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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 21, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the bbc obtains documents showing some countries want to play down the dangers to the climate of coal, gas and oil. the british government is accused of being �*wilfully negligent�* by the doctors�* union the bma for not imposing coronavirus rules to tackle rising cases, but ministers say further measures aren't needed. we don't believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure and that now is not the right moment to look to trigger plan b. police searching for brian laundrie, the fiance of murdered american blogger gabby petito, have found
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what appear to be human remains in a park in florida. the centenary of the partition of ireland and founding of northern ireland is being marked with a special church service, attended by politicans and communities from both sides of the border. and coming up this hour... putting your faith into artificial intelligence. from prayer apps to smart rosary beads, the rise of robots in religion. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the bbc has obtained documents that show countries, including saudi arabia, australia and japan, are asking the united nations to play down the need to move away
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from using fossilfuels like coal, gas and oil. it comes just ten days before world leaders gather in glasgow for crucial climate talks. our climate editor justin rowlatt has more. the clock is ticking on tackling climate change. the science says, unless we start making dramatic cuts to emissions now, we risk very serious consequences. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years. terrible floods in india, while hot, dry weather has sparked vast fires in australia, as well as in brazil and in argentina. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show these are among countries pressuring the un to change its message on the options for tackling climate change. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn't need to reduce fossilfuel use as quickly as the un suggests.
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the saudis ask un scientists to delete a claim that the focus for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels. meanwhile, india warns it expects coal to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them on to the bbc. these un reports are pretty much the bible of climate science. they are used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. scientists who have helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on scientists to accept the comments. if comments are lobbying, if they are not justified by science,
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they will not be integrated in the ipcc reports. the leak comes days before a crucial climate conference begins in glasgow. it shows just how tricky the negotiations are likely to be. but don't give up hope just yet, says a veteran of countless international negotiations. people can see the effects of climate change. and the effects of climate change, by the way, on countries like india and china, are going to be dramatic. this is all about understanding that even though the challenge is immense, there really isn't an alternative to dealing with it. you've got to go back and redouble your efforts, including with those people who still are holding out. they are putting the finishing touches to the huge conference facilities in glasgow. this leak shows just how tough the negotiations there are likely to be. we will discover at the conference whether, despite the lobbying, world leaders are willing to take the ambitious action needed to
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curb emissions. justin rowlatt, bbc news. joining me now is our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes. why is japan pushing for this? for the report to play down the need to move away from fossil fuels. i think to many people it will be a bit of a surprise because japan is not one of the big fossil fuel producers, they don't have any coal or oil, so it imports all or most of its energy from the middle east and australia and elsewhere so why is it on that side of the argument rather than with countries like the uk that are pushing much more towards renewable is much more quickly? i think the answer is japan just has a lot of legacy infrastructure and it is still building new coal—fired
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power stations today. earlier this week i was filming about one hour south of tokyo where they are building a huge brand—new coal—fired power station there which will go online in 2023. that much investment will need to run for 40—50 years taking it well into the 20 60s or 70s and japan has a lot of this infrastructure and heavy industry and i think there is a realfear that moving quickly to renewable energy exclusively is going to massively disadvantage and cause huge costs for the japanese economy and that is why they are playing this down and saying we need to go down a different route, we can carry on using fossil fuels but turn them into hydrogen or ammonia, burn those into hydrogen or ammonia, burn those in our power plants and they don't produce any c02. the c02 produced in the creation of this hydrogen and ammonia can be buried on the ground, which is called carbon capture and storage and japan is arguing very
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much that carbon capture and storage has to be a big part of the solution in the future of getting to zero carbon. countries like britain, germany, northern european countries argue against that and say we have to go renewable much more quickly. car manufacturing is a huge part of the japanese economy as well so what are all the car—makers playing in all of this? are all the car-makers playing in all of this?— all of this? japan's august car manufacturer— all of this? japan's august car manufacturer and, _ all of this? japan's august car manufacturer and, perhaps i all of this? japan's august car. manufacturer and, perhaps the biggest in the world, is toyota, and japan is going in a direction against the rest of the world. in north america and europe we are seeing manufacturers switching to battery power but in these leaked papers we can seejapan is battery power but in these leaked papers we can see japan is saying battery power but in these leaked papers we can seejapan is saying we can stick with hybrid cars for a
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longer and then move to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. i was driving one this morning, fantastic technology but hugely expensive and we don't have the infrastructure around the world and most manufacturers say it is a dead end and we need to go battery for the future. toyota is standing out against the rest of the crowd on this issue. joining me now is professor mark maslin a climate change expert and reviewer on the most recent ipcc report and a professor of earth system science at ucl. i wonder if you can give us a little insight first the all into how the process works when it comes to drafting a report by the ipcc. it works by having different chapters and what we do is bring experts from all around the world to write those. what is interesting as there is
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always a lead author from a developing country and a developed country to make sure we cover all the signs in the world. they write those reports and write each individual chapters and then countries are invited to comment on those chapters. of course many of them are incredibly helpful comments but of course some of them, as you can tell from the report, start lobbying, trying to influence the science and try to actually improve their country's standing or they are economy. an interesting thing is that has no effect. the scientists, the social scientists and the economists dedicating their lives to working on these reports are following the evidence. they are looking at what is best for the planet and what is best for the people of the planet. it is interesting because that gives you that incredible trust. you go out in the world, politicians and the public trust to these reports and trust scientists because they know we are not going to be influenced by
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australia, brazil, russia or china. what you are saying is something can't be included just because a government doesn't like it or a country doesn't like it, there has to be proven scientific evidence behind the claim.— to be proven scientific evidence behind the claim. absolutely. every sinale one behind the claim. absolutely. every single one of _ behind the claim. absolutely. every single one of these _ behind the claim. absolutely. every single one of these reports - behind the claim. absolutely. every single one of these reports is - single one of these reports is purely the evidence that we have collected over decades and we also then insure what are other ways forward if we want to actually deal with climate change. i think it is really important because if you grab somebody from the street and see which countries do you think are going to lobby in a certain way against climate change? they are going to see australia, the government wants to burn more coal. saudi arabia are going to go for oil. brazilwants saudi arabia are going to go for oil. brazil wants to have more beef. it is interesting that it is really quite simplistic how some of this geopolitics is working but everybody realises if we are going to deal with climate change we need to get rid of coal as soon as possible,
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phase out natural gas and oil as quick as possible. we need to stop deforestation, and we need to move to a more plant —based diet and phase out beef. the amazing thing is thatis phase out beef. the amazing thing is that is going to save millions of lives because we will have better air quality, less people affected by that, and also we are going to have a better diet and live longer. it is a better diet and live longer. it is a classic win—win situation. deal with climate change, save the planet and look after ourselves better. but we need to also work together and this shows the kind of arguments we are likely to see at the climate conference in glasgow as different governments push they different viewpoints. this governments push they different viewoints. , , ., governments push they different viewpoints-_ governments push they different viewoints. , , ., ., viewpoints. this is one of the most im ortant viewpoints. this is one of the most important things — viewpoints. this is one of the most important things about _ viewpoints. this is one of the most important things about cop26, - viewpoints. this is one of the most important things about cop26, the j important things about cop26, the governments will have to build solidarity because this is a global
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issue. the environment doesn't care about where the c02 comes from, it cares about how much as they are. we have to build solidarity and bring all the countries together, winning hearts and minds, persuading the japanese that moving to renewables is going to boost their economy. they are brilliant at building cars so why can't they build battery cars? that is the key. solidarity in bringing all the countries together in one common goal. goad bringing all the countries together in one common goal.— bringing all the countries together in one common goal. good to have you with us. pressure is growing on the uk government to re—impose some covid restrictions in england, amid a surge in cases. it comes as the british medical association has accused ministers of being "wilfully negligent". it says measures such as compulsory face coverings and social distancing should be brought back in now, to protect the nhs as we head into the winter months. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. the nhs under pressure. staff and resources always strained as winter approaches,
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but as covid admissions rise, doctors warn it could become unbearable. the government should be making sure that the public are expected and required to follow simple infection control measures, such as the wearing of masks in indoor public settings, including public transport. now is the time to act. we have enough evidence that this a trajectory heading in the wrong direction. yesterday, the health secretary acknowledged things would get worse. 100,000 cases per day, he warned. and unless people took precautions, ministers would have to act. am i saying that if we don't do our bit, get vaccinated, you know, all of those behavioural changes that we can make, that we are more likely to face restrictions as we head into winter, then i am saying that. i think we have been really clear that we've all got a role to play. for now, the government is holding firm and says it's not yet time
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to take further measures. moving to the government's plan b in england would make face coverings mandatory in some settings. people would be asked to work from home, and vaccine passports introduced. in northern ireland, face coverings remain a legal requirement in crowded indoor spaces. it's the same for masks in wales, where proof of vaccination is needed in nightclubs and people are asked to work from home. scotland's strategy similarly includes vaccine passports and face masks are required in schools and some other settings. for now, the focus at westminster is urging those not yet vaccinated to come forward, and getting booster jabs to those eligible. but doctors say it's wilfully negligent of ministers not to take further steps, and pressure on the health service is likely only to increase in the coming weeks. jonathan blake, bbc news. i've been speaking to our political
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correspondent, chris mason. it was the first downing street covid news conference in five weeks, that five o'clock ritual of the medics and minister and their charts and graphs and words. the fact that it was happening tells you something. yes, ostensibly they were meeting to tells about two new antivirals, two new drugs which could help mitigate the effects of covid for those who have already caught it, and we await their approval by the regulator. but the bigger picture was the rising number of cases in england, the rising number of hospitalisations and deaths and what the government might want to do. if you look at the document which accompanied the last news conference in september five weeks ago which set out explicitly the idea of plan b and what would be within it, actually the first strand of plan b was implemented yesterday which was the government saying cases are going up and asking us in england voluntarily to take
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mitigating measures, but not then go to the second and third strands of plan b which would be mandating face masks in crowded indoor settings and also the use of vaccine passports. the government clearly is aware and cautious around the rising numbers but doesn't want to press the button on mandating a change in our behaviour. here is the health minister on breakfast a little earlier. we are seeing infections rising. you saw what the secretary of state said yesterday. and we are seeing hospitalisations and deaths are rising. but at a much lower rate. we don't believe that, even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure and that now is not the right moment to look to trigger plan b. and that notion of unsustainable pressure has always been the government's driving motivation around the implementation of restrictions on our liberties and they don't think we are there yet.
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it is striking though that medical organisation after medical organisation, trade associations, trade unions, clearly do think something should happen now. the government's chief scientific adviser patrick vallance has said publicly he is forever saying privately to the prime minister, look, if you think you have to do x you probably have to do y, in other words, act quickly and act now. and england is an outlier in the broader uk. as we heard from jonathan a few minutes ago in his report, with mitigation measures are still in place in northern ireland, wales and scotland, that were relaxed months ago in england. the world health organisation has told the bbc it believes the coronavirus pandemic will go on for a year longer than it needs to because of the unequal distribution of vaccines. it comes as a group of charities have criticised the uk and canada for themselves using doses from covax, the global programme to ensure vaccines are distributed fairly. meanwhile, 0xfam is issuing a report criticising pharmaceutical companies
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and rich nations for delivering just one in seven of the doses promised for developing countries. naomi grimley reports. it's a question we all keep asking — when will this pandemic end? not as soon as it could, is the answer from the world health organization, because of uneven vaccine distribution across the world. there have been plenty of summits about vaccine donations to poorer countries, but the exasperation of who officials is clear to see. we need a stock—take. the g20 will meet at the end of october. we need them to say, where are we against those commitments? and i can tell you today, they're not on track. we need to really speed it up. or, you know what, this pandemic is going to go on for a year longer than it needs to.
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covax was the international programme set up to ensure all countries, both rich and poor, could get enough vaccines to cover at least 20% of the population. but it hasn't worked out as planned. the vast majority of vaccine doses administered have been in richer countries. africa especially has been left behind. a new analysis from a group of charities called the people's vaccine alliance shows the huge gap between what the world's richest countries have promised to give the poorest versus the number of doses delivered so far. the uk and canada have been singled out for particular criticism as both countries acquired some vaccines from covax for their own populations, even though they have their own supplies. 0n the one hand, every country that joined the covax facility was entitled to obtain vaccines, but these two countries obtained many, many doses through bilateral agreements that could best be characterised as hoarding.
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so the idea then that they would double dip and take more vaccines from the covax initiative really is morally indefensible. the uk stressed it helped kickstart covax and was one of its most generous financial supporters. the canadian government told us it has now stopped procuring vaccines from covax. as it became clear that the supply that we had secured through our bilateral deals with different companies like astrazeneca, pfizer and moderna would be sufficient for the canadian population, we then pivoted the doses that we had procured from covax to be donated back to covax so that they could be redistributed to developing countries that needed those doses. the latest warning from the world health organization is that the pandemic will continue into 2022. it is urging pharmaceutical companies and wealthy nations to make sure low—income countries
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are now prioritised in the queue for life—saving vaccines. naomi grimley, bbc news. some breaking news from wales. the latest nhs statistics show the worst ever performance figures have been recorded by both hospital emergency departments and the ambulance service in wales, reflecting the enormous pressure on urgent care in the nhs. the statistics also show more people than ever before are on waiting lists for planned treatments with a record number of people also waiting more than nine months to be treated. these new statistics from the nhs in wales, after the chief executive of nhs wales warrant of the health service was under the most extreme pressure in its history with tired staff preparing for their
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hardest ever winter. no doubt we will bring you more on that during the course of the morning so stay with us. the home secretary, priti patel, has asked police for an update on so—called �*spiking', following a spate of reports of women being injected with drugs on nights out. nottinghamshire police have told us they've had 12 reports injust the last three weeks. this it comes as nearly 150,000 people have signed a petition calling on the government to make searches at bars and clubs mandatory. michael kill is from the night time industries association, he insists work is being done to tackle spiking. 0perators across the country have been working with police, local authorities, key stakeholders. their focus has been on safeguarding customers, particularly women at night, and they, without a doubt, have been escalating their front line protocols in terms of searching. yvette cooper is the chair of the home affairs select committee
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which has asked for urgent information from police forces on the scale of the problem and drink spiking more widely. she says it should not be the responsibility of the victim to stay safe and that venues and the police need to do more. these are very dangerous crimes. if someone is prepared to do this kind of thing to another person, to abuse somebody else's body in this way, they are very dangerous. so i think there has to be much more focus on identifying and stopping the perpetrators of these crimes, and that does mean nightclubs or venues of different kinds working much more closely with the police and with local groups and organisations to do that as well. so i think they can do more. i know there will be some venues who are taking this immensely seriously and working very hard to do this, but we know there are an awful lot more that don't and they aren't and they do need to do so. martha williams is a third year student at edinburgh university and founder of girls night in. she explained her motivation in setting up the group.
