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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 21, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown — our headlines at five. get your boosterjabs — says the prime minister — as new daily covid cases rise to more than 50 thousand for the first time since july. boris johnson says the government is �*sticking with the plan�* on managing covid in england — but doctors accuse the government of wilful negligence for not imposing more restrictions now. if you want to wait until the pressures reach a peak in november, december, that will be too late. we now need to act to safeguard our health services. but we are within the parameters of what the predictions were, what spi—m and the others said, where we would be at this stage, given the steps we have taken. so we are sticking with our plan.
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a 25—year—old man is remanded in custody, charged with the murder of mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali, from north london, also faces charges of preparing acts of terrorism. a 14—year—old boy has appeared in court, charged with murdering five—year—old logan mwangi, whose body was found in a river in south wales earlier this year. climate campaigners condemn attempts by some countries to influence a un report on global warming — leaked documents show some nations want to play down the need to move away from fossil fuels. and if you good enough — you're old enough — how a four—year—old boy caught the attention of a premier league team.
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more than 50,000 covid cases have been recorded in the uk for the first time since july. it comes as the government has been accused of �*wilful negligence�* for not doing more to stop the spread of covid in england. the doctors union — the british medical association — says it�*s �*incredibly concerning�* that ministers are not taking immediate action to reduce the impact of coronavirus on the nhs. the prime minister has defended the government�*s decision not to re—impose coronavirus restrictions, despite a rise in infections. 0ur health correspondent katherine da costa reports. this is plan a — boosting elderly and vulnerable groups is part of the government�*s main strategy to navigate what many fear might be a difficult winter. now, in england, those who are six months and one week post their second covid
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vaccine are being asked to book their booster online or dial 119, but labour says more urgency is needed. 0n current trends, we won�*t complete the booster programme until march 2022. instead of doing 165,000 jabs a day, will the minister set a commitment to do 500,000 jabs a day and get this programme complete by christmas? long queues of ambulances outside some hospitals, record numbers of patients in major a&es and a growing backlog of care. some health experts want england to follow scotland and wales with mandatory masks, vaccine passports and work from home orders, so called plan b. the government has a responsibility to protect the nation�*s health, it has a responsibility to make sure the health service has the capacity
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to care for the patients. we have a situation where the evidence tells you that you need to be doing something. covid infections are mainly being driven by secondary pupils, with the highest seven day average seen in wales, at nearly 600 cases per 100,000 people, and the lowest rates in scotland, where infections have been falling for several weeks. while the number of patients with covid in hospital is much lower than earlier in the year, some areas like wales are under severe pressure, but for now in england the government is sticking with plan a. we are seeing infections rising. you saw what the secretary of state said yesterday. and we are seeing hospitalisations and deaths rising, but at a much lower rate. we don�*t believe, even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter, but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure, and that now is not the right moment to look to trigger plan b. the health secretary signalling a more cautious approach, encouraging more mask wearing and meeting friends outside, but there is still a lot of work to do to reach out to nearly
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5 million people in the uk who have still not had their firstjab. let�*s take a closer look at the coronavirus figures for the uk. in the latest 2a hour period, there have been another 52,009 cases. there have also been 115 deaths within 28 days of a positive covid test — that�*s down on yesterday�*s total. more than 49.5 million people have received a first dose of the vaccine. 45.5 million people have got their second jab. that means that 79% of the population aged over 12 have been fully vaccinated. borisjohnson has acknowledged cases are high but says "we�*re within the parameters of what the predictions were". he�*s been speaking to journalists during a visit to a school in county antrim.
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we are continuing with the plan that we set out injuly, which is itself an extension of the road map that began in february, and, yes, we are watching the numbers very carefully every day, and, yes, you are absolutely right, the numbers of infections are high. but we are within the parameters of what the predictions were, what spi—m and the others said, where we would be at this stage, given the steps we have taken. so we are sticking with our plan. i think the most important thing people can do now is is just get that booster jab. when you get the call, get the jab. we have done about 4 million booster jabs already,
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but as soon as you become eligible, as soon as you get that call, everybody over 50 should be getting thatjab. we are in a much better position going into the autumn, the winter now than we were 12 months ago. incomparably better. because of the huge level of protection that we got from the vaccines. 90% of the adult population has antibodies right now. but we must fortify ourselves further. the numbers are high, we can see what is happening, we can see the increase. now is the time to get those boosterjabs. and also to vaccinate the 12 to 15—year—olds, as well. given the importance of the booster programme, there have been reports it�*s been patchy across the country. what are you going to do to sort that out? and is there any thought being given to reducing the time between jab two and three? that�*s an extremely important point, the last one that you mention, but on the... ..the patchiness of the programme, i think what i would
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say is that this time, there is certainly no shortage of supply. we have got the jabs, we have got huge quantities of vaccine — of pfizer and astrazeneca — but pfizer is the one we are using for the third, for the booster. come forward and get it when your time comes. it�*s a demand issue and we really urge people to come and do it. and we are also wanting to see the 16 and 17—year—olds plus the 12 to 15—year—olds vaccinated, as well — that will make a big difference. and on the issue of timing, all i will say is that i think we just need to keep going as fast as possible. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, said the government needed to take action on the vaccine take up the government said that the vaccine would be the security wall against the virus, and now the government is letting that will crumble. we have seen those that most need it not able to get the job they need.
