of the world's largest oil producers. australia is a major coal exporter. the leak comes as world leaders prepare to gather in glasgow for crucial climate talks in 10 days time. 0ur climate editor, justin rowlatt reports. the clock is ticking on tackling climate change. the science says unless we start making dramatic cuts to emissions now, we risk very serious consequences. world leaders will be meeting here in glasgow for a crucial climate conference in just ten days. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show some countries are pressuring the un to change its message on the options for tackling the challenge. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn't need to reduce fossil fuel use as quickly as the un suggests. "delete the claim that the focus
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for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels," saudi arabia tells the un scientists. 0ne aim of the glasgow conference is to phase out coal, but india once it expects it to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades. meanwhile, brazil and argentina ask that evidence that eating meat can help cut greenhouse gas emissions be watered down. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them onto the bbc. i think the comments of these countries demonstrates the depth to which they will go to try and halt progress in tackling climate change. these un science reports, and this is just one part of three, are pretty much the bible of climate science. they are used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change, and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow.
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scientists who have helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on scientists to accept the comments. so if the comments are lobbying, if they are not justified by the science, they will not be integrated in the ipcc report. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years. they have been terrible floods, including in china, and ferocious wildfires in australia, and right around the world. it means, says a veteran of many international negotiations, that most world leaders do understand what is at stake in glasgow. people can see the effects of climate change. this is all about understanding that, even though the challenge is immense, there really isn't an alternative to dealing with it. in my lifetime even, and certainly in your generation, the generation coming up,
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that are going to be living with this. glasgow wants to show its best face to the world for this conference. it could well be the biggest gathering of world leaders in british history. christiana figueres will be there. she is environmental royalty, having played a crucial role in previous climate summits. she says it is vital that governments are involved in the review process. everybody�*s voice has to be there. that's the whole purpose. this isnot a single thread, this is a tapestry woven by many, many threads. but there is no time to waste. every second, more carbon dioxide is building up in the atmosphere. what the world needs now is ambition. justin rowlatt, bbc news. our top story this evening... a man is charged with the murder of the conservative mp sir david amess. 25—year—old ali harbi ali,
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a british somalian, appeared in court in london this afternoon. and coming up — we'll talk to students, campaigner and parents after relationship education was made compulsory for all school children in england. is coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel, a new era at newcastle. we look at who might replace steve bruce as the club's new owners look to take it to the next level. obesity is a common problem in the uk. it's estimated to affect around a quarter of all adults. now, new research for the bbc has highlighted the mental health issues that thousands of people living with obesity endure every day. a survey by ipsos mori found that those who are severely overweight had the poorest mental health and many felt shame, embarrassment and despair when they look in the mirror. but treatment across the uk is patchy, asjeremy cooke reports. i remember the bullying starting.
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"she's really fat, she's really ugly." india is 28. she's been struggling with obesity for years, living with the stigma. i let my mental health disorder get the better of me. and i let that turn to food. that complex relationship with food and hormone problems took india to weighing more than 19 stone. are you sad a lot of the time? yeah, all the time. why? _ because ijust don't like myself. i've got gastric sleeve cookbooks... after so many failed diets, india's now preparing for nhs bariatric surgery... not complete bed rest, but no overexertions. ..to remove most of her stomach. i'm really nervous. i kind ofjust want this phase to be over. my name is tom. my heaviest, i was 34 stone. genetics can play a huge role in this. i wouldn't go to family events unless i felt like that i absolutely had to. right, legs and arms up, come on.
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for tom, the endless gym sessions and diets failed to overcome his body's biological pre—programming for weight gain. depressing stuff. i didn't realise i had self—confidence issues. i thought i wasjust an introvert. tom went for the bariatric surgery and, amazingly, went from 34 stone to 16 stone. you do look at life before and life after, that pivitol... they are completely different lives. i felt immeasurably different. life just seemed easier. today's survey shows that living with obesity can bring embarrassment, self—consciousness and shame. i think if you're living with severe, chronic obesity, then it's highly likely you will have a mental health difficulty or emotional difficulty. i'm back to visit india, four weeks after surgery. hi, how are you? you have five incisions. this is the one they pulled the stomach out of.
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it feels like your relationship with food is completely different. it's non—existent. i don't enjoy eating any more. how are you, mentally? honestly? low. really low. i can manage about half a pot of this for dinner. india's stomach is now the size of a pen. food has been my happiness for 15 years. did you ever find yourself even for a moment thinking, "0h, wish i'd never done this"? yeah. tom's surgery, four years ago, cost him thousands. losing so much weight so quickly can bring new problems — physical and mental. the excess skin kind ofjust plays on it a little bit. that kind of creeps into my thoughts. i'd like to get rid of this. i've gone through all of this effort, and i still can't pick up this t—shirt out of my wardrobe and just wear it. i have to have this compression top on. tom is saving hard. surgery to remove the excess skin could cost more than £20,000.
