Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 20, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news i'm ben thompson. the headlines: health leaders call for the return of some covid preventative measures in england to help the nhs cope with rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so. we will reach a situation where public health is under threat. we look at this on an hourly basis. we don't _ look at this on an hourly basis. we don't feel— look at this on an hourly basis. we don't feel it — look at this on an hourly basis. we don't feel it is the time for plan b right— don't feel it is the time for plan b right now — the uk's cost of living rises by more than 3% for the second month in a row. brazil's parliament publishes a damning report on the president's handling of the coronavirus pandemic
2:01 pm
— he could face criminal charges, including homicide and even crimes against humanity. police investigate a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out — leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. the queen cancels a trip to northern ireland on doctors orders, reluctantly accepting, she needs some rest. and, the first casualty of newcastle united's new saudi—backed owners — manager steve bruce leaves the club just a week after the take over. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news. health leaders are demanding the immediate reintroduction, of some covid restrictions in england, to avoid the nhs
2:02 pm
"stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation, says rising infections means measures, including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. week on week, the number of covid cases across the uk, hospital admissions and deaths, are rising at a rate of 10 per cent or more, though that's well below levels seen in january. the government says it has no immediate plans, to reintroduce covid restrictions. here's our health editor, hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried this about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. we are now seeing data going up, people in respiratory beds and also, deaths have started to rise, where they have been pretty flat for most of the last two months.
2:03 pm
we are trying to support the restoration of major complex surgery for which _ restoration of major complex surgery for which there are many, many people — for which there are many, many pe0ple on— for which there are many, many people on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do we accept the overwhelming evidence and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that does not disrupt our day—to—day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that a miracle will happen? then stumble, as we have done
2:04 pm
before, stumble into crisis. ministers ruled out plan b for now. we are looking at data on an hourly basis. we don't feel it is time for plan b right now. i think what we are trying to do is get people who haven't been vaccinated to get those vaccinations up, increase the uptake of the boosterjab. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. how bad are the pressures currently facing accident and emergency departments? to answer that, we can speak
2:05 pm
to doctor ian higginson, vice president of the royal college of emergency medicine. what is the state of hospitals right now? in what is the state of hospitals right now? . , , now? in emergency departments, the situation is pretty _ now? in emergency departments, the situation is pretty grim _ now? in emergency departments, the situation is pretty grim right - now? in emergency departments, the situation is pretty grim right now. - situation is pretty grim right now. the amount of patients coming through the doors, and the fact many of our hospitals are full to bursting. of our hospitals are full to bursting-— of our hospitals are full to burstina. �*, , ., of our hospitals are full to burstin.. �*, , , ., ., bursting. it's probably worth at this moment _ bursting. it's probably worth at this moment separating - bursting. it's probably worth at this moment separating those | this moment separating those hospitalisations related to covid and others, and i am aware that the focus is on the pressure on the nhs overall, but give me your assessment of where we are with covid. irate of where we are with covid. we aren't just _ of where we are with covid. - aren't just experiencing covid, of where we are with covid. - aren'tjust experiencing covid, but it is certainly making things worse. what we are seeing now is a result
2:06 pm
of years of underinvestment and poor strategic planning within the health service coming to fruition on top of the additional difficulties covid causes. �* . , the additional difficulties covid causes. ~ ., , f . the additional difficulties covid causes. �* . , m 3 causes. after a very difficult 18 months, clearly. _ causes. after a very difficult 18 months, clearly. today, - causes. after a very difficult 18 months, clearly. today, a - causes. after a very difficult 18 - months, clearly. today, a suggestion that there should be an immediate reintroduction of measures to protect people in public. given what you've told me, i imagine you support those proposals? that's well above my pay — support those proposals? that's well above my pay grade. _ support those proposals? that's well above my pay grade, to _ support those proposals? that's well above my pay grade, to be _ support those proposals? that's well above my pay grade, to be honest. l support those proposals? that's well above my pay grade, to be honest. i| above my pay grade, to be honest. i can comment on a couple of things. the pressure on the nhs, certainly from the perspective of urgent and emergency care is already unsustainable, and that's without significant increases in covid numbers. the other thing is, as doctors, we weigh up the evidence, look at the context, learn from our mistakes, learn from what others are doing well. i guess that is what we hope our political and health service leaders are doing to come up with the right decision because it is a difficult one.— is a difficult one. given what ou've
2:07 pm
is a difficult one. given what you've told _ is a difficult one. given what you've told me _ is a difficult one. given what you've told me about - is a difficult one. given what you've told me about the . is a difficult one. given what i you've told me about the state is a difficult one. given what - you've told me about the state of hospitals, the pressure they are under, what happens if there isn't any change? the under, what happens if there isn't any change?— any change? the pattern at the moment is _ any change? the pattern at the moment is a — any change? the pattern at the moment is a steady _ any change? the pattern at the moment is a steady decline - any change? the pattern at the moment is a steady decline in l moment is a steady decline in conditions within the urgent and emergency care systems. we are seeing patients unable to get into hospital beds because our hospitals are full, meaning long waits in emergency departments. we are now seeing long waits for patients in ambulances trying to get into those departments, then long waits for patients waiting for an ambulance out in the community. that has shown all signs of continuing to get worse in the current situation, and that's without additional pressure. tail: in the current situation, and that's without additional pressure. talk to me a little bit _ without additional pressure. talk to me a little bit about _ without additional pressure. talk to me a little bit about the _ without additional pressure. talk to me a little bit about the pressure . me a little bit about the pressure being put on staff. clearly, resources are very much limited given what is going on, but after a very difficult couple of years. in the medical profession i imagine they are somewhat nervous about the approaching winter? yes. they are somewhat nervous about the approaching winter?— approaching winter? yes, i think more than _ approaching winter? yes, i think more than nervous. _ approaching winter? yes, i think more than nervous. it's - approaching winter? yes, i think more than nervous. it's been - approaching winter? yes, i think more than nervous. it's been a l more than nervous. it's been a gruelling and exhausting time for
2:08 pm
nhs staff. nhs staff are dedicated, highly skilled professionals who want to do a good job. it's really upsetting for us to see when we can't provide the care we want for our patients. as we look forward to things getting worse, we really are very worried about what's coming our way and anxious about the care we will be able to provide. we way and anxious about the care we will be able to provide.— will be able to provide. we are heafina will be able to provide. we are hearing from _ will be able to provide. we are hearing from the _ will be able to provide. we are hearing from the health - will be able to provide. we are i hearing from the health secretary will be able to provide. we are - hearing from the health secretary at five o'clock today, a press conference held by savage ? a press conference held by savage ? a press conference held by sajid javid, what would you like to hear him say? we want a would you like to hear him say? - want a realistic assessment of the problem is, an honest assessment of the problems, and an effective and realistic plan to deal with what we are facing. that's all we ever want to see from our leaders. as health care professionals, we will always
2:09 pm
do our best to work within those sorts of plans. do our best to work within those sorts of plans-— sorts of plans. absolutely. it's aood to sorts of plans. absolutely. it's good to have _ sorts of plans. absolutely. it's good to have your— sorts of plans. absolutely. it's good to have your thoughts i sorts of plans. absolutely. it's. good to have your thoughts this afternoon. thank you forjoining us. thank you. at 5 o'clock, the health secretary sajid javid will be holding a briefing from downing street. he will be joined by drjenny harries, chief executive of the uk health security agency and professor stephen powis, national medical director of nhs england. we'll bring you full coverage of that briefing, right here on the bbc news channel, from 5 o'clock. the other element all of this is how businesses may react to the possibility of restrictions returning. i'm joined by kate nicholls, the chief executive of uk hospitality. good to see you. i wonder when there
2:10 pm
is this mounting pressure for the reintroduction of restrictions, first of all what would it mean to the businesses you represent? it the businesses you represent? it would have a significant impact on businesses in hospitality. they've had 18 months of very restricted trading. they are not into a positive state of trading where they are making a profit, and therefore to have the restrictions reimposed at this point in time, at this point in the recovery, will have made an impact on their revenues. we know from introducing vaccine passports, and working from home, that can have and working from home, that can have an impact of 20, up to 40% for them. we will see business failures and job losses as a result unless there is substantive government support to sit alongside that if restrictions are reimposed.— sit alongside that if restrictions are reimposed. sit alongside that if restrictions are reim osed. ., , ., , are reimposed. that gets me to my next question- _ are reimposed. that gets me to my next question. what's _ are reimposed. that gets me to my next question. what's the - are reimposed. that gets me to my next question. what's the biggest l next question. what's the biggest fear in the industry? the reintroduction of these measures now
2:11 pm
with a view, perhaps, to saving christmas for want of a better phrase, or if the restrictions aren't to now there is a danger this could get much worse at one of the busiest times of the year for the hospitality industry. irate busiest times of the year for the hospitality industry.— busiest times of the year for the hospitality industry. we are already into our busiest _ hospitality industry. we are already into our busiest trading _ hospitality industry. we are already into our busiest trading time. - hospitality industry. we are already into our busiest trading time. 40%| into our busiest trading time. 40% of our profits come between halloween and christmas. we lost that last year. we lost most of our major trading days in 2020 and 2021 in easter. businesses have only really been reopened for the last two and a half months. if we introduced measures now, particularly working from home, that would have an impact on our town and city business centres that are still in survival mode, as it were, and that would have an effect on our confidence. it would have significant impact on the busiest trading period already if you reintroduce them now. i'm heartened by the business secretary saying now is not the time, we don't need to
2:12 pm
move to plan b, we need the government to stick with plan a. we need to make sure that any decision is notjust looking at health implications but looking wide at jobs, business viability, and the economy. it’s jobs, business viability, and the econom . �* , . ., jobs, business viability, and the econom . h . ., ., economy. it's quite clear that neither of— economy. it's quite clear that neither of these _ economy. it's quite clear that neither of these options - economy. it's quite clear that neither of these options are l economy. it's quite clear that l neither of these options are an alternative, neither of them are anything the industry would want to see, but i wonder whether it is about accepting some restrictions now to make sure that by christmas businesses can operate at full capacity. it businesses can operate at full ca aci . , ., , ., capacity. if you put it in now, businesses _ capacity. if you put it in now, businesses won't _ capacity. if you put it in now, businesses won't be - capacity. if you put it in now, businesses won't be able - capacity. if you put it in now, businesses won't be able to i capacity. if you put it in now, - businesses won't be able to operate, they won't be trading viably, you will see an accelerated period of business failure. we are losing i6 business failure. we are losing 16 businesses per week with closures. businesses are incredibly fragile. if we lose this trading period now we won't save christmas. you do need to make sure the economy can remain open, and that we remain trading so that we can remain viable. irate
2:13 pm
open, and that we remain trading so that we can remain viable.— that we can remain viable. we have talked about _ that we can remain viable. we have talked about this _ that we can remain viable. we have talked about this many _ that we can remain viable. we have talked about this many times - that we can remain viable. we have talked about this many times about businesses having had a very difficult i8 businesses having had a very difficult 18 months. we are nowjust getting a sense of the businesses that will now not reopen. you walk down many a high street and you think perhaps they are being slow to reopen but the reality is they have gone under. i was starting to get a sense ofjust how bad this last year has been? in sense ofjust how bad this last year has been? 'j~ ., , ., .,, has been? in the 18 months covid has hit we've lost — has been? in the 18 months covid has hit we've lost 12,000 _ has been? in the 18 months covid has hit we've lost 12,000 businesses. - hit we've lost 12,000 businesses. we've lost one in ten of our hotels and restaurants. 6% of our pub estate. in our towns and city centres, they are disproportionately affected by the lack of people working from offices, we have seen one in five businesses go under already and that in the last 18 months. those who have come out the other side have depleted reserves, shattered balance sheets, and are just holding on, so we can't afford to do anything that knocks them off track. if we impose restrictions now thatis track. if we impose restrictions now that is what we will see, businesses won't be able to trade, they won't
2:14 pm
be able to survive, and he would see business failures accelerated without government support. ? you would see. . ~ without government support. ? you would see. ., ~ , ., without government support. ? you would see. ., ~ ., would see. thank you for your time. we will stay — would see. thank you for your time. we will stay right _ would see. thank you for your time. we will stay right across _ would see. thank you for your time. we will stay right across that - we will stay right across that story. lots of moving parts, as you would expect, this afternoon. and we'll be answering on the increasing cases and whether tighter restrictions are needed in your questions answered with dr deepti gurdasani from queen mary's university at half past three this afternoon. you can get in touch using the hastag bbcyourquestions or email your questions at bbc.co.uk. please send in any thoughts or comments and we will talk more about them at 3:30 30p on bbc news. let's bring you up—to—date with some of
2:15 pm
today's other stories including news that the cost of living has gone up by more than 3% for the second month running. the office for national statistics said inflation, the rate at which prices are rising, came in at which prices are rising, came in at 3.1% last month. that's down slightly from the month before, but still remains well above the bank of england's target of 2%. our business correspondent, nina warhurst has more details. this is ruth's kitchen where she cooks, mum and dad come to catch up, jack does his homework, and amy checks her messages. like most families, ruth is starting to feel the force of inflation. irate families, ruth is starting to feel the force of inflation.— families, ruth is starting to feel the force of inflation. we are 'ust startin: the force of inflation. we are 'ust starting to — the force of inflation. we are 'ust starting to notice i the force of inflation. we are 'ust starting to notice the i the force of inflation. we are 'ust starting to notice the pinch h the force of inflation. we are 'ust starting to notice the pinch a h starting to notice the pinch a little bit. ~ ., , , ., little bit. whereabouts is that? the bi est one little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for _ little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us _ little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us is _ little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us is energy - little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us is energy bill - biggest one for us is energy bill because we wear with peoples energy who went bust, so the energy bill is doubling every month. that's going from £120 up to £250.— from £120 up to £250. today's fiuures from £120 up to £250. today's figures show _ from £120 up to £250. today's figures show inflation -
2:16 pm
from £120 up to £250. today's figures show inflation in - from £120 up to £250. today's - figures show inflation in september was at 3.1%, driven by higher prices in transport, food, and home services. that is slightly lower than the august figure, but much higher than the bank of england target of 2%. i higher than the bank of england target of 296-— target of 2%. i think it's a real cause of some _ target of 2%. i think it's a real cause of some concern - target of 2%. i think it's a real. cause of some concern because clearly we want inflation rates to the lower. the critical question is, how long is that inflation going to last for. the governor of the bank of england is hopeful the inflation rate will be contained and that is something they are looking at. inflated places means pension pots aren't stretching quite as far. the ices are aren't stretching quite as far. tie: ices are effectively aren't stretching quite as far. he ices are effectively losing value.
2:17 pm
? isas. the 7 isas. the idea of interest rates is if borrowing _ the idea of interest rates is if borrowing is less attractive to people. — borrowing is less attractive to people, and saving is more attractive, then people will spend slightly— attractive, then people will spend slightly less and that will ease the demand _ slightly less and that will ease the demand on prices, meaning that the price rate _ demand on prices, meaning that the price rate slows. in reality, a 025% — price rate slows. in reality, a 0.25% interest rate by the bank of england _ 0.25% interest rate by the bank of england is— 0.25% interest rate by the bank of england is still very low. like millions of _ england is still very low. like millions of public— england is still very low. like millions of public sector - england is still very low. l «19 millions of public sector workers, ruth's salary is stuck for now, and for lots of busy families, even those with decentjobs, there is a winter ahead of putting on an extra jumper, thinking twice about treats, and wondering whether it is worth saving at all if there is anything left to put away. what does all of that mean? let's get more analysis from our economics correspondent, andy verity who's here. a small fall last month but still way above the 2% target. mat;
2:18 pm
a small fall last month but still way above the 2% target. way above but also you — way above the 2% target. way above but also you shouldn't _ way above the 2% target. way above but also you shouldn't mistake - way above the 2% target. way above but also you shouldn't mistake that l but also you shouldn't mistake that for the end of the rise in the cost of living we have been seeing recently. it's much more likely to be a statistical blip. i say that because it is what you are comparing it with. 3.2% from last time was comparing august with august 2020 which had eat 0ut comparing august with august 2020 which had eat out to help 0ut. comparing august with august 2020 which had eat out to help out. by comparison, a year later, it looked like a biggerjump. that has all fallen out of the equation by september, so there was less of an effect from eat 0ut september, so there was less of an effect from eat out to help 0ut, september, so there was less of an effect from eat out to help out, but you see price pressures coming through. airfares are up 9.7%. second—hand cars are up 22%. what you are really looking at is the commodity prices coming through. if you look at the prices manufacturers are paying for raw materials, they are paying for raw materials, they are up by 11.11%. that's quite big.
