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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 21, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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in the last few minutes police have charged a 25—year—old man with the milder of conservative mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali is also charged with the preparation of terrorist acts. sir david was killed last friday after being attacked in a church leigh—on—sea. we'll have the very latest from scotland yard. also, doctors warn the government is being wilfully negligent in not imposing more restrictions as cases of coronavirus rise. but ministers say it is not necessary yet. we don't believe _ say it is not necessary yet. - don't believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, that it is under unsustainable pressure and now is not the right moment to look
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to trigger plan b. iii now is not the right moment to look to trigger plan 8-— to trigger plan b. if you want to wait until the _ to trigger plan b. if you want to wait until the pushes _ to trigger plan b. if you want to wait until the pushes reach - to trigger plan b. if you want to wait until the pushes reach a i to trigger plan b. if you want to i wait until the pushes reach a peak in november, december, that will be too late _ in november, december, that will be too late. we now need to act to safeguard — too late. we now need to act to safeguard our hail services to make sure there — safeguard our hail services to make sure there is a capacity to cope with_ sure there is a capacity to cope with winter. sure there is a capacity to cope with winter-— sure there is a capacity to cope with winter. ' , ., ., . ., with winter. 14-year-old boy charged with winter. 14-year-old boy charged with the milder _ with winter. 14-year-old boy charged with the milder of _ with winter. 14-year-old boy charged with the milder of a _ with winter. 14-year-old boy charged with the milder of a five-year-old. i with the milder of a five—year—old. leaked documents reveal how some countries are trying to push back on the fight against climate change. united kingdom, zero points. shifter united kingdom, zero points. after the uk was — united kingdom, zero points. after the uk was humiliated _ united kingdom, zero points. after the uk was humiliated at _ united kingdom, zero points. he the uk was humiliated at the last eurovision song contest, a plan to stop it happening again.— eurovision song contest, a plan to stop it happening again. coming up on the bbc news _ stop it happening again. coming up on the bbc news channel, - stop it happening again. coming up| on the bbc news channel, scotland play oman later in the men's t20 world cup and could get back to the next round. scotland have two winds from two in the competition so far.
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welcome to the bbc news at one. police have charged a mild with the milder of the conservative mp sir david amess. 25—year—old ali harbi ali was arrested following the —— in leigh—on—sea last friday. he has also been charged with the preparation of terrorist acts. this is a very latest from our correspondent. daniel. is a very latest from our corresondent. daniel. , ., ., correspondent. daniel. 25-year-old ali harbi ali — correspondent. daniel. 25-year-old ali harbi ali has _ correspondent. daniel. 25-year-old ali harbi ali has been _ correspondent. daniel. 25-year-old ali harbi ali has been in _ correspondent. daniel. 25-year-old ali harbi ali has been in custody - ali harbi ali has been in custody since just moments the mp was a tad. he was arrested in leigh—on—sea and has been in custody for six days
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since then. but this morning the crown prosecution service which decides whether there is enough evidence to bring charges against someone made a decision that he can be charged, both with milder and with the preparation of terrorist acts and nick price the head of? he acts and nick price the head of 7 he said we will submit to the court that this milder has a terrorist connection, namely that it has religious and ideological motivations. this is going to be prosecuted through the court as a terrorist crime and just before we came on air we heard from assistant commissioner who is the most senior officer in britain. irate commissioner who is the most senior officer in britain.— officer in britain. we will continue to build a case. _ officer in britain. we will continue to build a case. for— officer in britain. we will continue to build a case. for members - officer in britain. we will continue to build a case. for members of. officer in britain. we will continue l to build a case. for members of the public, _ to build a case. for members of the public, who— to build a case. for members of the public, who have further information that might _ public, who have further information that might help the investigation, i would _ that might help the investigation, i would urge them to come forward. every— would urge them to come forward. every piece — would urge them to come forward. every piece of information in investigations like this and we will not be _ investigations like this and we will not be wasting our time. please