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only i think 17% of children have got the vaccine. and the booster programme has slowed down so much that at this rate we are not going to complete it until spring of next year. so the government needs to change them and needs to get a grip. i think it needs to drive those numbers up to at least 500,000 vaccines a day. and that can be done, i think, by using community pharmacy systems. they have got more capacity, they can do it. pop up centres for vaccines, and mobilising those retired health workers as we did before, but the government needs to get a grip. the vaccine programme, which was going so well, is now stalling and the government needs to recognise that failure and get a grip. professor tim spector is an epidemiologist and lead
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scientist on the zoe covid study app, which tracks symptoms and has been used to inform government response to the pandemic — hejoins me now. thank you very much for being with us once again. today�*s case number figures, 52,000, that�*s the highest sincejuly. how worrying is that what you think the government needs to do about that? it is what you think the government needs to do about that?— to do about that? it is worrying and the fi . ures to do about that? it is worrying and the figures are _ to do about that? it is worrying and the figures are even _ to do about that? it is worrying and the figures are even higher, - to do about that? it is worrying and the figures are even higher, over. the figures are even higher, over 84,000 cases because not all people are getting tested now because we are getting tested now because we are still not telling people all the symptoms of covid. and under which the government is using at the moment, but all the indicators really are pointing in the wrong direction. cases are of, hospitalisations are up, number of beds in it you occupied are up. 0ver beds in it you occupied are up. over 1000 people a day are getting long covid because of this and the
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government strategy was to depended totally on vaccination and as we have heard that system is faltering. in terms of total number of the population we are stuck at about 66 or 67% of the total population, and is now dropping down the league table in europe and so we are near the bottom of the league table where we were at the top. discipline not going up anymore were as countries like portugal have 86% of their 20% more than we do and they have no cases now. fin more than we do and they have no cases nova— more than we do and they have no cases now. . . . , ., ., cases now. on the vaccine programme wh is it cases now. on the vaccine programme why is it stalled? _ cases now. on the vaccine programme why is it stalled? there's _ cases now. on the vaccine programme why is it stalled? there's number - cases now. on the vaccine programme why is it stalled? there's number of i why is it stalled? there�*s number of people that just don�*t why is it stalled? there�*s number of people thatjust don�*t want why is it stalled? there�*s number of people that just don�*t want the vaccine but also in terms of the booster programme that does not seem to be going very well.— to be going very well. different reasons. the _ to be going very well. different reasons. the booster _ to be going very well. different i reasons. the booster programme to be going very well. different - reasons. the booster programme is probably that there are not enough staff around and with basically volunteers helping to get those jabs
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out in the early part of the year. they are no longer happy to work for no money and long hours. next message from the government that it�*s all fine now. the other 33% of the population that are not being vaccinated doing fairly poorly for mixed messages from the government, and i think there is a general idea that we are never going to get there. other countries have dealt with this like france, italy, spain by having vaccine passwords, not because they necessarily make everyone safe but they forced a lot of people to get vaccinated so that they can carry on a normal social life. to realise that at the moment we in this mid range. that israel saw it�*s all thin and very high levels of virus from a risk of mutations and we are not going to
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get out of itjust keeping that level even if we managed to get boosters because as we have heard the booster campaign is aptly getting a bigger backlog every week that we can�*t cope with. although it is going wrong and we�*re in a state of complacency very much like march last year without looking at what other countries are doing well. and starting to learn those lessons of. in terms of which were the government to do now in england at least to me you have already mentioned vaccine passwords, what else do you want to see, compulsory face coverings in certain places for one thing? face coverings in certain places for one thin ? , ., , , one thing? yes, virtually every country in _ one thing? yes, virtually every country in europe _ one thing? yes, virtually every country in europe that - one thing? yes, virtually every country in europe that has - one thing? yes, virtually every country in europe that has low| one thing? yes, virtually every - country in europe that has low rates has that. it does not cost anything. public places definitely have that and if you are going to very large super spreader events try and make sure people are vaccinated at those events. 0r sure people are vaccinated at those events. or you don�*t have them. i think we have got to start doing
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something now because we can�*t prevent it in a month�*s time by adding something mild like masks at that point when we have so many people clogging up the hospitals that one or ten people waiting for health care, they cannot get into hospital and that backlog anymore. i think looking at the really big picture here, these decisions are being made politically, not based on the science or health.— the science or health. thank you very much _ the science or health. thank you very much indeed. _ the royal cornwall hospitals trust has declared a �*critical situation�* — after what it says it �*unprecedented more so this week than at any point�* in the pandemic. ambulances have been queuing outside the hospital in truro this week. its medical director said that last night there were more than 100 people waiting in an emergency
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department that was only designed to accommodate 40. and more than 25 ambulance crews were waiting to hand over patients. leaked documents appear to show how countries like australia, saudi arabia and japan have tried to force a key united nations report on global warming to be watered down. the documents — obtained by the bbc — reveal how some countries are trying to push back on key recommendations. here�*s our climate editorjustin rowlatt. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years, terrible floods in india while hot, dry weather has sparked vast fires in australia as well as in brazil and argentina. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show these are among countries pressuring the un to change it�*s message on the options for tackling climate change. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn�*t need to reduce fossil fuels use as quickly as the un suggests.
