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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 20, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines... health leaders call for the return of some covid measures in england to tackle rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so, and rules out any further lockdowns. now, these are inconvenient measures but if we take them, hopefully we can stem the rising tide of infection and hospitalisation and will not have to go further. we have manaued will not have to go further. we have managed to — will not have to go further. we have managed to get _ will not have to go further. we have managed to get people _ will not have to go further. we have managed to get people back- will not have to go further. we have managed to get people back to - will not have to go further. we have i managed to get people back to normal life, managed to get people back to normal life. and _ managed to get people back to normal life, and those gains were very hard won and _ life, and those gains were very hard won and i_ life, and those gains were very hard won and i do— life, and those gains were very hard won and i do not want to reverse back— won and i do not want to reverse back to _ won and i do not want to reverse back to a — won and i do not want to reverse back to a situation where we have lockdowns, — back to a situation where we have lockdowns, i do not think it necessary. we'll be live in downing street for a government news conference by the health secretary, sajid javid in the next few minutes.
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the uk's cost of living rises by more than 3% for the second month in a row, despite a small drop in the rate of inflation. a draft report from brazillian lawmakers recommends presidentjair bolsonaro face criminal charges over his government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic — but drops accusations of genocide and homicide. good afternoon, you are watching bbc news. a reminder that the health secretary will be leading a briefing from downing street shortly — it was due at five o'clock but i can tell you it's been delayed byjust a few minutes. sajid javid will be joined by drjenny harries from the uk health security agency and professor stephen powis from nhs england. the briefing comes after comments from the nhs confederation, which said rising infections means measures, including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. here's our health editor, hugh pym.
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the nhs confederation says increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying and with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that, week on week, uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are rising at a rate of 10% or more but remain well below levels seen injanuary. some working in intensive care say they are all ready under prepped. in some hospitals one in five bedsits occupied with covid patients. at some hospitals one in five bedsits occupied with covid patients. at the same time we _ occupied with covid patients. at the same time we have _ occupied with covid patients. at the same time we have increased - occupied with covid patients. git tie: same time we have increased numbers of non—covid emergency patients appearing at hospital and intensive care, and we are also trying to support the restoration of major complex surgery, of which there are
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many, many on waiting lists. the nhs confederation — many, many on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has _ many, many on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has called _ many, many on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has called on _ many, many on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has called on the - confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england. drawn up by ministers to be implemented of pressure on the nhs became unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. it is a very simple — and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, _ and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do _ and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do we _ and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do we accept - and more working from home. it 3 —. very simple choice, do we accept the overwhelming evidence from all parts of the health service and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that does not disrupt day to day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope a miracle will happen and then stumble, as we have before, into crisis? this happen and then stumble, as we have before, into crisis?— before, into crisis? this morning ministers will _ before, into crisis? this morning ministers will 10 _ before, into crisis? this morning ministers will 10 platt _ before, into crisis? this morning ministers willjo platt be - before, into crisis? this morning ministers willjo platt be in - ministers willjo platt be in england for now. , this morning, ministers ruled out plan b for england for now. ministers and scientists are looking
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at data on an hourly basis. we don't feel it is time for plan b right now. i think what we are trying to do is get people who haven't been vaccinated to get those vaccinations up, increase the uptake of the booster jab. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. joining me now from westminster is our political correspondent, jonathan blake. we are waiting for sajid javid and this press conference in the next few minutes or so, and what are you hearing he might want to come out with? we hearing he might want to come out with? . hearing he might want to come out with? ~ with? we can report the government will announce — with? we can report the government will announce child's _ with? we can report the government will announce child's of— with? we can report the government will announce child's of two - with? we can report the government will announce child's of two new - will announce child's of two new antiviral drugs, there will be more from him in the next few minutes at
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that downing street briefing, but this is very much part of the government approach and there will be trials of two different types of antiviral drugs at which the government house procured, subject to approval by the medicines regulator the medicines and health care regulatory agency they may well be available for use before the end of the year. as you heard from jim reed eight few minutes ago, the idea is to lessen the impact of coronavirus, to reduce the severity of the symptoms and in doing that to reduce the number of people but have tuesday in hospital for a reduce the number of people but have tuesday in hospitalfor a prolonged period, thereby reducing strain on the nhs. this will be seen as an important step in country —— containing or controlling the virus to an extent over the winter but it does not overwhelm the nhs and see unbearable strain which would cause the government to move to plan b, as
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it calls it, and implement further steps involving compulsory wearing of masks in some settings, covid passports in some settings and more people working from home. we will hear more about that from the health secretary in the next few minutes. one wonders how much alarm there is in government over the rising rates of infection, hospitalisation and death, nowhere near the levels we saw injanuary, that must be made clear, but certainly compared to other parts of europe, very high indeed? , ., other parts of europe, very high indeed? ,., ., , ., indeed? the government house that the winter will _ indeed? the government house that the winter will be _ indeed? the government house that the winter will be challenging, - indeed? the government house that the winter will be challenging, that l the winter will be challenging, that is what the prime minister told the cabinet, we are told by downing street, at a meeting yesterday, but he reassured them that in his eyes the government house the right plan in place to deal with it. nevertheless downing street says it is keeping a very close eye on those case numbers which, as you say, have been rising, along with the number
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of deaths and hospitalisations from covid—i9, and there is an argument that the rise in cases is somewhat inevitable at this point given that the uk was able to roll out a vaccination programme sooner than other countries, over time the impact of that was going to wane and cases would eventually rise. of course, that has coincided with the arrival of autumn and winter weather virus will spread more quickly and easily and there will be a greater strain on the nhs as a result, and added to the regular strain interfaces every winter. it is a precarious position but ministers believe at least for now they have the right approach and measures in place to keep the virus under a certain level of control, but nevertheless we had seen from health leaders that that is not the case and things will get worse before they get better.— and things will get worse before the net better. ., ., ., they get better. thank you, jonathan blake at westminster. _
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with me now is our health correspondent, jim reed. two new antiviral drugs are being trialled and the hope is they can be rolled out quickly, how would this altered the equation on dealing with winter pressures, the nhs and covid? there is a lot of excitement about one of these drugs made by a company called msd, trials showed that it roughly halved the risk of death or hospitalisation, you take the pill twice a dayjust after you had started to show symptoms of covid. lots of excitement and interest in this drug, developed by an american company. when the trial results were announced it would be announced it would be made available quite quickly in america, this announcement goes to address this country. one downside is it can be quite expensive, about £500 a cause,
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and it has to be given very quickly after you are diagnosed and show symptoms so it is only really useful in a situation like maybe a care home outbreak —— £500 course. you might consider giving this a drug to people at high risk in a care home outbreak, for example, it might stop them needing hospital treatment and breakthrough infections and it could be very encouraging going forward. as we wait for sajid javid to begin the press conference, it does not sound like there will be any announcement about the possibility of bringing back some of the covid measures that have been in place for such a long time? about the focus as jonathan said is on plan eight at the moment, particularly vaccinations, so lots of the focus will be on boosterjabs, in particularfor will be on boosterjabs, in particular for those aged over 50, this is the third child that people