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contact — not be wasting our time. please contact us — not be wasting our time. please contact us through the anti—terrorist hotline. it remains the case — anti—terrorist hotline. it remains the case that no other arrests have been _ the case that no other arrests have been made — the case that no other arrests have been made at this time we are not seeking _ been made at this time we are not seeking anybody else in relation to this incident. they are still hoping to get more evidence — they are still hoping to get more evidence together to dry and build the case — evidence together to dry and build the case. ali harbi ali will next appear— the case. ali harbi ali will next appear at— the case. ali harbi ali will next appear at magistrates' court. that will be _ appear at magistrates' court. that will be this afternoon, his first court — will be this afternoon, his first court appearance and because he is on a nrilder— court appearance and because he is on a milder charge, he will have to appear— on a milder charge, he will have to appear at— on a milder charge, he will have to appear at a — on a milder charge, he will have to appear at a crown court within 204i was _ appear at a crown court within 204i was it— appear at a crown court within 204i was it will— appear at a crown court within 204i was. it will almost certainly be the old bailey. almost certainly be the old bailey. thank you, daniel almost certainly be the old bailey. thank you, daniel sandford. the government has been accused of wilful negligence for not doing more to stop the spread of covid in england. the doctors' union, the british medical association, says it's "incredibly concerning" that ministers are not taking
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immediate action to reduce the impact of coronavirus on the nhs. yesterday, the health secretary ruled out imposing the government's so—called plan b of restrictions, such as the compulsory wearing of face coverings. our health correspondent katherine da costa reports. this is plan a, boosting elderly and vulnerable groups is part of the governmentstrategy to navigate what many fear might be a difficult winter. now, in england, those who are six months and one week post their second covid vaccine are being asked to book their boost online or dial 111, asked to book their boost online or dialiii, but asked to book their boost online or dial 111, but labour says more urgency is needed. fin dial 111, but labour says more urgency is needed. on current trends, urgency is needed. on current trends. we — urgency is needed. on current trends, we won't _ urgency is needed. on current trends, we won't complete . urgency is needed. on current| trends, we won't complete the booster programme until march 2022. instead of doing 165 thousand jobs a day, will the minister set a commitment to do 500,000 jobs a day
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and get this programme complete by christmas? ., , ., and get this programme complete by christmas? ., ., , ., . , christmas? long queues of ambulances outside some — christmas? long queues of ambulances outside some hospitals, _ christmas? long queues of ambulances outside some hospitals, record - outside some hospitals, record numbers of patients in major a&es and a growing backlog of care. some health experts want england to follow scotland and wales with mandatory masks, vaccine passports and work from home orders, so called plan b. and work from home orders, so called [an b. ., ., , ., plan b. the government has a responsibility _ plan b. the government has a responsibility to _ plan b. the government has a responsibility to protect - plan b. the government has a responsibility to protect the l plan b. the government has a - responsibility to protect the nation possible health, it has a responsibility to make sure the health service has the capacity to care for the patients. we have a situation where the evidence tells you that you need to be doing something. you that you need to be doing something-— you that you need to be doing somethina. ., . ., , ., something. covid infections are mainly been — something. covid infections are mainly been driven _ something. covid infections are mainly been driven by - something. covid infections are l mainly been driven by secondary pupils, with the highest average in wales, nearly 600 cases per 100,000 people, and the lowest rates in scotland, where infections have been falling for several weeks. while the number of patients with covid in hospital is much lower than in the
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year, some areas like wales are under severe pressure, but for now in england the government is sticking with plan a. taste in england the government is sticking with plan a.- in england the government is sticking with plan a. we are seeing infections rising. _ sticking with plan a. we are seeing infections rising. you _ sticking with plan a. we are seeing infections rising. you saw - sticking with plan a. we are seeing infections rising. you saw what - sticking with plan a. we are seeing infections rising. you saw what the j infections rising. you saw what the secretary of state said yesterday. and we are seeing hospitalisation and death rates rising, but at a much lower rate. we don't believe, even though the nhs is under real pressure, as it always is in winter, that it pressure, as it always is in winter, thatitis pressure, as it always is in winter, that it is under unsustainable pressure, and now is not the right moment to look to trigger plan b. the health secretary signalling a more cautious approach, encouraging more cautious approach, encouraging more mask wearing and meeting friends outside, but there is still a lot of work to do to reach out to nearly 5 million people in the uk who have still not had their first chap. —— theirfirstjab. our political correspondent damian grammaticas is in westminster. how much political pressure is the government under to do something about these rising case numbers7 it's starting to rise. we have seen