2:19 pm
they can do that up to a point but then they have to pass it on. if you look at prices at the factory gate before they get to retailers, they are up by 6.7%, and that's the highest rise we've seen there for a decade. you really see that inflationary pressure coming down the pipeline. find inflationary pressure coming down the pipeline-— the pipeline. and that's before we see an of the pipeline. and that's before we see any of the _ the pipeline. and that's before we see any of the figures _ the pipeline. and that's before we see any of the figures we've - the pipeline. and that's before we see any of the figures we've seen | see any of the figures we've seen over the last few weeks, things like gas prices in petrol prices going up, that's not even in the figures, are they? up, that's not even in the figures, are the ? :, �* , , up, that's not even in the figures, arethe? , are they? that's right, this was done in the _ are they? that's right, this was done in the middle _ are they? that's right, this was done in the middle of - are they? that's right, this was i done in the middle of september. are they? that's right, this was - done in the middle of september. you can expect inflation to get a lot worse before it gets any better. the bank of england has a very interesting dilemma here because if they raise interest rates too quickly and too fast, then they risk snuffing out a recovery which is already slowing down. the markets are now pricing in a rise in interest rates as a certainty by the end of this year up to 0.25%.
2:20 pm
interestingly, the markets are predicting that by the end of next year they'll get up to 1%. just a month ago that wasn't on the cards, people want expecting any rise, 1% would be the highest interest rate we have seen since 2009. it might not sound too high to us, certainly not sound too high to us, certainly not our grandparents who saw much higher rate in the 70s and 80s, but it is a much higher one than we have been used to. there will be people on the monetary policy committee saying if we do what the markets are predicting we risk snuffing out the recovery, so there will be some interesting debates.— interesting debates. also, even whether a _ interesting debates. also, even whether a rise _ interesting debates. also, even whether a rise of _ interesting debates. also, even whether a rise of that _ interesting debates. also, evenl whether a rise of that magnitude will be enough to tame inflation. exactly, you are talking about rises due to global commodity prices, what will it due to global commodity pricesjust by making will it due to global commodity prices just by making it more expensive for british borrowers. not that much. the bank of england is also concerned about wage issues. in areas like truck drivers, builders,
2:21 pm
they can almost tell their employers what they are going to have to pay them, and the risk is that feeds through to a more generalised wage inflation which then creates an upwards spiral. that is what andrew bailey is worried about.— bailey is worried about. really good to have your — bailey is worried about. really good to have your thoughts _ bailey is worried about. really good to have your thoughts on _ bailey is worried about. really good to have your thoughts on all- bailey is worried about. really good to have your thoughts on all of- to have your thoughts on all of that. so many moving parts right now. a small fall in inflation but the implications from it certainly over the months to come. we have some breaking news. this is following a football game. the match against brugge last night. a supporter has received life—threatening injuries after that match. it took place on the e40 motorway after the victory last night. it is believed there is an altercation ? there was an
2:22 pm
altercation ? there was an altercation involving a manchester city scarf leaving a 63—year—old, we are told, in mortal danger. ? it is believed there was an altercation involving a manchester city scarf. at least fourteen people have been killed in a bomb attack on a military bus in the syriian capital, damascus. state media say two blasts hit the vehicle as it passed under a bridge, a third device was defused. it's the deadliest attack in damascus, since 2017. more than 100 people have now died following several days of flooding and landslides in india and nepal. dozens are still missing after torrential downpours swept away homes, roads and bridges. the himalayan state of uttarak—hand in northern india, was the worst affected, with a series of landslides killing at least 46 people. buckingham palace says the queen has cancelled a trip to northern ireland today, and has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest. she's 95 and said to be in good
2:23 pm
spirits, but disappointed. here's our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. she has had a busy few days since she returned from balmoral. last tuesday she was at westminster abbey for the centenary of the royal british legion. last thursday she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament. and last night she was hosting a very big reception at windsor castle for dozens of global business leaders. she had been due to travel to northern ireland later today for engagements tonight and tomorrow, marking the centenary of the partition of ireland, but a statement this morning from buckingham palace saying, as you reported, she has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest for the next few days. she is in good spirits and she's disappointed not to be going to northern ireland. now, the palace is not really saying anything more than that, but i understand this is not in any way covid related. she has had both vaccinations,
2:24 pm
we don't know whether she's had the booster vaccination. but i think what will be in the minds of the royal officials and doctors is that she is due to attend cop 26 to host a reception for all the global leaders attending that at the end of next week, and they will want to be sure that she is fully rested for that. a parliamentary inquiry in brazil is presenting its finalfindings into president bolsonaro s handling of the covid—19 pandemic. according to excerpts of the report already leaked to the media, the inquiry will recommend charges including homicide against jair bolsonaro after the brazilian leader was accused of failing to control the virus that has so far killed more than 600,000 brazilians. 0ur south america correspondent katy watson is in rio. news on this within the last few minutes suggesting that while the enquiry me ? saying that the enquiry might be looking at different
2:25 pm
things, bring us up—to—date. the things, bring us up-to-date. the readin: things, bring us up-to-date. the reading of— things, bring us up-to-date. the reading of the — things, bring us up—to—date. tt9 reading of the report has started. it's 1200 pages reading of the report has started. it's1200 pages listing a huge amount of crimes, corruption schemes. there has been six months of hearings into what the government did and didn't do during the pandemic. in the original report there were crimes such as the genocide of the indigenous, and looking at the issue of potential murder. it's believed those more serious crimes have been dropped. it is an 11 person enquiry, 11 senators, seven critical of the president, four on the side ofjair bolsonaro. they need to agree on the crimes they want to list in the document that will then be sent to federal prosecutors. they all have to agree. they need to make sure these crimes are crimes he may well be able to be charged with eventually otherwise six months of hearings will come to nothing. there will be late—night discussions about exactly what he can be charged with
2:26 pm
and how responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people they can hold the government to account. jair they can hold the government to account. , :, a, :, :, they can hold the government to account. �* :, l, :, :, , ,, account. jair bolsonaro dismissing the investigation, _ account. jair bolsonaro dismissing the investigation, calling - account. jair bolsonaro dismissing the investigation, calling it - the investigation, calling it politically motivated. i wonder what we can expect is this plays out as there is so much more to come, as you say. there is so much more to come, as ou sa . �* , :, there is so much more to come, as ousa. h :, there is so much more to come, as ousa. , you say. it's a political enquiry. there is no _ you say. it's a political enquiry. there is no legal— you say. it's a political enquiry. there is no legal standing. - you say. it's a political enquiry. there is no legal standing. it i you say. it's a political enquiry. there is no legal standing. it isj there is no legal standing. it is effectively a police department who has done the investigation, they will pass on their findings to prosecutors who could press charges or not. that's the issue, whatever side of politics people are on, everybody can agree this enquiry has dented jair bolsonaro's popularity. some say it is a good thing, others a political witchhunt. it will mean that if he decides to run in the elections next year, it'll be a much harder challenge for him, but will we see him leaving the presidency anytime soon because of this? no, i
2:27 pm
think this will be a long drawn out process, but it has highlighted the damage, if like, what the government did or rather didn't do, during the pandemic. did or rather didn't do, during the andemic. :, , . did or rather didn't do, during the andemic. :, , : ~ pandemic. thanks very much. we will rive ou pandemic. thanks very much. we will give you the — pandemic. thanks very much. we will give you the details _ pandemic. thanks very much. we will give you the details as _ pandemic. thanks very much. we will give you the details as we _ pandemic. thanks very much. we will give you the details as we get - pandemic. thanks very much. we will give you the details as we get them. l over 130,000 people have signed a petition calling for the government to make nightclub searches a legal requirement — after reports of women being injected with needles in nottingham. nottinghamshire police say they've made one arrest and admit reports of spiking overall are on the rise. student zara 0wens is among three women in the last fortnight who claim they were attacked and made ill while at city centre nightclubs. i remember going in, going to the bar, going to the toilet, and up until that moment my memory is a blank until i get home and i'm getting my phone charger. i know i
2:28 pm
didn't drink as much as i usually would on a night out. the fact i don't remember anything is terrifying for me because this is something that is a very rare occasion for me. i've never suffered from memory loss. then the next morning, i woke up with a really, really painful neck. the labour mp for nottingham east, nadia whittome, is working with women's groups in the area on a set of demands to take to the home secretary and police. she said searches are one possibility and should be debated by parliament. what we have to be really careful of is that this conversation doesn't become one about what can women do, and putting the responsibility on women. women should be able to go out freely and enjoy themselves without fear of assault, sexual or otherwise. this is part of a much wider problem of male violence from sexual harassment to rape. we need immediate measures to prevent this
2:29 pm
from happening, and deal with it when it does, but also long—term much deeper change because this isn't something that is going to be stopped by spiking measures and bottle tops. if we don't deal with the cultural problem of misogyny then this is going to keep happening. bbc newsbeat�*s christian hewgill has been following the story and joins me from nottingham now. christian you ve been talking to students this morning, what have they been saying? it is fairto it is fair to say there is a lot of concern. nottingham trent university's city campus is a mile from the bbc in nottingham. i've just been over there. when you walk through the camp as you can overhear people talking about it. it is fair to say there is a lot of concern. i spoke to lots of students this morning, lots of women saying they
2:30 pm
aren't going out tonight. wednesday night has always been one of the biggest students at night in nottingham but there is going to be a lot of the official university society is not going out tonight. there is a campaign gaining momentum nationally called girls night in encouraging women not to go out and to have an arranged night in. some i have spoken to said they won't go to big night clubs but may be to a small bar. lots of concerned students in nottingham today. we heard in that clip about one of the proposals potentially about being searching on entrance to nightclubs, what are the police telling you about this?- nightclubs, what are the police telling you about this? we've spoken to cuite a telling you about this? we've spoken to quite a lot — telling you about this? we've spoken to quite a lot of _ telling you about this? we've spoken to quite a lot of police _ telling you about this? we've spoken to quite a lot of police forces - to quite a lot of police forces across the uk. there are calls for increased searches, also lots of calls from those campaign groups for coverings on the top of drinks, also drinks to be served in clear plastic bottles or glasses so it is obvious
2:31 pm
if something has been put into it. we have police in merseyside and west yorkshire telling us that they are looking into cases of alleged spiking is. the same with police forces in scotland. looking at the picture across the country, this is still a very small number of cases. nobody has actually been charged with spiking with needles especially in the country. we have police in livable, and merseyside, looking into it after lots of social media reports but haven't found any illegal activity. reports but haven't found any illegalactivity. ? police in liverpool. police in nottingham have seen an increase in reports on this. still a comparatively small number of cases across the country. the context is _ of cases across the country. the context is important. thanks very much. we'll have sport and the headlines coming up for you in a moment, but now, time for the weather.
2:32 pm
hello again, with a mixture of sunshine and heavy downpours today, not quite as mild as it was yesterday forced up still some decent temperatures late afternoon and early evening towards the south—east, your showers by the stage, but that rain in scotland will move southwards overnight and we have the storm developing and running through the english channel, windy conditions, rain before that clears later. and behind this band of rain, winds pick up in the north, blowing in those showers, wintry of the higher parts of northern scotland and it will be a chilly night across the country than it has been for quite some time. tomorrow we still have some rain to clear away first thing from southern parts of england, after that, sunshine, showers, mainly towards northern and western scotland, northern ireland, pushing down irish sea coastal areas, away from here, dry weather and but strong winds will make feel colder and gales around some of these north sea gusts for a while, together with some high spring tides, so these are the temperatures, eight or nine a run northern scotland, maybe 14 in
2:33 pm
southern england. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: health leaders call for the return of some covid measures in england to tackle rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so, and rules out any further lockdowns. the uk's cost of living rises by more than 3% for the second month in a row. police investigate a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out — leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. the queen cancels a trip to northern ireland on doctors' orders, reluctantly accepting their advice that she takes a few days rest. let's check in on the latest sport.
2:34 pm
we will start with football, because newcastle united are on the hunt for a new manager, the club parted company with steve bruce this morning, just 13 days after the saudi backed takeover on tyneside. bruce leaves after two years in charge with the club second from bottom in the premier league table. 0ur correspondent has more. managing newcastle's steve bruce's dream job but no matter how badly he wanted it to work at his hometown club, it always felt like an uphill battle. his departure had been widely expected. fiur battle. his departure had been widely expected.— battle. his departure had been widel exected. : :, :, widely expected. our new chairman! cheering he was under pressure even before the saudi arabian lead to with his side second from bottom and without a win all season. on sunday in front of the new owners, his team failed again. newcastle stay in the bottom three. in a statement confirming his departure, bree said he was grateful to everyone connected with newcastle for the opportunity to manage this
2:35 pm
unique football club. —— bruce said. he succeeded rougher than it has —— rov in 2019, but prove unpopular with fans. t rov in 2019, but prove unpopular with fans. ,:, rov in 2019, but prove unpopular with fans. :, with fans. i feel quite sad for him, but for the — with fans. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, _ with fans. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, it _ with fans. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, it will _ with fans. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, it will be - with fans. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, it will be good. i | but for the club, it will be good. i think he had to go, really, for the club to— think he had to go, really, for the club to progress in the way then you want that— club to progress in the way then you want that because the new owners wanted _ want that because the new owners wanted it — want that because the new owners wanted it to go. 35m want that because the new owners wanted it to go— want that because the new owners wanted it to go. an interim manager will take charge. _ wanted it to go. an interim manager will take charge. but _ wanted it to go. an interim manager will take charge. but as _ wanted it to go. an interim manager will take charge. but as for - wanted it to go. an interim manager will take charge. but as for what - will take charge. but as for what next for bruce, given the till this job has taken on him and his family, his 1000th game in management is likely to be his last. staying with football, five people have been arrested following an attack on a manchester city fan after last night's champions league game against bruges.