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aged over 50, health care workers and some with underlying conditions are us == and some with underlying conditions are u- , , ., , are us -- this is the third 'ab. there is fl are us -- this is the third 'ab. there is concern i are us -- this is the third jab. there is concern about the i are us -- this is the third jab. . there is concern about the speed are us -- this is the third jab. - there is concern about the speed of the roll—out, if we are looking at the roll—out, if we are looking at the statistics we think about a million people in england would qualify at the moment for this third jab, around 4,000,003rd doses have been given so there is a bit of a shortfall. the nhs suggests that might be more reluctance for people to come forward than in the spring when there was more urgency about vaccination, there also questions about the roll—out, gps are having to deal with the flu vaccine, having to deal with the flu vaccine, having to deal with an increasing demand for treatments in general so there is a lot of pressure on people giving out this vaccination at the moment, which some think might be slowing down the roll—out. a lot of pressure for them to accelerate
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this. , a, a, pressure for them to accelerate this. , . ., , , pressure for them to accelerate this. ., , , ., ., this. there is a real sense among health managers _ this. there is a real sense among health managers and _ this. there is a real sense among health managers and those - this. there is a real sense among i health managers and those working this. there is a real sense among - health managers and those working in the nhs that they need tuesday ahead of the curve and if you are seeing a steep rise in infections, hospitalisations and deaths, we might not be at the level we were at in january but we need might not be at the level we were at injanuary but we need to put those markets in place to prevent us from getting to the state we were at in january now rather than further down the line? ., ., u, h, january now rather than further down the line? ., ., u, ,., ., the line? from a medical point of view they are _ the line? from a medical point of view they are particularly - the line? from a medical point of. view they are particularly concerned about waning immunity, as they describe it, that the vaccine becomes less effective over time. i was in public health england research in september showing after a second dose of the astrazeneca vaccine in particular, even the protection against hospitalisation and death starts to full back —— there was some public health england research. some people think it could
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make a difference to hospitalisations and deaths this autumn so they are really keen to roll—out this booster dose to top up immunity as soon as they can before we get into november, december, january when the health service is under pressure. pare january when the health service is under pressure.— january when the health service is under pressure. are people within the nhs and _ under pressure. are people within the nhs and people _ under pressure. are people within the nhs and people who - under pressure. are people within the nhs and people who have - under pressure. are people within i the nhs and people who have looked at this. chelan clear or do they have any idea why the take—up of the booster vaccine has been so patchy? —— people within nhs and who have looked at this, are they clear? survey say that people are quite enthusiastic about a booster dose, but the way they deliver... i will 'ust cut but the way they deliver... i will just out you _ but the way they deliver... i will just cut you off. _ but the way they deliver... i will just cut you off, here _ but the way they deliver... i will just cut you off, here is - but the way they deliver... i will just cut you off, here is the i but the way they deliver... i will just cut you off, here is the health secretary, sajid javid.— secretary, sa'id javid. good secretary, sajid javid. good afternoon and _ secretary, sajid javid. good afternoon and welcome i secretary, sajid javid. good afternoon and welcome to l secretary, sajidjavid. (13mg. afternoon and welcome to downing street for today's coronavirus briefing. i am joined street for today's coronavirus briefing. iamjoined by street for today's coronavirus briefing. i am joined by drjenny
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harries, the chief executive of the uk health security agency, and professor stephen powis, the medical director of nhs england. we have always known the winter months would pose the greatest threat to our road to recovery. the darker skies and colder weather provide perfect conditions notjust colder weather provide perfect conditions not just for colder weather provide perfect conditions notjust for covid—i9 to thrive but also other seasonal viruses like flu and narrow virus. ahead of winter, as we expected, we are starting to seep impact. cases are starting to seep impact. cases are rising and today we reported 43,738 new cases across the uk, up i6% from the previous week. it could yet go as high as 100,000 a 16% from the previous week. it could yet go as high as 100,000 a day. we are also seeing greater pressure on the nhs across the uk, we are now approaching 1000 hospitalisations per day. the nhs is performing with
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distinction and i would like to thank everyone working so hard to keep us safe. and we will do what it takes to make sure there pressure does not become unsustainable and that we do not allow the nhs to become overwhelmed. deaths remain no civilly low, that they are still, sadly, over100 civilly low, that they are still, sadly, over 100 per day —— mercifully low. this pandemic is not over. thanks to the vaccination programme the link between cases and hospitalisations and deaths has significantly weakened, but it is not broken. so we must all remember that this virus will be with us for the long—term and it remains a threat, a threat to our loved ones and to the progress we have made in getting our nation closer to normal
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life. we are looking closely at the data and will not be implementing our plan b of contingency measures at this point. but we will be staying vigilant, preparing for all eventualities while strengthening our vital detent —— defences that can help fight back against this virus. as we approach this critical time for our nation's recovery, i wanted to bring you up to date with some of our work in strengthening these defences as we learn to live with the virus. one line of defences treatments, and i had some positive news to share today. we should all be proud that the uk has been at the forefront of some of the most cutting—edge treatments. covid—19 treatments have already had an amazing impact and they are especially important for people who cannot take vaccines for medical
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reasons or if they are a new no compromise. it was british scientist who led the clinical trial that discovered an effective treatment for covid—19, it is already estimated to have saved 1 million lives across the world. some of the most vulnerable nhs patients in hospital are already benefiting from a treatment specifically designed to treat covid—19. we will also see some promising developments around antivirals too. antivirals work by targeting a virus at an early stage and disrupting the way the virus develops and multiplies. i am pleased to announce that we had signed two landmark deals securing hundreds of thousands of doses of two new antivirals from pfizer and
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from msd. these antivirals have the potential to speed up recovery time and stop infections from progressing. if these treatments get mhra approval then we can provide some of the most vulnerable patients with vital protection this summer. i want to deploy them as quickly as possible. i would like to thank the antiviral task force under the leadership of eddie gray for everything they have done to make it happen. we will keep working to secure even more of these incredible treatments so that we can continue to protect as many people as possible. this is great news but we cannot be complacent. when covid—19 remains such a potent threat. ever since our phenomenal vaccine programme began last winter we have beenin programme began last winter we have been in a race between the vaccine and the virus stop although we are ahead in that race the gap is
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narrowing. we have come so far thanks to the efforts of so many but with winter ahead, we can't blow it now. so we are going to do everything we can to maintain our lead by strengthening our vaccination programme as our primary line of defence. first we will redouble our efforts to encourage anyone who is eligible to take up the initial offer of a jab. there is almost 5 million people over the age of 16 that remain unvaccinated in the uk. it might be someone you know, a friend orfamily member or colleague. if you do, tell them, it is never too late to come forward. so if you yet haven't had yourjab, please take this huge step to protect yourself and to protect your loved ones. secondly, we have extended the offer of a vaccine to
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more and more people including young people aged between 12 and 15. we will be making it easierfor them people aged between 12 and 15. we will be making it easier for them to get protected by opening up our national booking service so they can get their jab national booking service so they can get theirjab at national booking service so they can get their jab at vaccination centres across the country as well as at school. third, we have also started rolling out our booster programme, which is vital to keeping us safe over the coming months. although our vaccines offer powerful protection, we know the protection you get from me over to vaccine reduces materially over time. especially in older people who are at greatest risk. without delivering protection to a booster dose we will see a real—world impact. as well as this,
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covid—19 mutates like any virus and we are identifying new variants all the time. this includes a new version of the delta variant which is currently known as a white 4.2 and that new variant is now spreading. while there is no reason to believe at this point that ay4.2 produces a greater threat, the next variant or one after that might do. so we need to be ready for what lies around the corner. this means our ongoing programme of boosterjabs is so important and this winter we are prioritising those most in need. today we have reached a milestone of 4 million top up ofjabs in england but we need to get even more people protected. we have got the jabs, we just need the arms to put them in.