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the motivation behind our boycott was that the situation seems to be accelerating and getting far worse and there doesn't seem to be any action against these attacks and so what we figured was that if we boycott nightclubs then maybe they will start taking this seriously and actually make some reform to keep their clubbers and customers safe. what sort of reforms do you want them to make? the kind of actions we are looking forfrom clubs is retraining of staff in first aid and drug misuse and how to handle these situations and the procedure for spiking and also looking at things like cctv and security checks and clear cups and lids and things they can implement to ensure the safety of people in their environment. what responses have you had from nightclubs? we sent an open letter to most
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of the major nightclubs in edinburgh and we haven't had many responses. we have had two responses from two of the biggest nightclubs in edinburgh, which have been really meaningful to us because they showed how they are going to put in the effort to make changes and keep their customers safe, but most of the nightclubs have not commented or not put out a plan just yet. that's interesting. i suppose when you talk about clear cups and lids that is to do with spiking drinks but we have been hearing more about the phenomenon of spiking using needles, by injection. how many people are saying to you that that is actually going on? 0ur campaign is focusing on spiking as a whole, and obviously the new phenomenon of spiking by injection has brought a lot of attention to spiking in general. i have had, through the instagram
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set up for the campaign, people come forward saying they believe they have been spiked by injection and my first instinct is to always believe victims and i believe this could be happening. as a new phenomenon, we need to really take it seriously and act on it before necessarily doubting it is happening. experts in the us state of florida are investigating whether suspected human remains found in a park belong to brian laundrie. he's the boyfriend of a young woman found murdered in the state of wyoming last month. gabby petito went missing weeks earlier while on a road trip with mr laundrie. aru na iyengar reports. a possible breakthrough on a florida nature reserve. police using sniffer dogs have been searching for brian laundrie, the fiance of gabby petito, whose body was discovered in wyoming in september. laundrie went home to florida after her
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disappearance, but went missing himself soon afterwards. his family say he went for a hike and never came back. earlier today, investigators found what appeared to be human remains and personal items, such as a backpack and notebook belonging to brian laundrie. these items were found in an area that, up until recently, had been underwater. the case has provoked widespread media interest. gabby petito's body lay in wilderness for over a month before she was found. police say she was strangled. mr laundrie has not been charged with any crime relating to the killing of gabby petito, but the fbi issued a federal arrest warrant and charged him with fraudulently using her debit card after her death. the couple had packed their lives into a camper van for a cross—country adventure, starting injuly. they documented theirjourney in a stream of social media posts, but life was not sunny
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under the surface. this video emerged as the couple travelled through the state of utah. two people came to us and told us that they saw him hit you. they were interviewed, but no further action was taken. she sobs. ms petito was crying, talking to officers about her mental health. the murder has triggered a debate about domestic violence, over the amount of attention accorded to white women compared to other missing persons. in addition, whilst the two separate searches for the pair were going on, other bodies of missing people were found. the fbi says investigations in florida are likely to continue for several days. aruna iyengar, bbc news. latvia has gone back into lockdown after recording 2,599 new covid cases and 2a deaths in the last 2a hour period. the rules will be in effect from today until the 15th of november, meaning all non—essential shops and schools will be shut, private
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household gatherings are banned, and all public events are suspended. there is also a strict curfew to prevent people leaving 0ur correspondent adam easton is following developments from neighbouring poland. what is the government saying about this lockdown and what has the reaction been? the this lockdown and what has the reaction been?— this lockdown and what has the reaction been? ~ , ., reaction been? the prime minister of latvia has reaction been? the prime minister of latvia has said _ reaction been? the prime minister of latvia has said these _ reaction been? the prime minister of latvia has said these new— latvia has said these new restrictions, the first time a country from europe has gone back into lockdown in recent months, are required to protect the health care system. last week, most planned hospital operations in latvia were counselled to prioritised covid patients, one of the main hospitals
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in riga, one of the two main hospitals in the capital, was setting up makeshift beds in the entrance in anticipation of additional covid patients. this is the reason that this lockdown is being reintroduced in latvia. 0bviously being reintroduced in latvia. obviously there is a certain amount of weariness on the part of the population notjust in latvia but in countries across europe, who are wondering when is this pandemic going to be eased sufficiently that we can go back to normal life and why do we have to keep going back to restrictions? but certainly the rise in hospitalisations in latvia, the prime minister has squarely blamed it on the rather low vaccination rate in latvia, only 47% are fully vaccinated, compared to the average in the eu which is 74%. but it does notjust latvia having these
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problems, it is the whole region of central and eastern europe which is seeing a spike in covid infections. here in poland, the health minister talked about an explosion in new cases over the last two or three days. we have seen more than double the amount of cases in recent days compared to just one week ago. again, this is regions in poland which have relatively low vaccination rates. so this is the connection they are making as well. romania is well has seen a record high numbers of infections and deaths, intensive care units in hospitals in romania which are full. the czech republic has seen rising cases and they are reintroducing some restrictions as well. facemasks must be worn in the workplace and if you want to go into a restaurant or bar you have to show proof that you have been vaccinated or have a negative test.—
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have been vaccinated or have a neaative test. ., ., ~ ., ,, negative test. good to talk to you. our correspondent _ negative test. good to talk to you. our correspondent in _ negative test. good to talk to you. our correspondent in poland - negative test. good to talk to you. | our correspondent in poland giving 0ur correspondent in poland giving us a picture of covid across europe. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... the bbc obtains documents showing some countries want to play down the dangers to the climate of coal, gas and oil, as former british prime minister tony blair says it's vital all countries play their part in keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees. even though the challenge is immense, there really isn't an alternative to dealing with it, you've got to go back and redouble your efforts, including with those people who are still holding out. the british government is accused of being wilfully negligent by the doctors' union the bma for not imposing coronavirus rules to tackle rising cases, but ministers say further measures aren't needed. we don't believe that even though the nhs _
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we don't believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always— the nhs is under real pressure, it always is— the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in— the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter, but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure and that now is not _ unsustainable pressure and that now is not the _ unsustainable pressure and that now is not the right moment to look to trigger— is not the right moment to look to trigger plan b. the world health organisation says it believes the coronavirus pandemic will go on for a year longer than it needs to because of the unequal distribution of vaccines. let's cross now to the house of commons in london where the 0pposition's health spokesman jonathan ashworth is asking for a government response to covid—19. to response to covid—19. ask the secretary of state fo health to ask the secretary of state for health and social care for the government's response on covid—19. minister. thank you, mr speaker. i'm gratefulto minister. thank you, mr speaker. i'm grateful to the right honourable member for grateful to the right honourable memberfor his question grateful to the right honourable member for his question and for the opportunity to answer questions from across the house in addition to my oral statement later this morning.
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before i do, mr speaker, i want to underline our commitment to keeping the house informed. yesterday's announcement on the procurement of new antiviral treatments was made to parliament via a written ministerial statement. the purpose of the secretary of states press conference was to appeal directly to the public to come forward for their vaccines, including the 4.7 million people over the age of 18 in england who haven't accepted the vaccine. and the need for those eligible to take up the need for those eligible to take up the offer of a boosterjab as we pursue plan a to its full extent. i thank the parliamentary undersecretary for that answer. yesterday, the secretary of state said that pressure is on the nhs are sustainable. but we have ambulances backed up outside hospitals, patients waiting hours upon hours in alpha merge, cancel operations cancelled and nhs staff exhausted. has there ever been in the history of the nhs a more complacent attitude from a secretary of state
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as we head into winter? yesterday he refused to trigger plan b. can the parliamentary undersecretary tell us what is the criteria for triggering plan b? newspapers today report of a plan see, of no households mixing, being considered. a lockdown by the back door, madam deputy speaker. when the business secretary ruled out a lockdown yesterday, was that just another example of him making things up as he goes along in interviews? the minister of state said on the radio today that it is not something actively being considered. no, the qualifying advert actively. we don't want a return to the dark days of lockdown, nor do we want to see regional lockdowns, or local lockdowns, like we saw in leicester and bolton and burnley. so, can the parliamentary undersecretary rule those lockdowns out? but isn't the truth that we are in this situation because the
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vaccination programme is now stalling? ministers can't blame the public when 2 million people haven't even been invited for a boosterjab and on current trends, we won't complete the booster programme until march 2022. instead ofjust doing 165,000 jobs a day, will the minister set a commitment to do 500,000 jobs a day and get this programme complete by christmas? the minister will know that the highest concentration of infections is amongst children, yet only 17% of children have been vaccinated. this is a stuttering roll—out of the children's vaccination programme, and doesn't it expose the folly of cutting school nurses and health visitors who support these immunisation programmes in our communities? and on flu, only 36% of over—65s have been vaccinated. we hear stories of cancelled flu jabs at gps' surgeries, pharmacists saying they don't have enough supplies, so, why are supplies
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currently running so low? with infections running so high, ministers need to, if i may, stop vacillating and get vaccinated. the wall of defence is crumbling, we know with this virus, you have to get ahead of it, otherwise it gets ahead of you, how will the minister fix this stalling vaccination programme?— fix this stalling vaccination i programme?- thank fix this stalling vaccination - programme?- thank you, programme? minister. thank you, madam deputy _ programme? minister. thank you, madam deputy speaker. _ programme? minister. thank you, madam deputy speaker. first - programme? minister. thank you, madam deputy speaker. first of l programme? minister. thank you, | madam deputy speaker. first of all programme? minister. thank you, l madam deputy speaker. first of all i would like to thank the right honourable gentleman for his co—operation throughout the pandemic, i am a bit disappointed with the tone today, in that what we're seeing is the government carrying out the plans that have been laid before parliament, the autumn and winter plan with plan a and plan b, and as the secretary of state has quite rightly said yesterday, that plan a is still what we are working to. our vaccines have created a wall of defence, it's
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incredible how many people have taken up the offer, not for the firstjab, but for the second jab, and now coming forward for their boosters. in fact at the start of the week, 5.4 million people were eligible for their booster jab the week, 5.4 million people were eligible for their boosterjab and 4 million people had taken up that opportunity, 4 million arms have beenjabbed up to now. the right honourable gentleman talks about the 12- to 15 honourable gentleman talks about the 12— to 15 euros, and we are now able to offer up more choice for parents to offer up more choice for parents to take their children to vaccination centres. —— 12— to 15—year—old took over. i'm sure the right honourable gentleman with agree with me that it is important that the choice of where children get theirjabs is as wide as possible. but madam deputy speaker, one important factor to consider is to ensure that those 4.7 million people who haven't yet taken up the offer of a firstjab encouraged to come forward because as the right
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honourable gentleman said, the vaccines are our wall of defence. regards to the flu vaccine programme, once again it is an extremely important programme and people are being called forward for their flu, people are being called forward for theirflu, which is helping to protect us throughout the winter months, and my message is, if you get your call for yourflu months, and my message is, if you get your call for your flu jab, don't wait to get your call for your booster jab don't wait to get your call for your boosterjab and vice versa, whichever jab you boosterjab and vice versa, whicheverjab you get invited for first, and that will help to protect you and your family first, and that will help to protect you and yourfamily and first, and that will help to protect you and your family and the people around you. the you and your family and the people around yon-— you and your family and the people around you-— you and your family and the people around you. the chair of the health select committee, _ around you. the chair of the health select committee, jeremy - around you. the chair of the health select committee, jeremy hunt. i around you. the chair of the health l select committee, jeremy hunt. last week, two select committee, jeremy hunt. week, two committees published a report saying that the vaccine roll—out was one of the biggest and most impressive achievements in british public administration in our lifetimes and i want to pay tribute to the government and to the vaccines ministerfor to the government and to the vaccines minister for what has to the government and to the vaccines ministerfor what has been achieved. but in truth at its peak in the spring we were jabbing 400,000 people a day, now it is less
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than 200,000 people a day. and if you look at the higher hospitalisations, cases and death rates compared to countries like france and germany, the heart of it is not actually things like mask wearing and covid passports, it is there a higher vaccine immunity. so, i want to ask the minister two questions. firstly, this decision that has been made that you can't have your boosterjab until six months after you had your second jab, how hard and fast should that rule be? does it really matter when it is only nine weeks till the christmas holidays if someone has their boosterjab after five months? and should we not looked at weather there should be flexibility in that decision so we can get more people in more quickly for their booster jabs? ? and secondly, at risk of making the minister blush, does she not need to be a cabinet minister, is not one of the issues that the vaccines minister before sat round the cabinet table, and now does not?
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and this is such an important thing for our national defence against virus, and our national auto determination to avoid another lockdown, do we not need a vaccines minister sitting around the cabinet table as we head before?— table as we head before? answer! minister! thank _ table as we head before? answer! minister! thank you, _ table as we head before? answer! minister! thank you, madam - table as we head before? answer! l minister! thank you, madam deputy speaker and i thank my honourable friend for his questions. i would like to reassure him that i have regular meetings with the prime minister and the prime minister takes the vaccine roll—out extremely seriously, as does the secretary of state. in regards to the eligibility and the timescale to that, obviously the jcvi have and the timescale to that, obviously thejcvi have provided the advice that it should be six months from the second jab but i would like to reassure the house that the immunity does not fall off a cliff edge, it has waned slightly, but not
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completely so there is still time for people to come forward, and obviously we are encouraging people to come forward as soon as they are eligible, but they still have a huge amount of immunity over and above those who are yet to get their first jab. those who are yet to get their first 'ab. . ., those who are yet to get their first 'ab. . ~' , ., those who are yet to get their first 'ab. ., ~ i. a, ., those who are yet to get their first 'ab. ., ~ ., ,, , jab. thank you, madam deputy seaker. jab. thank you, madam deputy speaker. with _ jab. thank you, madam deputy speaker. with infection - jab. thank you, madam deputy speaker. with infection levels. speaker. with infection levels worryingly at previous lockdown levels and the government accused of having taken its foot off the pedal with nhs leaders calling for reintroduction of restrictions, the secretary of state stands with not implemented plan b at this point does not look credible. secretary of states stance. if the government will not now follow scotland's lead on things like mask wearing, how much worse must things get before it does implement plan b?— does implement plan b? minister. i thank the gentleman _ does implement plan b? minister. i thank the gentleman for _ does implement plan b? minister. i thank the gentleman for that - thank the gentleman for that question. 0urvaccines thank the gentleman for that question. 0ur vaccines programme has
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really created that wall of defence and we're in plan a and there is more that can be done as part of plan a common that's why i'm calling upon .7 million people who have yet to come forward for their firstjab to come forward for their firstjab to ensure that people have their boosterjab to ensure that people have their booster jab sooner they are eligible, as well as encouraging the 12- to eligible, as well as encouraging the 12— to 15—year—olds to take up their job as well. -- 4.7 —— 4.7 milliion people. presenter: we are going to leave the house of commons there. we heard jonathan ashworth and indeed the snp asking ministerfor jonathan ashworth and indeed the snp asking minister for vaccines and public health, what is the criteria for triggering plan b, which is essentially a tightening of restrictions, reintroduction of mask wearing, say, social distancing and possibly more working from home, not a clear answer given on that from
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the minister. who was keen to urge people to take up the vaccine, both the initial vaccine and indeed the booster vaccine if they're eligible. artificial intelligence is changing how we interact with everything from food, healthcare and travel but also, religion. experts say that major global faiths are now discussing their relationship with al, and some are starting to incorporate the technology into their worship. robot priests can recite prayers, perform funerals, and even comfort those experiencing a spiritual crisis. so, is al going to transform how people experience faith? our global religion reporter sofia bettiza has the story. artificial intelligence, ai, the technology that allows a computer to think like a human. welcome to the church of england. and different faiths around
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the world are starting to use it. inside this church is a robotic prayer companion. my name is sant0. what brings you here on this beautiful day? let us pray. sant0 is programmed with 2,000 years of knowledge about the catholic faith. i think it is impressive. it's a bit like catholic alexa. do you think it gave you a satisfying answer? well, i think that's the problem with artificial intelligence, sometimes the answers are very vague. he is helping you finding your own answer. people here have mixed feelings about the robot. most of them said they prefer a human priest but they were surprisingly open—minded. one of them said anything that brings you closer to god is a good thing.
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sant0, tell me about resurrection, please. yes, i think we can use the robot or artificial intelligence to help understand the christian teaching, not to replace the priest, because it has no soul, it is not personal. it is not person. this buddhist temple is more than 400 years old. and inside is a robot. it's designed to look like kannon, the goddess of mercy. these university students have come to see mindar for the first time. a whole sermon delivered by a robot. but not everyone felt
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at ease with it. that change in other religions is already happening. prayer apps for muslims, smart rosary bracelets for catholics, and an algorithm called robo rabbi. but is there a danger that people could place too much faith in artificial intelligence? i think there's a danger in assuming that artificial intelligence has super agency, that it is in fact making beneficial decisions on our behalf. we've got to be careful we don't trust ai too soon. ai can quite frequently be artificially stupid rather than artificially intelligent. but with many religions experimenting with al and robots, it could change the way we worship.