2:36 pm
the 63—year—old belgian man, who watched city's 5—1 win at the stadium, is in a life—threatening condition. the attack took place at a motorway services 45 kilometres from bruges. city said they were "shocked and saddened" by the incident, while club bruges said they were "horrified". there's more champions league action tonight. chelsea host malmo, while manchester united will be without defender raphael varane and forward anthony martial for their game with atalanta. united are third in their group, and they're struggling forform — manager 0le gunnar solskjaer says everyone at the club is working together to put that right. we still want to improve. we have signed some players that have raised expectations, other teams have signed players and improves, as well. so we are in the same boat of all the top teams, that there is pressure all the time, there is pressure all the time, there is pressure on me, of course, but we
2:37 pm
have been through this before and we have been through this before and we have come through it stronger as individuals and as a team. now to cricket and the twenty20 world cup continues, with ireland looking to make it two wins from two and boost their chances of qualilfying for the next stage. they take on sri lanka in abu dhabi, that's at 3 o clock our time. in today's first match namibia beat the netherlands by six wickets. the dutch batted first and made 164 for 4 from their 20 overs. but namibia were up to the task, chasing it down with an over to spare after both sides lost their opening matches, it means the netherlands now can't make it through to the next stage. meanwhile england havejust won theirfinal warm up match before their first match on saturday, but captain eoin morgan's barren run with the bat has continued. he madejust ten in england's total of 163 for six against new zealand. morgan said he would consider dropping himself if his poor form continues. but his side have beaten
2:38 pm
the black caps by 13 runs. i'll have more throughoutt the afternoon, but ben, that's all the sport for now. the biggest study ever undertaken in the uk into what's known as �*extreme pregnancy sickness' has found that the condition can be so severe, more than half of sufferers consider having abortions. while mild sickness is a common symptom of pregnancy, �*extreme nausea' can affect between 1% and 3% of pregnant women. daniela relph has been speaking to one woman about her experience. i still can't eat, and i can't drink. and i'm hungry, and i am stressed, and i can't sleep. extreme sickness in pregnancy can be brutal. the condition, known as hg, can overwhelm you. i'm so cold. two years ago, laura anderson kept a video diary of her pregnancy. it's a horrible illness.
2:39 pm
itjust makes you a complete shadow of who you were. two years on, and laura is now mum to ava. we had to try very hard to get pregnant, and we had had four miscarriages and she was very wanted, and she was what kept me going, because i knew the only way to get a baby was to get to that end point, and that's what got me through. but the pregnancy left her feeling isolated and struggling to get help. she wants other women to get better care and treatment. the mentaljourney is actually harder, because that is still left over at the end of it. that doesn't go away as quickly as the physical symptoms. it's nine months of isolation and feeling completely useless, because you can't do anything. some people have to quit theirjobs. some people have other children, and they feel like they are letting them down.
2:40 pm
0bviously, treat the physicalfirst, because that can be very dangerous if not, but so can the mental part of it. laura had wanted more children, but she is forever changed by her hg experience. do you think you will have any more children? no, no. i very much at the end of ava's pregnancy told myself, i am finally done with hg. i was happy about that. if i could be promised that i wouldn't have hg, i would definitely have another baby. that is the only reason why i'm not having another baby. it is just too risky for you. yeah. yeah, i can't be a mum if i've got hg. we've been speaking to other women who have been affected by it. first let's hearfrom chessie king — an instagrammer and new mum who ended up hospitalised. they admitted me at 16 weeks, i was admitted with severe, intense pain in my rib and they said i could have
2:41 pm
cracked a rib or turn an intercostal muscle from being sick so much, and that's when i started to take note, that's when i started to take note, that's when i started to take note, that's when they thought, maybe this is serious, maybe she does have hyperemesis. i think it affected my partner more than me because i felt the purpose, i knew i would have a baby girl at the end of it and i was extremely lucky to be experiencing that, but he felt helpless and hopeless, and ifeltjust an overwhelming sense of guilt for the baby inside me, because i was like, i'm not giving you any nutrition, i couldn't even take sips of water, couldn't even take sips of water, couldn't keep any food down, i was being sick 25 to 30 times a day some days, and spent a lot of it in hospital and just felt lonely. i didn't know how to explain it. hyperemesis is characterised as extreme — hyperemesis is characterised as extreme sickness, noise and dehydration, —— nausea and
2:42 pm
dehydration, —— nausea and dehydration, and anything can trigger— dehydration, and anything can trigger the sickness, colours, movement, your sense of smell is heightened, so even having your own children. _ heightened, so even having your own children, family members around you, it's children, family members around you, it'sjust _ children, family members around you, it'sjust impossible because it's just impossible because anything it'sjust impossible because anything can trigger the vomiting and the _ anything can trigger the vomiting and the whole aim is to try and prevent— and the whole aim is to try and prevent that from happening because you are _ prevent that from happening because you are looking at vomiting up to often _ you are looking at vomiting up to often up — you are looking at vomiting up to often up to— you are looking at vomiting up to often up to 50 times a day. a typical— often up to 50 times a day. a typical day isjust being in your bedroom — typical day isjust being in your bedroom with a bowl, which hopefully you will— bedroom with a bowl, which hopefully you will have someone come and empty for you. _ you will have someone come and empty for you, you're often also suffering with a _ for you, you're often also suffering with a condition which is extreme saliva, _ with a condition which is extreme saliva, which can leave you feeling as though — saliva, which can leave you feeling as though you're drowning, you can occasionally— as though you're drowning, you can occasionally watch the television but quite — occasionally watch the television but quite often you try and catch up on sleep _ but quite often you try and catch up on sleep because during the night, your sleep— on sleep because during the night, your sleep is often broken, so that your sleep is often broken, so that you can _ your sleep is often broken, so that you can vomit. you are essentially 'ust you can vomit. you are essentially just existing. there is no comfort, there _ just existing. there is no comfort, there is— just existing. there is no comfort, there is no— just existing. there is no comfort, there is nojoy in your life, you are just — there is nojoy in your life, you are just existing and for that to go
2:43 pm
on for— are just existing and for that to go on for nine — are just existing and for that to go on for nine months, that's almost a year. _ on for nine months, that's almost a year. we _ on for nine months, that's almost a year, we really do have to understand that the women that are going _ understand that the women that are going through this is very serious. labour mp harriet harman has called on the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick to step down from her post in the wake of sarah everard's murder. ms harman spoke out after asking an urgent question to policing minister kit malthouse about sexual misconduct in the met and other forces. mr malthouse told mps a home office inquiry is being launched into what happened. the public are in urgent need of reassurance. so, too, are the vast majority of police officers who serve with courage and professionalism, and who rely on all of their colleagues to uphold their values. this is why the government is launching a two part independent enquiry. the first part will examine the recruitment and employment of sarah's killer and whether there are opportunities to have were opportunities to have intercepted him along the way. and i would expect the second part to look at a range of relevant
2:44 pm
issues, from policing culture to whether enough is being done to identify patterns of behaviour, identify and report patterns of behaviour of those individuals who could go on to abuse their policing powers. we will appoint the chair of the inquiry shortly, and then agree terms of reference. the home secretary will at that point provide the house with an update. we've also asked her majesty's inspectorate to undertake an urgent inspection of forces to look at their vetting and counter corruption arrangements, as well as focusing on how well forces can identify unacceptable behaviour. we recognise that sexual violence is a broader issue in society and we must leave no stone unturned in confronting it, and the prime minister will therefore launch a task force to drive cross government action and to help maintain public confidence in policing and our many thousands of outstanding police officers. the police have a unique and vital role in our society, and we rightly expect them to meet high standards of behaviour and professionalism.
2:45 pm
that's the announcement of the investigation. but ms harman said urgent action is now needed to restore public confidence in the police. women need to be able to trust the police, not fear them. that means we need to be certain that allegations of sexism and misogyny result in immediate suspension, not just removal from the front line, immediate suspension from the police, that findings of sexual misconduct lead to instant dismissal, that vetting and training is sorted urgently. if you're in a whatsapp group that deals in sexual violence and misogyny, you shouldn't be in the police. the official inquiries the minister has mentioned which are under way are welcome, but even before those enquiries report, these basic issues should be tackled now. we need firm leadership from the police, from the top of the police, in recognition that big change is needed and a determination not to stand on the way of that
2:46 pm
change but to make it happen, and i know the home secretary agrees with us on that. i don't believe that will happen under the current metropolitan commissioner, who should, i believe, step down so this vital change can happen and happen now. harriet harman there. managers running care services in england say staff shortages are so acute, they're having to make tough decisions about which patients they can help. the national care forum, which represents many working in the sector, says pressures on the care system are becoming intolerable. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. these are the empty beds that show the reality of the staffing crisis facing both care homes and home care providers. this plymouth residential home is getting multiple calls each day from hospitals and families asking if they will take new residents. but they don't have enough care workers to look after any more people. we have six care homes in north and south devon. we've got 21% of our beds that are empty and that is purely because we cannot staff them.
2:47 pm
our staff are working tirelessly hard and they are exhausted, they are working overtime. it's extremely hard to be making these heartbreaking decisions where we are getting to the point where our care potentially may not be safe and we may have to turn away residents. as society has reopened, it's become increasingly difficult for care services to keep and recruit staff. exhaustion from the pandemic, compulsoryjabs in care homes and better pay in other sectors are all playing their part. that's according to 340 care managers with more than 21,000 staff who responded to questions from organisations representing them. they had an average of 17% ofjobs vacant. more than two thirds had stopped or limited some services, including saying no to taking patients from hospital. it's estimated together they have turned down nearly 5000 requests for help since september the 1st. we have heard the government in response to other staff shortages talk about moving heaven
2:48 pm
and earth in order to address those staff shortages. we need to see some of that heavy lifting applying right now to the social care sector. otherwise i fear we will see more people who need care and support right now being unable to access it. the government says it is putting more money into the care system, including investing in training and regular recruitment campaigns for staff. alison holt, bbc news. the taliban takeover of afghanistan forced thousands of people to flee their country, with many trying to make new lives here in the uk. but months later, some are still living in hotels that were supposed to be temporary, restricting their access tojobs, proper healthcare and education. with more, here's our home editor, mark easton. a budget hotel in buckinghamshire is currently home to 160 afghan migrants, mostly children. and, after more than two months stuck there, it is the children who often find it hardest.
2:49 pm
a local primary has offered educational support, but the authorities discourage such arrangements, and that is a source of frustration. my wife, and my seven children, it's very difficult for us. nazir�*s children missed a lot of school in afghanistan and, after more than two months stuck in uk hotels, he's desperate to get them back into a classroom. i think a permanent education system is not available at the moment, and we are really keen, and would really press the government to sort this out as soon as possible. finding suitable accommodation for large families is a huge challenge. there are fears that some may be in so—called bridging hotels for many months yet. local charities help, but stuck in institutional limbo, it seems like basic safeguarding is not always there. we have visited some families here that have been in the country for three weeks. and children had unseen bullet wounds in their legs,
2:50 pm
so we were able to muster support, get people to a local walk—in surgery. in south london, one school has found a way to get afghan children out of a local hotel and into class. after meeting a desperate migrant dad, the head at walworth academy realised that, if afghan parents applied for an available place, her school was legally bound to take them. $0, off we went down to that hotel, land quite literally sat in the lobbyl with that gentleman, _ talking to him, which meant that more people and then more people kept coming up, - and next day, we got - a telephone call here saying, we understand you have been to this hotel. _ could you come and see us? we would be interested in school places. - these three girls, all evacuated from kabul with their families, as the taliban seized control, are thrilled to be in school at last. i am so happy because i love education. 0ur mind is fresh, we get more friends in here, it is a true comfort and it is too
2:51 pm
good for us. the education department says it is funding extra school places for afghans. and trying to get children into classrooms as soon as possible. but the question is whether the government should be doing more to support the children now. mark easton, bbc news. a key figure in the development of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine says the government must stick to spending commitments for science, if future breakthroughs to combat viruses and diseases are to take place. professor sir andrew pollard has told the bbc other nations will overtake the uk in research and development if funding is cut. there are growing fears government plans to double science funding will be reversed in next week's autumn budget. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh.
2:52 pm
the covid jab has saved millions of lives. its development within the space of a year is one of the clearest illustrations of the value of science. the man who helped develop one of the vaccines is concerned that britain's leading role in research could be under threat. that's if the government doesn't follow through on plans to increase science spending to £22 billion by 2024. we absolutely have to invest in science, otherwise we are going to fall behind other countries. indeed, over the months and years ahead, every aspect of our lives will be touched by the investment that happens in science today. and if we aspire to, in the future, build into a stronger society, we absolutely have to have that science. our very lives depend on it. the promised boost to research spending was to help the uk keep up with its international rivals. over the past 20 years or so, the uk has increased research spending by 0.1% of gdp. in south korea, it was 2.6. in china, it was1.5 and in germany, it was 0.8. overall, the uk spends less as a proportion of gdp than nearly every other
2:53 pm
major industrialised country. speaking to the science select committee, two nobel prize—winning scientists have expressed their concerns. we have to have a country that thrives on its brains and its skills. and that comes and is driven really by science and research, in the most general sense. this would be like the new zealand government not investing in rugby. we are quite good at it, why wouldn't you invest behind strength? you might get away for awhile with a slightly smaller investment than the other countries, but it's unlikely to last. plans for a big boost to science spending are said to be injeopardy. leading scientists say it's now up to the prime minister to decide whether to ask the chancellor to change his mind. pallab ghosh, bbc news, at the oxford vaccine center. it's a month since a volcano on one of spain's canary islands erupted,
2:54 pm
forcing thousands of people to leave their homes. lava is still spewing on la palma, with close to 2,000 buildings destroyed and now experts say they have no idea when eruptions will end. 0ur correspondent dan johnson sent this report. it still has the capacity to attract and enthral. but after a month it's become an overbearing backdrop to much of life here, an incredible spectacle with its own mundane chores. ryan does this once a week. "maybe it doesn't affect you directly," he says, "but a family member or someone you know." translation: i want it to end. it's not too worrying to me, but it is for my family. and in the meanwhile we just have to live with it. they have this kind of strong mentality that they say, "it doesn't matter what comes, we go through it and go forward." lucas isn't going forward.
2:55 pm
this is what happened to the house he lived in for 60 years. his wife can't bear to watch. translation: i cannot put into words, losing l the house my father built, which should have been for my children and my grandchildren. it's a miracle we have this flat because i know people who are living in cars and tents and caravans. there is no sign of this eruption easing at all. in fact, if anything, the volcano only gets more active. and it's actually grown over the weeks as the layers of lava have built up and hardened. but there is still fresh lava pouring down the hillsides too, destroying more farmlands, homes and villages, and there are new fires breaking out all the time. there are amazing survival stories. these dogs have been fed by drone for four weeks, and now there is an attempt to use one to rescue them. but there is little hope for the homes still in the way of the lava. and the longer it flows, the further it reaches, smothering more of this island.
2:56 pm
danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. the queen of cakes, mary berry, says she's proud and honoured to be made a dame commander for a lifetime of cooking, writing and baking. she was awarded the honour by the prince of wales, during a ceremony at windsor castle. the former bake 0ffjudge has published more than 50 books during a career spanning more than five decades. dame mary has also been recognised for her charity work. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. today has been a mixture of sunshine and heavy downpours. it's not been as mild as yesterday, i'm through the rest of the week it will be feeling colder. yesterday with the winds from the south of the way from the tropics, we saw temperatures of 21 in the south—east. we have cut off that supply of warmer air today and
2:57 pm
tomorrow winds will be around from the north, bringing much colder air our way. these are the temperatures late afternoon and early evening. still quite mild towards the south—east and east anglia, still showers around, rain heading to scotland, which will continue to head its way southwards overnight, and windy and wet weather developing with the storm moving through the english channel, gusts of over 60 mph in the channel islands, heavy rain to clear away, then winds pick up rain to clear away, then winds pick up as the showers moved other parts of the uk. so a lot going on overnight, temperature is be lower than they have been the last few nights, particularly in the north. still some rain to clear away from the south and south—east early on thursday. then sunshine and some showers, the book of the showers in the north and west, pushing through the north and west, pushing through the irish sea, over the tops of the high ground in scotland there could be some wintriness in those showers, and the showers driven on by a strong and gusty wind, gales around the north sea coasts, combined with some spring tides as well, and
2:58 pm
temperatures eight, nine degrees, could make 15 perhaps toward south wales, where it wouldn't be quite as windy, but elsewhere it will feel cold in the wind. the code are still in place i think on friday, high pressure beginning to push into western areas, many more cloud for the west side of the uk, a few showers at least to begin with, for showers at least to begin with, for showers into the afternoon, head of that, for many eastern areas, likely to be dry, some sunshine at times, it won't be as windy or as cold i think on friday, but temperatures again around 11 — 14 celsius. heading into the weekend, high pressure moves across, it will be a cooler night i think on friday, then this approach in weather system comes in from the atlantic, and many places will be dry on saturday, some sunshine at times, always best in the eastern areas, rain hanging on until later in the day for northern ireland and the western fringes of the uk. more of a southerly breeze so temperatures will be more widely 14 or 15.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: health leaders call for the return of some covid measures in england to tackle rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so, and rules out any further lockdowns. these are inconvenient measures. if we take them hopefully we can stem the rising tide of hospitalisation and we won't have to go further. we managed to get peoples lives back to normal, _ managed to get peoples lives back to normal, those gains were hard won, and i_ normal, those gains were hard won, and i don't _ normal, those gains were hard won, and i don't want to reverse back to and i don't want to reverse back to a situation — and i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have a lockdown is because _ a situation where we have a lockdown is because i_ a situation where we have a lockdown is because i don't think it is necessary. the uk's cost of living rises by more than 3% for the second month in a row, despite a small drop in the rate of inflation.