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if you are over 50 or in another priority group and had your second jab over six months ago you are eligible for a booster. the nhs will send you an invite. if you haven't been invited within a week of reaching that six milestone, please get onto the national booking service and book online and phone 119. notjust to save lives but to keep your freedoms to. because all of these precious moments we have been able to restore over the past few months, the loved ones we have been able to see and the collective experiences we have been able to share, they have been possible thanks to our vaccination programme and because of so many of you that came forward when it was your time. if we want to secure these freedoms for the long term, the best thing we
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can do is come forward once again when that moment comes. after the decisive steps we have taken this year, none of us want to go backwards now. so we must all play our part in this national mission and think about what we can do to make a difference. that means getting the jab when the time comes whether it is for covid—19 or flu. but although vaccinations are our primary form of defence there are very more things we can all do to help contain the spread of this virus. like meeting outdoors where it is possible and if you can only meet indoors, letting in fresh air, wearing a face covering in crowded and closed spaces, especially if you are coming into contact with people you don't normally meet. and like making and taking rapid tests, making and taking rapid tests, making them as part of your weekly
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routine. a quarter of the positive cases we are now identifying come from those literal flow tests that people are taking without symptoms but they are taking them as a precaution, especially if they are about to meet a loved one or perhaps about to meet a loved one or perhaps a grandparent or another vulnerable person. with winter soon upon us these little steps make a big difference. they are more important now than they have ever been. if we all play our part, then we can give ourselves the best possible chance in this race, get through this winter and enjoy christmas with our loved ones. thank you. i'd now like to hand over tojenny, who will take us through some of the latest covid—19 data. us through some of the latest covid-19 data.— us through some of the latest covid-19 data. could i have the first slide, _ covid-19 data. could i have the first slide, please? _ covid-19 data. could i have the first slide, please? i— covid-19 data. could i have the first slide, please? i think i covid-19 data. could i have the | first slide, please? i think what they— first slide, please? i think what they will— first slide, please? i think what they will do isjust highlight first slide, please? i think what they will do is just highlight where we are _ they will do is just highlight where we are in— they will do is just highlight where we are in the epidemiological picture — we are in the epidemiological picture to but also highlight some
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of its _ picture to but also highlight some of its excesses from the vaccination but also _ of its excesses from the vaccination but also some of the risks that lay ahead _ but also some of the risks that lay ahead of— but also some of the risks that lay ahead of us— but also some of the risks that lay ahead of us this winter. the first slide _ ahead of us this winter. the first slide issuing is the number of individuals who have had at least one positive covid—19 test result, this is_ one positive covid—19 test result, this is right — one positive covid—19 test result, this is right across the uk and brings— this is right across the uk and brings us— this is right across the uk and brings us up to the 20th of october. what _ brings us up to the 20th of october. what we _ brings us up to the 20th of october. what we can see there is that since yesterday— what we can see there is that since yesterday we have had 49,139 people testing _ yesterday we have had 49,139 people testing positive. the number here, the 45.799 — testing positive. the number here, the 45,799 is our average through the 45,799 is our average through the week— the 45,799 is our average through the week which is entirely appropriate, we get dips and peaks. if i appropriate, we get dips and peaks. if iiust _ appropriate, we get dips and peaks. if iiust go _ appropriate, we get dips and peaks. if ijust go back one week to the 13th of— if ijust go back one week to the 13th of october the number then was 42,776, _ 13th of october the number then was 42,776, what you will see as there is quite _ 42,776, what you will see as there is quite a — 42,776, what you will see as there is quite a steep increase as we go forward _ is quite a steep increase as we go forward in — is quite a steep increase as we go forward in the number of cases. i would _ forward in the number of cases. i would just— forward in the number of cases. i would just like to brag on this the unusual— would just like to brag on this the unusual and slightly worrying picture — unusual and slightly worrying picture of the shape of that curve. we can— picture of the shape of that curve. we can see — picture of the shape of that curve. we can see the cases now are almost
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as high— we can see the cases now are almost as high as _ we can see the cases now are almost as high as they were in july and actually— as high as they were in july and actually not far off where they were last winter~ — actually not far off where they were last winter. what we are not seeing is that— last winter. what we are not seeing is that dipped down again at the other— is that dipped down again at the other side of the peak and that is really— other side of the peak and that is really important because we are kicking — really important because we are kicking off the winter at a really hi-h kicking off the winter at a really high level of cases. fortunately that is— high level of cases. fortunately that is not— high level of cases. fortunately that is not currently working through _ that is not currently working through into serious disease and deaths _ through into serious disease and deaths but we will come onto that in a moment — deaths but we will come onto that in a moment. good i have the next slide. _ a moment. good i have the next slide, please? this shows a number of people _ slide, please? this shows a number of people in— slide, please? this shows a number of people in hospital with covid—19, again— of people in hospital with covid—19, again right — of people in hospital with covid—19, again right across the uk. this has increased — again right across the uk. this has increased by 10.3% since last week. we are _ increased by 10.3% since last week. we are seeing that movement forward. we are seeing that movement forward. we would _ we are seeing that movement forward. we would expect a high point after rising _ we would expect a high point after rising cases to come about two weeks after a _ rising cases to come about two weeks after a peak— rising cases to come about two weeks after a peak and if you look at the bottom _ after a peak and if you look at the bottom on— after a peak and if you look at the bottom on the right—hand side you can see _ bottom on the right—hand side you can see where the cases peaked previously injuly, the middle of august. — previously injuly, the middle of august, you can see there is a peak there _ august, you can see there is a peak there what — august, you can see there is a peak there. what hasn't happened is those cases— there. what hasn't happened is those cases have _ there. what hasn't happened is those cases have not decreased. they have
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continued _ cases have not decreased. they have continued at — cases have not decreased. they have continued at a fairly high level and in actual— continued at a fairly high level and in actual fact in the last few days they are — in actual fact in the last few days they are continuing to increase. we had 7891— they are continuing to increase. we had 7891 people in hospital on the 19th of— had 7891 people in hospital on the 19th of october, if we go back one week_ 19th of october, if we go back one week only— 19th of october, if we go back one week onlyjust over 7000. a steady increase at the moment as we approach the winter months. if we io we approach the winter months. if we go back— we approach the winter months. if we go back to _ we approach the winter months. if we go back to hospital injanuary, the peak— go back to hospital injanuary, the peak was — go back to hospital injanuary, the peak was around 39,200, so we are a lon- peak was around 39,200, so we are a long way— peak was around 39,200, so we are a long way of— peak was around 39,200, so we are a long way of that but it is a very different — long way of that but it is a very different epidemiological picture. next slide, please. sadly we look at the depths. we know there was a very hi-h the depths. we know there was a very high death— the depths. we know there was a very high death toll in the first wave of the pandemic and the total deaths we sadly recorded since the start of the pandemic are nowjust over 139.000 — the pandemic are nowjust over 139,000. these relate to people who have had _
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139,000. these relate to people who have had a _ 139,000. these relate to people who have had a positive covid test within — have had a positive covid test within 28 _ have had a positive covid test within 28 days of death. we see here the most _ within 28 days of death. we see here the most recent seven day average is 136 deaths _ the most recent seven day average is 136 deaths. it is very flat compared with the _ 136 deaths. it is very flat compared with the first wave but it is clearly _ with the first wave but it is clearly every life is of significance and i think one of the more _ significance and i think one of the more significant points about this as we _ more significant points about this as we have had in the last two days of the _ as we have had in the last two days of the highest rates we have had for some _ of the highest rates we have had for some time, — of the highest rates we have had for some time, sojust in the last 24 hours _ some time, sojust in the last 24 hours 179 — some time, sojust in the last 24 hours 179 deaths recorded. these are moving _ hours 179 deaths recorded. these are moving in_ hours 179 deaths recorded. these are moving in the wrong direction. we can see _ moving in the wrong direction. we can see the — moving in the wrong direction. we can see the really strong effect of vaccination which it is difficult to believe — vaccination which it is difficult to believe just wasn't here this time last year— believe just wasn't here this time last year but still moving in the wrong — last year but still moving in the wrong direction. next slide, please. this is— wrong direction. next slide, please. this is why— wrong direction. next slide, please. this is why we see the difference. we have _ this is why we see the difference. we have had a huge roll—out of vaccination. this chart shows the cumulative — vaccination. this chart shows the cumulative uptake of individuals who have received their first dose, that is in blue _
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have received their first dose, that is in blue and then who have received _ is in blue and then who have received two doses. that is an orange — received two doses. that is an orange in _ received two doses. that is an orange. in total over 49 and a half million _ orange. in total over 49 and a half million individuals have received that first — million individuals have received that first dose and over 45 million the second. we now have in the 12 plus age _ the second. we now have in the 12 plus age group right the way through adulthood, 86.1% of our population have had _ adulthood, 86.1% of our population have had that first dose and 79% the second _ have had that first dose and 79% the second dose. clearly from the information we have had before, the fact we _ information we have had before, the fact we are _ information we have had before, the fact we are now approaching winter and the _ fact we are now approaching winter and the secretary of state has said there _ and the secretary of state has said there are _ and the secretary of state has said there are still people out there who have not— there are still people out there who have not had a first dose which will significantly protect them. there is still plenty of opportunity to come and get _ still plenty of opportunity to come and get that. if we look on the next slide. _ and get that. if we look on the next slide. which — and get that. if we look on the next slide, which shows us how the booster— slide, which shows us how the booster vaccination programme is doing. _ booster vaccination programme is doing, these are the vulnerable groups. — doing, these are the vulnerable groups, the elderly individuals in care homes, those with underlying conditions. — care homes, those with underlying conditions, and you can see here we