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the pressure coming from the doctors groups in the last couple of days. today in parliament, we have seen questions being put, asking, us position party saying, if you don't act now, at what point do you step in and act? the government insisting they will continue with this strategy at the minute, which they have, of advising people, saying it's down to individual choices. they believe that's the right way. again, questions being asked today, pointing to countries in europe, saying, look at france, look at italy, germany, they have lower case rates, but they have compulsory masks, vaccine passports, that sort of thing. should we be moving to that? the government is saying, not at the minute, but i think you are seeing cautious moves in that direction, with the advice being, think about your behaviour, not moving to compulsory moves at the
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minute. but they say we are coming up minute. but they say we are coming up to the half term break, and the bulk of cases at the minute in england is among school—age children. they want to look at those cases and what happens there. that's before thinking about taking any more measures. we know that tomorrow there will be a public health advertising campaign coming out, stressing vaccinations, and that is where they are focusing, getting people who have not been vaccinated at all or are due a booster shot to come forward, and trying to urge that message. you have the families of those who died earlier in the pandemic saying, they think the government is not learning the lessons from last winter and is not prioritising saving lives. they say they should be doing that. damian grammaticas _ they should be doing that. damian grammaticas at _ they should be doing that. damian grammaticas at westminster. - a 14—year—old boy has appeared before magistrates in cardiff charged with the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi, whose body was disovered in the river ogmore injuly, after he was reported missing by his parents. our correspondent hywel griffith
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is at the court in cardiff. this was a brief appearance before the magistrates, and the 14—year—old spoke only to confirm his age and address, and he was told about the seriousness of the charge against him. that's the charge of murdering five—year—old logan mwangi, also known locally as williamson. the investigation goes back to the end ofjuly, july the 31st, when the police were called to the small village of sam near bridgend initially to reports of a missing child, but shortly afterwards they discovered logan's body in the river ogmore. they went on to arrest both his stepfather and his mother. stepfather, cole, was charged with murder, his mother charged with perverting the course ofjustice, as was a teenage bay, can't be because of his age. the same boy has now
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been charged with logan's murder and because of the seriousness of the offence this case will go on for the crown court. the boy was told also you will have to remain under curfew between the hours of eight p m and 8am and monitored by tag. this was a case which the community in sarn 8am and monitored by tag. this was a case which the community in sam was traumatised by, logan remembered locally is a happy, smiling boy by neighbours, and this latest development will clearly be a shock to them. the world health organization says the pandemic will "drag on" for a year longer than it needs to because of the failure of rich nations to share vaccines with poorer ones. the organisation is appealing to wealthy nations to give up their places in the queue for vaccines so that pharmaceutical companies can prioritise the countries most in need. it comes as a group of charities have criticised the uk and canada for themselves using doses from covax, the global programme that is meant to ensure that vaccines are shared fairly
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around the world. naomi grimley reports. it's the question we all keep asking — when will this pandemic end7 not as soon as it could, is the answer from the world health organization, because of uneven vaccine distribution across the world. there have been plenty of summits about vaccine donations to poorer countries, but the exasperation of who officials is clear to see. we need a stock—take. the g20 will meet at the end of october. we need them to say, where are we against those commitments, and i can tell you today, you are not on track. you need to really speed it up or, you know what, this pandemic is going to go on for a year longer than it needs to. covax was the international programme set up to ensure all countries, both rich and poor, could get enough vaccines to cover at least 20% of their population. but it hasn't worked out as planned. the vast majority of vaccine doses administered have been
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in richer countries. africa especially has been left behind. a new analysis from a group of charities called the people's vaccine alliance shows the huge gap between what the world's richest countries have promised to give the poorest versus the number of doses delivered so far. the uk and canada have been singled out for particular criticism, as both countries acquired some vaccines from covax for their own populations, even though they had their own supplies. on the one hand, every country that joined the covax facility was entitled to obtain vaccines, but these two countries obtained many, many doses through bilateral agreements that could best be characterised as hoarding, so the idea then that they would double dip and take more vaccines from the covax initiative really is morally indefensible. the uk stressed it had helped kick—start covax and was one of its most generous financial supporters.