3:01 pm
brazil's president bolsonaro could face at least ten criminal charges as the country's parliament publishes a report into his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. police have been asked to assess the scale of spiking at nightclubs and parties, after a number of reports of women being drugged by injection. the queen cancels a trip to northern ireland on doctors' orders, reluctantly accepting their advice that she takes a few days rest. less than two weeks after the takeover by new saudi—backed owners, steve bruce is out as manager of newcastle united — leaving the club by mutual consent. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news. health leaders are demanding the immediate reintroduction, of some covid restrictions in england, to avoid the nhs "stumbling into a winter crisis".
3:02 pm
the nhs confederation, says rising infections means measures, including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. week on week, the number of covid cases across the uk, hospital admissions and deaths, are rising at a rate of 10 per cent or more, though that's well below levels seen in january. the government says it has no immediate plans, to reintroduce covid restrictions. covid restrictions are tighter in scotland, wales and northern ireland. here's our health editor, hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary.
3:03 pm
some working in intensive care say they are already under pressure. in some hospitals one in five beds are already occupied with covid patients. that already occupied with covid atients. : already occupied with covid atients. ~ :, patients. at the same time, we have increased numbers _ patients. at the same time, we have increased numbers of— patients. at the same time, we have increased numbers of non-coded - increased numbers of non—coded emergency patients appearing at the doors of our hospitals and at the intensive care unit. ? non—covert. there are many, many people on waiting lists. ? non—covid emergency patients. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do we accept the overwhelming evidence and do what we can now to reduce the
3:04 pm
risks in a way that does not disrupt our day—to—day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that a miracle will happen? then stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis. this morning, ministers ruled out plan b for england for now. we are looking at data on an hourly basis. we don't feel it is time for plan b right now. i think what we are trying to do is get people who haven't been vaccinated to get those vaccinations up, increase the uptake of the booster jab. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance
3:05 pm
of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. at 5 o'clock, the health secretary sajid javid will be holding a briefing from downing street. he will be joined by drjenny harries, chief executive of the uk health security agency and professor stephen powis, national medical director of nhs england. we'll bring you full coverage of that briefing, right here on the bbc news channel, from 5 o'clock. earlier we spoke to dr ian higginson from the royal college of emergency medicine. 0ur our members all over the country are saying the emergency department situation is pretty grim right now given the numbers of patients we are seeing through our doors, and the fact that many of our hospitals are already full to bursting. it’s already full to bursting. it's robabl
3:06 pm
already full to bursting. it's probably worth at this point separating those hospitalisations related to covid and others, and i am aware that the focus is on the pressure put on the nhs overall, but give me your assessment of where we are with covid cases. lloathed give me your assessment of where we are with covid cases.— are with covid cases. what we are experiencing _ are with covid cases. what we are experiencing at — are with covid cases. what we are experiencing at the _ are with covid cases. what we are experiencing at the moment - are with covid cases. what we are experiencing at the moment isn't| are with covid cases. what we are i experiencing at the moment isn't all covid, it is certainly not helping, though. we are seeing a result of years of underinvestment and poor planning within the health service coming to fruition on top of the additional difficulties covid causes. :. , additional difficulties covid causes. :. additional difficulties covid causes. :, ., additional difficulties covid causes. :, :, g additional difficulties covid causes. :, :, '. 'f~ causes. clearly after a difficult 18 months. today _ causes. clearly after a difficult 18 months. today a _ causes. clearly after a difficult 18 months. today a suggested - causes. clearly after a difficult 18| months. today a suggested there should be an immediate reintroduction of measures to protect people in public. given what you've told me i imagine you support those proposals. that you've told me i imagine you support those proposals-— those proposals. that is well above m -a those proposals. that is well above my pay grade _ those proposals. that is well above my pay grade but — those proposals. that is well above my pay grade but there _ those proposals. that is well above my pay grade but there are - those proposals. that is well above my pay grade but there are a - those proposals. that is well above | my pay grade but there are a couple of things i could comment on. the pressure on the nhs, certainly from the perspective of urgent and emergency care, is already
3:07 pm
unsustainable and that's without significant increases in covid numbers. the other thing, as doctors we weigh up the evidence, look at the context, learn from our mistakes, learn from what others are doing well. i guess that's what we hope that our political and health service leaders are doing to come up with the right decision because it is a difficult one.— is a difficult one. given what ou've is a difficult one. given what you've told _ is a difficult one. given what you've told me _ is a difficult one. given what you've told me about - is a difficult one. given what you've told me about the . is a difficult one. given what i you've told me about the state is a difficult one. given what - you've told me about the state of hospitals, the pressures they are under, what happens if there isn't any change? the under, what happens if there isn't any change?— any change? the pattern at the moment is _ any change? the pattern at the moment is of _ any change? the pattern at the moment is of steady _ any change? the pattern at the moment is of steady decline i any change? the pattern at the moment is of steady decline in | moment is of steady decline in conditions within the emergency and urgent care departments. we've seen patients unable to get into hospital beds because the hospitals are full. they're a long wait in emergency departments. we are seeing long waits for patients in ambulances trying to get into those emergency departments, and then long waits for patients who are waiting for an ambulance out in the community. that is showing all signs of looking to get worse in the current situation,
3:08 pm
and that's without additional pressure. and that's without additional ressure. :. ~' and that's without additional ressure. :, ~ :, :, , pressure. talk to me a little bit about the _ pressure. talk to me a little bit about the pressure _ pressure. talk to me a little bit about the pressure being - pressure. talk to me a little bit about the pressure being put i pressure. talk to me a little bit| about the pressure being put on staff. clearly resources are limited given what is going on, but after a very difficult to years for staff in the medical profession i imagine they are somewhat nervous about the approaching winter. more they are somewhat nervous about the approaching winter.— approaching winter. more than nervous. approaching winter. more than nervous- lt's — approaching winter. more than nervous. it's been _ approaching winter. more than nervous. it's been a _ approaching winter. more than nervous. it's been a gruelling. approaching winter. more than i nervous. it's been a gruelling and exhausting time for nhs staff. nhs staff are dedicated and high skilled professionals who just want to do a good job. professionals who just want to do a goodjob. it's professionals who just want to do a good job. it's really upsetting for us to see where we can't provide the care we want for our patients. and as we look forward to things getting worse we really are very worried about what's coming our way and anxious about the sort of care we will be able to provide for our patients. will be able to provide for our atients. ~ , :, will be able to provide for our atients. 9 , :, ., patients. we were explaining earlier that we will hear _ patients. we were explaining earlier that we will hear from _ patients. we were explaining earlier that we will hear from the _ patients. we were explaining earlier that we will hear from the health i that we will hear from the health secretary earlier today, press conference held by sajid javid. what would you like to hear from conference held by sajid javid. what would you like to hearfrom him
3:09 pm
today? would you like to hear from him toda ? :, :. would you like to hear from him toda ? :, :, _ : today? from an emergency medicine perspective. — today? from an emergency medicine perspective. what — today? from an emergency medicine perspective, what we _ today? from an emergency medicine perspective, what we always - today? from an emergency medicine perspective, what we always like i today? from an emergency medicine perspective, what we always like to i perspective, what we always like to hear from our political and perspective, what we always like to hearfrom our political and health service leaders is an honest assessment of the problem, and effective and realistic plans to deal with what we are facing. i think that's all we ever want to see from our leaders. as health care professionals we will always do our best to work within those sorts of plans. and we'll be answering your questions on the increasing cases and whether tighter restrictions are needed. that's in your questions answered with dr deepti gurdasani from queen mary's university at half past three this afternoon. you can get in touch using the hastag bbcyourquestions or email your questions at bbc.co.uk.
3:10 pm
dojoin me for that in do join me for that in about 20 minutes' time on this channel. an update on the rest of today's stories. the cost of living has increased by more than 3% for the second month running. the office for national statistics said inflation — the rate at which prices are rising — was at 3.1% last month. that's down slightly from the month before, but still remains well above the bank of england's target of 2%. our business correspondent, nina warhurst has more details. this is ruth's kitchen where she cooks, mum and dad come to catch up, jack does his homework, and amy checks her messages. like most families, ruth is starting to feel the force of inflation. we are just starting to notice the pinch a little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us is energy bill because we wear with peoples the biggest one for us is energy bill because we were with peoples energy who went bust, so the energy bill is doubling every month.
3:11 pm
that's going from £120 up to £250. 0uch. today's figures show inflation in september was at 3.1%, driven by higher prices in transport, food, and home services. that is slightly lower than the august figure, but much higher than the bank of england target of 2%. i think it's a real cause of some concern because clearly we want inflation rates to the lower. the critical question is, how long is that inflation going to last for. the governor of the bank of england is hopeful the inflation rate will be contained and that is something they are looking at. inflated places means nigel and susan's teacher pension pots aren't stretching quite as far. they like to see their savings to be better. : :. . they like to see their savings to be better. ::, , ,,~ , :, they like to see their savings to be better. , , :, better. the cash isas are losing value. better. the cash isas are losing value- you _ better. the cash isas are losing value. you hope _ better. the cash isas are losing value. you hope the _ better. the cash isas are losing value. you hope the stocks i better. the cash isas are losing value. you hope the stocks and| value. you hope the stocks and shares might go up but there is a risk attached to those.
3:12 pm
the idea of interest rates is if borrowing is less attractive to people, and saving is more attractive, then people will spend slightly less and that will ease the demand on prices, meaning that the price rate slows. in reality, a 0.25% interest rate by the bank of england is still very low. like millions of public sectorworkers, ruth's salary is stuck for now, and for lots of busy families, even those with decentjobs, there is a winter ahead of putting on an extra jumper, thinking twice about treats, and wondering whether it is worth saving at all if there is anything left to put away. earlier i spoke to our economics correspondent, andy verity, who said that while this is a small fall in inflation, it's nonetheless still above that 2% target. it's above the target but also,
3:13 pm
you shouldn't mistake that for the end of the rise in the cost of living that we have been seeing recently. it's very much more likely to be a statistical blip. the reason i say that is what you're comparing it with. so the previous month's figures, which were 3.2%, were comparing august with august of 2020, when you had eat out to help 0ut. that artificially depressed prices in restaurants and hotels, and so by comparison, a year later, it looked like a big jump in prices. whereas when you come to september, that's all fallen out of the equation. september 2020, there was no eat out to help 0ut. so there's less of an effect from that. but nonetheless, you really do see price pressures coming through. so just to give you a couple of items, i mean, air fares are up 9.7%. second hand cars are up 22%. so, what you're really looking at is the commodity prices coming through. so, if you look at the prices that manufacturers are paying for their raw materials, they are up by 11.4%. that's quite a chunky old rise.
3:14 pm
11.4%, and they can wear that rise in their raw material costs up to a point, but then they have to pass it on, and you're seeing that, too. if you look at the prices at the factory gate, before they come to retailers, they are up by 6.7%. and that's the highest rise we have seen there for a decade. so, you really see that inflationary pressure coming down the pipeline. and you might also say that's before any of the figures we have seen over the last few weeks about things like gas prices going up, petrol prices going up, that's not even yet in the figures, is it? no, that's right. in fact, these figures were taken in the middle of september, before we had the queues at the petrol pump, so that's not even priced in. so, you can expect inflation to get a lot worse before it gets any better. but the bank of england has a very interesting dilemma here, because if they raise interest rates too quickly and too fast, then they risk snuffing out a recovery which is already slowing down. but the markets are now pricing in a rise in interest rates, it's a racing certainty by the end of this year from the historic low of 0.1%, the official
3:15 pm
rate, up to 0.25%. but interestingly, the markets are now predicting that by the end of next year, they'll get up to 1%. now, just a month ago, that wasn't on the cards. people weren't expecting any rate rise next year. 1% would be the highest interest rate we've seen since 2009, february 2009. now, it might not sound too high to you or me, certainly not our grandparents�* ears, who have seen much higher interest rates in the 70s and 80s, but it�*s still a much higher interest rate than we have been used to. and there will be people on the bank of england�*s monetary policy committee saying, if we do what the market is predicting, we risk snuffing out the recovery. there will be some interesting debates. and also, the big question about whether even a rise of that magnitude will be enough to tame inflation. well, yeah. and you�*re talking about rises in inflation caused by global commodity prices. what�*s it going to do to global commodity prices, just by making it more expensive for british borrowers to borrow? not necessarily that much. but the bank of england is also concerned about wage pressures, because the supply of labour isn�*t what it used to be and in areas like truck drivers, brickies, they can almost tell their employers what they�*re going to need to pay
3:16 pm
them, and the risk is that that feeds through into a more generalised wage inflation which then creates a sort of upward spiral. that�*s what andrew bailey is worried about. the headlines on bbc news... the government says it has no plans to reintroduce coronavirus measures in england, despite calls from health leaders who say the country faces a crisis without immediate change. despite a small drop in the rate of inflation, the cost of living in the uk rises by more than three percent for the second month in a row. after a number of women reported being injected with needles on nights out, police have been asked to assess the scale of spiking at nightclubs and parties a parliamentary inquiry in brazil is presenting its final findings into president bolsonaro s handling of the covid—19 pandemic. according to excerpts of the report already leaked to the media, the inquiry will recommend numerous charges against presidentjair bolsonaro. it�*s after the brazilian leader
3:17 pm
was accused of failing to control the virus that has so far killed more than 600,000 brazilians. 0ur south america correspondent katy watson told me some of the charges people were expecting have been dropped. the reading of the report has started and it�*s a 1200 page document listing a huge amount of crimes, corruption, schemes, it�*s been six months of hearings into what the government did and didn�*t do during the pandemic. in the original report there were crimes such as the genocide of indigenous and looking at the issue of intentional murder but it�*s believed that those more serious crimes, if you like, have been dropped. what they are trying to do, because it is an 11 person enquiry, 11 senators, four on the side ofjair bolsonaro,
3:18 pm
seven critical of the president. they need to agree on the crimes they want to list in the document that will then be sent to federal prosecutors. they want to make sure that these crimes are crimes he may well be able to be charged with eventually otherwise six months of hearings will come to nothing. there�*s been lots of late—night discussions about what he can be charged with and how responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people they can hold the government to account. president bolsonaro dismissing _ government to account. president bolsonaro dismissing the - bolsonaro dismissing the investigation, calling it politically motivated, i wonder what we can expect as far as this plays out, as you said there is so much more still to come. it's more still to come. it�*s a political enquiry. there is no legal standing. it�*s effectively a police department that has done the investigation is, that will pass on their findings to prosecutors who could then press charges or not. that�*s the issue. whatever side of
3:19 pm
politics people are on, everybody can agree this enquiry has dented president bolsonaro�*s popularity. some say it�*s been a good thing, others say it�*s been a political witchhunt. it�*ll mean that if he decides to run in any elections next year it�*ll be a much harder challenge for him. but will we see him leaving the presidency soon because of this? no, i think we will see a long drawn out process, but it has highlighted the damage, if you like, of what the government did, or didn�*t do, during the pandemic. buckingham palace says the queen has cancelled a trip to northern ireland today, and has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest. she�*s 95 and said to be in good spirits, but disappointed. here�*s our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. she has had a busy few days since she returned from balmoral. last tuesday she was at westminster abbey for the centenary of the royal british legion.