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we can speak now to dr usama hasan, who is an an imam and senior analyst at the tony blair institute for global change and who has also worked in and studied ai. good to have you with us, good morning to you, how is the muslim faith using artificial intelligence and robots?— faith using artificial intelligence and robots? ~ , , ., , and robots? muslims have used apps riaht and robots? muslims have used apps ri . ht from and robots? muslims have used apps right from the _ and robots? muslims have used apps right from the very _ and robots? muslims have used apps right from the very beginning, - right from the very beginning, because the four or five pillars of daily practice, prayer times, five times a day, which occur at different times depending on where you are world and what the season is, so they will get automatic calls to prayer in arabic from their phone. there is also the charity, the complicated rules to work out what percentage of wealth you are supposed to give away in charity, and all of these things can be put into algorithms. then there is the
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fasting, telling you when to begin your fast, fasting, telling you when to begin yourfast, and in the fasting, telling you when to begin your fast, and in the future, fasting, telling you when to begin yourfast, and in the future, it fasting, telling you when to begin your fast, and in the future, it has not happened yet but i can see in the future things like the pilgrimage to mecca, we will have robot showing people the way, because it is a very complicated set of rituals. you will also have i think in the near future robots people prayers, because islamic is our very orderly, you stand, you bow, you prostrate on the ground, you have different prayers for each posture, and all of that is available to, and the research is slowly going on. we have the prayer apps already which help you the direction two to pray and also for the different prayers in each posture. the different prayers in each osture. ~ ,,., , the different prayers in each osture. , ., posture. absolutely fascinating, i mean ou posture. absolutely fascinating, i mean you are _ posture. absolutely fascinating, i mean you are an _ posture. absolutely fascinating, i mean you are an in _ posture. absolutely fascinating, i mean you are an in mum, - posture. absolutely fascinating, i mean you are an in mum, how. mean you are an in mum, how concerned are you that this technology could eventually put you out of a job?— technology could eventually put you out of a job? out of a “ob? yes, i have considered ve in out of a job? yes, i have considered very in favour— out of a job? yes, i have considered very in favour of _ out of a job? yes, i have considered very in favour of technology - out of a job? yes, i have considered very in favour of technology to - very in favour of technology to benefit humanity, and i think
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robots, two people the koran, how to recycle from, say their prayers and work out things like the charity, and also inheritance, i am all for that full i do think that eventually we may have robot imams leading prayers, or conducting marriages, even, but i can't see that happening in my lifetime so i am quite confident that i will still have work to do, but future generations may not. work to do, but future generations ma not. �* . , work to do, but future generations ma not. �* ._ ., may not. are there any drawbacks, thou~h. may not. are there any drawbacks, though- we — may not. are there any drawbacks, though. we heard _ may not. are there any drawbacks, though. we heard in _ may not. are there any drawbacks, though. we heard in that _ may not. are there any drawbacks, though. we heard in that report . may not. are there any drawbacks, l though. we heard in that report that perhaps a loss of personal, the eye contact, if you like, and i also wonder perhaps about pieces of information being perhaps taken out of context? , ., , , of context? yes, absolutely. so, the ai of context? yes, absolutely. so, the al technology _ of context? yes, absolutely. so, the al technology is _ of context? yes, absolutely. so, the ai technology is great _ of context? yes, absolutely. so, the ai technology is great but _ of context? yes, absolutely. so, the ai technology is great but still - ai technology is great but still very, very far from a ai technology is great but still very, very farfrom a human is of a person with a soul, as people said. so, i think we have to see this as a
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supporting role, really, for teaching et cetera, for companionship, for lonely people, and when it comes to the teaching of the information. scripture especially, it is complex, you need that human soul who has gone through the study and the practice and the devotional worship and has a good character, basically, as a human being, to do an effective function, and it is notjust through the text and it is notjust through the text and data. and a good example of that is that many faiths are misused for evil in the world, whereas most of it actually is overwhelmingly used for good, that is the understanding mission of religion, in my understanding, that it is for good in the world, but much of it is misused for evil. the ai will not
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understand the moral differences between good and evil so it can only between good and evil so it can only be an accessory, at best. dr between good and evil so it can only be an accessory, at best.— be an accessory, at best. dr usama hasan, thank _ be an accessory, at best. dr usama hasan, thank you _ be an accessory, at best. dr usama hasan, thank you very _ be an accessory, at best. dr usama hasan, thank you very much - be an accessory, at best. dr usama hasan, thank you very much for - hasan, thank you very much for joining us. a special service to mark the founding of northern ireland and the partition of ireland is being held this morning in armagh. the event has been organised by the catholic church and the three biggest protestant denominations. the queen had to withdraw yesterday on medical advice, but the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, is due to attend. let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page. what is this going to involve, exactly? it what is this going to involve, exactl ? . , , , what is this going to involve, exactl ? ., , , , _ exactly? it has been billed by the church leaders _ exactly? it has been billed by the church leaders as _ exactly? it has been billed by the church leaders as a _ exactly? it has been billed by the church leaders as a service - exactly? it has been billed by the church leaders as a service of- exactly? it has been billed by the l church leaders as a service of hope and reflection, the centenary of the founding of northern ireland, the partition of the island of ireland, it is seen in different ways by different people on different sides of the community here in northern ireland. forthe
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of the community here in northern ireland. for the unionists it is the anniversary of the state they cherish, and two irish nationalists, it is the anniversary of partition, which to them is the source of much injustice. i'm talking to you, i see the prime minister borisjohnson has just arrived, he is speaking to the schoolchildren and their teachers here on the hill beside the outlook and cathedral here in armagh, which is the ecclesiastical capital of the whole island of ireland, actually, so, prime minister is here. the queen was due to attend, but she had to withdraw on medical advice, so, borisjohnson representing the boris johnson representing the government, borisjohnson representing the government, also representatives of the dublin government here, the irish foreign minister simon coveney and the government chief whipjack chambers. there was some controversy in the run—up to this service, the irish president, the queen's counterpart, declined his invitation, he said that this event wasn't politically neutral enough.
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so, the church leaders who have organised this service have expressed sadness about that, they say they are saddened by the polarised political commentary around this event. president higgins was criticised for deciding not to come, but they stressed that they hope today will be an opportunity to reflect on the last 100 years in this part of the world, in terms of the conflict, the great pain that many have suffered, but also the peace process and the priceless nurse of the peace which is now enjoyed by so many in northern ireland. , ., ., . ireland. yes, we are watching those ictures ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with _ ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with you — ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with you now. _ ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with you now. tell - ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with you now. tell us - ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with you now. tell us a - ireland. yes, we are watching those pictures with you now. tell us a bit l pictures with you now. tell us a bit more about how controversial this service might be.— more about how controversial this service might be. well, anybody any sort of event — service might be. well, anybody any sort of event to _ service might be. well, anybody any sort of event to focus _ service might be. well, anybody any sort of event to focus on _ service might be. well, anybody any sort of event to focus on the - sort of event to focus on the centenary is going to be walking something of a tight rope. in 1921, most of the island of ireland became in essence independent from britain.
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the 26 counties became the irish free state, which then became the republic of ireland, but six counties remained in the uk is northern ireland, so, as regards to the way people see history, it very much depends on their political leanings. to unionists it is an important anniversary, something to celebrate. to nationalists, it is not something to celebrate, it is something more to remember perhaps, something more to remember perhaps, something for them they would say to reflect on the damage that the partition of the island has done over the last 100 years. there is also the contact of all of this, there has been more reflection and contemplation on the fact that the peace process has by and large, 23 years after the good friday agreement that ended by and large 30 years of conflict that were known as the troubles, and there for there is something to build on, that northern ireland has come a very long way over the last 2.5 decades. so, while
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there is controversy and while there is political agreement about what the centenary in northern ireland means, how it should be marked and some of that political controversy has been together loud in the run—up to this service. certainly everybody involved is very much hoping that this morning, the event will go successfully and it will be a chance for people to mark this anniversary in whatever way they choose, that will be contravening to a process of reconciliation rather than generating more division. chris pace, generating more division. chris page. our _ generating more division. chris page, our northern _ generating more division. chris page, our northern ireland correspondent, thank you very much for that. correspondent, thank you very much forthat. now correspondent, thank you very much for that. now it is time for a look at the weather with carol. it is much colder than it was yesterday and we have got a strong wind. behind this weather front, cold air is coming in and we have gota cold air is coming in and we have got a brisk north—westerly wind. the cold will feel really accentuated by the blue, pushing away the yellow
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which some of us had in the south earlier this morning. the weather front is continuing to drift away taking the rain with it. will be a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. 0n the breast north—westerlies there will be a lot of showers coming in. the black circles represent the strength of the wind gusts. and we are looking at gales down the north sea coastline, where, with the spring tides, there could be some overtopping. temperatures really tempered by the winds so it will feel cooler than these temperatures suggest. tonight there will be some clear skies but still a lot of showers coming in on the wind. some of them getting over towards these. it will be a cold night and in some sheltered eastern areas there could be a touch of frost. but for most there will not be any issues with frost because it will be too windy. tomorrow we have high pressure building in, it will not be as windy and we have also got another front coming down the east coast. that means there will be more cloud around tomorrow than today. there will be some sunshine as well. till
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a few showers coming in, temperatures 8—14 but not feeling as cold because the wind won't be as strong. 0n cold because the wind won't be as strong. on saturday you can see the high pressure gradually being pushed out of the way on friday, and then on saturday, the next clutch of fronts, our way which will introduce milder air. that will introduce some rain as well. on saturday, you can see a lot of cloud, some sunshine, some patchy like rain or drizzle in some patchy like rain or drizzle in some western coasts and hills before the next rain comes in. but we will have south—westerlies on saturday as opposed to the north—westerlies we are looking at at the moment that is are looking at at the moment that is a milder direction. 0vernight saturday to sunday, the front pushes to the not much on it bar a band of cloud there showers. you can see more showers coming into the west.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: the government is accused of being �*wilfully negligent�* by doctors�* union the bma for not imposing coronavirus rules. labour says the health secretary is being complacent, but ministers say further measures aren�*t needed. we have ambulances backed up outside hospitals, patients waiting hours upon hours in a&e, nhs staff exhausted. we upon hours in a&e, nhs staff exhausted-— upon hours in a&e, nhs staff exhausted. ~ ., �* , ., exhausted. we don't believe that even though _ exhausted. we don't believe that even though the _ exhausted. we don't believe that even though the nhs _ exhausted. we don't believe that even though the nhs is - exhausted. we don't believe that even though the nhs is under- exhausted. we don't believe thatl even though the nhs is under real pressure. — even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter, but it_ pressure, it always is in winter, but it is— pressure, it always is in winter, but it is physically now that it is under— but it is physically now that it is under sustainable pressure and that is now— under sustainable pressure and that is now the _ under sustainable pressure and that is now the moment. the bbc has obtained documents showing some countries asking the united nations to play down
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the need to move away from using fossil fuels to tackle climate change as police assess the scale of the problem of women being spiked with needles in nightclubs, one force is investigating 12 reports injust the last three weeks. police searching for brian laundrie, the fiance of murdered american blogger, gabby petito, have found what appear to be human remains in a park in florida. and coming up, after scoring the dreaded "nul points" last year, the team behind dua lipa will now select next year�*s eurovision entry. pressure is growing on the government to re—impose some covid restrictions in england, amid a surge in cases. it comes as the british medical association has accused ministers
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of being "wilfully negligent". it says measures such as compulsory face coverings and social distancing should be brought back now, to protect the nhs as we head into the winter months. daily uk infections have been above 40,000 for eight days in a row. the health secretary has warned daily cases could soon rise to 100,000. speaking this morning, health minister edward argar acknowledged that the nhs is under pressure, but said he believed that it is "not unsustainable" and that now is not the time to re—impose additional measures. in the past hour, the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth, says the government�*s current plans are failing, and the vaccination programme is stalling. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake has this report. the nhs under pressure. staff and resources always strained as winter approaches, but as covid admissions rise, doctors warn it could become unbearable. the government should be making sure
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that the public are expected and required to follow simple infection control measures, such as the wearing of masks in indoor public settings, including public transport. now is the time to act. we have enough evidence that this a trajectory heading in the wrong direction. yesterday, the health secretary acknowledged things would get worse. 100,000 cases per day, he warned. and unless people took precautions, ministers would have to act. am i saying that if we don�*t do our bit, get vaccinated, you know, all of those behavioural changes that we can make, that we are more likely to face restrictions as we head into winter, then i am saying that. i think we have been really clear that we�*ve all got a role to play. for now, the government is holding firm and says it�*s not yet time to take further measures. moving to the government�*s plan b in england would make face coverings mandatory in some settings.
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people would be asked to work from home, and vaccine passports introduced. in northern ireland, face coverings remain a legal requirement in crowded indoor spaces. it�*s the same for masks in wales, where proof of vaccination is needed in nightclubs and people are asked to work from home. scotland�*s strategy similarly includes vaccine passports and face masks are required in schools and some other settings. for now, the focus at westminster is urging those not yet vaccinated to come forward, and getting booster jabs to those eligible. but doctors say it�*s wilfully negligent of ministers not to take further steps, and pressure on the health service is likely only to increase in the coming weeks. jonathan blake, bbc news. let�*s talk to our political correspondent, peter saull. a lot of people asking what is the
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government�*s strategy now? well. government's strategy now? well, at the moment — government's strategy now? well, at the moment it's _ government's strategy now? well, at the moment it's not _ government's strategy now? well, at the moment it's not introducing - the moment it�*s not introducing extra restrictions on our lives. yes, they are under pressure, some really quite strident language there from people within the nhs, the british medical association most notably, but we heard from sajid javid last night, the health secretary, and the first downing street press conference in five weeks, and itjust goes to show how seriously they are now considering this that they felt the need to do that yesterday, but for now it is more about advising us to act cautiously to wear face masks, as we are being told to regularly in enclosed public spaces, to perhaps think about taking natural flow test before going to parties, but as yet they are not going to move to what has been termed in the past as the government�*s plan b of mandating some of those measures, saying that you must by law where a face covering in certain scenarios, and also introducing maxim passports, covert certificates, to get into
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large crowded venues, but as you imagine it is the large topic here in the house of commons, as the labour shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth. isn’t labour shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth.— jonathan ashworth. isn't it the truth is that _ jonathan ashworth. isn't it the truth is that it _ jonathan ashworth. isn't it the truth is that it is _ jonathan ashworth. isn't it the truth is that it is stalling? - jonathan ashworth. isn't it the l truth is that it is stalling? many people — truth is that it is stalling? many people haven't even been invited for a booster— people haven't even been invited for a boosterjab, and on current trends you want— a boosterjab, and on current trends you want complete the booster programme until march 2022. instead of doing _ programme until march 2022. instead of doing hundred and 65,000 jobs a day, will— of doing hundred and 65,000 jobs a day, will the minister that a commitment to do 500 jobs a day and -et commitment to do 500 jobs a day and get this— commitment to do 500 jobs a day and get this programme complete by christmas? 50, get this programme complete by christmas? ., �* , get this programme complete by christmas?— christmas? so, labour's shadow health secretary _ christmas? so, labour's shadow health secretary there _ christmas? so, labour's shadow health secretary there saying i christmas? so, labour's shadow| health secretary there saying the government should stop vacillating and start vaccinating, clearly a concern that the booster programme isn�*t happening quickly enough, and for example not enough teenagers have had their dose of the vaccine. it was up to their minister to
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defend the government this morning. we are seeing infections rise, and we are _ we are seeing infections rise, and we are seeing hospitalisations and deaths _ we are seeing hospitalisations and deaths rise, but the much lower rate _ deaths rise, but the much lower rate we — deaths rise, but the much lower rate. we don't believe that though the nhs _ rate. we don't believe that though the nhs is under pressure, it always is in winter— the nhs is under pressure, it always is in winterand the nhs is under pressure, it always is in winter and it is now, that it is in winter and it is now, that it is under— is in winter and it is now, that it is under unsustainable pressure and that now— is under unsustainable pressure and that now was not the right moment to look to— that now was not the right moment to look to trigger plan b. | that now was not the right moment to look to trigger plan b.— look to trigger plan b. i think the key phrase _ look to trigger plan b. i think the key phrase there _ look to trigger plan b. i think the key phrase there is _ key phrase there is unsustainable pressure. the governor was asked what constituted unsustainable, as far as people in the medical profession are concerned, we have already reached that point. there�*s also questions about whether they can bring forward the date at which people can get their boosterjab, currently they have to wait six months to get the third, the chair of the commons health committee said that we should look at that again, perhaps bring that forward, because of concerns about people losing their immunity against the virus,
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that might be the reason when hospitalisations are starting to creep up at the moment. it certainly for the moment the government is holding firm, same example on the boosterjab its shoe that is the job of the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. what they are not considering is the idea of plan c, which appeared in a newspaper report this morning, about household mixing. that is according to the government totally untrue. for the moment, thank you very much. stephen reicher is professor of psychology at st andrews and participates in the sage sub—committee advising on behavioural science. thank you very much forjoining us. how clear to you is the government�*s strategy? 0n the one hand they are saying that we don�*t need to reintroduce restrictions that we have had in the past, while we have the health secretary warning we could be facing 100,000 infections a day. could be facing 100,000 infections a da . �* ., could be facing 100,000 infections a da . �* ~ ., �*, ., could be facing 100,000 infections a da. ~ , day. and i think that's a very dangerous — day. and i think that's a very dangerous message - day. and i think that's a very dangerous message to - day. and i think that's a very dangerous message to send| day. and i think that's a very - dangerous message to send out, because i think if you say to people
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we might have 100,000 infections a day, but that isn�*t cause for alarm, you are saying to people that infections don�*t matter, and if infections don�*t matter, and if infections don�*t matter, why should people get vaccinated, why should they be careful and so on? it�*s a very dangerous form of messaging which implicitly, at least, indicates that infections don�*t matter, and getting on top of this pandemic relies on getting it across that they do matter. many thousands of people are in hospital, we have five planeloads, 1000 people, dying each week, and that�*s before we factor in things like long covid and children missing school at the moment, so i think it�*s important to send out a clear message which is infections do matter. to send out a clear message which is infections do matter.— infections do matter. to what extent, then, _ infections do matter. to what extent, then, do _ infections do matter. to what extent, then, do you - infections do matter. to what. extent, then, do you restrictions need to be brought back in and made mandatory? need to be brought back in and made mandato ? ~ ._
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need to be brought back in and made mandato ? ~ mandatory? well, if! may say so, i think your — mandatory? well, if! may say so, i think your question _ mandatory? well, if! may say so, i think your question exemplifies - think your question exemplifies the problem. because when we talk about covid measures, we ten, the government as well, talk about restrictions, and then they tend to be talked about in terms of lockdown is, so the business secretary suggested we don�*t want locked out. actually, we don�*t look down and we don�*t need restrictions. what we need our protections. we need is the government to bring income of instance, more protections and ensuring protections in pubs and bars being ventilated so that we don�*t get infected. we knew protections being able to work at home if we can so we don�*t need to work out in the office and getting affected. the danger is that what the government is doing is suggesting that any covid measures are taking away their freedom of choice. actually, ithink are taking away their freedom of choice. actually, i think we could have a strategy which is based on protections and supports which gives
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people more choice, it gives them the choice to stay at home, given the choice to stay at home, given the choice to go into spaces knowing they are safe, given the choice of safe isolates. it vaccination is very important, but they need to be supplemented by protections and support so we can get on top of things, and the danger is not that at the moment people are calling for lockdown in any form, what people are calling for at the moment is protections, and the danger is, if we don�*t have protectors now in the short term, things are run so far out of control that we will need restrictions on looked on in the future. that is what happened last year. the government ignored sage in various voices saying act now, the left it so late that we had a non—christmas and a miserable winter. we don�*t want that to happen again, so we need protections now to make sure that we don�*t have restrictions and lockdown later. your point is noted, i will think
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about my language differently. serra; about my language differently. sorry about my language differently. sorry about that! no, _ about my language differently. sorry about that! no, you're _ about my language differently. sorry about that! no, you're right, - about my language differently. sorry about that! no, you're right, it's - about that! no, you're right, it's about that! no, you're right, it's about how _ about that! no, you're right, it's about how you — about that! no, you're right, it's about how you frame _ about that! no, you're right, it's about how you frame it. - about that! no, you're right, it's about how you frame it. finally, | about how you frame it. finally, before we let you go, until the government changes its tack, it�*s down to personal responsibility, is it? what do you think we should be doing? different people have a different view on what they need to be doing. you gonna train and some people choose to wear a mask and some don�*t. the people choose to wear a mask and some don't-— some don't. the first point that i would make _ some don't. the first point that i would make is _ some don't. the first point that i would make is that _ some don't. the first point that i would make is that yes - some don't. the first point that i would make is that yes people . some don't. the first point that i i would make is that yes people need to be responsible to do the right things, but if we say ventilate you can�*t ventilate if you people going to spaces that don�*t open. we need support so we can do the right thing. the second thing is, when it comes to masks, the problems throughout this pandemic has been that my choices impact upon you. if i choose not to wear a mask makes it
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dangerous for you, especially if you�*re a vulnerable person, to go into that space, and that�*s what it�*s really important notjust for that person was my responsibility, but social responsibility, acting so the whole community can be safe in the whole community can be safe in the whole community can be safe in the whole community can participate. i don�*t want a society in which we open up in such a way that the vulnerable are forced to stay at home, and that�*s precisely why we need, i think, home, and that�*s precisely why we need, ithink, a mandate on home, and that�*s precisely why we need, i think, a mandate on mask wearing so that we make our public spaces say for everyone. the mark of the society, after all, is how we treat most vulnerable, and by not mandating masks, we are forcing most of the most vulnerable people to stay at home. wales�* health minister says further covid restrictions before christmas are "unlikely" at the moment. but eluned morgan pleaded with the welsh public to "play their part" in keeping the virus at bay. it comes after welsh nhs boss andrew goodall said the service is under the most intense pressure
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in its history. taking a look at the latest covid situation in wales, figures show there are around 624 cases per 100,000 people. face coverings are mandatory on public transport and in shops and restaurants. there are no social distancing requirements in most venues, but an nhs covid pass is required for entry to night clubs as well as many indoor and outdoor events. latvia has gone back into lockdown after recording 2,599 new covid cases and 24 deaths in the last 24 hour period. the rules will be in effect from today until the 15th of november — meaning all non—essential shops and schools will be shut, private household gatherings are banned, and all public events are suspended. there is also a strict curfew to prevent people leaving their homes between 8pm and 5am. russia has reported another record number of coronavirus—related death in the last 24 hours, with more than 1,000 people dying with the virus.