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have _ conditions, and you can see here we have reached — conditions, and you can see here we have reached over 4 million individuals having their booster dose _ individuals having their booster dose i— individuals having their booster dose. i know professor powis can add some _ dose. i know professor powis can add some detail— dose. i know professor powis can add some detail as we go forward. this isjust— some detail as we go forward. this isjust for— some detail as we go forward. this isjust for england. it has increased from 860,000 on the 30th of september, so that is rolling out very rapidly now as we move forward to cover— very rapidly now as we move forward to cover all— very rapidly now as we move forward to cover all those at higher risk. then— to cover all those at higher risk. then on— to cover all those at higher risk. then on the _ to cover all those at higher risk. then on the final slide, ijust want to highlight how important that vaccination is. what we can see here are covid-i9— vaccination is. what we can see here are covid—19 cases coming into emergency care within 28 days of a positive _ emergency care within 28 days of a positive test. these are individuals where _ positive test. these are individuals where hospital intervention has resulted — where hospital intervention has resulted in an inpatient admission. these _ resulted in an inpatient admission. these are — resulted in an inpatient admission. these are people who have had to seek care — these are people who have had to seek care. but you can see it in terms — seek care. but you can see it in terms of— seek care. but you can see it in terms of vaccination status, the dark— terms of vaccination status, the dark blue — terms of vaccination status, the dark blue lines or those individuals who are _
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dark blue lines or those individuals who are unvaccinated and the orange lines are _ who are unvaccinated and the orange lines are those people who have had to make _ lines are those people who have had to make doses. it is clear as you -et to make doses. it is clear as you get more — to make doses. it is clear as you get more elderly you have more other conditions _ get more elderly you have more other conditions but even then the protections that is afforded to the older— protections that is afforded to the older people is significant but for younger— older people is significant but for younger people i think there is a really— younger people i think there is a really important message here, which is you _ really important message here, which is you have _ really important message here, which is you have very little risk if you have _ is you have very little risk if you have two — is you have very little risk if you have two doses of vaccine but you have _ have two doses of vaccine but you have a _ have two doses of vaccine but you have a significant risk if you have had none — have a significant risk if you have had none i— have a significant risk if you have had none. iwill have a significant risk if you have had none. i will hand have a significant risk if you have had none. iwill hand back have a significant risk if you have had none. i will hand back to the secretary— had none. i will hand back to the secretary of state. thank you very much, jenny. our first two questions are from members of the public, i believe the first one is from ruth in cornwall. i will read the question out. "with the huge rise in covid infections, which did not be sensible to make wearing face coverings mandatory and public buildings again?" —— would it not be
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sensible? research take the plan a three weeks ago when we took the step forward decision back injuly —— we set out a clear plan three weeks ago. we think it is the right decision to live with this virus and a lot of mandatory measures were put into guidance. it is asking people to take more responsibility to follow that guidance, when it comes to face coverings, as i said eight few minutes ago, everyone should follow that guidance and think about others around them, the settings, if they are in an enclosed space, especially with people they are not normally with, they should wear a facemask. on public transport, london underground, for instance, has a face mask rule, they should observe those rules. and to say to ruth, we have also said that if we
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need to take further measures as part of our contingency plans, plan b, they would include making facemasks mandatory in certain settings, that may well public buildings. if i can, the next question is, i believe, from jonathan from leicester. "many children 11 to 16 years... what i would say tojonathan, in many countries, not all, but many, where they have a vaccination rule for entry or even for travel by plane prior to boarding, they would treat anyone under dh of 16, 16 or
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under, as being fully vaccinated, as the uk does —— anyone under dh of 16. that does not apply to every single country, asjonathan alluded to, we are working on a plan that would allow from our to get some kind of proof of antibodies but it will ultimately be up to the country that child is travelling to with their family whether they can accept that. as we had done with vaccinations, we work with international partners to try to come to a common understanding. my thanks to ruth and jonathan ford are questions. now from the journalists, thank you for coming —— ruth and jonathan, for their questions. sophie from bbc news? jonathan, for their questions. sohie from bbc news? ,, sophie from bbc news? reporter: nhs oraanisations sophie from bbc news? reporter: nhs organisations had _ sophie from bbc news? reporter: nhs organisations had said _ sophie from bbc news? reporter: nhs organisations had said they _ sophie from bbc news? reporter: nhs organisations had said they are _ organisations had said they are right at the edge of what they can manage now, given your own measure
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is unsustainable pressure on the nhs in order to bring in restrictions, isn't it time to do so? and a question for professor powis, do you believe these nhs organisations when they say they are right at the edge, is this not unsustainable? first they say they are right at the edge, is this not unsustainable?— is this not unsustainable? first of all, i is this not unsustainable? first of all. i think— is this not unsustainable? first of all. i think you — is this not unsustainable? first of all, i think you are _ is this not unsustainable? first of all, i think you are referring i is this not unsustainable? first of all, i think you are referring to i all, i think you are referring to the nhs confederation, i have a lot of time for the nhs confederation, i have met with in the past and will do in the future, they do a lot of good work. on this particular question, we do not believe the pressure is currently faced by the nhs are unsustainable. don't get me wrong, there are huge pressures especially in a&e and primary care, but at this point we do not believe they are unsustainable. steve can answer more in a moment but one of the reasons i think the nhs is able to do what it does, number one,
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thanks to everyone working in the nhs, but the extra support we are providing for the second half of this year, additional £5.4 billion which is certainly helping, we will absolutely keep it under review. if we feel at any point it is becoming unsustainable then the department together with our friends at the nhs, will not hesitate to ask. steve? thank you, sophie. the first thing _ steve? thank you, sophie. the first thing to— steve? thank you, sophie. the first thing to acknowledge, as the secretary of state has said and our chief _ secretary of state has said and our chief executive amanda pritchard said yesterday, the nhs is under considerable pressure. we have had a barry— considerable pressure. we have had a barry chuckle summer as we have continued — barry chuckle summer as we have continued to treat people with covid being _ continued to treat people with covid being admitted to hospitals, society has opened up again and we are seeing— has opened up again and we are seeing near—normal has opened up again and we are seeing near— normal levels of presentation of people needing urgent — presentation of people needing urgent and emergency care, and as we started _ urgent and emergency care, and as we started making inroads into patients
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whose _ started making inroads into patients whose treatment was disrupted and delayed _ whose treatment was disrupted and delayed during the pandemic, so it undoubtedly feels exceptionally busy in the nhs and our nhs organisations tell us— in the nhs and our nhs organisations tell us about all the time. in september we saw a reduction in the number— september we saw a reduction in the number of— september we saw a reduction in the number of covid patients in hospital. _ number of covid patients in hospital, down to below 5000 in england. — hospital, down to below 5000 in england, as infection rates went down, _ england, as infection rates went down, as— england, as infection rates went down, asjenny showed earlier. in the last— down, asjenny showed earlier. in the last few— down, asjenny showed earlier. in the last few weeks those rates increased again and as the secretary of state _ increased again and as the secretary of state said we have seen an increase — of state said we have seen an increase in the number of other nations— increase in the number of other nations and patients in hospital, so that our— nations and patients in hospital, so that our main hospitals in england we are _ that our main hospitals in england we are just — that our main hospitals in england we are just over 6000 patients with covid, _ we are just over 6000 patients with covid, back— we are just over 6000 patients with covid, back to where we were in the middle _ covid, back to where we were in the middle of— covid, back to where we were in the middle of september. i anticipate that over— middle of september. i anticipate that over the next week or two that number— that over the next week or two that number will increase because infection— number will increase because infection rates are increasing, as i have _ infection rates are increasing, as i have said — infection rates are increasing, as i have said many times there is a light— have said many times there is a light between infection rates in hospital— light between infection rates in hospital admissions. light between infection rates in hospitaladmissions. it light between infection rates in hospital admissions. it is notjust covid, _ hospital admissions. it is notjust covid, of— hospital admissions. it is notjust
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covid, of course. —— there is a lag between — covid, of course. —— there is a lag between infection rates and hospital admissions. we have the flu season, we do _ admissions. we have the flu season, we do not _ admissions. we have the flu season, we do not know what will happen with flu but _ we do not know what will happen with flu but there is a risk we will get more _ flu but there is a risk we will get more and — flu but there is a risk we will get more and it— flu but there is a risk we will get more and it will be worse than previous— more and it will be worse than previous years because we missed it last year. _ previous years because we missed it last year, and there are other viruses — last year, and there are other viruses around. we are continuing to do all— viruses around. we are continuing to do all that— viruses around. we are continuing to do all that work about the recovery of our— do all that work about the recovery of our elective and routine services. _ of our elective and routine services, it is very busy indeed. we work— services, it is very busy indeed. we work very— services, it is very busy indeed. we work very closely with the department of health and social care around _ department of health and social care around the _ department of health and social care around the judgment of how the nhs is doing _ around the judgment of how the nhs is doing and we will continue to do that in_ is doing and we will continue to do that in the — is doing and we will continue to do that in the winter, but critically the public— that in the winter, but critically the public can absolutely help the nhs _ the public can absolutely help the nhs as— the public can absolutely help the nhs. as the secretary of state said, there _ nhs. as the secretary of state said, there are _ nhs. as the secretary of state said, there are things the public are due to take _ there are things the public are due to take pressure off the nhs. first, remember— to take pressure off the nhs. first, rememberthere is to take pressure off the nhs. first, remember there is guidance to take pressure off the nhs. first, rememberthere is guidance in to take pressure off the nhs. first, remember there is guidance in place for facemasks. remember there is guidance in place forfacemasks. if remember there is guidance in place for facemasks. if you are in a crowded _ for facemasks. if you are in a crowded environment, a high—risk environment, on the tube, a cramped building _ environment, on the tube, a cramped building with — environment, on the tube, a cramped building with low ventilation, wearing _ building with low ventilation, wearing a face mask really makes a difference — wearing a face mask really makes a difference. the second thing is the