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step two of the operation would be to kind of pull that skin tight. but after all the problems, the future looks promising. i was thinking about how nice it would be to actually post that photo and go, i did it, this is now where i'm at. this was two weeks prior to surgery. and then this was the other day. when i see that now, i'm like, whoa. it's now three months since india's op. she's lost four stone already. six more to go. how've you been? yeah, really good. really good. i remember last time you were here, i was so miserable. your smile is coming through now as well, which is brilliant. yeah. no, i do, i look in the mirror, and i'm, like, "hm, i think you don't look half bad." none of this is easy and, of course, not everyone can get bariatric surgery. but at least for india, there's new hope. i'm excited for the future. it's a long journey. it's years, and years, and years, and years of change. but i'm getting there. india ending that report byjeremy cooke. details of organisations offering information and support with mental health
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are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline. families of some of the victims of the manchester arena bomb have demanded an explanation after it emerged that the elder brother of the bomber left the country in august to deliberately avoid attending the public inquiry. ismail abedi had been ordered to give evidence, but was allowed to board a flight a day after he was stopped at the airport and interviewed by police. church leaders have come together to deliver a message of reconciliation at a cross—community service to mark the centenary of the partition of ireland and the formation of northern ireland. borisjohnsonjoined politicians and church leaders from both sides of the irish border at the event. here's our ireland correspondent, emma vardy. there was always going to be uneasy around the way this milestone was marked. the centenary of the
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formation of northern ireland is by its nature a contentious anniversary.— its nature a contentious anniversary. its nature a contentious anniversa . , , anniversary. our past has shaped us and scarred — anniversary. our past has shaped us and scarred us. _ anniversary. our past has shaped us and scarred us. it _ anniversary. our past has shaped us and scarred us. it has _ anniversary. our past has shaped us and scarred us. it has divided - anniversary. our past has shaped us and scarred us. it has divided us - and scarred us. it has divided us and yet on occasion it has also brought us together.— and yet on occasion it has also brought us together. despite their differin: brought us together. despite their differing perspectives _ brought us together. despite their differing perspectives on - brought us together. despite their differing perspectives on the - differing perspectives on the history of this island, leaders from the british and irish government attended in a spirit of unity. but the queen had to cancel her visit after being advised by doctors to rest. ., , ., , ' rest. people from very different perspectives — rest. people from very different perspectives have _ rest. people from very different perspectives have come - rest. people from very different. perspectives have come together rest. people from very different - perspectives have come together to celebrate whatever way you look at it. it's an incredible place, an incredible part of the country which has an amazing future. cars incredible part of the country which has an amazing future.— has an amazing future. cars were used to break _ has an amazing future. cars were used to break up _ has an amazing future. cars were used to break up hostile - has an amazing future. cars were used to break up hostile mobs... j has an amazing future. cars were - used to break up hostile mobs... the decision to — used to break up hostile mobs... iie: decision to divide used to break up hostile mobs... "iie: decision to divide up used to break up hostile mobs... i““i9 decision to divide up the used to break up hostile mobs... ii9: decision to divide up the island used to break up hostile mobs... ii9 decision to divide up the island of ireland 100 years ago was marked by sectarian violence. after two years
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of bloodshed, as nationalists fought to break away from british rule, the ireland was partitioned. the south eventually became the republic of ireland, a country governing itself, while northern ireland remained part of the uk. today irish nationalists continue to view the partition is a great injustice. for continue to view the partition is a great injustice.— great in'ustice. for the past 100 ears, great injustice. for the past 100 years. partition _ great injustice. for the past 100 years, partition has _ great injustice. for the past 100 years, partition has polarised i years, partition has polarised people on this island. notably absent from _ people on this island. notably absent from today's _ people on this island. notably absent from today's service i people on this island. notably l absent from today's service was people on this island. notably - absent from today's service was the irish president, michael d higgins, who said he felt the event had become politicised. and michelle o'neill. become politicised. and michelle 0'neill. sinn fein the largest irish republican party viewed the centenary is no cause for celebration. i centenary is no cause for celebration.— centenary is no cause for celebration. ~ :, :, ~ :, ., celebration. i think looking forward rather than being _ celebration. i think looking forward rather than being held _ celebration. i think looking forward rather than being held back- celebration. i think looking forward rather than being held back by - celebration. i think looking forward rather than being held back by the | rather than being held back by the pastis rather than being held back by the past is something that will hopefully inspire political leaders and community leaders and church leaders for the challenges that we face. , : leaders for the challenges that we face. , . ., . ,, :, face. the service acknowledged northern ireland's _
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face. the service acknowledged northern ireland's tragic - face. the service acknowledged northern ireland's tragic past i face. the service acknowledged l northern ireland's tragic past and those on different sides of the divide offered a commitment to building a shared future, but it comes at a time when there is more uncertainty than ever over how long northern ireland will continue to be part of the uk. calls for a border poll have grown as divisions between unionists and nationalists have deepened over brexit. 100 years since northern ireland came into being, it continues to struggle with its unresolved national identity. emma vardy, bbc news, armagh. this term, all primary and secondary school children in england have been having compulsory lessons in relationship education — with older pupils also getting sex education — after the guidance was updated for the first time in 20 years. schools can be flexible in their approach, and pupils, parents and campaigners have been telling chi chi izundu what they make of the changes. we're going to be looking today at this really important topic about consent. do we know what consent means? and then also do we think we talk enough about it? sex and relationships education.