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the country also reported 36,300 new infections in the same period. on wednesday, the government approved a week—long workplace shutdown to cope with fast—rising cases. the kremlin has blamed the rising infection rate on a slow vaccination campaign. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi, from bridgend in south wales. the body of logan mwangi, also known as logan williamson, was discovered in the river 0gmore on july 31st after he was reported missing by his parents. his step—father was later arrested and charged with his murder. his mother was charged with perverting the course ofjustice. the 14—year—old boy, who cannot be named due to his age, will appear before magistrates in cardiff. the bbc has obtained documents that show countries, including saudi arabia, australia and japan, are asking the united nations to play down the need to move away from using fossilfuels like coal, gas and oil. it comes just ten days before world
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leaders gather in glasgow for crucial climate talks. 0ur climate editor justin rowlatt has more. the clock is ticking on tackling climate change. the science says, unless we start making dramatic cuts to emissions now, we risk very serious consequences. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years. terrible floods in india, while hot, dry weather has sparked vast fires in australia, as well as in brazil and in argentina. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show these are among countries pressuring the un to change its message on the options for tackling climate change. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn�*t need to reduce fossil fuel use as quickly as the un suggests. the saudis ask un scientists to delete a claim that the focus
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for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels. meanwhile, india warns it expects coal to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them on to the bbc. these un reports are pretty much the bible of climate science. they are used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. scientists who have helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on scientists to accept the comments. if comments are lobbying, if they are not justified by science, they will not be integrated in the ipcc reports. the leak comes days
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before a crucial climate conference begins in glasgow. it shows just how tricky the negotiations are likely to be. but don�*t give up hope just yet, says a veteran of countless international negotiations. people can see the effects of climate change. and the effects of climate change, by the way, on countries like india and china, are going to be dramatic. this is all about understanding that even though the challenge is immense, there really isn�*t an alternative to dealing with it. you�*ve got to go back and redouble your efforts, including with those people who still are holding out. they are putting the finishing touches to the huge conference facilities in glasgow. this leak shows just how tough the negotiations there are likely to be. we will discover at the conference whether, despite the lobbying, world leaders are willing to take the ambitious action needed to curb emissions.
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justin rowlatt, bbc news. joining me now isjennifer morgan, executive director of greenpeace international. thank you forjoining us. what is your view of this lobbying that these countries have been engaging in? i these countries have been engaging in? ., �* , , these countries have been engaging in? ~' �*, , ., , these countries have been engaging in? ~ �*, , in? i think it's 'ust really an insiaht in? i think it's 'ust really an insight into _ in? i think it'sjust really an insight into how _ in? i think it'sjust really an insight into how a - in? i think it'sjust really an insight into how a small- in? i think it'sjust really an i insight into how a small group in? i think it'sjust really an - insight into how a small group of coal, oiland insight into how a small group of coal, oil and meat producing countries are putting the profits of those industries in front of science and in front of the planet, and that is shocking, to be said. the and in front of the planet, and that is shocking, to be said.— is shocking, to be said. the united nations and _ is shocking, to be said. the united nations and other _ is shocking, to be said. the united nations and other scientists - is shocking, to be said. the united nations and other scientists who i nations and other scientists who know the facts behind climate change, they are not going to be swayed by that, are they? ida. change, they are not going to be swayed by that, are they?- swayed by that, are they? no, i think the scientists _ swayed by that, are they? no, i think the scientists are - swayed by that, are they? no, i think the scientists are indeed, | think the scientists are indeed, they will be swayed by that, they will look at what�*s in the literature, they will see the comments that coming, all the thousands of comments are consistent with a science or not, then they can accept them or reject them. i think
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what is shocking, or what needs to be seen is how the depths to which countries like australia and saudi arabia injapan will go to try and stop a focus on the phase—out of fossil fuels that is needed, and we also need to see this in the glasgow outcome, next week. haifa also need to see this in the glasgow outcome, next week.— outcome, next week. how does it chance outcome, next week. how does it change the _ outcome, next week. how does it change the likelihood _ outcome, next week. how does it change the likelihood of- outcome, next week. how does it change the likelihood of cop26 i outcome, next week. how does it change the likelihood of cop26 in j change the likelihood of cop26 in glasgow being successful, then, if we already know that this lobbying has been going on behind the scenes? well, my hope would be that it will really shine a light for other world leaders or about the depths to which these countries will go to try and stop progress and try and stop, for the small island nations, certainly, put their very existence into the question, and that will bond them together more in an outcome in glasgow that is consistent with science and that keeps the 1.5 degrees gold is the goal of the whole conference on site. horse
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degrees gold is the goal of the whole conference on site. how much ressure whole conference on site. how much pressure can — whole conference on site. how much pressure can certain _ whole conference on site. how much pressure can certain nations - whole conference on site. how much pressure can certain nations bring i pressure can certain nations bring to bear on those that have been lobbying? who is going to be the most powerful voice, do you think, to say to japan and saudi arabia and australia, look, you got this wrong? personally i think there are a couple of voices. i think one of the most vulnerable countries, because i think there is nothing like someone saying to you, what you are doing is threatening my very existence, but certainly the other big players like the united states, china, will have a say, i think, a the united states, china, will have a say, ithink, a big the united states, china, will have a say, i think, a big say in how things go forward and what view prevails. this is the science we are talking about, one would hope that they will keep that in the centre and the needs of this phase out those fossil fuels. you mention china, those fossil fuels. you mention china. how _ those fossil fuels. you mention china, how much _ those fossil fuels. you mention china, how much authority - those fossil fuels. you mention china, how much authority can | those fossil fuels. you mention - china, how much authority can china have when they have never said there will stop using coal imminently? they will keep using coal and building coal power stations to
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generate energy. i building coal power stations to generate energy.— building coal power stations to generate energy. i think, on china, we are all hoping _ generate energy. i think, on china, we are all hoping and _ generate energy. i think, on china, we are all hoping and waiting - generate energy. i think, on china, we are all hoping and waiting for i we are all hoping and waiting for further news from china on what they will do to reduce emissions further away from coal. they have committed to stop financing international projects and call, now we need to see them and other countries step up their domestic actions. it�*s in the national interest, and certainly would increase their credibility in the world stage. i would increase their credibility in the world stage.— the world stage. i optimistic are ou that the world stage. i optimistic are you that it _ the world stage. i optimistic are you that it isn't _ the world stage. i optimistic are you that it isn't too _ the world stage. i optimistic are you that it isn't too late? - the world stage. i optimistic are you that it isn't too late? i... i the world stage. i optimistic are l you that it isn't too late? i... ch, cosh, you that it isn't too late? i... oh, gosh. that's _ you that it isn't too late? i... oh, gosh. that's a _ you that it isn't too late? i... oh, gosh, that's a hard _ you that it isn't too late? i... oh, gosh, that's a hard one. - you that it isn't too late? i... oh, gosh, that's a hard one. i - you that it isn't too late? i... oh, gosh, that's a hard one. i am - gosh, that�*s a hard one. i am optimistic, i am a stubborn optimist, i would say, i think that every 10th of a degree matters, and i am hopeful because all the people around the world, the youth, indigenous, environmental, mums and p°p5 indigenous, environmental, mums and pops who are engaging, that gives me
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hope that is not too late but rather we need to keep fighting to keep every 10th of a degree in sight. jennifer morgan, executive director of greenpeace international, thank you forjoining us. the public inquiry into the manchester arena attack has been told the elder brother of the bomber has laughed in the face of the hearings, by leaving the uk after being ordered to attend. a lawyerfor the inquiry said ismail abedi s lawyers had submitted a "self—serving and disgraceful" statement that made clear he would not answer questions. he has refused to give evidence into the 2016 suicide attack in case he incriminates himself. the home secretary, priti patel, has asked police for an update on so—called "spiking", following a spate of reports of women being injected with drugs on nights out. nottinghamshire police have told us they�*ve had 12 reports injust the last three weeks. it comes as nearly 150,000 people have signed a petition calling keith on the government to make searches at bars and clubs mandatory. michael kill is from the night time
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industries association. he insists work is being done to tackle spiking. 0perators across the country have been working with police, local authorities, key stakeholders. their focus has been on safeguarding customers, particularly women at night, and they, without a doubt, have been escalating their front line protocols in terms of searching. yvette cooper is the chair of the home affairs select committee which has asked for urgent information from police forces on the scale of the problem and drink spiking more widely. she says it should not be the responsibility of the victim to stay safe and that venues and the police need to do more. these are very dangerous crimes. if someone is prepared to do this kind of thing to another person, to abuse somebody else�*s body in this way, they are very dangerous. so i think there has to be much more focus on identifying and stopping the perpetrators of these crimes, and that does mean nightclubs or venues of different kinds working much more closely with the police and with local groups and organisations to do that as well.
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so i think they can do more. i know there will be some venues who are taking this immensely seriously and working very hard to do this, but we know there are an awful lot more that don�*t and they aren�*t and they do need to do so. nottinghamshire police have told the bbc they�*ve had 12 reports of these kind of spiking cases in the last three weeks. fiona lamdin has been speaking to people affected by this growing problem. miranda�*s drink was spiked after a night out in leeds. after a few sips, she felt unwell and asked for help. it makes me feel deeply frightened because all i kept thinking that night when i was sort of going in and out of consciousness, i was feeling like i was going to die, you know? and sadly it wasn�*t taken seriously. but 40 miles away in sheffield, this bar certainly is. they already have anti—spiking measures in place. bars were aware of it but they didn't really want to shout about it, it was a negative connotation towards their night out
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and i think bars, like, were thinking, that's not good for business. i think there's been a shift in realising that if this isn't snuffed out and taken care of soon, then it could cause bigger problems down the line for the whole industry. spiking, whether it be putting drugs in people�*s drinks or injecting victims directly is all causing so much concern that here in bristol many people are boycotting pubs and clubs next wednesday, joining the national campaign, girls night in. all of my male friends in my social group all feel the same way and two of my best mates are both girls and two of them have been spiked and i feel very scared for them. you hear about it every day. you want people that you love and you like to be safe. it is a scary time. just in solidarity, i think all of us will be doing a strike. like alex�*s friend, alana. a third—year student
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at bristol university. three weeks ago, she was spiked on a night out. i basically got spiked at a nightclub in bristol. i only knew it happened, like, when i saw the videos of it. looking back on it, i could have predicted it happening. luckily i was with friends, like, so basically, looking back on it, this guy spiked me and the moment i told him, "i�*m with my boyfriend." so he asked me if i wanted to dance with him. the moment i was like, "i�*m with my boyfriend," he left me completely. an hour later, i went back home and it hit. i was completely paralysed. she was unable to move. her boyfriend filmed this footage, which she wanted us to broadcast. go to bed. ilana has since been back to talk to the club. what they could do, even putting lids on cups, like they do in takeaway coffee cups, just could prevent spiking so much. i feel like the fact
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they don�*t is just shocking. and it was a similar story for immy — a fourth—year student. i believe i have had my drink spiked. a lot of girls are really tentative to say that. what are you now doing to protect yourself? i am wearing a denim jacket because i've heard it is harder for the needles to pierce through the denim. aside from that, it'sjust kind of trying to be as wary as possible, looking out for female friends and making sure they get home safe, stuff like that, which has always been important to me. will it stop you going out? yeah, 100%, 100%. i'd rather stay in when i know i'm safe or do something _ at home with my friends. knowing no—one is going to do anything there. - do you know what i mean? it is notjust in england. in scotland, they are also joining next wednesday�*s boycott. we just genuinely believe that if security is not going to be taken seriously when it comes to women, especially with spiking in nightclubs, then we simply will not turn up and show we make up a large percentage of people who attend nightlife. without us, what are
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venues going to do? for weeks, many victims say they feel they�*ve been ignored. finally, the industry and the police seem to be listening. fiona lamdin, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather, with carol. if you haven�*t yet ventured out, it is a cold day with some brisk winds around. a lot of sunshine though, this morning�*s rain having pushed away. still strong winds down the north sea coastline, touching gale force at times, and there is also the risk of some overtopping with the combination of the spring tides. but a lot of sunshine, showers coming in on the brisk north—westerly wind. top temperatures today up to 15, but tempered by the wind it will feel colder than yesterday. tonight still some clear skies around but still a lot of showers coming in on that wind. still wintry on the tops of the hills and mountains. it�*s going to be a cold night, in fact cold enough in some sheltered eastern areas
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for a touch of frost. for most of us that won�*t be a problem because it is also going to be too windy. tomorrow the winds will slowly ease, a bit more cloud around tomorrow, still some sunshine, still a few showers coming in on the north—westerly, getting down towards the south—east. and temperatures up to 14. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... doctors�* union the bma accuses the government of being �*wilfully negligent�* for not re—introducing coronavirus restrictions — labour says the health secretary is being complacent, but ministers say plan b isn�*t needed yet... ambulances backed up outside hospitals, patients waiting hours upon hours in a&e, cancer operations cancelled and nhs staff exhausted. we don't believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter, but it is particularly now, that it is under
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unsustainable pressure. the bbc obtains documents showing some countries asking the un to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels to tackle climate change. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of five—year—old of five—year—old logan mwangi, whose body was found in a river in bridgend in south wales earlier this year. as police assess the scale of the problem of women being spiked with needles in nightclubs, one force is investigating 12 reports injust the last three weeks. the centenary of the partition of ireland and founding of northern ireland is being marked with a special church service, attended by the prime minister and politicans and communities from both sides of the border. and coming up, after scoring the dreaded nul pwah last year, the team behind dua lipa will now select next year�*s eurovision entry. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre.