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vaccine _ difference. the second thing is the vaccine programme, our best protection against covid. if you have _ protection against covid. if you have been— protection against covid. if you have been invited for a booster and have not had one or if you are getting — have not had one or if you are getting your
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are you concerned about winning vaccine immunity and are you already being in increased doublejob hospitalisations? i being in increased double 'ob hospitalisations?i being in increased double 'ob hospitalisations? i think the plan we have set _ hospitalisations? i think the plan we have set out _ hospitalisations? i think the plan we have set out as _ hospitalisations? i think the plan we have set out as taking - hospitalisations? i think the plan we have set out as taking into i we have set out as taking into account the situation we are confronted with at the moment, in my remarks, the entire focus is on what we can do to help ourselves with obviously the government has a huge role to play, the vaccine programme, testing programme, but we need people to take up those vaccines when they are offered, especially the boosters and the testing regime that stays in place, three tests so
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important identifying positive cases, the action people take if they are positive to isolate and not spread that virus any further and the behaviours we talked about we can all deploy. that is what we have called plan a, we have contingency measures ready, i will not go through them all now but they are publicly available and we have set out what we would do if the situation became more challenging. we are not yet at that point and i hope that everyone can play their part, especially when it comes to the vaccinations and the booster. if you are invited all at that six—month milestone, please get your booster. i six-month milestone, please get your booster. ~ . . booster. i think we are all concerned _ booster. i think we are all concerned about - booster. i think we are all concerned about whaling l booster. i think we are all - concerned about whaling immunity booster. i think we are all _ concerned about whaling immunity but the first _ concerned about whaling immunity but the first thing is to remind everybody that vaccines are incredibly effective. —— concerns about— incredibly effective. —— concerns about waning immunity. one year ago
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if you _ about waning immunity. one year ago if you had _ about waning immunity. one year ago if you had said we would have a vaccine — if you had said we would have a vaccine programme rolled out to as many— vaccine programme rolled out to as many people as we had with a 95% or thereabouts _ many people as we had with a 95% or thereabouts effectiveness of preventing hospital admission, thereabouts effectiveness of preventing hospitaladmission, i preventing hospital admission, i think— preventing hospital admission, i think we — preventing hospitaladmission, i think we would have been absolutely delighted, so do not forget that vaccines— delighted, so do not forget that vaccines are incredibly effective at giving _ vaccines are incredibly effective at giving high—level protection and that is— giving high—level protection and that is why we are not seeing the numbers— that is why we are not seeing the numbers of people in hospital he saw in previous— numbers of people in hospital he saw in previous peaks. but it is a natural— in previous peaks. but it is a natural phenomenon that immunity reduces— natural phenomenon that immunity reduces over time after a vaccine and reduces overtime after a vaccine and natural— reduces over time after a vaccine and natural infection, that is why people _ and natural infection, that is why people get repeated flu infections over the _ people get repeated flu infections over the lifetime, this natural phenomenon will occur and that is whyjcvi _ phenomenon will occur and that is whyjcvi have recommended a booster dose is _ whyjcvi have recommended a booster dose is an— whyjcvi have recommended a booster dose is an important part of our armament — dose is an important part of our armament against this virus in boosting — armament against this virus in boosting immunity, particularly going _ boosting immunity, particularly going into this winter. yes, waning immunity— going into this winter. yes, waning immunity will occur, but we have a way of— immunity will occur, but we have a way of dealing with that, the booster _ way of dealing with that, the booster programme, and therefore, once again — booster programme, and therefore, once again to remind everybody,
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getting _ once again to remind everybody, getting that booster when offered and eligible six months after your second _ and eligible six months after your second dose is really critical. the pandemic— second dose is really critical. the pandemic is not over yet and increasing the level of immunity in the population by that booster is one of— the population by that booster is one of our— the population by that booster is one of our main defences going into the winter. — one of our main defences going into the winter, along with the caution we have _ the winter, along with the caution we have described in terms of people being _ we have described in terms of people being sensible, particularly in high-risk— being sensible, particularly in high—risk environments. the final thing _ high—risk environments. the final thing i_ high—risk environments. the final thing i should have seen earlier —— search— thing i should have seen earlier —— search earlier and thing i should have seen earlier —— search earlierand i'm thing i should have seen earlier —— search earlier and i'm saying no, dont _ search earlier and i'm saying no, dont forget _ search earlier and i'm saying no, don't forget your flu vaccine. last year— don't forget your flu vaccine. last year we _ don't forget your flu vaccine. last year we had — don't forget your flu vaccine. last year we had our most successful other— year we had our most successful other nhs— year we had our most successful other nhs flu vaccine programme, we did not— other nhs flu vaccine programme, we did not have _ other nhs flu vaccine programme, we did not have any flu, this year it needs— did not have any flu, this year it needs to — did not have any flu, this year it needs to be even better, so jab for covid. _ needs to be even better, so jab for covid. chard — needs to be even better, so jab for covid, chard for flu, needs to be even better, so jab for covid, chard forflu, be needs to be even better, so jab for covid, chard for flu, be cautious, that— covid, chard for flu, be cautious, that is— covid, chard for flu, be cautious, that is the — covid, chard for flu, be cautious, that is the message going into winter~ — that is the message going into winter~ -- _ that is the message going into winter. ——jab that is the message going into winter. —— jab forflu. that is the message going into winter. -- jab for flu. winter. -- 'ab for flu. reporter: some winter. -- jab for flu. reporter: some people _ winter. -- jab for flu. reporter:
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some people would _ winter. -- jab for flu. reporter: some people would see - winter. -- jab for flu. reporter: some people would see it - winter. -- jab for flu. reporter: some people would see it as i some people would see it as complacent that you see nothing in the data at the moment to give you concern, particularly when the nhs confederation and senior scientists argue that the warning signs are there. a number, how bad you hospital admissions need to get her day before you bring in plan b? a question on the antivirals, there will be many people with weakened immune systems are very concerned about this surge, hopeful the drugs might be there for them. igraffiti about this surge, hopeful the drugs might be there for them.— might be there for them. will they be? the first _ might be there for them. will they be? the first part _ might be there for them. will they be? the first part of _ might be there for them. will they be? the first part of your- might be there for them. will they | be? the first part of your question, we are concerned. i think everyone is right to be concerned and i hope that it the last ten minutes or so i have managed to express that concern and the reasons, with cases rising asjenny and the reasons, with cases rising as jenny has and the reasons, with cases rising asjenny has just and the reasons, with cases rising as jenny has just shown and the reasons, with cases rising asjenny has just shown in her latest data. deaths are mercifully low but still more than 100. the focus very much remains on what we
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set out in plan a, the vaccines are working, as steve hasjust set out in plan a, the vaccines are working, as steve has just alluded to we have seen from the data if you look at hospital admissions the vaccines are clearly working. the ons estimates they had saved 130,000 lives, prevented 240,000 hospitalisations, prevented 24 million infections. that is what the vaccines are doing, so if more people are vaccinated, just to emphasise again the 5 million also across the uk that haven't even had their firstjab, across the uk that haven't even had theirfirstjab, including then, if you know someone, appeal, speak to them and nudge than to do their bit to help themselves and others. if they had some weird ideas about vaccines because they have been reading this information on the intranet or elsewhere and put them intranet or elsewhere and put them in the right direction. —— because they have been reading
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misinformation. the flu vaccination this year is more important than ever, the biggest flu vaccination programme in history, we have 35 million doses with people we are targeting to really help combat both those viruses. that is our plan, we remain cautious. you asked me what is the number of hospitalisations, we monitor this daily, we work very closely with the nhs on a daily basis and it is notjust one particular number we are looking at, i am very conscious that behind these numbers, you often talk about numbers easily but there is an individual and family affected, we are very conscious of that, but as well as hospitalisations we are looking up the pressure on the nhs across—the—board, a&e, primary care, emergency services like 999, the ambulance service, we are looking at a number of factors and taking them
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into account. on the drugs, then you antivirals, i can't tell you a bit more about them. in terms of the total we have put, it is 730,000 patient courses we had purchased, 480,000 courses of one that i referred to and 230,000 from pfizer. they work differently with different mechanisms, it could be worn all the other that mighty —— might be deployed —— it could be one or the other that might be deployed. they can be deployed if somebody has become ill from covid or if you expect that they might be because there is an outbreak, say, in a care home where you would naturally have vulnerable people. it is a really new, fresh two in our armour, these are the first—ever antivirals
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designed specifically for covid. they still need approval from the nhra, the tests that are publicly available at the moment are very encouraging that we wanted to get in early and sign a deal to be one of the first countries in the world to receive them, should they be approved. i receive them, should they be approved-— receive them, should they be a- roved. ~' , ., ., approved. i think there is no one number that _ approved. i think there is no one number that we _ approved. i think there is no one number that we would _ approved. i think there is no one number that we would use i approved. i think there is no one number that we would use to i approved. i think there is no one i number that we would use to figure but triggering further interventions because _ but triggering further interventions because it is more complex than that. _ because it is more complex than that. there — because it is more complex than that, there are a variety of things difficult — that, there are a variety of things difficult. we talked about infection rates _ difficult. we talked about infection rates because they tell us what is i could _ rates because they tell us what is i could have — rates because they tell us what is i could have been the nhs the next three _ could have been the nhs the next three weeks. we have talked about vaccine _ three weeks. we have talked about vaccine effectiveness because it tells us — vaccine effectiveness because it tells us how many people are likely to require _ tells us how many people are likely to require hospitalisation. we later received _ to require hospitalisation. we later received a — to require hospitalisation. we later received a number of admissions but we also _ received a number of admissions but we also look— received a number of admissions but we also look at what is happening with flu _ we also look at what is happening with flu and other viruses and other emergehcy— with flu and other viruses and other emergency admissions. there is a variety— emergency admissions. there is a variety of— emergency admissions. there is a variety of things that we will be looking — variety of things that we will be looking at and continue to look at.