3:20 pm
last thursday she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament. and last night she was hosting a very big reception at windsor castle for dozens of global business leaders. she had been due to travel to northern ireland later today for engagements tonight and tomorrow, marking the centenary of the partition of ireland, but a statement this morning from buckingham palace saying, as you reported, she has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest for the next few days. she is in good spirits and she�*s disappointed not to be going to northern ireland. now, the palace is not really saying anything more than that, but i understand this is not in any way covid related. she has had both vaccinations, we don�*t know whether she�*s had the booster vaccination. but i think what will be in the minds of the royal officials and doctors is that she is due to attend cop 26 to host a reception for all the global leaders attending that at the end of next week, and they will want to be sure that she is fully rested for that.
3:21 pm
morocco has announced a ban on flights to and from the uk due to the coronavirus pandemic. the suspension comes into force at 11.59 tonight. flights to and from germany and the netherlands will also be halted. morocco�*s national office of airports said the policy will remain in place "until further notice". the biggest study ever undertaken in the uk into what�*s known as �*extreme pregnancy sickness,�* has found that the condition can be so severe, more than half of sufferers consider having abortions. while mild sickness is a common symptom of pregnancy, �*extreme nausea�* can affect between 1 and 3% of pregnant women. daniela relph, has been speaking to one woman, about her experience. i still can�*t eat, and i can�*t drink. and i�*m hungry, and i am stressed, and i can�*t sleep. extreme sickness in pregnancy can be brutal. the condition, known as hg, can overwhelm you. i�*m so cold. two years ago, laura anderson kept
3:22 pm
a video diary of her pregnancy. it�*s a horrible illness. itjust makes you a complete shadow of who you were. two years on, and laura is now mum to ava. we had to try very hard to get pregnant, and we had had four miscarriages and she was very wanted, and she was what kept me going, because i knew the only way to get a baby was to get to that end point, and that�*s what got me through. but the pregnancy left her feeling isolated and struggling to get help. she wants other women to get better care and treatment. the mentaljourney is actually harder, because that is still left over at the end of it. that doesn�*t go away as quickly as the physical symptoms. it�*s nine months of isolation and feeling completely useless, because you can�*t do anything. some people have to quit theirjobs.
3:23 pm
some people have other children, and they feel like they are letting them down. 0bviously, treat the physicalfirst, because that can be very dangerous if not, but so can the mental part of it. laura had wanted more children, but she is forever changed by her hg experience. do you think you will have any more children? no, no. i very much at the end of ava�*s pregnancy told myself, i am finally done with hg. i was happy about that. if i could be promised that i wouldn�*t have hg, i would definitely have another baby. that is the only reason why i�*m not having another baby. it is just too risky for you. yeah. yeah, i can�*t be a mum if i�*ve got hg. 0ver130,000 people have signed a petition calling for the government to make nightclub searches a legal requirement — after reports of women being injected with needles in nottingham. nottinghamshire police say they�*ve
3:24 pm
made one arrest and admit reports of spiking overall are on the rise. student zara 0wens is among three women in the last fortnight who claim they were attacked and made ill while at city centre nightclubs. i remember going in, going to the bar, going to the toilet, and up until that moment my memory is a blank until i get home and i�*m getting my phone charger. i know i didn�*t drink as much as i usually would on a night out. the fact i don�*t remember anything is terrifying for me because this is something that is a very rare occasion for me. i�*ve never suffered from memory loss. then the next morning, i woke up with a really, really painful neck. the labour mp for nottingham east, nadia whittome, is working with women�*s groups in the area on a set of demands to take to the home secretary and police. she said searches are one possibility and should be debated by parliament.
3:25 pm
what we have to be really careful of is that this conversation doesn�*t become one about what can women do, and putting the responsibility on women. women should be able to go out freely and enjoy themselves without fear of assault, sexual or otherwise. this is part of a much wider problem of male violence from sexual harassment to rape. we need immediate measures to prevent this from happening, and deal with it when it does, but also long—term much deeper change because this isn�*t something that is going to be stopped by spiking measures and bottle tops. if we don�*t deal with the cultural problem of misogyny then this is going to keep happening. bbc newsbeat�*s reporter christian hewgill is in nottingham speaking to students. it is fair to say there
3:26 pm
is a lot of concern. nottingham trent university�*s city campus is about a mile from the bbc here in nottingham. i�*ve just been over there. when you walk through the campus you can overhear people talking about it. it is fair to say there is a lot of concern. i spoke to lots of students this morning, lots of women saying they aren�*t going out tonight. wednesday night has always been one of the biggest students�* nights in nottingham but there is going to be a lot of official university societies not going out tonight. there is a campaign gaining momentum nationally called girls night in encouraging groups of girls not to go out. lots of people here have said to me that they will follow that, have an arranged night in. some i have spoken to said they won�*t go to big night clubs but maybe just to smaller bars. lots of concern from the students i�*ve spoken to in nottingham today. we heard in that clip about one of the proposals potentially about being searching on entrance to nightclubs, what are the police telling you about this?
3:27 pm
we�*ve spoken to quite a lot of police forces across the uk. there are calls for increased searches, also lots of calls from those campaign groups for coverings on the top of drinks, also drinks to be served in clear plastic bottles or glasses so it is more obvious if something has been put into it. we have police in merseyside and west yorkshire telling us that they are looking into cases of alleged spikings. the same also with police scotland in edinburgh, glasgow and dundee. it�*s important to say, though, looking at the picture across the country, this is still a very small number of cases. nobody has actually been charged with spiking, spiking with needles especially, anywhere in the country. we have police in liverpol, in merseyside, saying they�*ve looked into it after lots of social media reports but haven�*t found any illegal activity. as you said, police in nottingham have seen an increase in reports on this over the last couple of months, so it is being reported,
3:28 pm
but still a comparatively small number of cases across the country. the queen of cakes mary berry says she�*s proud and honoured to be made a dame commanderfor a lifetime of cooking, writing and baking. she was awarded the honour by the prince of wales, during a ceremony at windsor castle. the former bake 0ffjudge has published more than 50 books during a career spanning more than five decades. dame mary, has also been recognised for her charity work. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello again. with a mixture of sunshine and heavy downpours today, not quite as mild as it was yesterday. still some decent temperatures late afternoon and early evening towards the south—east of the uk, fewer showers by this stage, but that rain in scotland will move southwards overnight and we have the storm developing and running through the english channel, very windy conditions here,
3:29 pm
some heavy rain for a while before that clears later. and behind this band of rain, winds pick up in the north, blow in those showers, wintry over higher parts of northern scotland and it will be a chillier night across the country than it has been for quite some time. tomorrow we still have some rain to clear away first thing from southern parts of england, after that, it�*s sunshine, showers, mainly towards northern and western scotland, northern ireland, pushing in around irish sea coastal areas. away from here, a lot of dry weather and sunshine, but strong winds will make it feel colder and we have gales around some of these north sea coasts for a while, together with some high spring tides. so these are the temperatures, eight or nine in northern scotland, maybe 14 in southern england. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: health leaders call for the return of some covid measures in england to tackle rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so,
3:30 pm
and rules out any further lockdowns. the uk�*s cost of living rises by more than three percent for the second month in a row, despite a small drop in the rate of inflation. a report from brazilian lawmakers could recommended president jair bolsonaro face at least ten criminal charges over his government�*s handling of the coronavirus pandemic — but is expected to drop accusations of genocide and homicide. the home secretary asks police forces to assess the scale of spiking at nightclubs and parties, after a number of women reported being injected with needles on nights out. the queen cancels a trip to northern ireland on doctors�* orders, reluctantly accepting their advice that she takes a few days rest. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s austin. it afternoon.
3:31 pm
newcastle�*s search for a new manager begins. the club parted company with steve bruce this morning, just 13 days after the saudi arabia—backed takeover on tyneside. bruce leaves after two years in charge, with the club second from bottom in the premier league table. 0ur correspondent katie gornall has more. managing newcastle was steve bruce�*s dream job but no matter how badly he wanted it to work at his hometown club, it always felt like an uphill battle. his departure had been widely expected. our new chairman! cheering. he was under pressure even before the saudi arabian led takeover, with his side second from bottom and without a win all season. on sunday in front of the new owners, his team failed again. newcastle stay in the bottom three. in a statement confirming his departure, bruce said he was grateful to everyone connected with newcastle for the opportunity to manage this unique football club.
3:32 pm
bruce succeeded rafa benitez in 2019, but despite keeping a limited squad in the premier league for the past two season, the former sunderland manager proved a deeply unpopular appointment with fans. t manager proved a deeply unpopular appointment with fans.— appointment with fans. i think it's about time. _ appointment with fans. i think it's about time, the _ appointment with fans. i think it's about time, the club _ appointment with fans. i think it's about time, the club wasn't i appointment with fans. i think it's about time, the club wasn't going j about time, the club wasn�*t going forward. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, it will be good. i think he had to go, really, - for the club to progress in the way the new owners want it to go. an assistant coach will take interim charge while they turn to what will happen next for newcastle. but as for what�*s next for bruce, given the toll this job has taken on him and his family, his 1000th game in management is likely to be his last. staying with football, five people have been arrested following an attack on a manchester city fan after last night�*s champions league game against bruges. the 63—year—old belgian man, who watched city�*s 5—1 win at the stadium,
3:33 pm
is in a life—threatening condition. the attack took place at a motorway services 45 kilometres from bruges. city said they were "shocked and saddened" by the incident, while club bruges said they were "horrified". there�*s more champions league action tonight. manchester united will be without defender raphael varane and forward anthony martial for their game with atalanta. meanwhile, chelsea host swedish side malmo, and thomas tuchel says it�*s important they don�*t feel ashamed that they�*re not on top form and dominating games. it is what it is and it�*s very important that we don�*t feel ashamed and we don�*t be too critical of ourselves. it is what it is and if you have hard moments, you fight through the hard moments. we wanted to be the team that nobody likes to play against and we are in a good way, and from there we try to
3:34 pm
improve. now to cricket and the twenty20 world cup continues, with ireland looking to make it two wins from two and boost their chances of qualilfying for the next stage. they�*re taking on sri lanka in abu dhabi. and the irish have had a brilliant start! they bowled first and had the sri lankans eight for 3. joshua little with two wickets in two balls. there�*s live commentary right now on radio five live sports extra. and namibia beat the netherlands by six wickets in the early game. the dutch batted first and made 164 for four from their 20 overs, but namibia were up to the task. chasing it down with an over to spare. now, after both sides lost their opening matches, it means the netherlands now can�*t make it through to the next stage. meanwhile england beat new zealand by 13 runs in their final warm—up match. but captain eoin morgan�*s barren run with the bat continued. he madejust ten in england�*s innings of 163 for six against new zealand.