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hello. good morning. cristiano ronaldo was the man of the hour in an iconic european fightback for manchester united. they came back from 2—0 down to win 3—2, with ronaldo getting the decisive winner against atalanta in the champions league. chelsea had a successful night too, but in a far easier match against malmo. but for united manager 0le gunner solskjaer, his star striker has relieved the pressure on him, asjoe wilson reports. it is another big european night... the manager may say he is impervious to negativity, but 0le gunner solskjaer is not made of norwegian wood. he knows the expectations at manchester united. he knows that when atalanta from italy found a way to goal so quickly it would increase the scrutiny on him. but he doesn�*t defend. he�*s not there to compete in the air when a corner comes in. yeah, this was happening. any ideas?
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this pass from bruno fernandes was perfect. now it was down to marcus rashford. he had to score. he did. hope was back. with all united�*s attacking stars, who do you want with this chance? harry maguire? 75th minute. still time. still someone. a story with all these turns and twists could only be complete with a ronaldo leap. old trafford shook with the rhythm of revival. genius, isn�*t he? he even was down inside his own six yard box and blocked towards the end, defending. you can see him sprinting. he did everything we said before he should be doing. leading a line and defending. and of course the goal is just what he does better than most. meanwhile, chelsea were in control in west london. 4—0 the final score against malmo.
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lukaku and werner limped off, but this result, no dramas. scotland could get through to the next round of the men�*s t20 world cup if they beat hosts 0man later today. scotland have two wins from two in the first round, having beaten papua new guinea after upsetting bangladesh. ireland face a winner takes all tie with namibia tomorrow after sri lanka beat them by 70 runs yesterday. joshua little was the last man to fall for the irish. it means sri lanka have qualified for the next stage of the competition, but ireland still have work to do. england captain eoin morgan�*s poor run of form continues as he admits he would consider dropping himself for the t20 world cup if his performances don�*t improve. despite victory over new zealand in their final warm—up match, morgan managed just 10 of england�*s innings of 163 for 6. they take on the west indies in their first match on saturday.
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staying with cricket, and opener dom sibley has withdrawn from the england lions squad for the tour of australia this winter. last week the 26—year—old was named in the 14—strong squad, which will shadow the main england ashes party. but england say "after much thought and consideration" warwickshire�*s sibley has decided to work on his batting at home in a bid to regain a place in the test team. yorkshire batter harry brook has been added to the lions squad. there are promising signs for paris 2024, as great britain s women have just claimed bronze in the sprint final at the track cycling world championships. lauren bate, sophie capewell, blaine ridge—davis and milly tanna all made their championship debut, beating japan in the bronze—medal final and coming home more than half a second clear. afterwards, davis said it was a dream come true. and just before we go, have a look at this.
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liverpool forward mohamed salah has unveiled a life—size waxwork of himself at madame tussauds in london. he was clearly very impressed with the waxwork, which the general public will be able to see from friday. salah has been in brillaint form this season so far, scoring 12 goals in 11 appearances. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. experts in the us state of florida are investigating whether suspected human remains, found in a park, belong to brian laundrie. he�*s the boyfriend of a young woman found murdered in the state of wyoming last month. gabby petito, who kept a travel blog and went missing weeks earlier while on a road trip with mr laundrie. aru na iyengar reports. a possible breakthrough on a florida nature reserve. police using sniffer dogs have been searching for brian laundrie, the fiance of gabby petito, whose body was discovered
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in wyoming in september. laundrie went home to florida after her disappearance, but went missing himself soon afterwards. his family say he went for a hike and never came back. earlier today, investigators found what appeared to be human remains and personal items, such as a backpack and notebook belonging to brian laundrie. these items were found in an area that, up until recently, had been underwater. the case has provoked widespread media interest. gabby petito�*s body lay in wilderness before she was found for over a month. police say she was strangled. mr laundrie has not been charged with any crime relating to the killing of gabby petito, but the fbi issued a federal arrest warrant and charged him with fraudulently using her debit card after her death. the couple had packed their lives into a camper van for a cross—country adventure, starting injuly. they documented theirjourney in a stream of social media
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posts, but life was not sunny under the surface. this video emerged as the couple travelled through the state of utah. two people came to us and told us that they saw him hit you. they were interviewed, but no further action was taken. she sobs ms petito was crying, talking to officers about her mental health. the murder has triggered a debate about domestic violence, over the amount of attention accorded to white women compared to other missing persons. in addition, whilst the two separate searches for the pair were going on, other bodies of missing people were found. the fbi says investigations in florida are likely to continue for several days. aruna iyengar, bbc news. new research for the bbc has highlighted the mental health anguish of people living with obesity. a survey by ipsos mori found that among adults who responded saying they were obese, almost half reported poor mental health.
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many described negative emotions such as shame, embarrassment and despair when they look in the mirror. jeremy cooke reports. i feel weak. i feel like a failure because i can�*t lose weight. that�*s it. good girl. alex is a successful, professional women. mother of two, happily married, comfortable. come on then. this way. life should be good but today�*s survey found of the adults who responded saying they are obese, almost half reported that their mental health is bad. for me i think it was the cycle of mental health, overweight, mental health. and then it feeds. because you�*re overweight, and you�*ve tried so hard to not be and you can�*t change that no matter what you do, you then have the issues of self—esteem that then takes its toll on your mental health. good girl, come here. there is growing
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scientific evidence that for those living with serious chronic obesity, the eat less, move more mantra of weight loss is way too simplistic. it may work for many of us but not for those whose genetics and physiology are preprogrammed for weight gain. they are set to fail and they live with the harsh judgment of society. you�*re waking up every single day going, you are not normal, you are too fat, you should be able to do something about this. they told you if you eat well, they told you if you exercise, if you live a healthy life you can lose weight. when that doesn�*t happen, you can think, why? what have i done wrong? you blame yourself. today�*s exclusive survey for the bbc also shows that about half of those who said they are living with obesity describe negative emotions, such as embarrassment, self—consciousness and shame when they looked in the mirror. i think obesity and mental health issues are very closely linked.
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many people experienced difficulties with anxiety, depression, social anxiety. one of the really significant aspects of this is stigma that people experience on a day—to—day basis because of their obesity, so lots of experiences of being highly self—critical to themselves, and deeply ashamed of their bodies as well. right, watering can. i�*ve got some great support around me. my husband is fantastic. i think that one might have had it. alex is lucky in so many ways but for her, for so many others, living with obesity can bring low self—esteem, even to a life surrounded by love and marked by professional achievement. it doesn�*t make that voice go away. that�*s the thing with mental health. you can logically look at your life, you can logically go, i�*ve done this, i�*ve achieved this, i�*m great at this but that�*s irrelevant. you know? there�*s something in my head saying to me, doesn�*t matter, you�*re still fat, you can�*t lose
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weight, you�*re a failure. it�*s soul destroying. does it cast a shadow over everything? yeah, absolutely everything i do. do you feeljudged? yep, absolutely. notjust by other people but by myself. those locked in daily battle with their obesity know that it�*s hard — often a lifelong struggle. modern medical advances, surgery and drugs can help but what alex wants is a shift in mindset, to feel lessjudged. i think ijust need some kindness. i need kindness from others but i mostly need kindness from myself. i think that could be the help i need. jeremy cooke, bbc news. now, who can forget the agony of the united kingdom�*s eurovision entry last year when james newman�*s song embers — was the only act to end the night with nul points. no uk entry has made the top 10 since jade ewen in 2009,
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but it�*s hoped the team behind pop stars like dua lipa and lana del rey can change that, as steve holden reports. # out of the embers. # you and i gonna light up the room. # going to light up the room. # out of the embers, there�*s a fire... and the united kingdom, zero points. james newman received the dreaded "nul points" at this year�*s contest in rotterdam. # it�*s bigger than everything we see, yeah... it was the uk�*s second last—placed finish in a row, after michael rice also came bottom in the previous event, in 2019. and if we�*re honest, british results this entire millennium haven�*t been great. duo gemini kickstarted the miserable run back in 2003, their song crybaby ended with a big fat zero. # cry, cry baby.
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# shine a light in every corner of the world... you have to go back to 1997 to find the uk�*s last eurovision winner, katrina and the waves, with love shine a light. but a lot has changed since then. 183 million people watched this year�*s event. eurovision is now a huge, slick affair with many countries sending their biggest acts, and the performance matters as much as the song. to try to find success once again, the bbc are looking to the team behind two of the uk�*s biggest pop stars, dua lipa and ellie goulding. both singers, who have dozens of hit songs between them, are managed by tap music. the company is coming on board to find the act who will represent the uk at next year�*s eurovision and the song they�*ll sing. the bbc says it wants tap�*s experience managing world—class artists
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and finding international hits. the last thing it wants is another rock bottom result. and it can be worth the effort. just look at the winners of this year�*s contest. italian rock band maneskin have gone on to top global streaming charts. to many countries, the uk has one of the most vibrant and successful music scenes in the world, and british eurovision fans are hoping there is a winner out there somewhere. steve holden, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the british medical association says the government is being �*wilfully negligent�* by not bringing in stronger coronavirus prevention measures in the face of rising rates of infection. the bbc obtains documents showing some countries want to play down the dangers of fossil fuels,
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and others questioning how much richer countries should pay to help tackle climate change. the world health organization says it believes the coronavirus pandemic will go on for a year longer than it needs to because of the unequal distribution of vaccines. a special service to mark the founding of northern ireland, and the partition of ireland is being held this morning in armagh. the event has been organised by the catholic church and the three biggest protestant denominations. the queen had to withdraw yesterday on medical advice, but the uk prime minister, borisjohnson is there. the anniversary has been controversial, which isn t surprising, given northern ireland s still recovering from a long conflict. some people, but just some people, butjust the queen, notable by their absence. yes.
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notable by their absence. yes, that's right- — notable by their absence. yes, that's right. this _ notable by their absence. yes, that's right. this is _ notable by their absence. yes, that's right. this is probably i notable by their absence. yes that's right. this is probably the that�*s right. this is probably the biggest event of the year focusing on the centenary of the founding of northern ireland and the partition of the island of ireland. boris johnson is here, the dublin government represented by the foreign minister and the chief whip. the first minister of northern ireland also attending the service in the anglican cathedral in armagh. but one person who is not here, the irish president, he turned down his invitation because he said this event was insufficiently politically neutral. that is a sign of the controversy for millions over the centenary two unionists. this is the hundredth anniversary of the state they cherish. the nationalists, it is a century of partition and a source of great injustice. the anniversary has brought some fresh reflections ofjust how far northern ireland has come and change during the peace process. i�*ve been hearing from a number of people.
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failure to dream, just because a dream fail. we are trapped in history, the future not unveiled. rouse up yourself, belfast, wake up... new voices are giving expression to hope and history here. ..this is a small tale told with all fail. true titanic... raquel is from jamaica, but she�*s lived in northern ireland for 18 years, one of an increasing number of people from diverse backgrounds who bring distinctive perspectives. true titanic. i�*m conscious of it being a very welcoming place as well as it being a place where people will give you so much and no more. having said that, i do call northern ireland home. i don�*t know if northern ireland called me one of its own yet. i still hear the word blow—in from time to time! for most of the last century there was this cultural - diversity, but more cultural clashes.
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the boundaries of identity are still sharp, but they are being softened. linda irvine runs an irish language school in a strongly unionist part of east belfast. some argue the language is a political tool of irish nationalism, but linda passionately believes her work enhances her british identity. hello, linda. she is taking part in the centenary service. linda, the service on thursday. big moment for you. yeah. it�*s an exciting moment and it�*s been lovely to be asked. it never struck me until i was a certain age that it wasn�*t northern ireland when my grandparents were born, it became northern ireland within their lifetime,
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and must have been a very strange thing for them. what do you think of the fact that we�*ve seen this new appreciation, this new sharing, if you like, of cultures in northern ireland? how important will that be in the future? i think the fact that we can have an irish language centre here in east belfast is a very important symbol of how our society has changed. that we are more tolerant, we are a more understanding society. many significant changes happen slowly. hello. nice to see you. emma d�*souza fought a lengthy court case, essentially over her right to irish citizenship. for me it was about ensuring that my own identity as an irish citizen was respected and upheld, but also ensuring that everyone else had that same right. what would your hopes and concerns be with the future of this part of the world? invariably, i think we are living through a time of constitutional change and i think that the future of northern ireland is something that may be transformed within the next one or two decades. in terms of concerns, my concerns are the perpetuation of dogmatic and tribalistic politics.
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in northern ireland, identity shapes aspirations. divisions are being challenged and different is being more valued. ..to learn from all failure, true titanic. here in our mother church leaders who organise the service which is currently taking place in st patrick�*s cathedral have hope that the people taking part will reflect the people taking part will reflect the sort of society northern ireland thatis the sort of society northern ireland that is increasingly diverse. a society that is enjoying a level of peace that was unthinkable even a quarter of a century ago. whatever? the political leaders are sitting in the political leaders are sitting in the hearing contributions from lots of different perspectives. perhaps
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some of the words which will have hit home that ijust have come from young people, schoolchildren who have been having their say and just to give you a sense of that, lucy said that her hope was that the diverse batch of cultures will continue to grow in mutual respect and understanding. a14—year—old said we need courageous leaders who can offer young people like me a hopeful vision of the future. andrea andrews said i hope this land will be a place where everyone, no matter any differences, can flourish. place where everyone, no matter any differences, canflourish. so place where everyone, no matter any differences, can flourish. so this service has been about reflecting on has very often been a very painful past in northern ireland, but also the ongoing process of reconciliation that everybody agrees must continue, that challenge must be met in orderfor the for must continue, that challenge must be met in order for the for the young people to enjoy the future that they have said so passionately they want.
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the world health organisation has told the bbc it believes the coronavirus pandemic will go on for a year longer than it needs to because of the unequal distribution of vaccines. it comes as a group of charities have criticised the uk and canada for themselves using doses from covax, the global programme, to ensure vaccines are distributed fairly. meanwhile, 0xfam is issuing a report criticising pharmaceutical companies and rich nations for delivering just one in seven of the doses promised for developing countries. naomi grimley reports. it�*s the question we all keep asking — when will this pandemic end? not as soon as it could, is the answer from the world health organization, because of uneven vaccine distribution across the world. there have been plenty of summits about vaccine donations to poorer countries, but the exasperation of who officials is clear to see. we need a stock—take. the g20 will meet at the end of october.
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we need them to say, where are we against those commitments? and i can tell you today, they�*re not on track. you need to really speed it up. or, you know what, this pandemic is going to go on for a year longer than it needs to. covax was the international programme set up to ensure all countries, both rich and poor, could get enough vaccines to cover at least 20% of the population. but it hasn�*t worked out as planned. the vast majority of vaccine doses administered have been in richer countries. africa especially has been left behind. a new analysis from a group of charities called the people�*s vaccine alliance shows the huge gap between what the world�*s richest countries have promised to give the poorest versus the number of doses delivered so far. the uk and canada have been singled out for particular criticism as both countries acquired some vaccines from covax for their own populations, even though they have their own supplies.
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0n the one hand, every country that joined the covax facility was entitled to obtain vaccines, but these two countries obtained many, many doses through bilateral agreements that could best be characterised as hoarding. so, the idea then that they would double—dip and take more vaccines from the covax initiative really is morally indefensible. the uk stressed it helped kickstart covax and was one of its most generous financial supporters. the canadian government told us it has now stopped procuring vaccines from covax. as it became clear that the supply that we had secured through our bilateral deals with different companies like astrazeneca, pfizer and moderna would be sufficient for the canadian population, we then pivoted the doses that we had procured from covax to be donated back to covax so that they could be redistributed to developing countries that needed those doses.
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the latest warning from the world health organization is that the pandemic will continue into 2022. it is urging pharmaceutical companies and wealthy nations to make sure low—income countries are now prioritised in the queue for life—saving vaccines. naomi grimley, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. it�*s much colder today than it was yesterday, plus we�*ve got a strong wind. you can see that weather front here, the cold front moving away. behind it, cold air is following on and we�*ve got a brisk north—westerly wind. the cold will feel really accentuated here by the blues, pushing away the milder yellows that some of us had in the south earlier this morning. here we have got the weather front continuing to drift away, taking its rain with it, there will be a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine.