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the final— looking at and continue to look at. the final thing to say is we do see geographical variation. what is happening in one part of the country might— happening in one part of the country might not— happening in one part of the country might not be happening in another, that has— might not be happening in another, that has been typical of the pandemic. it is possible we will see that variation again. there is no one number to look at. we have to look at _ one number to look at. we have to look at things in the round, look at all these _ look at things in the round, look at all these numbers, look at things in the round, look at allthese numbers, isjudgment and of course _ allthese numbers, isjudgment and of course were closely with colleagues in uk hsa on the public outside. _ colleagues in uk hsa on the public outside, the department health and social— outside, the department health and social care — outside, the department health and social care to take collective judgment. on the anti—perils it is great _ judgment. on the anti—perils it is great news — judgment. on the anti—perils it is great news and as a secretary of state _ great news and as a secretary of state has — great news and as a secretary of state has said we have seen most impressive — state has said we have seen most impressive of the response of the nhs. _ impressive of the response of the nhs. the — impressive of the response of the nhs, the ability to stand up drugs rapidly. _ nhs, the ability to stand up drugs rapidly, investigate drugs and do work— rapidly, investigate drugs and do work out — rapidly, investigate drugs and do work out which drugs are truly effective — work out which drugs are truly effective at managing this pandemic and that— effective at managing this pandemic and that is— effective at managing this pandemic and that is undoubtedly saved many lives in _ and that is undoubtedly saved many lives in the — and that is undoubtedly saved many lives in the uk but actually throughout the world and i think we should _
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throughout the world and i think we should be _ throughout the world and i think we should be really proud that the public — should be really proud that the public health system such as ours is very well— public health system such as ours is very well placed to do that sort of study— very well placed to do that sort of study and — very well placed to do that sort of study and we have shown that we can do it _ study and we have shown that we can do it we _ study and we have shown that we can do it. we have these new antivirals coming _ do it. we have these new antivirals coming in — do it. we have these new antivirals coming in on — do it. we have these new antivirals coming in on stream, in terms of who should _ coming in on stream, in terms of who should get— coming in on stream, in terms of who should get it. — coming in on stream, in terms of who should get it, very that is a bit dependent on the mhra who need to license _ dependent on the mhra who need to license it _ dependent on the mhra who need to license it and they will license it with their— license it and they will license it with their particular licensing conditions. we will of course be taking _ conditions. we will of course be taking advice from clinical experts as to _ taking advice from clinical experts as to who— taking advice from clinical experts as to who it is most appropriate but we would _ as to who it is most appropriate but we would want to target these drugs as we _ we would want to target these drugs as we have _ we would want to target these drugs as we have done in the past at those at the _ as we have done in the past at those at the highest risk of infection and the highest risk of hospitalisation because — the highest risk of hospitalisation because it is what we are most trying — because it is what we are most trying to— because it is what we are most trying to avoid. it is likely that individuals with weakened immune systems— individuals with weakened immune systems are likely to be on that list but — systems are likely to be on that list but our clinical experts would recommend, but let's wait until we -et recommend, but let's wait until we get the _ recommend, but let's wait until we get the mhra licensing and until the advice _ get the mhra licensing and until the advice of— get the mhra licensing and until the advice of our clinical experts. kate
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from the sun _ advice of our clinical experts. kate from the sun paper. _ advice of our clinical experts. i—ir- from the sun paper, you advice of our clinical experts. i—re from the sun paper. you will have seen that the sun has lodged a new campaign to urge brits to get very boosterjabs, would you want us to go to a spirit in the first vaccine programme when people were proud to get there jab posted pictures, are we going to see a return to things like pop—up clinics, a dad's army of retired medics in this military does this help us turbo—charge the jabs led and do medics, some gps are saying they are too busy to roll out the boosterjabs and that there is not on a priority, are they wrong and what would you say to them today? in and what would you say to them toda ? , ., , , and what would you say to them toda? ,., , and what would you say to them toda? ,., _. . ,, and what would you say to them toda? _. .~g and what would you say to them toda? _. .mg, ., today? in short yes and thank you to the sun for— today? in short yes and thank you to the sun for its _ today? in short yes and thank you to the sun for its campaign _ today? in short yes and thank you to the sun for its campaign and - today? in short yes and thank you to the sun for its campaign and others. the sun for its campaign and others that are getting behind this. the boosters could not be more important was the as i have said, we as a country have come a long way and have so much to be proud of, the scientists, that designed the
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vaccines, the nhs and all the volunteers that delivered the vaccines and look at where it has got us, look where we are today versus the start of this year, changed our daily lives and we all want to keep that and sustain it. the biggest difference is the vaccines. it cannot be stressed enough how important it is to first get your initial vaccine if you're one of the 5 million that happened, but if you are the millions that did the if you're one of the recipients, we know your immunity wanes, but particularly concerned over the age of 50 and it has been six months since their second jab and they really need to get their boost and it is good to so many people are going forward but we need more people to come forward as the six—month milestone comes together and yes, we will be vaccination centres, gps going out there and
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delivering them in care homes and other places, making home visits for those that need it, there will be p°p�*up those that need it, there will be pop—up centres, mobile units, we will deploy everything. is it a bit spirit? it is. we need to sustain the progress we have made. we could lose it. we will could lose that progress if people don't take up their vaccination offers. i really couldn't have subsided more. it is important forflu. this couldn't have subsided more. it is important for flu. this year we expect there to be a lot more flu around than normal. why? because last year there just wasn't much because of the measures we had taken over covid, there wasn't much circulating and also the usual number of samples to make the flu vaccine, so take that together, flu could be a real problem this winter but we can all do something about that, that is a good news and that is get your flu vaccine. i
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that, that is a good news and that is get your flu vaccine.— is get your flu vaccine. i think the ublic is get your flu vaccine. i think the public has — is get your flu vaccine. i think the public has responded _ is get your flu vaccine. i think the i public has responded magnificently over the _ public has responded magnificently over the 18 months of the pandemic in responding to the interventions that needed to be put in place and they were — that needed to be put in place and they were incredibly painful but the public— they were incredibly painful but the public sector them and of course coming — public sector them and of course coming forward in droves to get their— coming forward in droves to get theirjabs — coming forward in droves to get theirjabs and vaccines in the initial— theirjabs and vaccines in the initial stages of the vaccine programme. the important message is the booster— programme. the important message is the booster is not some sort of add-on. — the booster is not some sort of add-on. it _ the booster is not some sort of add—on, it is a really critical part of maintaining immunity. if we don't maintain _ of maintaining immunity. if we don't maintain that level of immunity, we will see _ maintain that level of immunity, we will see infections translate into more _ will see infections translate into more hospital admissions and unfortunately more deaths. society has opened up and that is great news but people _ has opened up and that is great news but people shouldn't get complacent and shouldn't forget that there is still pandemic there and that public spiritedness of coming forward are doing _ spiritedness of coming forward are doing your— spiritedness of coming forward are doing your bit for society i think absolutely we need the spirit. on gps. _ absolutely we need the spirit. on gps. gps — absolutely we need the spirit. on gps, gps are extremely busy as society— gps, gps are extremely busy as society works up again, they have played _ society works up again, they have played a — society works up again, they have played a fantastic role in the vaccine _
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played a fantastic role in the vaccine programme and they will continue — vaccine programme and they will continue to do so but the strategy throughout has been to ensure there is as many— throughout has been to ensure there is as many routes as possible to get a backlink— is as many routes as possible to get a backlink as we have extended the community— a backlink as we have extended the community pharmacy programmes, we have put— community pharmacy programmes, we have put in_ community pharmacy programmes, we have put in place vaccination centres. _ have put in place vaccination centres, we have had pop—ups. what we have _ centres, we have had pop—ups. what we have learned through the initial stages _ we have learned through the initial stages of— we have learned through the initial stages of the vaccine programme in carrying _ stages of the vaccine programme in carrying on — stages of the vaccine programme in carrying on to the booster programme is for many— carrying on to the booster programme is for many people having a vaccine centre _ is for many people having a vaccine centre which is close to them is really— centre which is close to them is really important. we have worked with local — really important. we have worked with local communities, local government, public health officials to really— government, public health officials to really identify where it is the best place those vaccine centre so that people can access them easily and well— that people can access them easily and we'll continue to do that. but we know— and we'll continue to do that. but we know combined with that public spirit _ we know combined with that public spirit is _ we know combined with that public spirit is the way to get as many people — spirit is the way to get as many people vaccinated as possible. absolutely, huge thank you to gps, also volunteers— absolutely, huge thank you to gps, also volunteers and _ absolutely, huge thank you to gps, also volunteers and primary - absolutely, huge thank you to gps, also volunteers and primary care i absolutely, huge thank you to gps, i also volunteers and primary care and have done _ also volunteers and primary care and have done a — also volunteers and primary care and have done a lot — also volunteers and primary care and have done a lot to _ also volunteers and primary care and have done a lot to the _ also volunteers and primary care and have done a lot to the pandemic. i have done a lot to the pandemic.