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the canadian government told us it's now stopped procuring vaccines from covax. as it became clear that the supply that we had secured through our bilateral deals with different companies like astrazeneca, pfizer and moderna would be sufficient for the canadian population, we then pivoted the doses that we had procured from covax to be donated back to covax, so that they could be redistributed. the latest warning from the world health organization is that the pandemic will continue deep into 2022. it's urging pharmaceutical companies and wealthy nations to make sure low income countries are now prioritised in the queue for life—saving vaccines. naomi grimley, bbc news. the boss of one of the uk's biggest energy companies has called for the abolition of the price cap, which sets a maximum price that households have to pay. keith anderson, who runs
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scottishpower, says the recent energy crisis has exposed deep flaws in the way the market is structured and serious failures on the part of the regulator, ofgem. he's been talking to our business editor, simonjack. a price cap on consumer energy bills was a popular idea with consumers and politicians but, as wholesale prices soared sixfold this year, some companies have had to buy gas at a price miles above the rate they are allowed to sell it, forcing dozens of challenger suppliers to go bust. i think there was almost a fixation about trying to create more and more competition and get more and more companies into the energy sector, but it went too far. he said the price cap meant only the very biggest companies would survive the enormous cost of taking on customers from failed suppliers. right now, every customer who switches at the end of their product, at the end of their contract, who switches onto the price cap, that's £1,000 of cost that the price cap will not
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allow you to pass through to customers. so, every customer is going to cost £1,000. so, we estimate just now it's about £4 or £5 billion of cost being put on the companies in the marketplace. the risk of that is that you will end up going back to the big five or the big six. now, that's not a good place to be. that's not where we want this market to go. he also said a one—size—fits—all cap does not protect vulnerable consumers, as they saw a much greater percentage of their income go on energy bills. he suggested introducing a special discount tariff for low income households, with the better off paying more. he also had some harsh words for the regulator, ofgem. ofgem replied that the price cap had helped protect millions of customers from higher prices. one thing is certain to happen, energy bills are going up. he estimates the cap, if it stays, will rise by up to £500 when it's reset in april. simon jack, bbc news. the time is...