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but on these brisk north—westerly winds we are going to see a lot of showers coming in as well. black circles represent the strength of the wind gusts and we are looking at gales down the north sea coastline where, with the spring tides, there could be some overtopping. temperatures, 7 to 15 celsius. really tempered by the wind, so it will feel cooler than those temperatures suggest. tonight, once again, there will be some clear skies, but still a lot of showers coming in on the wind. some of them getting over towards the east. it�*s going to be a cold night and in some sheltered eastern areas we could well see a touch of frost. but for most there won�*t be any issues with frost because it will be too windy. tomorrow, we have got this ridge of high pressure building in. look at the isobars. they open out. it is not going to be as windy and we�*ve also got another front coming down the east coast. so translated, that means there will be more cloud around tomorrow than today. there will be some sunshine as well. still some showers coming in. temperatures, 8 to 14 celsius, but not feeling as cold because the wind won�*t be as strong. heading on into saturday,
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you can see the high pressure gradually being pushed out of their way during friday and then as we head into saturday this next clutch of fronts come our way and that is going to introduce milderair, notjust on saturday but also on sunday. but it is also going to introduce some rain as well. if we look first of all at saturday, you can see a lot of cloud, some bright outbreaks, some sunshine, some patchy light rain or drizzle in some western coasts and hills before the next system comes in, bringing in some rain. but we will have south—westerly winds on saturday, as opposed to the north—westerly winds we are looking at at the moment. that is a milder direction for us, with highs of up to 15. 0vernight saturday into sunday, our front pushes to the east. this is the dregs of it here. not much on it bar a band of cloud with some showers. we can see more showers packing into the west. top temperatures of 16.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the british medical association accuses the government of being �*wilfully negligent�* for not re—introducing coronavirus restrictions — labour says the health secretary is being complacent, but ministers say plan b isn�*t needed yet. we have ambulances backed up outside hospitals, patients waiting hours upon hours in a&e, nhs staff exhausted. we don't believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure and that now is not a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder the bbc obtains documents showing some countries asking the un to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels to tackle climate change. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder
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of five—year—old logan mwangi — whose body was found in a river in bridgend in south wales earlier this year. labour has called on the government to speed up its coronavirus vaccine booster programme — claiming the "wall of defence is crumbling". new cases have been above 40,000 for eight consecutive days and the british medical association is accusing ministers of being "wilfully negligent". it says measures such as compulsory face coverings and social distancing should be brought back now, to protect the nhs as we head into the winter months.
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daily uk infections have been above 40,000 for eight days in a row. the health secretary has warned daily cases could soon rise to 100,000. speaking this morning, health minister edward argar acknowledged that the nhs is under pressure, but said he believed that it is "not unsustainable" and that now is not the time to re—impose additional measures. the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth, says the government�*s current plans are failing, and the vaccination programme is stalling. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake has this report. the nhs under pressure. staff and resources always strained as winter approaches, but as covid admissions rise, doctors warn it could become unbearable. the government should be making sure that the public are expected and required to follow simple infection control measures, such as the wearing of masks in indoor public settings, including public transport. now is the time to act. we have enough evidence that this a trajectory heading in the wrong direction.
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yesterday, the health secretary acknowledged things would get worse. 100,000 cases per day, he warned. and unless people took precautions, ministers would have to act. am i saying that if we don�*t do our bit, get vaccinated, you know, all of those behavioural changes that we can make, that we are more likely to face restrictions as we head into winter, then i am saying that. i think we have been really clear that we�*ve all got a role to play. for now, the government is holding firm and says it�*s not yet time to take further measures. moving to the government�*s plan b in england would make face coverings mandatory in some settings. people would be asked to work from home, and vaccine passports introduced. in northern ireland, face coverings remain a legal requirement in crowded indoor spaces. it�*s the same for masks in wales, where proof of vaccination is needed in nightclubs and people are asked to work from home. scotland�*s strategy similarly includes vaccine passports and face
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masks are required in schools and some other settings. for now, the focus at westminster is urging those not yet vaccinated to come forward, and getting booster jabs to those eligible. but doctors say it�*s wilfully negligent of ministers not to take further steps, and pressure on the health service is likely only to increase in the coming weeks. jonathan blake, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent peter saull explained what the government�*s plan is to deal with rising case numbers and hospitalisations. at the moment it�*s not introducing extra restrictions on our lives. yes, they are under pressure, some really quite strident language there from people within the nhs, the british medical association most notably, but we heard from sajid javid last night, the health secretary, at the first downing street press conference in five weeks, and itjust goes to show how seriously they are now
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considering this that they felt the need to do that yesterday, but for now it is more about advising us to act cautiously to wear face masks, as we are being told to regularly in enclosed public spaces, to perhaps think about taking lateral flow test before going to parties, but as yet they are not going to move to what has been termed in the past as the government�*s plan b of mandating some of those measures, saying that you must by law wear a face covering in certain scenarios, and also introducing vaccine passports, covid certificates, to get into large crowded venues, but as you imagine it�*s the main topic of conversation here in westminster today, and there�*s been an urgent question in the house of commons, asked by labour�*s shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth. isn't it the truth that we are in this situation because the vaccination programme is now stalling? ministers can't blame the public when 2 million people haven't even been invited for a boosterjab,
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and on current trends we won't complete the booster programme until march 2022. instead ofjust doing 165,000 jabs a day, will the minister set a commitment to do 500,000 jabs a day and get this programme complete by christmas? so, labour�*s shadow health secretary there going on to say the government should stop vacillating and start vaccinating, clearly a concern that the booster programme isn�*t happening quickly enough, and for example not enough teenagers have had their first dose of the covid vaccine. it was up to the health minister edward argar to defend the government this morning. we are seeing infections rising. you saw what the secretary of state said yesterday. and we are seeing hospitalisations and deaths are rising. but at a much lower rate. we don't believe that, even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure and that now is not the right moment to look
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to trigger plan b. i think the key phrase there is "unsustainable pressure". the government was asked what constituted unsustainable — well, as far as people in the medical profession are concerned, we have already reached that point. also questions about whether they can bring forward the date at which people can get their boosterjab, at the moment you have to wait six months from getting your second dose to getting the third, well, the chair of the commons health committee said that we should look at that again, perhaps bring that forward, because of concerns about people losing their immunity against the virus, that might be the reason why the hospitalisations are starting to creep up at the moment. but certainly for the moment the government is holding firm, saying for example on that booster jab issue, that�*s a matter for thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. the other thing they are definitely not considering is the idea of a plan c, which appeared in a newspaper report this morning, of a ban on household mixing. that, according to the government, is totally untrue.
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one area seeing a sharp rise in covid cases is suffolk, which saw 4,265 cases recorded in the seven days to the 16th of october — an increase of almost 600 cases compared with the previous week. now the council says it�*s introducing rules after half term, that say staff and secondary school pupils will have to wear masks in communal areas outside the classroom, unless exempt. there will also be limits around access to school sites for parents and visitors. suffolk county council�*s director of public health explained why they made the decision. we know about 51% of our cases are under 19 so two or three weeks ago we brought in some measures which meant that if a school had an outbreak and a child had an outbreak and a sibling, we asked them to stay at home for three days and take a pcr test and that helped to reduce numbers. ultimately we are in a position where we have some of the highest
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rates in suffolk and the wider county and we are seeing cases start to increase in parents of children and people over 60 so it is about working out what works locally to keep the rates down. joining me now is dave—lee allan, headteacher of stowmarket high school in suffolk. thank you forjoining us. what is the reaction been to these new rules? i the reaction been to these new rules? ., the reaction been to these new rules? ~' ., the reaction been to these new rules? ~ ., ., , rules? i think from head teachers in suffolk, i rules? i think from head teachers in suffolk. i think _ rules? i think from head teachers in suffolk, i think we _ rules? i think from head teachers in suffolk, i think we appreciate - rules? i think from head teachers in suffolk, i think we appreciate the i suffolk, i think we appreciate the council has taken action. i have to emphasise it isjust council has taken action. i have to emphasise it is just wrong council has taken action. i have to emphasise it isjust wrong guidance. i think it helps support us for making these decisions. we have seen from the pandemic that slow responses can affect it further and like i of the council trying to get ahead of this, because schools are heavily impacted already through
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covid. ~ . , heavily impacted already through covid. ., , , ., ., covid. what is the situation your school? bizarrely, _ covid. what is the situation your school? bizarrely, my— covid. what is the situation your school? bizarrely, my school- covid. what is the situation your school? bizarrely, my school is. school? bizarrely, my school is doinu school? bizarrely, my school is doing 0k. _ school? bizarrely, my school is doing 0k. and _ school? bizarrely, my school is doing 0k, and it's _ school? bizarrely, my school is doing 0k, and it's not - school? bizarrely, my school is doing 0k, and it's not because | school? bizarrely, my school is| doing 0k, and it's not because i doing 0k, and it�*s not because i don�*t think we�*ve done anything different to any other school, but the schools surrounding us are having some significant issues. when we are having particular issues is through actually flu—like symptoms, staff are really hammered by this, i think immune systems have been really affected, so we�*ve got quite a lot of staff absence through those kind of things, and supply agencies have been stripped bare, so as we approach the half term, it�*s really quite hard work, i have to say. but i know many other schools around us have suffered far worse than us. they�*ve even gone down the roots of paying for the entire student cohort to have pcr tests. haifa paying for the entire student cohort to have pcr tests.— to have pcr tests. how many cases have ou to have pcr tests. how many cases have you seen — to have pcr tests. how many cases have you seen amongst _ to have pcr tests. how many cases have you seen amongst your- to have pcr tests. how many cases have you seen amongst your pupili have you seen amongst your pupil numbers? ~ �* ., , ,
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numbers? we've only been averaging around about — numbers? we've only been averaging around about ten _ numbers? we've only been averaging around about ten or _ numbers? we've only been averaging around about ten or“, _ numbers? we've only been averaging around about ten or 11, and _ numbers? we've only been averaging around about ten or 11, and as - numbers? we've only been averaging around about ten or“, and as i - around about ten or 11, and as i say, we are extremely grateful, we know that can change quite quickly, and we don�*t really have an explanation as to why that is. many schools around us, as i say, suffering far worse than us. horse suffering far worse than us. how supportive _ suffering far worse than us. how supportive are — suffering far worse than us. how supportive are parents and pupils themselves when it comes to these measures? we call them restrictions. 0thers measures? we call them restrictions. others might say they are protections. others might say they are protections.— others might say they are protections. others might say they are rotections. , . ., , , protections. our experience has been towards the — protections. our experience has been towards the end _ protections. our experience has been towards the end of _ protections. our experience has been towards the end of the _ protections. our experience has been towards the end of the summer - protections. our experience has been towards the end of the summer term | towards the end of the summer term we had to move to having masks worn, again, by students, and it was seamless. theyjust responded seamless. they just responded immediately, seamless. theyjust responded immediately, there was no issue, so i think our student body and our parent body understand that in order to try and keep education going that we need to adapt as necessary, so
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they are quite resilient in that sense. i think the other issues that surround us of things like vaccination programme, immunisation programme, these are really suffering, we�*ve had a covid jobs delayed as well as our flu immunisation is delayed through covid, so it�*s impacting on all sorts of different levels. horse sorts of different levels. how realistic is _ sorts of different levels. how realistic is it _ sorts of different levels. how realistic is it to _ sorts of different levels. how realistic is it to think - sorts of different levels. how realistic is it to think that - realistic is it to think that further into the school year exams can get back to normal, given the fact that we have this rising case numbers again?— numbers again? personally i can't see that you _ numbers again? personally i can't see that you could _ numbers again? personally i can't see that you could look _ numbers again? personally i can't see that you could look and - numbers again? personally i can't see that you could look and say i numbers again? personally i can't l see that you could look and say that you�*re going to run a normal exam process at this stage. even just within the 15 miles around my school, you are looking at a number of schools who have got significant numbers of cases, they�*re either
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unwell and therefore can�*t access them, or they are being asked to isolate. there is no way to then look at running of our system. igrate look at running of our system. we appreciate you talking to us thank you very much. wales�* health minister says further covid restrictions before christmas are "unlikely" at the moment. but, eluned morgan pleaded with the welsh public to "play their part" in keeping the virus at bay. it comes after welsh nhs boss andrew goodall said the service is under the most intense pressure in its history.taking is under the most intense pressure in its history. taking a look at the latest covid situation in wales — figures show there are around 624 cases per 100 thousand people. face coverings are mandatory on public transport and in shops and restaurants. there are no social distancing requirements in most venues, but an nhs covid pass is required for entry to night clubs as well as many indoor and outdoor events. latvia has gone back into lockdown after recording 2,599 new covid cases and 24 deaths
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in the last 24 hour period. (00v)the the rules will be in effect from today until the 15th of november — meaning all non—essential shops and schools will be shut, private household gatherings are banned, and all public events are suspended. there is also a strict curfew to prevent people leaving their homes between 8pm and 5am. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi, from bridgend in south wales. the body of logan mwangi, also known as logan williamson, was discovered in the river 0gmore on july 31st after he was reported missing by his parents. his step—father was later arrested and charged with his murder. his mother was charged with perverting the course ofjustice. the 14—year—old boy, who cannot be named due to his age, is due to appear before magistrates in cardiff. the headlines on bbc news: doctors�* union, the bma, says the government is being �*wilfully negligent�* by not bringing in stronger coronavirus prevention measures to tackle rising
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case rates in england. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi — whose body was found in a river in bridgend in south wales earlier this year. environmental groups have criticised attempts by some countries to influence a un report on global warming — as dcuments seen by the bbc show some nations want to play down the need to move away from fossil fuels. sport, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. we start with cricket because scotland could get through to the next round of the men�*s t20 world cup later this afternoon if they beat hosts 0man. scotland have two wins from two in the first round, having beaten papua new guinea and bangladesh. meanwhile, ireland face a winner takes all tie with namibia tomorrow after sri lanka beat them by 70 runs yesterday. joshua little was the last man to fall for the irish. it means sri lanka have qualified for the next stage of the competition,
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but ireland still have work to do. england captain eoin morgan�*s poor run of form continues as he admits he would consider dropping himself for the t20 world cup if his performances don�*t improve. despite victory over new zealand in theirfinalwarm—up match, morgan managed just 10 of england�*s innings of 163 for 6. they take on the west indies in their first match on saturday. staying with cricket, and 0pener dom sibley has withdrawn from the england lions squad for the tour of australia this winter. last week the 26—year—old was named in the 14—strong squad, which will shadow the main england ashes party. but england say "after much thought and consideration" warwickshire�*s sibley has decided to work on his batting at home in a bid to regain a place in the test team. yorkshire batter harry brook has been added to the lions squad. there are promising signs for paris 2024, after great britain s women claimed bronze in the sprint final
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at the track cycling world championships. lauren bate, sophie capewell, blaine ridge—davis and milly tanna all made their championship debut, beating japan in the bronze—medal final and coming home more than half a second clear. afterwards davis said it was a dream come true. and just before we go, he doesn�*t normally stand still for long, but liverpool forward mo salah was motionless — well it looked like mo salah. the striker unveiled a life—size waxwork of himself at madame tussauds in london. he was clearly very impressed with it. the general public will be able to see from friday. salah has been in great form this season so far, scoring 12 goals in 11 appearances. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for
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you in the next hour. it is unusually good, some of them are a bit off, but that�*s very convincing. it's convincing. it�*s just as well it did look like him, but because it must be awkward if it doesn�*t. the bbc has obtained documents that show countries, including saudi arabia, australia and japan, are asking the united nations to play down the need to move away from using fossilfuels like coal, gas and oil. it comes just ten days before world leaders gather in glasgow for crucial climate talks. 0ur climate editor justin rowlatt has more. the clock is ticking on tackling climate change. the science says, unless we start making dramatic cuts to emissions now, we risk very serious consequences. the world has experienced some of the most extreme weather ever recorded in recent years. terrible floods in india, while hot, dry weather has sparked
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vast fires in australia, as well as in brazil and in argentina. yet leaked documents seen by the bbc show these are among countries pressuring the un to change its message on the options for tackling climate change. saudi arabia, australia and japan are arguing the world doesn�*t need to reduce fossil fuel use as quickly as the un suggests. the saudis ask un scientists to delete a claim that the focus for the energy sector should be actively phasing out fossil fuels. meanwhile, india warns it expects coal to remain the mainstay of energy production for decades. the leak consists of thousands of comments by governments and others to the scientists responsible for a key un report. they were given to greenpeace uk, which passed them on to the bbc. these un reports are pretty much the bible of climate science.