3:35 pm
morgan said he would consider dropping himself if his poorform continues. england face the west indies in their first match on saturday. well there�*s more on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. including live text commentary of leicester against spartak moscow in the europa league. that match has just kicked off. now it�*s time for your questions answered. we�*ve been asking you to send in your questions about the latest coronavirus figures and the boosterjab roll out. to answer some of them now i�*m joined now by dr deepti gurdasani, a clinical epidemiologist from queen mary university london. nice to have you with us, thanks for joining us this afternoon. i want to delve into these questions, and there are many, straightaway, but
3:36 pm
first, we are going to talk over the next few minutes a lot about plan a and plan b, let�*sjust remind people what does because my plans are from the government point of view? —— those two plans. the government point of view? -- those two plans-— the government point of view? -- those two plans. sure, did you want to be done — those two plans. sure, did you want to be done so _ those two plans. sure, did you want to be done so that _ those two plans. sure, did you want to be done so that is _ those two plans. sure, did you want to be done so that is a _ those two plans. sure, did you want to be done so that is a question? i to be done so that is a question? yes, if you would maybe just outline the difference between them, just remind viewers before we get into some of the detail? plan remind viewers before we get into some of the detail?— some of the detail? plan a is 'ust movin: some of the detail? plan a is 'ust moving forward i some of the detail? plan a is 'ust moving forward with i some of the detail? plan a is 'ust moving forward with what i some of the detail? plan a is 'ust moving forward with what we i some of the detail? plan a isjust| moving forward with what we have now, which is, we don�*t have any mandatory restrictions except for isolated when you tested positive for covid. plan b would mean a stricter set of restrictions which would include mask mandates being brought back indoors, we would go back to work from home recommendation so you work from home when you can, and also, vaccine passports were particularly for access to areas with large gatherings, you would need to show
3:37 pm
you have been doubly vaccinated. absolutely, and reason that�*s important, of course, is because daily covered mac cases above 40,000 for seven days in a row now. ? daily covid cases. so let�*s get to the question is becausejeff has messaged and he said, does anyone know the make up of people who are suffering or dying from covid at the minute? because of course, at the outset of this pandemic, it was people may be described as vulnerable, those who are elderly or had, but it is our underlying health issues, he wants to know who is currently suffering at the moment? this is nonsense that is routinely published at the minute but office for national statistics reported recently, it�*s not neser the most recently, it�*s not neser the most recent information but during a period, 40% of people who died were people who did not have any limitation on day—to—day activity
3:38 pm
from health conditions, so people who we are guess would have considered fit and healthy. in terms of age groups, we have more recent data had about 85% of people who died were in the 60 plus age group since september, so the people dying are still predominantly those who are still predominantly those who are in the older age group. we are still seeing much higher death rates among ethnic minorities, where death rates are three to four times higher than people who are white, and the most deprived areas have a seven times higher chance of dying than those in the least deprived areas. and as a follow on to that, what is the impact of the vaccine? we are told that link is broken between hospitalisation and death but there is a concern about the waning utility, usefulness of the vaccine as many people come to the end of their life span come of that vaccine. —— the end of the life span
3:39 pm
of that vaccine. the vaccine. -- the end of the life span of that vaccine.— of that vaccine. the link isn't broken, of that vaccine. the link isn't broken. its _ of that vaccine. the link isn't broken, its considerably i of that vaccine. the link isn't i broken, its considerably weakened. we would have much, much higher deaths at the current infection rate, which is, as i say, 40,000 a day, if we did not have the levels of vaccination. but let�*s remember two things, one, one third of our population is still not received a two does it and we know there is waning immunity over time, two does it and we know there is waning immunity overtime, and two does it and we know there is waning immunity over time, and even before waning immunity, people don�*t have perfect protection. so someone who is 80, even after being vaccinated, will have the same risk as someone who is 50 years and unvaccinated, that�*s non—0 risk, so if we have high infection the population, sadly, people will die as we are seeing now. at the numbers of people dying will be much, much, much lowerthan numbers of people dying will be much, much, much lower than if we didn�*t have this level of vaccination in society. didn't have this level of vaccination in socie . �* , ,, vaccination in society. the business secretary has _ vaccination in society. the business secretary has been _ vaccination in society. the business secretary has been speaking - vaccination in society. the business secretary has been speaking to i vaccination in society. the business secretary has been speaking to the| secretary has been speaking to the bbc this morning, saying it�*s not yet time for plan b, he�*s been urging right uptake of boosterjabs, so a question from karen, who wants to know, if i had the astrazeneca
3:40 pm
vaccine, can i now choose to have the booster as a pfizerjab? yes. vaccine, can i now choose to have the booster as a pfizerjab? the booster as a pfizer 'ab? yes, in fact, the booster as a pfizer 'ab? yes, in fact. that-s — the booster as a pfizer 'ab? yes, in fact, that's almost i the booster as a pfizerjab? yes, in fact, that's almost definitely i the booster as a pfizerjab? yes, in fact, that's almost definitely what l fact, that�*s almost definitely what is going to happen, because the government is rolling out pfizer and moderna as boosters and there�*s good evidence to show that taking pfizer after astrazeneca gives you much, much higher protection than taking astrazeneca after astrazeneca, so it�*s very likely you will be offered either pfizer or moderna, which are very similar in their make—up and the sort of protection they provide. david asks, and this is a question about the information we have about the proportion of the population thatis the proportion of the population that is vaccinated and unvaccinated, david darby says, the us government publishes separate covid stats for the vaccinated and unvaccinated proportions of the popular shoe, why can�*t the uk to do the same? —— david in derby. can't the uk to do the same? -- david in derby.— can't the uk to do the same? -- david in derby. can't the uk to do the same? -- david in derb . : :, :, , david in derby. adding that would be treat, david in derby. adding that would be great. we've — david in derby. adding that would be great, we've been _ david in derby. adding that would be great, we've been asking _ david in derby. adding that would be great, we've been asking public i great, we�*ve been asking public health england to do this and it would be great if we could have that data about how many people who are
3:41 pm
unvaccinated getting infected every day as well as dying, i hope they will put that in place soon. good, that would _ will put that in place soon. good, that would maybe _ will put that in place soon. good, that would maybe give _ will put that in place soon. good, that would maybe give us - will put that in place soon. good, that would maybe give us a i will put that in place soon. good, that would maybe give us a bit i will put that in place soon. good, i that would maybe give us a bit more information. margaret e—mails, she is from essex, she says, someone who is from essex, she says, someone who is in the clinic the vulnerable group, she would like to know the difference between the third covid vaccination at the booster committees are different, aren�*t they, maybe you could clarify the difference? the they, maybe you could clarify the difference?— difference? the third vaccination for --eole difference? the third vaccination for people who _ difference? the third vaccination for people who are _ difference? the third vaccination for people who are clinically i for people who are clinically vulnerable and don�*t have an adequate immune response to vaccines as part of their primary programme of vaccinations, so they actually need three doses of vaccine to reach a level of detection that other people would have with two doses, so their primary programme is three doses and this does, essentially, they are eligible to get eight weeks or more after their second but it might depend on what immunosuppression their own because the clinicians might want to sort of change when they give that to them. a booster is for people who have
3:42 pm
already reached a high level of protection with two doses and essentially that immunity has gone down over time miss 0 to maintain that high level of protection, a booster is given about six months after the second dose. so immunosuppressed people will also need a booster but they need the three doses to get a high level protection similar to people who are not immune suppressed, you can do that with two doses or stop and while we�*re speaking of the number of doses, a question from kevin in surrey watt, who says, in the uk, we�*re one vaccine does for surrey watt, who says, in the uk, we're one vaccine does for children between 12 — we're one vaccine does for children between 12 and _ we're one vaccine does for children between 12 and 18 _ we're one vaccine does for children between 12 and 18 but _ we're one vaccine does for children between 12 and 18 but it _ we're one vaccine does for children between 12 and 18 but it means i between 12 and 18 but it means they�*re not fully vaccinated, he says two doses is what�*s required to be fully vaccinated in other countries, so with that cause an issue for going abroad when a child only has one vaccination rather than two? : :,. only has one vaccination rather than two? : : :, , only has one vaccination rather than two? : :, y�* only has one vaccination rather than two? :, , �* :, two? almost certainly, i'm already heafina two? almost certainly, i'm already hearing this _ two? almost certainly, i'm already hearing this from _ two? almost certainly, i'm already hearing this from parents - two? almost certainly, i'm already hearing this from parents are i two? almost certainly, i'm already| hearing this from parents are trying to travel to other areas that require two vaccinations for adolescents to be able to travel,
3:43 pm
almost every country in the road except perhaps norway is now giving two doses of vaccine to adolescents. i think the evidence is very strong for two does vaccination, and i am less concerned about children being able to travel, which is also problematic, but i think there�*s also no evidence one dose provides a sufficient level protection and we we need those two doses to be given for full protection of children unless there is evidence otherwise, which i don�*t think there is. let�*s which i don't think there is. let's talk about _ which i don't think there is. let's talk about infection _ which i don't think there is. let's talk about infection rates, i i which i don't think there is. let's talk about infection rates, i think that has sparked concern of rate, 40,007 days in a row, richard asks, why are so high, where there are so many more cases in the uk than in other countries? he wonders whether we are testing more, but how are we at this figure already? 50 we are testing more, but how are we at this figure already?— at this figure already? so it's not 'ust more at this figure already? so it's not just more testing. _ at this figure already? so it's not just more testing. we _ at this figure already? so it's not just more testing. we may i at this figure already? so it's not just more testing. we may be i at this figure already? so it's not i just more testing. we may be testing better than other countries but the problem is what we are seeing is that our death rates are also two
3:44 pm
times higher than in many other european countries and that suggests that the number of cases is also higher than that of other countries, and the reason that is happening is because most other, most if not all other european countries have maintain some level of restrictions like mosque mandates, better mitigations in schools, better ventilation was up —— mask mandates. caps on gatherings, social session, the sort of thing is we don�*t have an england right now, so very few countries have taken the route we have, which is why they have not had that massive surge we are seeing and they have much lower cases and liver deaths. —— lower death. t they have much lower cases and liver deaths. -- lower death.— deaths. -- lower death. iwonder whatyour— deaths. -- lower death. i wonder what your assessment _ deaths. -- lower death. i wonder what your assessment is - deaths. -- lower death. i wonder what your assessment is of i deaths. -- lower death. i wonder what your assessment is of the i deaths. -- lower death. i wonder. what your assessment is of the way the public is reacting, do we feel in the uk that the crisis is over and we can let our guard down and that�*s why the cases arising? t that's why the cases arising? i think that is possible, and i that's why the cases arising? t think that is possible, and i think it is down to the messaging from the
3:45 pm
government that suggests the pandemic is over, which is really surprising given that we have had 30,000 to 40,000 cases for months now and that has resulted in a huge rise in people with long covid over the past has met once, and we have also had dozens of deaths, we have had 10,000 deaths since freedom day which was the 19th ofjuly, many deaths which were preventable had we kept basic mask mandates and restrictions on gatherings, which we didn�*t. so i think a lot of this is messaging from government. the government had essentially asked the public, are you happy to get met basic measures like masks on if they save thousands of lives over the coming months and reduce pressure on the nhs, i think most people would have said yes to that. i think we offered vaccination very late compared other countries to adolescents, which led to it spreading in schools, and then
3:46 pm
spreading in schools, and then spreading to other relatives. let�*s spreading to other relatives. let's ut this in spreading to other relatives. let's put this in context _ spreading to other relatives. let's put this in context compared to other illnesses and deaths, it�*s very easy to focus on covid figures right now, of course there are many other causes right now and that�*s one reason hospitals are increasingly full, too. t one reason hospitals are increasingly full, too. i think there is a — increasingly full, too. i think there is a multiplicity - increasingly full, too. i think there is a multiplicity of- increasingly full, too. i think i there is a multiplicity of reasons. one thing i want to kind of, a piece of misinformation i want to address, as people keep saying there are 10,000 deaths of flu every year, their art, there are about 1500 deaths directly attribute about the flu, there are 10,000 deaths of pneumonia and flu, there are all sorts of pneumonias every year, by comparison, we are at a stage of 40,000, 50,000 deaths a year with the current rate. a&e departments and hospitals are full, notjust because a covid is also massive backlogs where people have not been able to get routine care because of the sort of waves we have had and many nhs staffing off with covid and long covid, which means people with chronic illness who didn�*t get early
3:47 pm
treatment are not presenting to emergency department, says a combination of factors but covid isn�*t helping and one fifth of our icu admissions are covid and many of our beds are full, we don�*t have space as we go into winter and we need to create that resilience. nicola sent in a question that many will be wondering about right now, which is, she says i had my second covid vaccine injune of 2021 and then therefore would be eligible to receive a booster, she says, six months later. but she says, is it better to wait six months after having that second vaccine, or because she contracted covid, to wait from six months after that, so much longer? she says, will be immune response be better if she waits a little longer? t immune response be better if she waits a little longer?— waits a little longer? i would say, take our waits a little longer? i would say, take your vaccine _ waits a little longer? i would say, take your vaccine now, _ waits a little longer? i would say, take your vaccine now, the - waits a little longer? i would say, | take your vaccine now, the reason waits a little longer? i would say, i take your vaccine now, the reason i am saying that is we do have comparisons between how effective vaccines art versus how effective
3:48 pm
sort of infection is in protecting against disease, but we really don't know about people who are vaccinated and then have what we call breakthrough infections, so infection after you have been vaccinated, and what that does to your response. it possibly boosted but we know vaccines are safe, effective and reliable way of increasing your immunity which is extremely important when we head into winter with increasingly high infection rates, so i would say take your booster dose now because we don't have reliable information on the impact of infection postvaccination on immunity. it’s postvaccination on immunity. it's been really _ postvaccination on immunity. it's been really useful to have your thoughts in all of this and to get through so many questions, thank you. thanks for talking us through all of that.
3:49 pm
and just a reminder, we will take you to that press conference being given by the health secretary at 5pm, looking at some of those things we have been talking about there, 5pm here on bbc news, we will hear from sajid javid giving a press conference at downing street, we will take you there and have full coverage for reaction to what ever is an ounce at 5pm, so stay with us here on bbc news. —— whatever is announced. managers running care services in england, say staff shortages are so acute, they're having to make tough decisions about which patients they can help. the national care forum, which represents many working in the sector, says pressures on the care system are becoming intolerable. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. these are the empty beds that show the reality of the staffing crisis facing both care homes and home care providers. this plymouth residential home is getting multiple calls each day from hospitals and families asking if they will take new residents. but they don't have enough care workers to look after
3:50 pm
any more people. we have six care homes in north and south devon. we've got 21% of our beds that are empty and that is purely because we cannot staff them. our staff are working tirelessly hard and they are exhausted, they are working overtime. it's extremely hard to be making these heartbreaking decisions where we are getting to the point where our care potentially may not be safe and we may have to turn away residents. as society has reopened, it's become increasingly difficult for care services to keep and recruit staff. exhaustion from the pandemic, compulsoryjabs in care homes and better pay in other sectors are all playing their part. that's according to 340 care managers with more than 21,000 staff who responded to questions from organisations representing them. they had an average of 17% ofjobs vacant. more than two thirds had stopped or limited some services, including saying no to taking patients from hospital. it's estimated together they have turned down nearly 5000 requests for help since september the ist.
3:51 pm
we have heard the government in response to other staff shortages talk about moving heaven and earth in order to address those staff shortages. we need to see some of that heavy lifting applying right now to the social care sector. otherwise i fear we will see more people who need care and support right now being unable to access it. the government says it is putting more money into the care system, including investing in training and regular recruitment campaigns for staff. alison holt, bbc news. the taliban takeover of afghanistan forced thousands of people to flee their country, with many trying to make new lives here in the uk. but months later, some are still living in hotels that were supposed to be temporary, restricting their their access tojobs, proper healthcare and education. with more, here's our home editor, mark easton. a budget hotel in buckinghamshire is currently home to 160 afghan migrants, mostly children.
3:52 pm
and, after more than two months stuck there, it is the children who often find it hardest. a local primary has offered educational support, but the authorities discourage such arrangements, and that is a source of frustration. my wife, and my seven children, it's very difficult for us. nazir�*s children missed a lot of school in afghanistan and, after more than two months stuck in uk hotels, he's desperate to get them back into a classroom. i think a permanent education system is not available at the moment, and we are really keen, and would really press the government to sort this out as soon as possible. finding suitable accommodation for large families is a huge challenge. there are fears that some may be in what are called bridging hotels for many months yet. local charities help, but stuck in institutional limbo, it seems even basic safeguarding
3:53 pm
is not always there. we have visited some families here that have been in the country for three weeks. and children had unseen bullet wounds in their legs, so we were able to muster support, get people to a local walk—in surgery. in south london, one school has found a way to get afghan children out of a local hotel and into class. after meeting a desperate migrant dad, the head at walworth academy realised that, if afghan parents applied for an available place, her school was legally bound to take them. $0, off we went down to that hotel, land quite literally sat in the lobbyl with that gentleman, _ talking to him, which meant that more people and then more people kept coming up, - and next day, we got - a telephone call here saying, we understand you have been to this hotel. _ could you come and see us? we are really interested in school places. - these three girls, all evacuated from kabul with their families, as the taliban seized control, are thrilled to be in school at last. i am so happy because
3:54 pm
i love education. our mind is fresh, we get more friends in here, it is too comfort and it is too good for us. the education department says it is funding extra school places for afghans. and trying to get children into classrooms as soon as possible. but the question is whether the government should be doing more to support the children now. mark easton, bbc news. it's a month since a volcano on one of spain's canary islands erupted, forcing thousands of people to leave their homes. lava is still spewing on la palma, with close to 2,000 buildings destroyed and now experts say they have no idea when eruptions will end. our correspondent dan johnson sent this report. it still has the capacity to attract and enthral. but after a month it's become an overbearing backdrop to much of life here, an incredible spectacle with its own mundane chores.
3:55 pm
ryan does this once a week. "maybe it doesn't affect you directly," he says, "but a family member or someone you know." translation: i want it to end. it's not too worrying to me, but it is for my family. and in the meanwhile we just have to live with it. they have this kind of strong mentality that they say, "it doesn't matter what comes, we go through it and go forward." lucas isn't going forward. this is what happened to the house he lived in for 60 years. his wife can't bear to watch. translation: i cannot put into words, losing l the house my father built, which should have been for my children and my grandchildren. it's a miracle we have this flat because i know people who are living in cars and tents and caravans. there is no sign of this eruption easing at all. in fact, if anything,
3:56 pm
the volcano only gets more active. and it's actually grown over the weeks as the layers of lava have built up and hardened. but there is still fresh lava pouring down the hillsides too, destroying more farmlands, homes and villages, and there are new fires breaking out all the time. there are amazing survival stories. these dogs have been fed by drone for four weeks, and now there is an attempt to use one to rescue them. but there is little hope for the homes still in the way of the lava. and the longer it flows, the further it reaches, smothering more of this island. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello. today has been a mixture of sunshine and heavy downpours. it's not been as mild as yesterday, and through the rest of the week it will be feeling colder. yesterday with the winds from the south all the way from the tropics, we saw temperatures of 21 in the south—east. we have cut off that supply of warmer air today and tomorrow
3:57 pm
the winds will be round from the north, bringing much colder air our way. these are the temperatures late afternoon and early evening. still quite mild towards the south—east and east anglia, still a few showers around, rain heading to scotland, which will continue to head its way southwards overnight, and windy and wet weather developing with the storm moving through the english channel, gusts of over 60 mph in the channel islands, heavy rain to clear away, then winds pick up as the showers move into northern parts of the uk. so a lot going on overnight, temperatures will be lower than they have been the last few nights, particularly in the north. still some rain to clear away from the south and south—east early on thursday. then sunshine and some showers, the bulk of the showers in the north and west, pushing through the irish sea, over the tops of the high ground in scotland there could be some wintriness in those showers, and the showers driven on by a strong and gusty wind, gales around the north sea coasts,
3:58 pm
combined with some spring tides as well, and temperatures eight, nine degrees, could make 15 perhaps toward south wales, where it won't be quite as windy, but elsewhere it will feel cold in the wind. the cold air still in place i think on friday, high pressure beginning to push into western areas, meaning more cloud for the west side of the uk, a few showers at least to begin with, fewer showers into the afternoon, ahead of that, for many eastern areas, likely to be dry, some sunshine at times, it won't be as windy or as cold i think on friday, but temperatures again around 11 — iii celsius. heading into the weekend, high pressure moves across, it will be a cooler night i think on friday, then this approach weather system comes in from the atlantic, and many places will be dry on saturday, some sunshine at times, always best in the eastern areas, rain hanging on until later in the day for northern ireland and the western fringes of the uk. more of a southerly breeze so temperatures will be more widely 1a or 15.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: health leaders call for the return of some covid measures in england to tackle rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so, and rules out any further lockdowns. these are inconvenient measures. if we take them hopefully we can stem the rising tide of hospitalisation and we won't have to go further. we managed to get people's lives back to normal, those gains were hard won, and i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have a lockdown is because i don't think it is necessary. the uk's cost of living rises by more than three percent for the second month in a row, despite a small drop in the rate of inflation. a report from brazillian lawmakers is expected to recommend
4:01 pm
presidentjair bolsonaro faces criminal charges over his government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic — but drop accusations of genocide and homicide. the home secretary asks police forces to assess the scale of spiking at nightclubs and parties, after a number of women reported being injected with needles on nights out. the queen cancels a trip to northern ireland on doctors orders, reluctantly accepting their advice that she takes a few days rest. less than two weeks after the takeover by new saudi—backed owners, steve bruce is out as manager of newcastle united — leaving the club by mutual consent. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news. health leaders are demanding the immediate reintroduction, of some covid restrictions in england, to avoid the nhs "stumbling into a winter crisis".