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our top story this lunchtime... police charge a 25—year—old man with the murder of conservative mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali has also been charged with the preparation of terrorist acts. how a revolutionary medical treatment called gene silencing is helping to relieve pain. england opener dom sibley has withdrawn from the lions squad for the tour of australia this winter, having decided to work on his batting at home to try to regain his place in the test team. borisjohnson has joined politicians from both sides of the irish border to attend a church service marking the centenary of partition and the formation of northern ireland. the event in armagh was organised by the main protestant and catholic church leaders. our ireland correspondent chris
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page is in armagh. yes, ben, this is a place where commemoration is often complex and contentious. unionists view 2021 is the centenary of the state they cherish. but for irish nationalists, it is the 100th anniversary of the partition of ireland, which they look as a source of british injustice. there has been controversy in the run—up to the service, the irish president decided not to because he said the service had become too politicised. but also the debate over the centenary has generated some fresh reflections on just how much northern ireland has changed during the peace process. political leaders of the present have come to reflect on the past, and the pricelessness of peace. our past has shaped us and scarred us. it has divided us, and yet it has also, on occasion,
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brought us together. failure to dream, just because a dream fail. we're trapped in our history, the future not unveiled. rouse up yourself, belfast, wake up... new voices are giving expression to hope and history here. ..this is a small tale about how we all fail. true titanic... raquel is from jamaica, but she's lived in northern ireland for 18 years, one of an increasing number of people from diverse backgrounds who bring distinctive perspectives. ..true titanic. i'm conscious of it being a very welcoming place as well as it being a place where people will give you so much and no more. having said that, i do call northern ireland home. i don't know if northern ireland calls me one of its own yet. i still hear the word "blow—in" from time to time! for most of the last century
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there was this cultural diversity, there was less cultural diversity, but more cultural clashes. the boundaries of identity are still sharp, but they're being softened. linda irvine runs an irish language school in a strongly unionist part of east belfast. some argue the language is a political tool of irish nationalism, but linda passionately believes her work enhances her british identity. hello, linda. hello, nice to see you. you're very welcome. what do you think of the fact that we've seen this new appreciation, this new sharing, if you like, of cultures in northern ireland, what it says about the society we're in now? how important will that be in the future? i think the fact that we can have an irish language centre here in east belfast is a very important symbol of how our society has changed. that we're more tolerant, we're a more understanding society. many significant changes happen slowly. hello. nice to see you. emma d'souza fought a lengthy court
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case, essentially over her right to irish citizenship. for me it was about ensuring that my own identity as an irish citizen was respected and upheld, but also ensuring that everyone else had that same right. what would your hopes and for that matter your concerns be about the future of this part of the world? invariably, i think we are living through a time of constitutional change and i think that the future of northern ireland is something that may be transformed within the next one or two decades. in terms of concerns, my concerns are the perpetuation of dogmatic and tribalistic politics. ..but already shown a war—torn world... in northern ireland, identity shapes aspirations. divisions are being challenged, and difference is being more valued. ..to learn from all failure, true titanic.
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leaked documents appear to show how countries like australia waand saudi arabia have tried to force a key united nations report on global warming to be watered down. the bbc has obtained documents showing how some countries are trying to push back on recommendations. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has more. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years, terrible floods in india while hot, dry weather has sparked vast fires in australia as well as in brazil and argentina. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show these are among countries pressuring the un to change it's message on the options for tackling climate change. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn't need to reduce fossil fuels use as quickly as the un suggests. the saudis ask un scientists to delete a claim that the focus
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for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels. meanwhile, india warns it expects coal to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them onto the bbc. these un reports are pretty much the bible of climate science, they're used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change, and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. scientists who helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on the scientists to accept the comments, so, if the comments are lobby and, so, if the comments are lobbying, if they're not justified
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by the science, they will not be integrated in the ipcc report. the leak comes just days before a crucial climate conference begins in glasgow. it shows just how tricky the negotiations are likely to be. but don't give up hope just yet, says a veteran of countless international negotiations. people can see the effects of climate change, and the effects of climate change, by the way, on countries like india and china, are going to be dramatic. this is all about understanding that even though the challenge is immense, there really isn't an alternative to dealing with it, you've got to go back and redouble your efforts, including with those people who still are holding out. we will discover at the conference whether, despite the lobbying, world leaders are willing to take the ambitious action needed to curb emissions. justin rowlatt, bbc news. the nhs is set to use a revolutionary treatment called gene silencing to help people