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they are used by governments to decide how to tackle climate change and they will provide a crucial input to the negotiations in glasgow. scientists who have helped compile these reports say the un science is objective. there is absolutely no pressure on scientists to accept the comments. if comments are lobbying, if they are not justified by science, they will not be integrated in the ipcc reports. the leak comes days before a crucial climate conference begins in glasgow. it shows just how tricky the negotiations are likely to be. but don�*t give up hope just yet, says a veteran of countless international negotiations. people can see the effects of climate change. and the effects of climate change, by the way, on countries like india and china, are going to be dramatic. this is all about understanding that even though the challenge
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is immense, there really isn�*t an alternative to dealing with it. you�*ve got to go back and redouble your efforts, including with those people who still are holding out. they are putting the finishing touches to the huge conference facilities in glasgow. this leak shows just how tough the negotiations there are likely to be. we will discover at the conference whether, despite the lobbying, world leaders are willing to take the ambitious action needed to curb emissions. justin rowlatt, bbc news. so, lots of world powers have been lobbying the ipcc, for changes to that report. let�*s take a look now at the roles of two of the world�*s big energy consumers, japan and china, starting with our correspondent robin brant in shanghai. as the world�*s biggest consumer, the world�*s biggest burner of coal, that is the world�*s biggest emitter of c02, china features prominently in these documents, but there are other nations, saudi arabia and japan,
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which we�*re about to address, and brazil and others in south america, in terms of the meat and food industry, who seem to be appealing more, who seem to be lobbying more, in the document will follow. i think what we�*re seeing in terms of china�*s role, not wanting to oversimplify too much, as they don�*t want to be seen too much as the bad guy, the bad person, in the room. i mean, some elements are notable, is that when it comes to the paris agreement six years ago which set a target of trying to achieve a limit on growth of global temperatures to 1.5%, it says in the draft quite clearly, china�*s current commitments don�*t comply with that. china doesn�*t like that. it believes it�*s subjective, it believes it is doing a lot to try and improve its role in terms of climate change, and it asked for that language to be removed. 0verall, china doesn�*t feature too much, but, of course,
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its role going forward in terms of this ipcc report, and the final one that will follow, and also the cop26 meeting in glasgow, is absolutely huge. john kerry, the us climate envoy believes china can do more. it has its own targets in terms of peaking carbon emissions by 2030 and trying to be net carbon emitter by 2060, but in terms of that target, below 2 degrees and 1.5 degrees, we are still yet to see a big declaration, big pledge from china in trying to limit what it can do in china to try to hit that target. to many people will be a bit of a surprise, because japan is not one of the big fossil fuel producers. japan doesn't have any coal or oil, so it imports all of its energy, or most of its energy, from the middle east and australia and elsewhere, so why is it on that side of the argument rather than with countries like the uk that are pushing much more towards renewables much more quickly?
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i think the answer is, japanjust has a lot of legacy infrastructure, and it's still building new coal—fired power stations today. just earlier this week i was out filming — about an hour south of tokyo, they are building a huge new, brand—new coal fire power station there, which will go online in 2023. something with that much investment will need to run 40—50 years, taking it well into the 20605 or '705, and japan hasjust got a lot of this infrastructure and a lot of heavy industry, and i think there is a real fear that moving quickly to renewable energy exclusively is going to massively disadvantaged and cause huge costs for the japanese economy, that's why they're playing this down and saying, look, we need to go down a different route. we can carry on using fossil fuels, but turn them into hydrogen or ammonia, burn those in our power plants, they don't produce any c02, and the c02 it's producing
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in the creation of this hydrogen and ammonia can be buried in the ground. this is called carbon capture and storage. japan is arguing very much that carbon capture and storage needs to be a big part of the solution in the future to getting to zero carbon. now, countries like britain, germany, northern european countries argue very much against that, saying we need to go renewable much, much more quickly. the public inquiry into the manchester arena attack has been told the elder brother of the bomber has laughed "in the face" of the hearings, by leaving the uk after being ordered to attend. counsel for the inquiry said ismail abedi s lawyers had submitted a "self—serving and disgraceful" statement that made clear he would not answer questions. he has refused to give evidence into the 2017 suicide attack, which killed 22 people, in case he incriminates himself. experts in the us state of florida are investigating
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whether suspected human remains, found in a park, belong to brian laundrie. he�*s the boyfriend of a young woman found murdered in the state of wyoming last month. gabby petito, who kept a travel blog, went missing weeks earlier while on a road trip with mr laundrie. aru na iyengar reports. a possible breakthrough on a florida nature reserve. police using sniffer dogs have been searching for brian laundrie, the fiance of gabby petito, whose body was discovered in wyoming in september. laundrie went home to florida after her disappearance, but went missing himself soon afterwards. his family say he went for a hike and never came back. earlier today, investigators found what appeared to be human remains and personal items, such as a backpack and notebook belonging to brian laundrie. these items were found in an area that, up until recently, had been underwater. the case has provoked widespread media interest. gabby petito�*s body lay in wilderness before
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she was found for over a month. police say she was strangled. mr laundrie has not been charged with any crime relating to the killing of gabby petito, but the fbi issued a federal arrest warrant and charged him with fraudulently using her debit card after her death. the couple had packed their lives into a camper van for a cross—country adventure, starting injuly. they documented theirjourney in a stream of social media posts, but life was not sunny under the surface. this video emerged as the couple travelled through the state of utah. two people came to us and told us that they saw him hit you. they were interviewed, but no further action was taken. she sobs ms petito was crying, talking to officers about her mental health. the murder has triggered a debate about domestic violence, over the amount of attention accorded to white women compared to other missing persons. in addition, whilst the two separate searches
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for the pair were going on, other bodies of missing people were found. the fbi says investigations in florida are likely to continue for several days. aruna iyengar, bbc news. a 14—year—old boy has appeared in court, charged with the murder of a five year old. the teenager, who cannot be named due to his age, appeared before magistrates in a ten minute hearing in cardiff. we can speak now to our correspondent hywel griffith. remind us of the background to this. yeah, this is the investigation into the death of five—year—old logan won he was reported as a missing child is back injuly the 31st when his parents called in detectives, however his body was found shortly afterwards emerged in the river near bridgend. a day or two later his
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stepfather was arrested and charged with murder. his mother was also charged with perverting the course ofjustice, alongside a then 13—year—old boy who is also charged with perverting the course of justice. he of course cannot be named because of his age, but that same boy who is now 14 has now been charged with logan�*s murder as well. he appeared in the magistrates�* court behind me, very brief hearing, answering only to confirm his name date of birth and address, he will appear next before the crown court on a charge of murder. he will also need to abide by a curfew which is monitored by tags so are not allowed to be out between atm and apm. thank ou ve to be out between atm and apm. thank you very much- — hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the british medical association accuses the government of being �*wilfully negligent�*
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for not re—introducing coronavirus restrictions — labour says the health secretary is being complacent, but ministers say plan b isn�*t needed yet... ambulances backed up outside hospitals, patients waiting hours upon hours in a&e, cancer operations cancelled and nhs staff exhausted. we don't believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, it always is in winter, but it is particularly now, that it is under unsustainable pressure. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi — whose body was found in a river in bridgend in south wales earlier this year. the bbc obtains documents showing some countries asking the un to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels to tackle climate change. the world health organisation has told the bbc it believes the coronavirus pandemic will go on for a year longer than it needs
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to because of the unequal distribution of vaccines. it comes as a group of charities have criticised the uk and canada for themselves using doses from covax, the global programme to ensure vaccines are distributed fairly. meanwhile, 0xfam is issuing a report criticising pharmaceutical companies and rich nations for delivering just one in seven of the doses promised for developing countries. naomi grimley reports. it�*s the question we all keep asking — when will this pandemic end? not as soon as it could, is the answer from the world health organization, because of uneven vaccine distribution across the world. there have been plenty of summits about vaccine donations to poorer countries, but the exasperation of who officials is clear to see. we need a stock—take. the g20 will meet at the end of october. we need them to say, where are we against those commitments? and i can tell you today, they�*re not on track. you need to really speed it up. or, you know what, this pandemic
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is going to go on for a year longer than it needs to. covax was the international programme set up to ensure all countries, both rich and poor, could get enough vaccines to cover at least 20% of the population. but it hasn�*t worked out as planned. the vast majority of vaccine doses administered have been in richer countries. africa especially has been left behind. a new analysis from a group of charities called the people�*s vaccine alliance shows the huge gap between what the world�*s richest countries have promised to give the poorest versus the number of doses delivered so far. the uk and canada have been singled out for particular criticism as both countries acquired some vaccines from covax for their own populations, even though they have their own supplies. 0n the one hand, every country that joined the covax facility was entitled to obtain vaccines,
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but these two countries obtained many, many doses through bilateral agreements that could best be characterised as hoarding. so, the idea then that they would double—dip and take more vaccines from the covax initiative really is morally indefensible. the uk stressed it helped kickstart covax and was one of its most generous financial supporters. the canadian government told us it has now stopped procuring vaccines from covax. as it became clear that the supply that we had secured through our bilateral deals with different companies like astrazeneca, pfizer and moderna would be sufficient for the canadian population, we then pivoted the doses that we had procured from covax to be donated back to covax so that they could be redistributed to developing countries that needed those doses. the latest warning from the world health organization is that the pandemic will continue into 2022. it is urging pharmaceutical
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companies and wealthy nations to make sure low—income countries are now prioritised in the queue for life—saving vaccines. naomi grimley, bbc news. breaking news. we havejust heard that police have charged a man with the murder of sir david anis, who was fatally stabbed —— david amess. a25—year—old has been held in custody by the police and they have until tomorrow to continue questioning him under terror legislation. they have now charged him with the murder of said david amess. we are expecting an update
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from the metropolitan police very shortly and we will take you there as soon as officers appear. let�*s go back to our top story and the accusation from doctors that the government is being �*wilfully negligent�* by not imposing some coronavirus restrictions. daily infections in the uk have been over 40,000 for the past eight days. the health secretary has warned that daily infections could soon rise to 100,000. but he says now is not the time to bring back covid measures. mrjavid urged people to wear face coverings in crowded venues, and get booster vaccines. let�*s speak to former prime minister, tony blair. his think tank has been looking at ways to make sure that the nhs isn�*t overwhelmed by a fresh wave of the disease. thank you forjoining us. we do apologise if we have to go to that statement at scotland yard. but do stay with us. what are your conclusions? this report your institute has put out is calling for a much more vigorous attempt to get
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us to take boosters. that a much more vigorous attempt to get us to take boosters.— us to take boosters. that is basically — us to take boosters. that is basically it. _ us to take boosters. that is basically it. compared - us to take boosters. that is basically it. compared to i us to take boosters. that is - basically it. compared to france, italy, germany, our case levels are rising at several times the case levels in those countries, our hospitalisation rate is three or four times the rate in those countries. 0ver40,000 four times the rate in those countries. over 40,000 cases a day. the health secretary says the right is 100,000. from an abundance of caution, we are seeing in order to make sure we avoid lockdown, you have to accelerate the boosters. we are doing 165,000 a day. we can step that up to 500,000. we need to make a much bigger effort on 12 to 17—year—olds, even if they don�*t get ill themselves, they are spreaders of the virus. and then the issue of pregnant women, 15 to 20% of cases
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in most serious cases in hospital and large numbers are still not vaccinated. we need a much bigger drive on vaccination, including boosters, and i think things like masks on public transport, i really think this isjust masks on public transport, i really think this is just a sensible precautionary move in order to make sure that we don�*t go back into the type of full—scale restrictions before. ii type of full-scale restrictions before. ., ,, . ., , before. if the health secretary bein: before. if the health secretary being complacent _ before. if the health secretary being complacent and - before. if the health secretary being complacent and the - before. if the health secretary - being complacent and the government wilfully negligent? i being complacent and the government wilfully negligent?— wilfully negligent? i think they are bein: wilfully negligent? i think they are being complacent _ wilfully negligent? i think they are being complacent ? _ wilfully negligent? i think they are being complacent ? mike - wilfully negligent? i think they are being complacent ? mike i - wilfully negligent? i think they are being complacent ? mike i don't i being complacent ? mike i don�*t think. the health secretary has said several of the elements that are there. i have said that we just need accelerated urgency. we should make it much easier for the booster to get it. pharmacists can deliver booster shots alongside shot. with
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schools, you need a more vigorous effort. 12 to 17—year—olds, i reckon we are about 30% in this country. in france it is almost 70%. if you look at israel, which is well ahead on double vaccinated people, leading the world for a time, and then they found after roughly six months the efficacy of the vaccine starts to wane and with that waning, even vaccinated people become more vulnerable, the hospitalisation rates went up again. when they introduced boosters, they cut it back down. so i think if you look at the evidence around the world, it is clear what works and what doesn�*t and therefore it is not so much the government is being complacent or that they don�*t know what they should do, it is that they need to get a greater sense of urgency and
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put this back up the agenda, otherwise 40,000 cases a day is a lot and you don�*t know how many people outside of that 40,000 are asymptomatic and don�*t realise they have it. so if you were being cautious right now and taking these measures, take them now. knowing how the government — measures, take them now. knowing how the government has _ measures, take them now. knowing how the government has behaved _ measures, take them now. knowing how the government has behaved in - measures, take them now. knowing how the government has behaved in the - the government has behaved in the past, you are calling for an abundance of caution and yet the government is being criticised for being slow off the mark so many times. how optimistic are you that they will listen to what you are saying? i they will listen to what you are sa in: ? ., , saying? i think they will in the end because i think _ saying? i think they will in the end because i think when _ saying? i think they will in the end because i think when they - saying? i think they will in the end because i think when they look - saying? i think they will in the end because i think when they look at l because i think when they look at the fact they will realise that the political damage, apart from the damage to people�*s health, of being seen to be too slow is going to push them into action. i think the health secretary probably wants to act but there are people ? i completely
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understand. no one likes wearing masks, i don�*t like wearing a mask. when you are on public transport it is really sensible to have one stop the evidence from around the world, one of the great things about their data that we now accumulate as a result of the global experience of covid is that it is pretty clear what the answers are. people dispute the importance of vaccination. if you look at the evidence and data, it is absolutely clear. so this is why it is important to not be in the situation where pressures grow in winter, as it inevitably does, you can�*t afford to get to the stage where the health service overwhelmed. the backlog of people waiting for health appointments on things other than covid is very
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significant. it is a big problem. you don�*t want that getting any worse. you don't want that getting any worse. ., y �* ., you don't want that getting any worse. ., , r ., ., ~ you don't want that getting any worse. ., , �* ., ., ~ y worse. tony blair, thank you very much for talking _ worse. tony blair, thank you very much for talking to _ worse. tony blair, thank you very much for talking to us. _ worse. tony blair, thank you very much for talking to us. a - worse. tony blair, thank you very | much for talking to us. a reminder of breaking news that police have said that they have charged a 25—year—old man with the murder of david ms, mp for southend west —— david ms, mp for southend west —— david anis. he was holding a constituency surgery when he was attacked —— david amess. we are expecting to hear from the special crime and counterterrorism division of the metropolitan police very shortly with a statement, so we will take you to new scotland yard when that appears. thousands of leaked documents seen by the bbc show that many
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governments have lobbied to change a key un scientific report ahead of the international climate summit in glasgow. saudi arabia, australia, and japan are among countries asking the intergovernmental panel on climate change to play down the need for a rapid move away from fossil fuels. among them are countries that produce a lot of red meat such as brazil and argentina who have argued strongly against evidence in the draft report that reducing meat consumption is necessary to cut greenhouse gas emissions. well, let�*s look at the arguments for and against meat consumption further, and its role in contributing to greenhouse gas emissions. with me is louise davies, the ceo for the vegan society, who wants a meat free world. also, i�*m joined by hannah dillon who is the head of campaign, zero carbon where they work with famers to help them become more sustainable. hannah, first of all, do we need to go meat free? it�*s hannah, first of all, do we need to go meat free?— hannah, first of all, do we need to go meat free? it's a great question. our go meat free? it's a great question. 0ur argument _ go meat free? it's a great question. our argument would _ go meat free? it's a great question. our argument would be _ go meat free? it's a great question. our argument would be that - go meat free? it's a great question. our argument would be that it - go meat free? it's a great question. our argument would be that it is i go meat free? it's a great question. | our argument would be that it is not 0ur argument would be that it is not quite as simple as that. there is a debate going on around meat at the
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moment of the back of these documents, which is a you read them, thatis documents, which is a you read them, that is not what they are calling for. but we need to take a step back to reduce the intensity of food production, in the uk but internationally as well. [30 production, in the uk but internationally as well. do you a . ree internationally as well. do you agree with _ internationally as well. do you agree with anything _ internationally as well. do you agree with anything that - internationally as well. do you l agree with anything that hannah internationally as well. do you - agree with anything that hannah has just said, given that you are a vegan. you would prefer that we didn�*t take meat, but it doesn�*t sound like zero carbon are quite there yet. == sound like zero carbon are quite there et. ., sound like zero carbon are quite there yet-— there yet. -- zero carbon. i am representing — there yet. -- zero carbon. i am representing the _ there yet. -- zero carbon. i am representing the vegan - there yet. -- zero carbon. i am representing the vegan society | there yet. -- zero carbon. i am - representing the vegan society and we are _ representing the vegan society and we are keen to remove animals from our food _ we are keen to remove animals from our food and — we are keen to remove animals from our food and lifestyle system. if we're _ our food and lifestyle system. if we're just — our food and lifestyle system. if we're just looking at the climate crisis. _ we're just looking at the climate crisis, there is strong evidence that— crisis, there is strong evidence that shifting to a plant —based diet can reduce — that shifting to a plant —based diet can reduce your individual carbon footprint — can reduce your individual carbon footprint by up to 50%. the scientific _ footprint by up to 50%. the scientific evidence is there that tells _ scientific evidence is there that tells us — scientific evidence is there that tells us that it is better for the planet — tells us that it is better for the planet. so looking at the environmental angle alone, it is difficult — environmental angle alone, it is difficult to say we need a big and well, _ difficult to say we need a big and