4:02 pm
the nhs confederation, says rising infections means measures, including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. week on week, the number of covid cases across the uk, hospital admissions and deaths, are rising at a rate of 10 per cent or more, though that's well below levels the government says it has no immediate plans, to reintroduce covid restrictions. covid restrictions are tighter in scotland, wales and northern ireland. here's our health editor, hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be
4:03 pm
around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of io% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. some working in intensive care say they are already under pressure. in some hospitals one in five beds are already occupied with covid patients. at the same time, we have increased numbers of non—covid emergency patients appearing at the doors and at the doors of the intensive care unit. there are many, many people on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do we
4:04 pm
accept the overwhelming evidence and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that does not disrupt our day—to—day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that a miracle will happen? then stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis. this morning, ministers ruled out plan b for england for now. ministers and scientists are looking at data on an hourly basis. we don't feel it is time for plan b right now. i think what we are trying to do is get people who haven't been vaccinated to get those vaccinations up, increase the uptake of the booster jab. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said the government was not complacent
4:05 pm
and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. earlier i spoke to dr ian higginson from the royal college of emergency medicine — he said many hospitals are at full to bursting point — and said the situation in the emergency departments isn't looking positive. our members all over the country are saying the emergency department situation is pretty grim right now given the numbers of patients we are seeing through our doors, and the fact that many of our hospitals are already full to bursting. it's probably worth at this point separating those hospitalisations related to covid and others, and i am aware that the focus is on the pressure put on the nhs overall, but give me your assessment of where we are with covid cases. what we are experiencing at the moment isn't all covid, it is certainly not helping, though.
4:06 pm
and it's making it worse. what we are seeing is a result of years of underinvestment and poor planning within the health service coming to fruition on top of the additional difficulties covid causes. clearly after a difficult 18 months. today a suggestion there should be an immediate reintroduction of measures to protect people in public. given what you've told me, i imagine you support those proposals. that is well above my pay grade but there are a couple of things i could comment on. the pressure on the nhs, certainly from the perspective of urgent and emergency care, is already unsustainable and that's without significant increases in covid numbers. the other thing, as doctors we weigh up the evidence, look at the context, learn from our mistakes, learn from what others are doing well. i guess that's what we hope that our political and health service leaders are doing to come up with the right decision because it is a difficult one.
4:07 pm
we can now take a look at the latest figures. covid cases have been above 40,000 for seven days in a row. yesterday the figure was 15,738, so once again another rise to just below 50,000. that in itself will be some cause for concern. as far as deaths are concerned, 28 days since a test, the daily death toll is down on yesterday, but remember that on a monday there is a bit of catch up
4:08 pm
from the weekend, but nevertheless further deaths recorded and that is down from 223. but it is that infection rate be studied very closely, the number of new infections 49,139. it is worth saying, of course, and to keep an eye on the fact that at five o'clock we will hear from the health secretary who will host a briefing from downing street. in it he will be joined from downing street. in it he will bejoined by from downing street. in it he will be joined by doctor from downing street. in it he will bejoined by doctorjenny from downing street. in it he will be joined by doctorjenny harries, chief executive of the uk health security agency, and stephen powis. —— and professor stephen powis, national medical director of nhs england. we'll bring you full coverage of that briefing, right here on the bbc news channel, from five o'clock. the cost of living has increased by more than three percent for the second month running.
4:09 pm
the office for national statistics said inflation — the rate at which prices are rising — was at 3.1% last month. earlier i spoke to our economics correspondent, andy verity, who said that while this is a small fall in inflation, it's nonetheless still above that 2% target. it's above the target but also, you shouldn't mistake that for the end of the rise in the cost of living that we have been seeing recently. it's very much more likely to be a statistical blip. the reason i say that is what you're comparing it with. so the previous month's figures, which were 3.2%, were comparing august with august of 2020, when you had eat out to help out. that artificially depressed prices in restaurants and hotels, and so by comparison, a year later, it looked like a big jump in prices. whereas when you come to september, that's all fallen out of the equation. september 2020, there was no eat out to help out. so there's less of an effect from that. but nonetheless, you really do see price pressures coming through. so just to give you a couple
4:10 pm
of items, i mean, air fares are up 9.7%. second hand cars are up 22%. so, what you're really looking at is the commodity prices coming through. so, if you look at the prices that manufacturers are paying for their raw materials, they are up by 11.4%. that's quite a chunky old rise. 11.4%, and they can wear that rise in their raw material costs up to a point, but then they have to pass it on, and you're seeing that, too. if you look at the prices at the factory gate, before they come to retailers, they are up by 6.7%. and that's the highest rise we have seen there for a decade. so, you really see that inflationary pressure coming down the pipeline. and you might also say that's before any of the figures we have seen over the last few weeks about things like gas prices going up, petrol prices going up, that's not even yet in the figures, is it? no, that's right. in fact, these figures were taken in the middle of september, before we had the queues at the petrol pump, so that's not even priced in. so, you can expect inflation
4:11 pm
to get a lot worse before it gets any better. but the bank of england has a very interesting dilemma here, because if they raise interest rates too quickly and too fast, then they risk snuffing out a recovery which is already slowing down. but the markets are now pricing in a rise in interest rates, it's a racing certainty by the end of this year from the historic low of 0.1%, the official rate, up to 0.25%. but interestingly, the markets are now predicting that by the end of next year, they'll get up to 1%. now, just a month ago, that wasn't on the cards. people weren't expecting any rate rise next year. 1% would be the highest interest rate we've seen since 2009, february 2009. now, it might not sound too high to you or me, certainly not our grandparents�* ears, who have seen much higher interest rates in the 70s and 805, but it's still a much higher interest rate than we have been used to. and there will be people on the bank of england's monetary policy committee saying, if we do what the market is predicting, we risk snuffing out the recovery. there will be some interesting debates. and also, the big question about whether even a rise of that
4:12 pm
magnitude will be enough to tame inflation. well, yeah. and you're talking about rises in inflation caused by global commodity prices. what's it going to do to global commodity prices, just by making it more expensive for british borrowers to borrow? not necessarily that much. but the bank of england is also concerned about wage pressures, because the supply of labour isn't what it used to be and in areas like truck drivers, brickies, they can almost tell their employers what they're going to need to pay them, and the risk is that that feeds through into a more generalised wage inflation which then creates a sort of upward spiral. that's what andrew bailey is worried about. a parliamentary inquiry in brazil has begun to present its final findings into president bolsonaro s handling of the covid—19 pandemic. senators have decided to remove serious crimes from the document including homicide and indigenous genocide — but bolsonaro is still being accused of quackery, misuse of public funds and crimes against humanity.
4:13 pm
we can speak now to leandro ruschel. he's a conservative political commentator and brazilian newspaper columnist. welcome to bbc news. a proposal to drop those accusations of genocide and homicide but still face criminal charges. what do you make of that? thanks for having me. the commission in brazil is a political commission and in the end even the senators that oppose the government think that oppose the government think that was too much to indict the president on genocide, crimes, and homicide. but they still have plenty of other crimes. i think the main reason they are doing this commission is to create a political narrative. this political narrative can be used in the next presidential election. because some of the crimes
4:14 pm
was already put on the table for the public... forthe was already put on the table for the public... for the attorney general. the attorney general said it is baseless, there is no law in brazil against do not follow some politics, do not follow some strategy or another. it is subjective. in the end it'll be more political stuff than... you aren't going to have criminal implications on that. president bolsonaro dismissed it as politically motivated but many people in brazil and elsewhere will be angry because in march, for example, the president told brazilians to stop whining about covid and that was a day after the country saw a record rise in deaths. the country as a whole reporting 600,000 deaths from covid, one of
4:15 pm
the highest death tolls in the world. . �* the highest death tolls in the world. , �* , ., world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a — world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a nice _ world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a nice way _ world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a nice way to _ world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a nice way to put - world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a nice way to put it. - world. yes. he didn't behave well. it wasn't a nice way to put it. but i it wasn't a nice way to put it. but this isn't a crime. in the end you can have an impeachment trial, if you will, and you can remove the president. there is a way to do that. but to treat this kind of behaviour as criminal i think is a big stretch. behaviour as criminal i think is a big stretch-— behaviour as criminal i think is a bi stretch. ., ., ., , big stretch. how damaging will this before him? _ big stretch. how damaging will this before him? you've _ big stretch. how damaging will this before him? you've already - big stretch. how damaging will this| before him? you've already touched on the 2022 elections. this report makes it much harderfor him on top of an already damaged reputation given the handling of the covid pandemic. i given the handling of the covid andemic. ~' _, ., . pandemic. i think the economic crisis generated _ pandemic. i think the economic crisis generated by _ pandemic. i think the economic crisis generated by these - pandemic. i think the economic - crisis generated by these measures are worse for him than the handling of the pandemic because in the end
4:16 pm
you will see that brazil is a really poor country. we have, unfortunately, 2800 deaths per million population. i live here in florida, and we have 2700 deaths per million population. nobody wants that, of course. but it is a pandemic, it is worldwide, millions of people, unfortunately, are dead, and we have now an economic crisis. i was reading your programme about inflation in the uk. inflation in brazil is much worse because it is a poor country and we don't have a strong currency. so inflation is now running at 11, 12%, and people are getting very poor, and don't have money to buy basic stuff. i think this is hurting his popularity much more than the pandemic by itself. it's good to have your thoughts.
4:17 pm
thanks for being with us this afternoon. talking about that 1200 page report with some damning accusations against the brazilian president, jair bolsonaro. accusations against the brazilian president, jair bolsonaro.- president, jair bolsonaro. thank ou. buckingham palace says the queen has cancelled a trip to northern ireland today, and has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest. she's 95 and said to be in good spirits, but disappointed. here's our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. she has had a busy few days since she returned from balmoral. last tuesday she was at westminster abbey for the centenary of the royal british legion. last thursday she was in cardiff for the opening of the welsh parliament. and last night she was hosting a very big reception at windsor castle for dozens of global business leaders. she had been due to travel to northern ireland later today for engagements tonight and tomorrow, marking the centenary of the partition of ireland, but a statement this morning from buckingham palace saying, as you reported, she has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest for the next few days. she is in good spirits and she's disappointed not to be going to northern ireland.
4:18 pm
now, the palace is not really saying anything more than that, but i understand this is not in any way covid related. she has had both vaccinations, we don't know whether she's had the booster vaccination. but i think what will be in the minds of the royal officials and doctors is that she is due to attend cop 26 to host a reception for all the global leaders attending that at the end of next week, and they will want to be sure that she is fully rested for that. let's take some time now to talk about some of the issues surrounding climate change. it's just a couple of weeks now until the start of the landmark un summit on climate change, cop 26, gets under way in glasgow. the us government's climate tsar john kerry has called the conference the "last, best chance" to avert the environmental damage caused by rising global temperatures. but hopes that cop 26 will achieve its goals suffered a possible setback today, when the russian government annpunced that president putin would not be attending. the kremlin added, however,
4:19 pm
that despite this, addressing climate change was one of russia's top policy priorities. at the last meeting in 2019, the heads of the world's top five emitters — china, india,japan, the us and russia — all failed to attend. one organisation trying to drive forward initiatives to combat climate change is c40 cities, a network of almost 100 megacities around the world. today it announced its new chair—elect — it's the mayor of london, sadiq khan. he'll formally take the post at a handover ceremony with the mayor of los angeles, eric garcetti at an event at cop26. and hejoins me now. welcome. talk to me first of all about what this hopes to achieve.