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the saudis ask un scientists to delete a claim that the focus for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels. meanwhile, india warns it expects coal to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them onto the bbc. these un reports are pretty much the bible of climate science, they�*re used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change, and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. scientists who helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on the scientists to accept the comments, so, if the comments are lobbying,
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if they�*re not justified by the science, they will not be integrated in the ipcc report. the leak comes just days before a crucial climate conference begins in glasgow. it shows just how tricky the negotiations are likely to be. but don�*t give up hope just yet, says a veteran of countless international negotiations. people can see the effects of climate change, and the effects of climate change, by the way, on countries like india and china, are going to be dramatic. this is all about understanding that even though the challenge is immense, there really isn't an alternative to dealing with it, you've got to go back and redouble your efforts, including with those people who still are holding out. we will discover at the conference whether, despite the lobbying, world leaders are willing to take the ambitious action needed to curb emissions. justin rowlatt, bbc news.
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christiana figueres is co—founder of global 0ptimism — and was formerly the executive secretary of the un climate convention — responsible for overseeing the landmark 2015 paris agreement on climate change. she says she doesn�*t think the issues raised by some governments are problematic never before have we seen such blunt and alarming language coming out of this assessment report on the part of scientists and already approved by governments for publication. it is very understandable that governments would want to water down some of the recommendations that are being made. the fact is that because the first part of the report is so compelling and so alarming the third part which is the answer to the first has to actually be commensurate to the dangers that are put forward in the first. i�*m not
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surprised this is part of the normal process that science puts forth the draught, scented to governments, governments send opinions and their comments. ultimately we have to put the ceiling at 1.5. we are probably not there yet in the real economy, but the real economy is moving fast and furious. so the collective efforts of governments has to be to at least keep 1.5 as the ceiling of temperature rise, keep it alive. some breaking news now about to strictly come _ alive. some breaking news now about to strictly come dancing. _ alive. some breaking news now about to strictly come dancing. it _ alive. some breaking news now about to strictly come dancing. it is - to strictly come dancing. it is that judy love heads tested positive for covid and will not be taking part in strictly come dancing this weekend. that�*s according to a spokesman for the bbc. now self isolating after the bbc. now self isolating after the latest government guidelines whilejudy and her dance partner will not be taking part this weekend, particles mean that all
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being well they will return the following week. a 14 year old boy has appeared before magistrates in cardiff charged with the murder of five year old logan mwangi who�*s body was disovered in the river 0gmore injuly, after he was reported missing by his parents. earlier our correspondent hywel griffith gave us this update from outside the court in cardiff. this was a brief appearance before the magistrates. the 14—year—old spoke only to confirm his name, his age and his address. and he was told about the seriousness of the charge against him, the charge of murdering five—year—old logan mwangi, who was also known locally as logan williamson. now, the investigation goes back to the end ofjuly, and july 31, when the police were called to the small village of sam near bridgend, initially to reports of a missing child, but shortly afterwards they discovered logan�*s body in the river 0gmore. they went on to arrest both his stepfather and his mother. his stepfather, john cole,
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was charged with murder. his mother, charged with perverting the course ofjustice, as was then a teenage boy who can�*t be named because of his age. but the same boy has now also been charged with logan�*s murder. because of the seriousness of the offence, this case will go on before the crown court. the boy was told also he will have to remain under curfew between the hours of 8pm and 8am, monitored by a tag. but this was a case which shocked the community in sarn. logan remembered locally as a happy, smiling boy by his neighbours, and this latest development will clearly be a shock to them, as well. police have charged a man with the murder of conservative mp sir david amess. 25—year—old ali harbi ali was arrested following the attack in leigh—on—sea last friday. he�*s also been charged with the preparation of terrorist acts. he appeared in court this afternoon,
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and was remanded in custody. let�*s get more with our correspondent helena wilkinson who is watching events at westminster magistrates court. the 25—year—old had been in custody since he was arrested on friday, as you say, in custody for six days being questioned by detectives. earlier on today we heard from the crown prosecution service who confirmed they had advised to charges against ali harbi ali. 25 euros sold, as i say from north london and he made his first court appearance here at westminster magistrates court of their own this afternoon. relatively brief appearance lasting around 13 minutes or so. appearance lasting around 13 minutes orso. he appearance lasting around 13 minutes or so. he was brought into the dock in front of the chief magistrate
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here and he was asked to confirm his name, his date of birth and his address. and the court clerk read out those charges to the court to ali harbi ali and he was told he was charged with the murder of the mp sir david amess. he is also facing a second in charge of preparing terrorists acts the train made 319 and september of this year. we had a bit more detail about that charge in court. we heard he is accused at various times this year of visiting the home of one mp, and the constituency surgery of another mp as part of a reconnaissance for a potential attack. the chief magistrate here told ali harbi ali that he did not have the power to deal with bail if indeed that is
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what his lawyers apply for. so he has formally set the case to the central criminal court and remanded ali harbi ali in custody, and he will appeal at the old bailey tomorrow afternoon. the prime minister has been giving his reaction. first thing to say about the charging of the individual is that i hope that the family of david amess, and all those who love him will get the justice they deserve as fast as possible. other than that i can�*t really comment on the case. what i can say is that the threat to mps, as the home secretary said yesterday has been elevated a little bit too substantial, but that is in line with the general threat, the terrorist threat level in the country. and i think the police have