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well, but — difficult to say we need a big and well, but there is certainly evidence to say that everyone should be stepping up on an individual basis _ be stepping up on an individual basis to— be stepping up on an individual basis to change their diets and we need _ basis to change their diets and we need government support to make those _ need government support to make those choices easier and more affordable. those choices easier and more affordable-— those choices easier and more affordable. ~ , ., ., ., ~ affordable. when you are working with farmers. _ affordable. when you are working with farmers, who _ affordable. when you are working with farmers, who make - affordable. when you are working with farmers, who make their- with farmers, who make their livelihood from livestock and producing animals for consumption, how do you convince them that they need to move away to a different type of farming or a different type of model? in type of farming or a different type of model? . ., ., , ., of model? in the conversations that we've had. — of model? in the conversations that we've had. a _ of model? in the conversations that we've had. a lot _ of model? in the conversations that we've had, a lot of _ of model? in the conversations that we've had, a lot of land _ of model? in the conversations that we've had, a lot of land users - we�*ve had, a lot of land users recogniser there is the opportunity for the uk when it comes to the decarbonisation of agriculture because uk production is relatively low in terms of emissions. mention brazil in the introduction. so provided they are a range of measures that can incentivise change and also provide farmers and land users with benefits, changing the way they produce food, i think they are very on—board and very pragmatic. but it is about a range
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of different measures that not only incentivise producers to change their way create but also consumers to choose, have a default choice thatis to choose, have a default choice that is the lowest cost and most environmentally friendly. and that is what the document is talking about, notjust expecting people to change without help but making the obvious and right choice and environmentally friendly one. we need to consider international parameters when we are struck in trade deals, we need to try and maintain our domestic, environmental and animal welfare standards in a deal that we strike or there could be some unintended consequences. louise, you are nodding in agreement with a lot of that. what is wrong with a lot of that. what is wrong with taxing meat, for example? 0r eating less red meat but continuing to eat things like fish, poultry, dairy? to eat things like fish, poultry, dai ? ., , ~' , , '
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dairy? people like this stuff. the roblem dairy? people like this stuff. the problem is _ dairy? people like this stuff. the problem is with _ dairy? people like this stuff. the problem is with attacks - dairy? people like this stuff. the problem is with attacks on - dairy? people like this stuff. the problem is with attacks on the i dairy? people like this stuff. the. problem is with attacks on the red meat is that it is a quite bad instrument. it risks switching from potentially, if you think that any animalfarming is ethical, he would consider ethically reared cattle is better. i don�*t think anyone wants to really eight factory farmed chicken and the general public would agree. so i think what we need to see our financial instruments that encourage farmers towards more sustainable food production which can be found product, we can grow lentils, all sorts of transitional things out there for families. we need the government to encourage the transmission rather than the current process which is actively subsidising things that are bad for the environment. we needed radical shift and provide farmers with support to make the transition then enabled the public to make ethical
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choices. . ., enabled the public to make ethical choices. ., ,, , ., enabled the public to make ethical choices. . ~' , ., enabled the public to make ethical choices. ., ,, , ., . choices. thank you both. we were 'ust choices. thank you both. we were just telling — choices. thank you both. we were just telling you — choices. thank you both. we were just telling you that _ choices. thank you both. we were just telling you that police - choices. thank you both. we were just telling you that police have i just telling you that police have charged a 25—year—old man with the murder of the mp said david amess. let�*s go to scotland yard. we are expecting to hear from officers fairly soon. in expecting to hear from officers fairly soon-— expecting to hear from officers fairl soon. ., , , fairly soon. in the last few minutes it has been — fairly soon. in the last few minutes it has been confirmed _ fairly soon. in the last few minutes it has been confirmed that - fairly soon. in the last few minutes it has been confirmed that the - fairly soon. in the last few minutes i it has been confirmed that the crown prosecution service has authorised charges against the man, a charge of murder and also a charge of preparing terrorist act. they have said that they will be including ideological and religious motivation. the head of specialist operations is now coming to the camera. just to confirm
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that alii harbi ali has been charged. i that alii harbi ali has been charted. ., ., that alii harbi ali has been charged-— that alii harbi ali has been charted. ., ., , ., charged. i want to provide you with an u date charged. i want to provide you with an update into _ charged. i want to provide you with an update into the _ charged. i want to provide you with an update into the murder- charged. i want to provide you with an update into the murder of- charged. i want to provide you with an update into the murder of sir. an update into the murder of sir david _ an update into the murder of sir david anis _ an update into the murder of sir david anis. 0n an update into the murder of sir david anis. on behalf of everyone —— david _ david anis. on behalf of everyone —— david amess — david anis. on behalf of everyone —— david amess. i would like to offer my deepest condolences to the family. — my deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of sir david, — family, friends and colleagues of sir david, who died so tragically last friday. sir david's david dedication to his family and to joints— dedication to his family and to joints and community and its positive _ joints and community and its positive impact on the lives of so many— positive impact on the lives of so many have — positive impact on the lives of so many have been abundantly clear since _ many have been abundantly clear since his— many have been abundantly clear since his death. specialist officers continue — since his death. specialist officers continue to support sir david's family— continue to support sir david's family and all of our sympathies are with them — family and all of our sympathies are with them. i would also like to recognise _ with them. i would also like to recognise the courage and professionalism of officers from essex _ professionalism of officers from essex police and paramedics for their— essex police and paramedics for their response to the incident. as
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you know. — their response to the incident. as you know, last friday sir david tragically— you know, last friday sir david tragically died from serious injuries— tragically died from serious injuries after being stabbed at a constituency servicing at leigh—on—sea stopped a man was arrested — leigh—on—sea stopped a man was arrested at — leigh—on—sea stopped a man was arrested at the scene. since then, they met's — arrested at the scene. since then, they met's counterterrorism demand has led _ they met's counterterrorism demand has led the _ they met's counterterrorism demand has led the investigation. a large team _ has led the investigation. a large team of— has led the investigation. a large team of detectives have been working around _ team of detectives have been working around the _ team of detectives have been working around the clock to find out as much as we _ around the clock to find out as much as we can _ around the clock to find out as much as we can about what happened and why. as we can about what happened and why that _ as we can about what happened and why. that work has included searches of a number— why. that work has included searches of a number of london addresses. 0ur advanced _ of a number of london addresses. 0ur advanced forensics teams have analysed — advanced forensics teams have analysed digital devices and carried out a _ analysed digital devices and carried out a painstaking review of cctv footage — out a painstaking review of cctv footage. they also —— i also want to thank— footage. they also —— i also want to thank witnesses and members of the public— thank witnesses and members of the public who— thank witnesses and members of the public who have supported the investigation with information. as a result— investigation with information. as a result of— investigation with information. as a result of all— investigation with information. as a result of all of that work, to date
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we have — result of all of that work, to date we have reached a significant milestone. following the submission of a file _ milestone. following the submission of a file of— milestone. following the submission of a file of evidence to the crown prosecution service, charges have been _ prosecution service, charges have been authorised. ali harbi ali, aged 25 from _ been authorised. ali harbi ali, aged 25 from north london, has been charged — 25 from north london, has been charged with murder and the preparation of terrorist acts contrary— preparation of terrorist acts contrary to section five of the terrorism _ contrary to section five of the terrorism act 2006. he remains in custody— terrorism act 2006. he remains in custody and — terrorism act 2006. he remains in custody and will appear at westminster magistrates' court this afternoon. we will continue to build our case _ afternoon. we will continue to build our case if— afternoon. we will continue to build our case. if there are members of the public— our case. if there are members of the public who are further information that might help investigation, i would urge them to come _ investigation, i would urge them to come forward. every piece of information in investigations like this is— information in investigations like this is important and you will not be wasting — this is important and you will not be wasting our time. please contact us through— be wasting our time. please contact us through the anti—terrorist
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hotline _ us through the anti—terrorist hotline. it remains the case that no other— hotline. it remains the case that no other arrests have been made and at this time _ other arrests have been made and at this time we — other arrests have been made and at this time we are not seeking anybody else in— this time we are not seeking anybody else in relation to this incident. there _ else in relation to this incident. there has— else in relation to this incident. there has been considerable speculation in the media about the background history and motivation of the man— background history and motivation of the man now charged. i understand the man now charged. i understand the interest— the man now charged. i understand the interest in these questions and they form — the interest in these questions and they form part of our investigation. however. _ they form part of our investigation. however, now charges have been brought, — however, now charges have been brought, we will not be providing further— brought, we will not be providing further information on any aspect of this case _ further information on any aspect of this case i— further information on any aspect of this case. i would strongly urge anyone — this case. i would strongly urge anyone interested in the case to exercise — anyone interested in the case to exercise restraint when commenting on it publicly. we all have an interest _ on it publicly. we all have an interest in— on it publicly. we all have an interest in ensuring future court proceedings and are prejudiced in any way — proceedings and are prejudiced in any way i— proceedings and are prejudiced in any way. i would also like to reiterate _ any way. i would also like to reiterate the request made by sir david's _ reiterate the request made by sir david's family that their privacy be
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respected — david's family that their privacy be respected. i fully understand the significant impact that the attack on sir— significant impact that the attack on sir david has had on his colleagues in the houses of parliament. we have been working closely— parliament. we have been working closely with parliament's own security— closely with parliament's own security team and with the home office _ security team and with the home office to — security team and with the home office to review existing arrangements of police security and that work— arrangements of police security and that work will continue. police forces — that work will continue. police forces across the country have been working _ forces across the country have been working with individual mps to review — working with individual mps to review their specific arrangements. alongside — review their specific arrangements. alongside this case, it is important for me _ alongside this case, it is important for me to _ alongside this case, it is important for me to stress counterterrorism officers _ for me to stress counterterrorism officers across the uk and the security — officers across the uk and the security service and other partners are working — security service and other partners are working night and day to bear down _ are working night and day to bear down on — are working night and day to bear down on the threat from terrorism. our communities play a vital role in those _ our communities play a vital role in those efforts. every day information given _ those efforts. every day information given to _ those efforts. every day information given to the public, given to the police _ given to the public, given to the police by— given to the public, given to the police by the public helps our
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investigations. if you see or hear something — investigations. if you see or hear something suspicious, trust your instinct, — something suspicious, trust your instinct, contact the police, phone us or— instinct, contact the police, phone us or contact us in confidence online — us or contact us in confidence online in— us or contact us in confidence online. in respect of this investigation, although charges have been laid. _ investigation, although charges have been laid, our work continues. whilst — been laid, our work continues. whilst it— been laid, our work continues. whilst it does, said david's family remain— whilst it does, said david's family remain in— whilst it does, said david's family remain in our thoughts. thank you. let's _ remain in our thoughts. thank you. let's hear— remain in our thoughts. thank you. let's hear from our correspondent at new scotland yard. we were hearing from mac— new scotland yard. we were hearing from mac dukes they're confirming that charges have been made. it is two charges, a charge of murder and the crown— two charges, a charge of murder and the crown prosecution service in that they — the crown prosecution service in that they will be making the case in court. _ that they will be making the case in court. that— that they will be making the case in court, that it has a terrorist connection, both religious and
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ideological motivation and a second charge _ ideological motivation and a second charge is— ideological motivation and a second charge is preparation of terrorist act. charge is preparation of terrorist act~ so— charge is preparation of terrorist act~ so it — charge is preparation of terrorist act~ so it is _ charge is preparation of terrorist act. so it is a confirmation that the police _ act. so it is a confirmation that the police regard this as a terrorist _ the police regard this as a terrorist crime, that they are going to prosecute it in the court as a terrorist — to prosecute it in the court as a terrorist crime and ali harbi ali, who is— terrorist crime and ali harbi ali, who is 25— terrorist crime and ali harbi ali, who is 25 years old, born not far from _ who is 25 years old, born not far from here — who is 25 years old, born not far from here and grew up in croydon, will be _ from here and grew up in croydon, will be appearing at westminster magistrates' court this afternoon. so very— magistrates' court this afternoon. so very quickly into court from where — so very quickly into court from where once he has made a brief appearance he will be taken off to prison— appearance he will be taken off to prison to — appearance he will be taken off to prison to await his first crown court — prison to await his first crown court appearance. in prison to await his first crown court appearance. in choosing to have comic— court appearance. in choosing to have comic regard _ court appearance. in choosing to have comic regard this _ court appearance. in choosing to have comic regard this as - court appearance. in choosing to have comic regard this as a - have comic regard this as a terrorist incident, it gives police more time to question him. normally he would have _ more time to question him. normally he would have a _ more time to question him. normally he would have a maximum _ more time to question him. normally he would have a maximum of- more time to question him. normally he would have a maximum of four i more time to question him. normally i he would have a maximum of four days to question someone on suspicion of murder, but because it was being investigated as a terrorist offence they were able to hold him for seven days and they could have asked for more time. in fact, after six days
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almost exactly after sir david amess was stabbed in leigh—on—sea, a man has been charged and will be appearing in court this afternoon and that will be the long process of putting evidence together in preparation of a trial.- putting evidence together in preparation of a trial. thank you very much- _ preparation of a trial. thank you very much. now— preparation of a trial. thank you very much. now a _ preparation of a trial. thank you very much. now a company - preparation of a trial. thank you - very much. now a company in scotland is exploring a solution thatis that is unusual. governments all around the world are trying to find ways to tackle climate change. one of the biggest problems is our use of fossil fuels. whether it�*s warming our homes — or powering our vehicles — finding an alternative is crucial. now a company in scotland is exploring a solution that seems a little unusual. tim allman has the story. does its magical properties extend to saving the environment? maybe stop here at the distillery they have been making whiskey for nearly 200 years. but it is what they throw
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away that could turn out to be so useful. from these malted barley grains, a biofuel is created that can power this car. this is made from living cabin. it is one _ this is made from living cabin. it is one of— this is made from living cabin. it is one of the _ this is made from living cabin. it is one of the most important industries in the scottish economy and we _ industries in the scottish economy and we can— industries in the scottish economy and we can take these residues and turn them _ and we can take these residues and turn them into something that we need _ turn them into something that we need right— turn them into something that we need right now.— need right now. they end up with chemicals that _ need right now. they end up with chemicals that are _ need right now. they end up with chemicals that are used - need right now. they end up with chemicals that are used in - chemicals that are used in everything from fuel and food production to medicine and cosmetics. the company behind it says this is a sustainable and environmentally friendly process. igrate environmentally friendly process. we should continue to use his chemicals, everything from health care to _ chemicals, everything from health care to hydrogen, or we can make them _ care to hydrogen, or we can make them from — care to hydrogen, or we can make them from sustainable resources. we don't tell— them from sustainable resources. we don't tell everything that they can't — don't tell everything that they can't do. _ don't tell everything that they can't do, but to innovate. the plan is to produce _ can't do, but to innovate. the plan is to produce around _ can't do, but to innovate. the plan is to produce around a _ can't do, but to innovate. the plan is to produce around a million - is to produce around a million litres of biochemicals and they want
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to build five more refineries in the next five years. whiskey has been described as a liquid sunshine. sunshine brings light and hope. this brought rain last night, but it has cleared off and following that we have cool at northerly winds dragging in colder air. temperatures are dropping across the board significantly. in heathrow, 19 degrees, and this afternoon will be 12. in aberdeen we are going from 13 to roundabout seven through this afternoon. a significant drop in temperatures. it might be cooler but there is plenty of sunshine to be found. a sprinkling of snow over the highest scottish mountains. as we go
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through the rest of the day, showers will continue, snow over the highest scottish mountains, but for the majority of the uk and inland areas lots of sunshine, barely a cloud in the sky. we keep those brisk winds, gusting at around 30 mph. tonight, those blustery winds will drag in plenty of showers across the northern half of the uk. the wind slighter further south and that is where we will have some of the lowest temperatures. cold enough for frost in the very coldest part of the countryside. friday, although this ridge of high pressure is building in from the west, it is going to be a day of sunshine and showers. the showers will be widespread across the north and west of the uk, particularly in north west england, north wales also. but there will be plenty of sunshine between those showers. temperatures similar to those of this afternoon, around nine to 14 celsius. the weather picture in the weekend, we will see a change in wind patterns.
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eventually, we will start to see south—westerly winds spreading in and they will be bringing milder air. so this cool spell is only relatively short. saturday, a lot of cloud around and mist and fog patches, particularly over hills. in the west we will see heavy rain in northern ireland, western scotland in temperatures of 14 to 15 degrees. sunday, a day of sunshine and showers. the showers are heaviest and most frequent across the north—west but the wind still comes from a south—westerly direction. temperatures reaching highs of up to 15 degrees.
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in the last few minutes police have charged a 25—year—old man with the milder of conservative mp sir david amess. ali harbi ali is also charged with the preparation of terrorist acts. sir david was killed last friday after being attacked in a church leigh—on—sea. we�*ll have the very latest from scotland yard. also, doctors warn the government is being wilfully negligent in not imposing more restrictions as cases of coronavirus rise. but ministers say it is not necessary yet. igrate say it is not necessary yet. we don't believe _ say it is not necessary yet. - don't believe that even though the don�*t believe that even though the nhs is under real pressure, that it is under unsustainable pressure and now is not the right moment to look
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