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i feel like i'm forced to send inappropriate things that they don't want to send. the new sex education guidance states that all pupils understand the importance of equality and respect. so they'll be taught about relationships, mental wellbeing, the lgbt community, and — like this class in sheffield — what consent means. i believe that consent means to let someone do something _ and to give permission. # everyone's invited. # me too. # she was just walking home. schools in scotland and northern ireland shape their own policy, whilst classes will be compulsory in wales from 2022. the last time sex education guidance was updated was back in the year 2000, when teenagers didn't have as easy access to mobile phones, to the internet or to the sexually explicit content that you can find online. now this compulsory upgrade to the curriculum is hoping to address those changes and the issues that they brought up. so whilst the internet can be problematic, this online sex education charity called fumble says
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that is the place teenagers are looking for information. we were really delighted to see relationships and sex education becoming compulsory, but we are conscious that the internet currently responds with loads of unhealthy content, loads of unsafe content. and increasingly, we hear that young people are using pornography as sex education because they're not finding answers to their questions anywhere else. some parents are against their children learning certain aspects of this curriculum. we want to get the children to understand what's 0k, what's not ok. but these mums, dads and caregivers in scunthorpe are learning how to talk to their primary school kids about different types of relationships. my daughter's heard the word "sex" on telly, and she asked me, "oh, what's sex?" parents have the option to withdraw their children from certain elements of the teaching, but mum victoria still has concerns. you never want your children to lose their innocence, but i think if it's not dealt with as soon as possible,
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then, like... yeah, yeah. i think i'll warm to it. parents have really got to step up to the mark and take that responsibility, get over their shyness and potential embarrassment, and begin to have those conversations with their children. the next generation deserves that. the onus on primary and secondary schools is to make the lessons age—appropriate, but there are still questions about whether this approach is enough. chi chi izundu, bbc news. three fathers who all lost their daughters to suicide are nearing the end of a 300—mile walk to raise money for charity in memory of their children. they'll finish their two—week trek on saturday. they've already raised more than £340,000. along the way, they've been meeting people who've shared their own experiences of suicide within the family. alison freeman reports. three dads walking. in memory of their daughters who all took their own lives.
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tim, andy and mike found each other after the deaths of emily, sophie and beth. and decided to walk the 300 miles between their homes in cumbria, greater manchester and norfolk to raise money for the suicide prevention charity papyrus. they also want to raise awareness of help that's out there. the reason we are doing it is if we knew then what we know now, our daughters might still be alive. along the way, they have been joined by many other people with very personal stories to tell. we lost oursonjamie... two years ago. just over two years ago to suicide. i lost my daughter, tasha's little sister katrina. - and last year we lost my husband, tasha's stepfather. _ i've recently lost my daughter to suicide, and ijust need to understand why. people are reaching out, people
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are meeting us when we are walking with incredible stories. as well as meeting new people, other friends have come along to support them like mark and his son zach. why are we doing this today, zach? 0ne, because we want to help support them, and helped by the fact that - mike is a good friend of dad's, - and two to raise money for papyrus. the dads have managed to stay on track despite the odd unexpected locked gate. three dads walking, stopped. andy having a few problems with his feet. but of course the great british weather. walking across the muddy fields of lincolnshire on day 11. these seem to be the muddiest fields ever. but along the way, the aim has stayed the same... well done, chaps. ..making it easier to talk about suicide. we had a really powerful conversation with a lady yesterday. she had seen us on television and it's the first time she had been able to sit down with her teenage children to talk about suicide. and we almost created that
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permission in homes to do that. the men have two more days of walking left, the conversations being had along the way clearly increasing understanding of the problem. suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. i think the key thing - i would say is that not to be on your own, really. it is to talk to other people. alison freeman, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. good evening to you. it was a beautiful end to the day down on the south coast today. a lovely sunset at hayling island. a far cry from how things were this time yesterday. this curl of cloud that brought a deluge and some really strong and squally winds cleared away eastwards. today you can see some
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speckled shower clouds feeding down from the north, that northerly wind has been bringing some colder air but at least we have had some spells of sunshine. we will continue to see some showers as we go through this evening and tonight. we have had wintry showers across high ground in scotland, mainly rain showers will push overnight, but where we keep clear skies towards the south—east of england, some spots could get down to two degrees. elsewhere, you can see more in the way of cloud in the mix for tomorrow. it won't be completely cloudy, there will be sunny spells. equally some showers although they will be fewer and further between into the afternoon. the winds will further ease, and in the north—east it will feel particularly chilly again. a little milderfor the particularly chilly again. a little milder for the south and west of the uk, up to 14 degrees. the drier and calmer weather comes courtesy of this ridge of high pressure but it won't last all that long. this system moves in from the west, but ahead of that another change in wind
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direction, we are back to southerly wind so that will

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