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done a fantasticjob of reaching out to mps, telling them what they need to do to ensure their own safety and security. but what we must not do is be intimidated by this appalling murder into changing the way we conduct our parliamentary business or the way we work in our constituencies. which i think is the last thing that david amess himself would have wanted. the us house of representatives is expected this afternoon to approve charges of contempt—of—congress against steve bannon, a longtime aide to former president donald trump. he�*s accused of refusing to cooperate with the investigation into the january 6 attack on the capitol building. bannon has failed to comply with subpoenas seeking documents and ordering him to testify. nomia iqbaljoins me now from washington. he was a very colourful and larger than life figure as a close aide of donald trump. what are these expected charges relating to and how serious are they? yes.
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expected charges relating to and how serious are they?— serious are they? yes, well us lawmakers _ serious are they? yes, well us lawmakers want _ serious are they? yes, well us lawmakers want to _ serious are they? yes, well us lawmakers want to get - serious are they? yes, well us lawmakers want to get the - serious are they? yes, well us - lawmakers want to get the bottom of what happened onjanuary six, they that a lot of the former aides have questions to answer and one of them is steve bannon as you said. a very big character, very polarising figure. the chief strategist for mr trump, a close aide. he now has his own talk show. a media executive, he runs a radio station here in america. subpoenaed documents show that on the day before the wright happened he went on air to say, and i quote, all hell will break loose tomorrow. the vice chair of the committee that is investigating january the 6th, a high—profile republican named liz cheney, she has gone one step further and the house believes that the committee believes that steve bannon likely formulate it the plans and they want to hear from him. they want him in front of the panel to answer questions and he has refused to comply. basically he
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says that communications with the former president is protected by this legal principle known as executive privilege. something that donald trump is trying to invoke and there is real questions of, legally is quite untested but that is what he that�*s his reason for it. the house does not buy it, they say he just butt hiding behind former president trump so they will be taking this book later today. it will go through because of course the house is controlled by the democrats. what will happen next is that the department ofjustice will ultimately decide whether to bring charges against him. it will be a long process. if charges against him. it will be a long process-— charges against him. it will be a long process. if there are charges auainst long process. if there are charges against him _ long process. if there are charges against him and _ long process. if there are charges against him and he _ long process. if there are charges against him and he is _ long process. if there are charges against him and he is found - long process. if there are charges| against him and he is found guilty, what potentially could happen to him? , ., what potentially could happen to him? , . ., what potentially could happen to him? , ., ., ._ what potentially could happen to him? , ., ., ., ., him? there is a long way to go before it gets _ him? there is a long way to go before it gets to _ him? there is a long way to go before it gets to that _ him? there is a long way to go before it gets to that point. . him? there is a long way to go l before it gets to that point. just in a nutshell so the department of justice will decide whether to bring charges against them, they usually don�*t do that. they don�*t usually in cases of contempt against congress go with these cases because they are
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notoriously very slow, they take a long time to litigate. the attorney general has said that he is not committed to prosecuting steve bannon, going to leave it to the justice department. they will begin this investigation into him if they decide to do so, and if he is found guilty he could face a fine and up to a year injail. that guilty he could face a fine and up to a year in jail. that as guilty he could face a fine and up to a year injail. that as i said this will take some time because if they do go ahead with it it will be slow, it could get caught up in appeals and that sort of thing. and here�*s the key thing, if it goes on past 2022 midterm elections, let�*s just say the republicans take back the house, they will end the investigation. ultimately what the committee is really trying to do is make an example of steve bannon. they are saying to other potential witnesses, if you don�*t comply with us this is what you will face. witnesses, if you don't comply with us this is what you will face.- us this is what you will face. thank ou ve us this is what you will face. thank you very much _ us this is what you will face. thank
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you very much indeed. _ we are going to pause and look at the latest weather prospects for you. very good afternoon to you after the deluge that many of us saw yesterday and the really mild weather we have had at times this week. today was a little bit different, a brighter day with sunshine and it was much colder. and we have seen some showers pushing in on the northerly breeze, and showers if anything for this evening will become a little more widespread spring down across scotland and northern ireland. more cloud with though showers as well and towards the southeast of england clears guys and that will allow it to get quite chilly, big some parts of the countryside in the southeast down to around two degrees. more cloud in the mix, produced some showers at times and they becoming fewer and further between is the day wears on. best of the sunshine in northeast scotland but some change and elsewhere. winds easing throughout the day but stayed quite breezy for many and still quite chilly up toward the northeast, eight or nine degrees and a little
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milder than today for their southend west. and we stick with a slightly milder field to the weather into the weekend. southerly winds developing and a lot of cloud, epics of rain and a lot of cloud, epics of rain and those winds will be quite strong at times as well. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: get your boosterjabs — says the prime minister — as new daily covid cases rise to more than 50000 for the first time since july. boris johnson says the government is �*sticking with the plan�* on managing covid in england — but doctors accuse the government of wilful negligence for not imposing more restrictions now. a 25—year—old man is remanded in custody, charged with the murder of mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali, from north london, also faces charges of preparing acts of terrorism.