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some _ have done a lot to the pandemic. some clarity— have done a lot to the pandemic. some clarity because _ have done a lot to the pandemic. some clarity because i— have done a lot to the pandemic. some clarity because i think- have done a lot to the pandemic. | some clarity because i think from have done a lot to the pandemic. . some clarity because i think from a public— some clarity because i think from a public perspective _ some clarity because i think from a public perspective the _ some clarity because i think from a public perspective the idea - some clarity because i think from a public perspective the idea of- public perspective the idea of winning — public perspective the idea of winning and _ public perspective the idea of winning and then _ public perspective the idea of winning and then promoting i public perspective the idea of| winning and then promoting a public perspective the idea of- winning and then promoting a vaccine can sound _ winning and then promoting a vaccine can sound a _ winning and then promoting a vaccine can sound a little _ winning and then promoting a vaccine can sound a little counterintuitive. i can sound a little counterintuitive. just to _ can sound a little counterintuitive. just to be — can sound a little counterintuitive. just to be really— can sound a little counterintuitive. just to be really clear, _ can sound a little counterintuitive. just to be really clear, the - just to be really clear, the evidence _ just to be really clear, the evidence to _ just to be really clear, the evidence to date - just to be really clear, the evidence to date shows i just to be really clear, the i evidence to date shows that the vaccines. — evidence to date shows that the vaccines. all— evidence to date shows that the vaccines, all three _ evidence to date shows that the vaccines, all three vaccines i evidence to date shows that the vaccines, all three vaccines we. evidence to date shows that the i vaccines, all three vaccines we have been _ vaccines, all three vaccines we have been using — vaccines, all three vaccines we have been using around _ vaccines, all three vaccines we have been using around 90% _ vaccines, all three vaccines we have been using around 90% effective i vaccines, all three vaccines we have been using around 90% effective inl been using around 90% effective in preventing — been using around 90% effective in preventing deaths, _ been using around 90% effective in preventing deaths, up _ been using around 90% effective in preventing deaths, up to _ been using around 90% effective in preventing deaths, up to five - preventing deaths, up to five months. _ preventing deaths, up to five months. we _ preventing deaths, up to five months, we knew— preventing deaths, up to five months, we knew that, i preventing deaths, up to five i months, we knew that, obviously preventing deaths, up to five - months, we knew that, obviously the jcvi will_ months, we knew that, obviously the jcvi will continue _ months, we knew that, obviously the jcvi will continue to _ months, we knew that, obviously the jcvi will continue to monitor- months, we knew that, obviously the jcvi will continue to monitor that i jcvi will continue to monitor that and weep — jcvi will continue to monitor that and weep obvious _ jcvi will continue to monitor that and weep obvious ? _ jcvi will continue to monitor that and weep obvious ? published i and weep obvious ? published regularly _ and weep obvious ? published regularly it— and weep obvious ? published regularly it is— and weep obvious ? published regularly. it is important- and weep obvious ? published regularly. it is important thatl regularly. it is important that exactly — regularly. it is important that exactly as— regularly. it is important that exactly as professor- regularly. it is important that exactly as professor powis i regularly. it is important thatl exactly as professor powis has regularly. it is important that i exactly as professor powis has said we need _ exactly as professor powis has said we need to— exactly as professor powis has said we need to maintain— exactly as professor powis has said we need to maintain that _ exactly as professor powis has said we need to maintain that level- exactly as professor powis has said we need to maintain that level of. we need to maintain that level of vaccination — we need to maintain that level of vaccination as— we need to maintain that level of vaccination as we _ we need to maintain that level of vaccination as we go _ we need to maintain that level of vaccination as we go forward, i we need to maintain that level of| vaccination as we go forward, that is important _ vaccination as we go forward, that is important. the _ vaccination as we go forward, that is important. the second - vaccination as we go forward, that is important. the second point i vaccination as we go forward, that is important. the second point is. is important. the second point is that vaccination— is important. the second point is that vaccination is _ is important. the second point is that vaccination is really- is important. the second point is that vaccination is really good i is important. the second point is that vaccination is really good at| that vaccination is really good at preventing — that vaccination is really good at preventing serious _ that vaccination is really good at preventing serious illness, i preventing serious illness, hospitalisations— preventing serious illness, hospitalisations and - preventing serious illness, i hospitalisations and deaths, it is not necessarily— hospitalisations and deaths, it is not necessarily preventing - hospitalisations and deaths, it is not necessarily preventing you . not necessarily preventing you getting — not necessarily preventing you getting infection. _ not necessarily preventing you getting infection. this - not necessarily preventing you getting infection. this is - not necessarily preventing you getting infection. this is quite| getting infection. this is quite important _ getting infection. this is quite important because _ getting infection. this is quite important because one - getting infection. this is quite important because one of- getting infection. this is quite important because one of the| getting infection. this is quite i important because one of the key messages — important because one of the key messages here _ important because one of the key messages here is— important because one of the key messages here is both _ important because one of the key messages here is both about- messages here is both about vaccinations— messages here is both about vaccinations whether- messages here is both about vaccinations whether it i messages here is both about vaccinations whether it be i messages here is both about| vaccinations whether it be for covid. — vaccinations whether it be for covid. or— vaccinations whether it be for covid. or flu. _ vaccinations whether it be for covid, orflu, but— vaccinations whether it be for covid, or flu, but the - vaccinations whether it be for covid, or flu, but the rate i vaccinations whether it be for covid, or flu, but the rate is. covid, or flu, but the rate is hovering _ covid, or flu, but the rate is hovering somewhere - covid, or flu, but the rate is l hovering somewhere between covid, or flu, but the rate is - hovering somewhere between 0.9 covid, or flu, but the rate is _ hovering somewhere between 0.9 and 1.1.