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with a rare genetic disease that leaves them in crippling pain. acute intermittent porphyria can lead to paralysis and is sometimes fatal. it is hoped gene silencing could also lead to therapies for a range of other untreatable diseases. here's our science correspondent james gallagher. we remember both how traumatic it was for both me going through it and for you guys as a family watching me go through it. it was that element for me of the total pain and the sickness and eventually the paralysis and the seizures. sisters liz and sue have lived in pain that few can imagine. they both have the genetic disease acute intermittent porphyria. potent opioid painkillers were a feature of their daily life, and liz was paralysed for two years. one of the times that they had to transfer me from one hospital to another because i wasn't
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breathing very well at all and i needed intensive care and mum was following behind in her car, following the ambulance. and as soon as the blue lights went on, shejust crumbled. i lost it all, it felt overnight. lost myjob, my company car, lost everything i'd been working hard towards and in a new relationship not knowing whether my partner would stay with me. he did. we're married. we've got a little girl now. but yeah, it was scary. gene silencing therapies get to the root cause of liz and sue's genetic disease rather than just managing their pain. they were part of trials here at king's college hospital, which showed the drug cut severe symptoms by 75%. so, to find a drug that really does transform people's lives is extraordinary. the first time i've seen it really in my career as a doctor. if we can control genes and switch them off when you want to and switch them on when we want to, then almost anything is possible in terms of treating conditions,
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including alzheimer's and cancer and everything else. so, you've been on the drug for a while now. what kind of difference is it making? the difference is astronomical. we're not in pain any more and not feeling sick. and able to predict life, not having to wait for attacks to happen, which means you're generally more dependable, you're not dependent on opiate—based pain relief and that leads to things like being able to succeed in a job. and sue7 i think being so much - stronger, not being in pain, being able to sleep. just being able to plan life a little bit, being able - to be a mother better, j being able to be a wife better and just live life. liz and sue are some of the first people to benefit from gene silencing medicines, but they won't be the last. james gallagher, bbc news. you may remember this year's eurovision song contest ended in humiliation for the uk whenjames newman's song embers was the only act to get the dreaded "nul points".
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well, in fact, no uk entry has made the top 10 for more than a decade, but there are hopes all those years of glorious failure may now be coming to an end. the management team behind british stars like dua lipa and ellie golding will choose our next entry for the song contest. steve holden reports. # out of the embers. # you and i gonna light up the room. the united kingdom, zero points... james newman received the dreaded "nul points" at this year's contest in rotterdam. # it's bigger than everything we see, yeah... it was the uk's second last—placed finish in a row, after michael rice also came bottom in the previous event, in 2019. and if we're honest, british results this entire millennium haven't been great. duo gemini kickstarted the miserable run back in 2003. their song crybaby ended
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with a big fat zero. # shine a light in every corner of the world... you have to go back to 1997 to find the uk's last eurovision winner, katrina and the waves, with love shine a light. but a lot has changed since then. to try to find success once again, the bbc are looking to the team behind two of the uk's biggest pop stars, dua lipa and ellie goulding. both singers, who have dozens of hit songs between them, are managed by tap music. the company is coming on board to find the act who will represent the uk at next year's eurovision and the song they'll sing. we haven't had great successes over the last 20 years, and it's not because of politics, it's just because we've not been sending the best songs that we can send, we haven't had ourfinger on the pulse of the british music scene, and this new team who are behind the likes of dua lipa really understand the british music scene as it is at the moment. and it can be worth the effort. just look at the winners
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of this year's contest. italian rock band maneskin have gone on to top global streaming charts. to many countries, the uk has one of the most vibrant and successful music scenes in the world, and british eurovision fans are hoping there is a winner out there somewhere. steve holden, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. how many points are we giving the weather today, chris7 how many points are we giving the weather today, chris?— weather today, chris? well, it has turned cooler _ weather today, chris? well, it has turned cooler today, _ weather today, chris? well, it has turned cooler today, ben, - weather today, chris? well, it has turned cooler today, ben, there . weather today, chris? well, it has turned cooler today, ben, there is weather today, chris? well, it has i turned cooler today, ben, there is a chill in the but on the other hand it is a lot sunnier than it has been for a while as well. the little sprinkling of snow over the scottish mountains, and compared with yesterday, a significant drops in temperatures across the board. this is the area of low pressure that
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brought some windy and wet weather

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