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a 14—year—old boy has appeared in court, charged with murdering five—year—old logan mwangi, whose body was found in a river in south wales earlier this year. climate campaigners condemn attempts by some countries to influence a un report on global warming — leaked documents show some nations want to play down the need to move away from fossil fuels. sport — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. the abuse of managers has got to an unacceptable level, those are the words of the burnley boss sean dyche, who was responding to comments made by steve bruce
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about the toll the newcastle job took on him and his family. bruce left st james park by mutual consent yesterday, suggesting that it may have been his lastjob in football. we�*ll hear from burnley manager dyche in a moment, but first, the arsenal manager mikel arteta has also spoken out, saying something needs to be done about the amount of abuse managers are expected to put up with. when you cross a line, it is difficult. it is notjust a man, it is a man, a family, his loved ones, the environment. i think we have to deflect. i was impressed with how he spoke openly. i think we have to think about one of the most experienced managers in england history, you cannotjust ignore it. for me it is something that has to change. society has to change. it is part of the job. when it gets to an unacceptable level, steve's point was, player, coach, manager, for him to say that, it must have got too far. he is a wise fellow.
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he is someone i definitely trust with advice. if he is saying it, there must be some strength in what his words are. west ham have been fined £50,000 after fans threw objects during their europa league match against rapid vienna last month. david moyes�*s side are back in action tonight, whilst they would would love to win the tournament he is not putting extra pressure on his players. i putting extra pressure on his -la ers. ., �* . putting extra pressure on his -la ers. j . .,, putting extra pressure on his -la ers. .,�* ., .,, ., players. i don't want to put that level of pressure _ players. i don't want to put that level of pressure on _ players. i don't want to put that level of pressure on the - players. i don't want to put that level of pressure on the team i players. i don't want to put that| level of pressure on the team at players. i don't want to put that - level of pressure on the team at the moment because we are in need to it. but ideally if we could win then it would be great. but ultimately, respect. i know we have got to win it and we are going to have to prove it and we are going to have to prove it over the group games to do that.
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three british clubs are in european action this evening, at west ham against gang, rangers take on brondby, whilst tottenham play the test in the europa conference league. bangladesh have secured the victory in the world stage after a victory in the world stage after a victory over papua new guinea. scotland have the chance to join them. in reply, scotland are going well, currently seven to— one after eight overs. england get their t20 world cup campaign started on saturday, when they play defending champions west indies in a repeat of the 2016 final. bowler david willey played in that match five years ago, when england were beaten in a dramatic final over and says they haven�*t forgotten how it felt.
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i think there�*s things we have learnt from that. we have talked about us slowing down towards the back end. that final over seemed like it happened within the space of a few seconds. we have talked about learning from our experiences and should we find ourselves in those situations, to slow the game down and do it at our pace and make sure we take the time we need. we have also done some small scenario things, one ball scenario type things that is great preparation for the tournament. that�*s all the sport for now. you can keep up—to—date on the bbc sport website. just to bring you an update on a story out we brought earlier. a third person has been charged in connection with the
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murder of a boy in south wales last year. his mother will appear at cardiff magistrates court on the friday. she becomes the third person to be charged with logan�*s mother. the nhs in wales has recorded its worst performance figures ever amid growing concerns on staff pressures ahead of a difficult winter. figures show nearly a quarter of a million people have been waiting more than nine months for treatment, up from about 25,000 at the start of the pandemic. it comes as the welsh government unveils its winter pressures plan. 0wain clarke reports. the other warnings we have heard over many years way before covid even became part of our vocabulary. our top story, patients are told
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to stay away from hospitals tonight. surgeons warn cancelled operations due to winter pressures are becoming the norm. the winter pressure | on the nhs is biting. but now, with the nhs been battered by three covid waves, with emergency departments and the ambulance service recording their worst ever performance figures, and with waiting lists reaching levels hard to imagine just two years ago, this could well turn out to be the worst of all winters. the boss says the pressure is as intense as he�*s ever experienced. i think that this is the hottest that we have seen the overall system. he is especially worried that a shortage of carers is putting even more pressure on hospitals. the care system�*s resilience is a concern to us at the moment. it feels at its most fragile, even with some of the support we have made available. so the welsh government�*s winter pressures plan describes how £42 million will be spent supporting social care in an effort to get patients out of hospitals more quickly. there is also cash for schemes that try to ease the strain on a&es. the grange hospital in llanfrechfa