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hovering somewhere between 0.9 and it if— hovering somewhere between 0.9 and it if it _ hovering somewhere between 0.9 and it if it is _ hovering somewhere between 0.9 and it if it is over— hovering somewhere between 0.9 and 1.1. if it is over one _ hovering somewhere between 0.9 and 1.1. if it is over one the _ hovering somewhere between 0.9 and 1.1. if it is over one the rates - 1.1. if it is over one the rates will— 1.1. if it is over one the rates will go — 1.1. if it is over one the rates will go upwards— 1.1. if it is over one the rates will go upwards if— 1.1. if it is over one the rates will go upwards if it - 1.1. if it is over one the rates will go upwards if it the i 1.1. if it is over one the ratesj will go upwards if it the ways 1.1. if it is over one the rates i will go upwards if it the ways it will go upwards if it the ways it will start— will go upwards if it the ways it will start coming _ will go upwards if it the ways it will start coming downwards. i will go upwards if it the ways it. will start coming downwards. i'd small— will start coming downwards. i'd small behavioural— will start coming downwards. i'd small behavioural changes i will start coming downwards. i'd small behavioural changes in - will start coming downwards. i'd small behavioural changes in all| will start coming downwards. i'd . small behavioural changes in all of us will_ small behavioural changes in all of us will bring — small behavioural changes in all of us will bring that _ small behavioural changes in all of us will bring that down _ small behavioural changes in all of us will bring that down so - small behavioural changes in all of us will bring that down so there i small behavioural changes in all of us will bring that down so there is| us will bring that down so there is a message — us will bring that down so there is a message also— us will bring that down so there is a message also to _ us will bring that down so there is a message also to those - us will bring that down so there is a message also to those who - us will bring that down so there is a message also to those who are i a message also to those who are vaccinated. — a message also to those who are vaccinated, then _ a message also to those who are vaccinated, then think— a message also to those who are vaccinated, then think not - a message also to those who are vaccinated, then think not to - a message also to those who are i vaccinated, then think not to wear a face covering, — vaccinated, then think not to wear a face covering, put _ vaccinated, then think not to wear a face covering, put a _ vaccinated, then think not to wear a face covering, put a face _ vaccinated, then think not to wear a face covering, put a face covering. face covering, put a face covering on, you _ face covering, put a face covering on. you may— face covering, put a face covering on. you may be _ face covering, put a face covering on, you may be carrying - face covering, put a face covering on, you may be carrying infection| on, you may be carrying infection with you — on, you may be carrying infection with you and _ on, you may be carrying infection with you and not _ on, you may be carrying infection with you and not know. _ on, you may be carrying infection with you and not know. it - on, you may be carrying infection with you and not know. it is - on, you may be carrying infection| with you and not know. it is really important — with you and not know. it is really important we _ with you and not know. it is really important. we have _ with you and not know. it is really important. we have a _ with you and not know. it is really important. we have a natural- with you and not know. it is really. important. we have a natural break coming _ important. we have a natural break coming up — important. we have a natural break coming up ahead _ important. we have a natural break coming up ahead with _ important. we have a natural break coming up ahead with half- important. we have a natural break coming up ahead with half term. i coming up ahead with half term. chitdren— coming up ahead with half term. children have _ coming up ahead with half term. children have largely— coming up ahead with half term. children have largely had - coming up ahead with half term. i children have largely had infection and so _ children have largely had infection and so if— children have largely had infection and so if people _ children have largely had infection and so if people adopt _ children have largely had infection and so if people adopt those - and so if people adopt those behaviours _ and so if people adopt those behaviours and _ and so if people adopt those behaviours and we _ and so if people adopt those behaviours and we keep - and so if people adopt those - behaviours and we keep vaccination rates _ behaviours and we keep vaccination rates open, — behaviours and we keep vaccination rates open, children— behaviours and we keep vaccination rates open, children to _ behaviours and we keep vaccination rates open, children to get - behaviours and we keep vaccination rates open, children to get their- rates open, children to get their vaccinations— rates open, children to get their vaccinations as _ rates open, children to get their vaccinations as well— rates open, children to get their vaccinations as well over- rates open, children to get their vaccinations as well over the - rates open, children to get their. vaccinations as well over the have term, _ vaccinations as well over the have term, i_ vaccinations as well over the have term, ithink— vaccinations as well over the have term, i think that _ vaccinations as well over the have term, i think that our— vaccinations as well over the have term, i think that our right, - vaccinations as well over the have term, i think that our right, we i vaccinations as well over the have i term, i think that our right, we can oath _ term, i think that our right, we can oath to— term, i think that our right, we can oath to put— term, i think that our right, we can oath to put down— term, i think that our right, we can oath to put down under— term, i think that our right, we can oath to put down under one. - term, i think that our right, we can oath to put down under one. chrisl oath to put down under one. chris from the times. _ oath to put down under one. chris from the times. you _ oath to put down under one. from the times. you painted a oath to put down under one.“ from the times. you painted a gloomy picture of winter and highlighted a things we can do by getting booster jabs and wearing face masks, getting tested, should we be changing behaviour in any other way, people are socialising, going to the office, going to parties, apparently
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buying christmas parties, should we carry on with that or should we be having some second thoughts and professor powis, we are getting a lot of people who want to have their booster campaigns and they are six months on and they haven't heard anything from and they can't book online, using the date they will change the system so people can book automatically online once they are eligible without having to wait to be asked? taste eligible without having to wait to be asked? ~ . ., eligible without having to wait to be asked? ~ . . , be asked? we are heading but life isn't back to _ be asked? we are heading but life isn't back to normal. _ be asked? we are heading but life isn't back to normal. i _ be asked? we are heading but life isn't back to normal. i think - isn't back to normal. i think everyone can see that because the pandemic is still there, it is here in our country and around the world in our country and around the world in other countries, it is where they don't have sadly the benefit of the vaccines for example like we do, it is a much bigger challenge. people can see that. when they are running and going about their daily lives they are things we can all do. of
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course there are no restrictions any more, whether it is having a party or a wedding or going to church or a mosque or something, there is no restrictions that we had before, but they are all precautions we can take and we talked about some of them again today, face masks, enclosed with unfamiliar people, being outdoors when you can, that is harder in the winter and that is why we are worried about the winter, because it is darker outside earlier, it is old and so there is less time outdoors and spend more endorse so take that into account and see what you can do. the other big thing everyone can do more of is really take advantage of that offer of a free lateral flow test because where we have seen people, if they are going to a party perhaps where there are elderly relatives or grandparents, someone who is immunocompromised, it is really important that you take a lateral flow test and they are there not
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because you have symptoms but because you have symptoms but because you have symptoms but because you are taking precaution and you take that and that makes that don't make... there are a lot of things that we can do and if we want to keep until done to the fantastic progress we made then we all have a role to play. tline fantastic progress we made then we all have a role to play.— all have a role to play. one of the thins we all have a role to play. one of the things we have — all have a role to play. one of the things we have over _ all have a role to play. one of the things we have over during - all have a role to play. one of the things we have over during the i things we have over during the pandemic— things we have over during the pandemic is to be a bit more cautious— pandemic is to be a bit more cautious when we are not feeling well and — cautious when we are not feeling well and we might have an infectious disease _ well and we might have an infectious disease that we could pass on. i think— disease that we could pass on. i think there _ disease that we could pass on. i think there is a stoic british attitude _ think there is a stoic british attitude that we carry on regardless, you go into work even if you have _ regardless, you go into work even if you have a — regardless, you go into work even if you have a cold or sniffle, but i think— you have a cold or sniffle, but i think we — you have a cold or sniffle, but i think we have all learned is in doing — think we have all learned is in doing that we can spread disease. i think— doing that we can spread disease. i think there — doing that we can spread disease. i think there are simple things we can do which _ think there are simple things we can do which is — think there are simple things we can do which is if you are feeling a bit unweit— do which is if you are feeling a bit unwett or— do which is if you are feeling a bit unwell or feel like you have a virus. — unwell or feel like you have a virus, whether covid, you need to isolate _ virus, whether covid, you need to isolate if— virus, whether covid, you need to isolate if it — virus, whether covid, you need to isolate if it is covid, but if it is not, _ isolate if it is covid, but if it is not. think— isolate if it is covid, but if it is not, think cautiously about the risk
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of spreading it on and hand washing of spreading it on and hand washing of course, _ of spreading it on and hand washing of course, very simple effective measure — of course, very simple effective measure for covid, but for other infectious — measure for covid, but for other infectious diseases, so i think coming — infectious diseases, so i think coming out of this pandemic people are more _ coming out of this pandemic people are more cautious and understand the risk of— are more cautious and understand the risk of spreading infectious disease more _ risk of spreading infectious disease more and _ risk of spreading infectious disease more and i— risk of spreading infectious disease more and i for one hope we will carry— more and i for one hope we will carry on— more and i for one hope we will carry on those behaviours. 0n the vaccine _ carry on those behaviours. 0n the vaccine and — carry on those behaviours. 0n the vaccine and booster roll—out, if i give you — vaccine and booster roll—out, if i give you the breakdown of the figures, — give you the breakdown of the figures, eligibility, the numbers etigibte — figures, eligibility, the numbers eligible change every day as more people _ eligible change every day as more people come, that legibility criteria, _ people come, that legibility criteria, but roughly around 8 million — criteria, but roughly around 8 million people have become eligible of which _ million people have become eligible of which as you have heard 4 million have treen— of which as you have heard 4 million have beenjabbed to of which as you have heard 4 million have been jabbed to date with their boosters. _ have been jabbed to date with their boosters, there are a couple of million — boosters, there are a couple of million being invited this week so we witt— million being invited this week so we will hopefully be going forward in the _ we will hopefully be going forward in the next few weeks and there is about— in the next few weeks and there is about hatt— in the next few weeks and there is about half a million, 500,000 we go to directly— about half a million, 500,000 we go to directly such as resistance of care _ to directly such as resistance of care homes who don't get invited into those — care homes who don't get invited into those systems, so that leaves about _ into those systems, so that leaves about 15 _ into those systems, so that leaves about 1.5 billion who are being
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invited — about 1.5 billion who are being invited -- _ about 1.5 billion who are being invited —— million. forthose

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