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last month recorded the worst performance of any a&e in wales. in september, more than 60% of patients turning up here had to wait more than four hours. in 1300 cases, someone had to wait more than 12 hours. by offering people an opportunity to see a gp or specialist nurse at any time of night and day, it is hoped this centre at the neighbouring royal gwent hospital in newport will help ease the strain. it's a case of, it's for any type of patients, really. if a patient needs to be seen and they feel they can't wait for two weeks, then, absolutely, because everybody's idea of urgent is different. the pressure is coming from all directions and there are concerns in all corners of the health service. so how does the health minister respond? many bodies representing health staff today are saying, actually, what we are seeing now is the legacy not only of the pandemic but years of underinvestment before in capacity and staff. they are absolutely right, aren�*t they? well, if you look at how much we have invested over the years in staff,
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we have seen about a 30% increase in the number of people who work in the nhs in the past 20 years. we�*ve built four new hospitals, four new health centres. this is not... and the newest of which is struggling massively. it is, but thank goodness it was there. dealing with the pandemic showed the nhs at its best, but that immense effort has taken its toll. each winter, the nhs seems to pull through, even if sometimes by the skin of its teeth. but the next few months could be its ultimate test. experts in the us state of florida are investigating whether suspected human remains, found in a park, belong to brian laundrie. he�*s the boyfriend of a young woman found murdered in the state of wyoming last month. gabby petito, who kept a travel blog, went missing weeks earlier while on a road trip with mr laundrie. aru na iyengar reports. a possible breakthrough
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on a florida nature reserve. police using sniffer dogs have been searching for brian laundrie, the fiance of gabby petito, whose body was discovered in wyoming in september. laundrie went home to florida after her disappearance, but went missing himself soon afterwards. his family say he went for a hike and never came back. earlier today, investigators found what appeared to be human remains and personal items, such as a backpack and notebook belonging to brian laundrie. these items were found in an area that, up until recently, had been underwater. the case has provoked widespread media interest. gabby petito�*s body lay in wilderness before she was found for over a month. police say she was strangled. mr laundrie has not been charged with any crime relating to the killing of gabby petito, but the fbi issued a federal arrest warrant and charged him with fraudulently using her debit card after her death.
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the couple had packed their lives into a camper van for a cross—country adventure, starting injuly. they documented theirjourney in a stream of social media posts, but life was not sunny under the surface. this video emerged as the couple travelled through the state of utah. two people came to us and told us that they saw him hit you. they were interviewed, but no further action was taken. she sobs ms petito was crying, talking to officers about her mental health. the murder has triggered a debate about domestic violence, over the amount of attention accorded to white women compared to other missing persons. in addition, whilst the two separate searches for the pair were going on, other bodies of missing people were found. the fbi says investigations in florida are likely to continue for several days. aruna iyengar, bbc news. more than 150 people have died in flooding across india and nepal.
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india�*s military have been drafted in to help with rescue efforts. 0ur south asia correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan, has more from the southern indian state of kerala, where at least 42 people have died. it�*s been a few days now since those extremely heavy rains hit this part of kerala, leading to landslides and rivers overflowing and very deadly floods. just to give you an idea of how bad things were earlier in the week, the water levels wnet up to where that balcony is that i�*m pointing to. as you can see things have receded now, but there is still a concern that the death toll, which is already in the dozens, could be higher. you can see over there that you�*ve got rescue workers from india�*s ndrf, who are actually looking through the waters, they�*re going through the waters to see if there are any more dead bodies to be retrieved. i�*ve been speaking to some of the families who have been impacted by the
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devastating floods here, many are staying with family or friends, some are in relief camps a little further away from here as well. this extreme weather isn�*tjust hitting this southern state of kerala, also in north india, in the state of uttarakhand, dozens have also died. further afield in the neighbouring country of nepal, there have also been deaths as well. this is a reminder ofjust how south asia is impacted by these unseasonal weather patterns. eu leaders are meeting for a two—day summit in the shadow of a deepening dispute with member state poland. a top polish court recently found certain parts of eu law were incompatible with its own constitution — a ruling that�*s been described as a direct challenge to the bloc�*s legal order. arriving for the summit, hungary�*s prime minister, viktor 0rban, backed poland, saying sanctions would be "ridiculous."
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0ur correspondent in brussels, jessica parker, told me that things are heating up. i think you would expect to hear that from hungary�*s leader today, and i think it�*s worth pointing out right from the top there isn�*t necessarily going to be unanimity here over what to do. what many people agree, here at least in brussels, from the kind of brussels perspective, is that from poland�*s constitutional court poses something of an existential crisis to the legal bedrock of the european union, therefore something has to be done about it. that is certainly a view you hear it regularly here in brussels, although mateusz morawiecki very insistent when he spoke earlier in the week that the ruling had been misunderstood, even suggesting there were examples from powers from the european union via court rulings over reaching into a national boundaries. into national boundaries. as eu leaders meet you at this
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evening, it�*s interesting to note that the rule of law crisis, as some people have dubbed it, wasn�*t even an official item on the agenda. it will be touched upon, we are told by the president of the council, charles michel. we don�*t really know how much that conversation, they all sit round a table, will take off, it could even get heated. 0r whether there will be a sense they actually don�*t want this to completely overshadow things here. they also want to talk about, for example, migration and the surge in energy prices. there are big topics that are actually on the agenda that readers will want to get to as well. the headlines on bbc news... get your boosterjabs — says the prime minister — as new daily covid cases rise to more than 50,000 for the first time since july. boris johnson says the government is �*sticking with the plan�* on managing covid in england — but doctors accuse the government of wilful negligence for not imposing more restrictions now. a 25—year—old man is remanded in custody, charged with the murder of mp
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sir david amess. ali harbi ali, from north london, also faces charges of preparing acts of terrorism. the nhs is set to use a revolutionary treatment — called gene silencing — to help people with a rare genetic disease that leaves them in crippling pain. acute intermittent porphyria can lead to paralysis and is sometimes fatal. it is hoped gene silencing could also lead to therapies for a range of other untreatable diseases. here�*s our science correspondent, james gallagher: we remember both how traumatic it was for both me going through it and for you guys as a family watching me go through it. it was that element for me of the total pain and the sickness and eventually the paralysis and the seizures. sisters liz and sue have lived in pain that few can imagine.
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they both have the genetic disease acute intermittent porphyria. potent opioid painkillers were a feature of their daily life, and liz was paralysed for two years. one of the times that they had to transfer me from one hospital to another because i wasn�*t breathing very well at all and i needed intensive care and mum was following behind in her car, following the ambulance. and as soon as the blue lights went on, shejust crumbled. i lost it all, it felt overnight. lost myjob, my company car, lost everything i'd been working hard towards and in a new relationship not knowing whether my partner would stay with me. he did. we're married. we've got a little girl now. but yeah, it was scary. gene silencing therapies get to the root cause of liz and sue�*s genetic disease rather than just managing their pain. they were part of trials here at king�*s college hospital, which showed the drug cut severe
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symptoms by 75%. so, to find a drug that really does transform people�*s lives is extraordinary. the first time i�*ve seen it really in my career as a doctor. if we can control genes and switch them off when you want to and switch them on when we want to, then almost anything is possible in terms of treating conditions, including alzheimer�*s and cancer and everything else. so, you�*ve been on the drug for a while now. what kind of difference is it making? the difference is astronomical. we're not in pain any more and not feeling sick. and able to predict life, not having to wait for attacks to happen, which means you're generally more dependable, you're not dependent on opiate—based pain relief and that leads to things like being able to succeed in a job. and sue? i think being so much - stronger, not being in pain, being able to sleep. just being able to plan life a little bit, being able - to be a mother better, j being able to be a wife better and just live life. liz and sue are some of the first people to benefit from gene
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silencing medicines, but they won�*t be the last. james gallagher, bbc news. borisjohnson joined politicians from both sides of the irish border to attend a church service marking the centenary of partition and the formation of northern ireland. the event in armagh was organised by the main protestant and catholic church leaders. 0ur ireland correspondent, chris page, was there. yes, well, in northern ireland, commemorating history is often complex and contentious. for unionists, 2021 marks the centenary of the state that they cherish. for irish nationalists, however, it�*s the 100th anniversary of partition, which they view as the source of great injustice. so there had been controversy in the run—up to events here at the anglican cathedral in armagh. the irish president, michael d higgins, declined his invitation because he said in his opinion, the service had become too politicised.
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but during the event, the leaders of the catholic church in ireland and the three main protestant denominations put the focus very much on reconciliation, as well as looking back on the years of pain during the long conflict here in northern ireland. but amidst all the disagreements and debate, the centenary has generated some fresh reflections about how northern ireland has changed during the peace process. political leaders of the present have come to reflect on the past, and the pricelessness of peace. 0ur past has shaped us and scarred us. it has divided us, and yet it has also, on occasion, brought us together. failure to dream, just because a dream fail. we�*re trapped in our history, the future not unveiled. rouse up yourself, belfast, wake up... new voices are giving expression to hope and history here. ..this is a small tale about how we all fail.
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true titanic... raquel is from jamaica, but she�*s lived in northern ireland for 18 years, one of an increasing number of people from diverse backgrounds who bring distinctive perspectives. ..true titanic. i�*m conscious of it being a very welcoming place as well as it being a place where people will give you so much and no more. having said that, i do call northern ireland home. i don�*t know if northern ireland calls me one of its own yet. i still hear the word "blow—in" from time to time! for most of the last century there was less cultural diversity, but more cultural clashes. the boundaries of identity are still sharp, but they�*re being softened. linda ervine runs an irish language school in a strongly unionist part of east belfast.
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some argue the language is a political tool of irish nationalism, but linda passionately believes her work enhances her british identity. hi, chris, failte. hello, linda. hello, nice to see you. you�*re very welcome. what do you think of the fact that we�*ve seen this new appreciation, this new sharing, if you like, of cultures in northern ireland, what it says about the society we�*re in now? how important will that be in the future? i think the fact that we can have an irish language centre here in east belfast is a very important symbol of how our society has changed. that we�*re more tolerant, we�*re a more understanding society. many significant changes happen slowly. hello. nice to see you. emma desouza fought a lengthy court case, essentially over her right to irish citizenship. for me it was about ensuring that my own identity as an irish citizen was respected and upheld, but also ensuring that everyone else had that same right. what would your hopes and for that matter your concerns be about the future of this part
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of the world? invariably, i think we are living through a time of constitutional change and i think that the future of northern ireland is something that may be transformed within the next one or two decades. in terms of concerns, my concerns are, i suppose, the perpetuation of dogmatic and tribalistic politics. ..but already shown a war—torn world... in northern ireland, identity shapes aspirations. divisions are being challenged, and difference is being more valued. ..to learn from all failure, true titanic. the range of people who took part in the service here today did reflect how northern ireland�*s society has northern ireland�*s society has changed over the last 100 years, and particularly notable, many people afterwards were saying, were the contributions of young people. so school pupils had the opportunity
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to tell the audience, which included borisjohnson and the likes of the irish foreign minister, simon coveney, about their hopes for the future, saying they wanted nothing more than increased mutual respect between all of the communities on this island. zayn ali salman was just four years old when he caught the attention of one of london s biggest football clubs. he is the youngest—ever recruit to the arsenal pre—academy after his skills had him running rings round players twice his age. let�*s take a look at the youngster in action. my name is zayn ali salman. i am four years old and my favourite team is arsenal.
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what a goal! we put him, with his age range with the four, five and six—year—olds. already he was head and shoulders above everyone. he's a lot quicker than them, more willing to go and get the ball. the way he kicks the ball, passes the ball was so much better than everyone else. then we progressed him on, i spoke to his dad, and he went to try with the older ones. i thought, why not? let's see how he gets on. that's your goal. this kid is doing something he should not be doing, the way he is striking the ball — itjust looked too sharp for someone that age. i called my friend and he said, look, he�*s four. i said, no he is not. he cannot be at nursery. let me speak to his parents. from there, now we�*re here.
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he has been doing it in real time. it is notjust a one off, it is notjust a one off. he has been doing it consistently. i realised the moment he was born. the nurse put him on his stomach and he lifted his head up and started looking around. even she was shocked. he was very strong from a very young age. yes, that set the tone for his upbringing. you could kind of see he was different from the other kids. and what stood out was his balance. he had unbelievable balance from a very young age. you play against very tall and big people as well. l they are nine and eight. and how does that make you feel because you are only... - that feels really bad. because it�*s a bit hard.
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then which has got a look at the weather. the weather is a little bit different today after the very mild weather we have had so far this week and the real deluge some of us had last night. the dane has been much chillier but much brighter. —— today has been much chillier. 24—hour cycle, this swirl of hard work through, some very strong winds and heavy rain with that letter has cleared away. some of the showers that have been following today have been wintry over high ground in
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scotland. most of the showers have been falling as rain, any wintry element ebbing away this evening. potentially a few of them were drifting southwards, more cloud with that as well. further south and east, some clear spells, lowest temperatures in some spots in the countryside in south—east england down to around 2 degrees. it will be more cloud in the mix tomorrow, some producing showers at times, equally bricking up to give spells of sunshine. best of the sunshine across north—east scotland, where it will stay fairly windy, the wind is generally easing a bit is the way to macro day wears on. further west and south, 12—14, a little milder than today. a ridge of high pressure temporarily cooling off showers,
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giving dry weather for friday night. into saturday, a weather front wriggling into the west will introduce showers for some. a southerly wind developing, so the weather is set to turn mine. the best of any sunshine on saturday in eastern areas, generally more in at the way of cloud. that wind coming up the way of cloud. that wind coming up from the south, so it will be milder. sunday, the rain in the west tending to break up into showers spreading eastwards, but they will be spells of sunshine in between those showers. another fairly windy day but a somewhat milder one, with temperatures of 14 or 15 degrees. after the chilly but bright weather today, there is something a bit more unsettled but now there for the weekend.
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at six — a man is charged with the murder of the conservative mp sir david amess. 25—year—old ali harbi ali, a british somalian, appeared in court in london. he�*s also charged with preparing acts of terrorism. sir david was repeatedly stabbed as he met constituents at a church hall last friday — he died at the scene. we will continue to build our case. if there are members of the public who have further information that might help the investigation, i would urge them to come forward. also on the programme tonight... get your booster jabs says the prime minister, as new daily covid cases rise to more than 50,000 for the first time since july. australia, scorched by bushfires, is one of a number of countries revealed to be lobbying the un for a more gradual move away from the use of fossil fuels.

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