4:20 pm
many people won't have heard of this organisation, this gathering of big cities to solve some of these climate change issues. what will you hope to achieve. i’m climate change issues. what will you hope to achieve.— hope to achieve. i'm humbled and roud to hope to achieve. i'm humbled and proud to be _ hope to achieve. i'm humbled and proud to be elected _ hope to achieve. i'm humbled and proud to be elected chair- hope to achieve. i'm humbled and proud to be elected chair of- hope to achieve. i'm humbled and proud to be elected chair of c40. | proud to be elected chair of c40. it's a population of more than 700 million. we contribute more than a quarter of global wealth around the planet. what we are hoping to do is to address the consequences of climate change and air pollution. we are at a crossroads. we can either face the consequences that we saw in london this summer with flash flooding, many homes were flooded, and also extreme hot weather which leads to real concerns around the safety of older people. we saw flooding in germany, in new york. climate change and air pollution aren't things to discuss in the
4:21 pm
future, in 20 years away, or as problems whichjust future, in 20 years away, or as problems which just affect africa and parts of asia, we need to address these challenges. the overwhelming _ address these challenges. the overwhelming message we are hearing right now is that small, incremental changes aren't enough, they aren't enough to tackle this problem. i wonder what, enough to tackle this problem. i wonderwhat, perhaps enough to tackle this problem. i wonder what, perhaps in london, given your experience and your location, what will that look like day to day, how will we experience these changes?— day to day, how will we experience these changes? we've introduced in london in 2019 _ these changes? we've introduced in london in 2019 the _ these changes? we've introduced in london in 2019 the worlds _ these changes? we've introduced in london in 2019 the worlds first - london in 2019 the worlds first ultra emissions zone to help clear up ultra emissions zone to help clear up the air in london. and just two years we managed to reduce the toxicity of the air in central london by a half. we will be expanding this and we will be hoping to clean the air even more in our city. some of these solutions actually improve to immediate ? some of the solutions actually lead to
4:22 pm
immediate improvements. we are emitting less carbon, less nitrogen dioxide. we have electrical vehicle charging points, as well. it is a challenge but there are solutions for climate change and air pollution. it's important we embrace these solutions. this is the last chance and cop26 is so important. hopefully governments will set out how we will set an increase of the world's temperature by no more than 1.5 celsius. abs, world's temperature by no more than 1.5 celsius. �* . , . world's temperature by no more than 1.5 celsius. �* . , , ., , ., 1.5 celsius. a city needs to be a lace 1.5 celsius. a city needs to be a place where _ 1.5 celsius. a city needs to be a place where people _ 1.5 celsius. a city needs to be a place where people can - 1.5 celsius. a city needs to be a place where people can live - 1.5 celsius. a city needs to be a j place where people can live and work. economic prosperity is one of the drivers of living in a city. how do you make sure that they go hand in hand? that you can protect the environment but not at the cost of economic growth which is creating jobs and livelihoods of so many people absolutely. i’m jobs and livelihoods of so many people absolutely.— jobs and livelihoods of so many people absolutely. i'm trying to exlain
4:23 pm
people absolutely. i'm trying to explain this _ people absolutely. i'm trying to explain this to _ people absolutely. i'm trying to explain this to my _ people absolutely. i'm trying to explain this to my colleagues. i people absolutely. i'm trying to i explain this to my colleagues. we are hopefully coming out of this pandemic. we need a recovery and it should be a green recovery, not a business as usual recovery. there are opportunities here in relation to solving the awful problem of climate change and air pollution. think of thejobs climate change and air pollution. think of the jobs we could create around the country if all cities were going to electric buses or electric taxis. think of the jobs we could create around the country if we insulated our homes better. think about the jobs we could create with more people sitting electrical vehicle charging points, by having more solar. london was the host city. we had five winners who would hopefully scale up their ideas and hopefully scale up their ideas and hopefully solve these problems. 1when
4:24 pm
hopefully solve these problems. when we talk about — hopefully solve these problems. when we talk about the _ hopefully solve these problems. when we talk about the ultralow _ hopefully solve these problems. when we talk about the ultralow carbon emission zone, from a city point of view there is a danger that you just push this industry, you push these vehicles beyond the city limits. the problem doesn't go away. you don't lower the limits you just move the problem elsewhere. lower the limits you 'ust move the problem elsewhere.— lower the limits you 'ust move the problem elsewhere. what we are doing is scra -|n~ problem elsewhere. what we are doing is scrapping these _ problem elsewhere. what we are doing is scrapping these vehicles. _ problem elsewhere. what we are doing is scrapping these vehicles. since - is scrapping these vehicles. since we introduced the scheme more than 12,000 of these polluting vehicles have been scrapped. you are spot on, we don't want displacement. we don't want the toxic air from the city is going to other parts of the country. that's why we are saying to the government that we can't do it alone. families can't afford to do it alone, businesses can't afford to do it alone. the government must step in. the government investing in solutions to climate change and air pollution provides huge opportunities. people asked the question, what does the future of our country, post brexit, wouldn't it be wonderful if the future of our
4:25 pm
country was in high skilled, well—paid jobs, country was in high skilled, well—paidjobs, high country was in high skilled, well—paid jobs, high skilled expertise which we could export around the world. we could be those who solve the problems of climate change and poor quality air where some people have said we were the causes because we were the industrial revolution founders 150 years ago. industrial revolution founders 150 ears ao. ~ ., , , years ago. what will be the first initiative in _ years ago. what will be the first initiative in your _ years ago. what will be the first initiative in your new— years ago. what will be the first initiative in your new role? - years ago. what will be the first initiative in your new role? i'ml initiative in your new role? i'm lookin: initiative in your new role? i'm looking forward _ initiative in your new role? in looking forward to seeing mayors in glasgow. many are travelling to glasgow. many are travelling to glasgow for us to work together. one of the things i'm really conscious of the things i'm really conscious of is people think of london, paris, new york, and elsewhere, we need to be bold, showing initiative, and leading the way. we need to help the global south, places in africa, south asia and south america to help them address the issues of climate change and air pollution, and also making sure they aren't paying the
4:26 pm
price of the climate change caused by the global north.— price of the climate change caused by the global north. thank you very much. it's by the global north. thank you very much- it's good _ by the global north. thank you very much. it's good to _ by the global north. thank you very much. it's good to have _ by the global north. thank you very much. it's good to have you - by the global north. thank you very much. it's good to have you with i by the global north. thank you veryj much. it's good to have you with us this afternoon.— there's more worrying news ahead of cop26 — a report published today says plans by governments to continue to extract fossil fuels up to 2030 vastly exceed the amount that would be compatible with keeping global temperatures at safe levels. the un environment programme, says coal, oil and gas producers, including the uk, will obtain more than double the amount of fossil fuel that is consistent with the aim of a maximum temperature rise, of 1.5 celsius. i'm joined now by greg muttitt, senior policy advisor at the international institute for sustainable development and one of the authors of the report. tell us about this report because it
4:27 pm
seems to be pretty frightening with those headlines we've just gone through. those headlines we've 'ust gone throuuh. ~ ., ., ., those headlines we've 'ust gone throuuh. ~ . ., ., , through. what we are doing here is hiuuuhlihtin through. what we are doing here is highlighting a _ through. what we are doing here is highlighting a key _ through. what we are doing here is highlighting a key blind _ through. what we are doing here is highlighting a key blind spot - through. what we are doing here is highlighting a key blind spot in - highlighting a key blind spot in climate policy. it is a surprising blind spot because fossil fuels are the largest source of climate change and greenhouse gases. as you said in your introduction, governments need to be decreasing their production of oil gas and coal but governments around the world, when you add them together, the majority are planning together, the majority are planning to increase their production, and they are heading for twice as much as we can afford if we are to achieve the paris target of 1.5, twice as much in 2030. we really have an urgent need to change course here and to get away from the fossil fuel economy. here and to get away from the fossil fuel economy-— fuel economy. how are we still in a osition fuel economy. how are we still in a position where _ fuel economy. how are we still in a position where fossil _ fuel economy. how are we still in a position where fossil fuels - fuel economy. how are we still in a | position where fossil fuels dominate so much of our energy supply? we are constantly told investment is being made in renewables and in nuclear. but as your report shows, we are
4:28 pm
still so dependent on the energy it provides. i still so dependent on the energy it rovides. ~ ., ., ., provides. i think a lot of governments _ provides. i think a lot of governments are - provides. i think a lot of governments are very i provides. i think a lot of - governments are very locked in policies of the 20th century. they haven't caught up with the strategic issues we face now. i think the uk issues we face now. i think the uk is a good example of that. in the uk, the policy is to maximise the extraction of oil and gas from offshore, the north sea and the atlantic, so that the context in which the government has said it is intending to give the go—ahead to a major new oilfield intending to give the go—ahead to a major new oil field off the west coast of shetland. it's a massive contradiction in climate policy. the uk was the first major government to set a net zero target, which it did in 2019, but still it aims to maximise its extraction of oil and gas. these two things are pushing in opposite directions and they need to be connected up.— be connected up. when you say a ma'or be connected up. when you say a major contradiction, _ be connected up. when you say a major contradiction, what - be connected up. when you say a major contradiction, what will - be connected up. when you say a major contradiction, what will be | be connected up. when you say a i major contradiction, what will be so stark about this is many world
4:29 pm
leaders are saying this on one hand and doing quite the different thing when it comes to maintaining that energy source. when it comes to maintaining that energy source-— when it comes to maintaining that energy source. that's exactly right. partl we energy source. that's exactly right. partly we are _ energy source. that's exactly right. partly we are seeing _ energy source. that's exactly right. partly we are seeing the _ partly we are seeing the consequences of that continued dependence, particularly on gas and on oil in the price crisis. if we had accelerated the transition we wouldn't be suffering so much when the international factors that are pushing up the prices of gas at the moment. but coming back to the issue of contradictions. the uk is hosting the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. this is an area where we need to see leadership from the uk. unfortunately, uk policy is still moving in the wrong direction when it comes to oil and gas. that moving in the wrong direction when it comes to oil and gas.— it comes to oil and gas. that leads me nicely to _ it comes to oil and gas. that leads me nicely to my — it comes to oil and gas. that leads me nicely to my next _ it comes to oil and gas. that leads me nicely to my next question. - me nicely to my next question. cop26, eyes around the world will be looking at that event, how confident are you that will change anything and world leaders will listen? i4541431111.
4:30 pm
and world leaders will listen? well, i mean, and world leaders will listen? well, i mean. as — and world leaders will listen? well, i mean. as we _ and world leaders will listen? well, i mean, as we have _ and world leaders will listen? well, i mean, as we have talked - and world leaders will listen? ell i mean, as we have talked about, lots of governments are still moving in the wrong directions. but we are seeing glimmers of hope, especially on this fossilfuel seeing glimmers of hope, especially on this fossil fuel production agenda. for instance, two governments, denmark and costa rica, have said at cop26 they will launch something called the beyond oil and gas alliance which is a club of country ending their reliance on oil and gas. we will see how many countriesjoin and gas. we will see how many countries join that at the moment. getting away from fossil fuels, supporting a just transition for helpers, for people to get from where we are now using fossil fuels into high—qualityjobs in clean energy. that's the kind of leadership we really need to see. we would love to see more of it from the uk. at the moment, as our report shows, we still have the majority of governments going in the wrong direction. but some small governments are starting to pursue a
4:31 pm
different cause and we really need governments like the uk and others worldwide to be following and investing in the clean energy economy rather than yet more fossil fuels. �* . ., ~ economy rather than yet more fossil fuels. �* , ., ~ ., fuels. i'm sure we will talk about this much _ fuels. i'm sure we will talk about this much more _ fuels. i'm sure we will talk about this much more ahead _ fuels. i'm sure we will talk about this much more ahead of - fuels. i'm sure we will talk about this much more ahead of that - fuels. i'm sure we will talk about - this much more ahead of that cop26 meeting. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. we have a chilly feeling for a few days to come, quite a change from what we had earlier in the week, a lot of heavy showers that we saw today are fading away, but some rain is coming into northern scotland and the radar shows rain coming into the far south—west. that's from a storm that has been named by the french met service, where we will have the strongest winds, but gales and heavy rain will run eastwards this evening and overnight across southern england, then that band of rain will continue southwards across the uk, drawing in colder airfrom the north and winds picking up in scotland, blowing in a few wintry showers and
4:32 pm
temperatures in scotland may be close to freezing by the end of the night. stilla close to freezing by the end of the night. still a few bits of rain to clear away from southern england on thursday, and whilst that goes, we will have a lot of sunshine around but there will be showers coming into scotland, northern ireland, for the irish sea in western parts of england and wales, further east it should be drier and sunnier but a windy day tomorrow, especially down those nazi gusts. that of course will make it feel colder. temperatures will be lower, struggling to eight, in northern scotland, perhaps 14 along the south coast of inwood. —— especially down those north sea coasts. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: health leaders say some coronavirus measures should be immediately re—introduced to prevent a crisis in england — but the government says they're not needed yet, and rules out any further lockdowns. these are inconvenient measures,
4:33 pm
but if we take them, hopefully we can stem that rising tide of infection and hospitalisation and we won't have to go further. we have managed to get people back to normal_ we have managed to get people back to normal life and those gains were hard-won, — to normal life and those gains were hard—won, and i don't want to revert back to _ hard—won, and i don't want to revert back to a _ hard—won, and i don't want to revert back to a situation where we have locked _ back to a situation where we have locked arms, i don't think it's necessary _ locked arms, i don't think it's necessary. —— we have lockdowns. the uk's cost of living rises by more than 3% for the second month in a row, despite a small drop in the rate of inflation. a parliamentary inquiry in brazil accuses president bolsonaro of crimes against humanity and misuse of public funds over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic — but charges of homicide and genocide are withdrawn. the home secretary asks police forces to assess the scale of spiking at nightclubs and parties, after a number of women reported being injected with needles on nights out. the queen cancels a trip to northern ireland on doctors' orders, reluctantly accepting their advice that she takes a few days' rest. and less than two weeks after the takeover by
4:34 pm
new saudi—backed owners, steve bruce is out as manager of newcastle united — leaving the club by mutual consent. clive will be back with you in just a moment ahead of that press briefing from the health secretary, lets you to get under way at 5pm, but before that, the latest sport. and we will start with newcastle and steve bruce. newcastle's search for a new manager is under way. the club parted company with steve bruce this morning, just 13 daysafter the saudi arabia—backed takeover on tyneside. bruce leaves after two years in charge, with the club second from bottom in the premier league table. our correspondent katie gornall has more. managing newcastle was steve bruce's dream job but no matter how badly he wanted it to work at his hometown club, it always felt like an uphill battle. his departure had been widely expected. our new chairman!
4:35 pm
cheering. he was under pressure even before the saudi arabian led takeover, with his side second from bottom and without a win all season. on sunday in front of the new owners, his team failed again. newcastle stay in the bottom three. in a statement confirming his departure, bruce said he was grateful to everyone connected with newcastle for the opportunity to manage this unique football club. bruce succeeded rafa benitez in 2019, but despite keeping a limited squad in the premier league for the past two seasons, the former sunderland manager proved a deeply unpopular appointment with fans. i think it's about time, the club wasn't going forward. i feel quite sad for him, but for the club, it will be good. i think he had to go, really, - for the club to progress in the way the new owners want it to go.
4:36 pm
assistant coach graemejones will take interim charge while attention will now turn to what will happen next for newcastle. but as for what's next for bruce, given the toll this job has taken on him and his family, his 1000th game in management is likely to be his last. yeah, there's no denying that a large section of newcastle fans never really took to bruce, but some of his players have wished him well. alain saint—maximin said on social media that he was one of the most gentle people he had met, and a man of his word who never failed to protect the team. staying with football, leicester city are in action against spartak moscow right now in the europa league. and it's been an entertaining first half in moscow.
4:37 pm
the foxes currently 2—1 down. but just as i butjust as i say but just as i say that, butjust as i say that, they have just equalised, so it's 2—2 now. they were trailing 2—nil, butjust before half—time patson daka pulled a goal back for the visitors. you can follow live text commentary on the bbc sport website. so that game's the apetiser for tonight's champions league action. manchester united will be without defender raphael varane and forward anthony martial for their game with atalanta. while chelsea host swedish side malmo, and thomas tuchel says its important the premier league leaders don t get too disappointed by theirform. it is what it is and it's very important that we don't feel ashamed and we don't be too critical of ourselves. it is what it is and if you have hard moments, you fight through the hard moments. we wanted to be the team that nobody likes to play against and we are in a good way, and from there we try to improve.
4:38 pm
cricket�*s twenty20 world cup continues, with ireland looking to make it two wins from two and boost their chances of qualilfying for the next stage. they're taking on sri lanka in abu dhabi. and the irish made a brilliant start! they're bowling first and they had sri lanka eight for three at one point. but the sri lankans managed to steady the ship. a short time ago they were 143—5 after 16 overs. ——146—5 after 16 overs. namibia beat the netherlands in the day's other match. meanwhile england beat new zealand by 13 runs in their final warm—up match. but captain eoin morgan's barren run with the bat continued. he madejust 10 in england's innings of 163—6. morgan said he would consider dropping himself if his poorform continues. england face the west indies in their first match on saturday. that's all the sport for now.
4:39 pm
thanks for that. the health secretary, sajid javid, will hold a news conference in half an hour as the government faces calls from health leaders to bring back some coronavirus restrictions to halt rising case numbers. the head of the nhs confederation, which represents health bodies, has warned that the health service is under intense pressure and we risk "stumbling into a winter crisis" if the government's plan b strategy is not introduced. that could include face coverings becoming compulsory in some settings. ministers having powers to introduce vaccine passports, and encouraging people to work from home. concern is growing because latest government figures show week—on—week, uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. today the uk has reported more than 49,000 new positive covid cases and 179 further deaths.
4:40 pm
tighter rules are in place in other uk nations. in scotland, face coverings are still compulsory on public transport and inside places like shops. all school staff and secondary pupils must wear face coverings indoors, and indoor hospitality venues must collect customer contact details. in wales, face coverings are compulsory on public transport, and in shops and hospitals — but not bars or restaurants. the nhs covid pass is needed for entry to nightclubs, as well as many indoor and outdoor events. and people should work from home where possible. and in northern ireland, face coverings are compulsory in shops, indoor seated venues and visitor attractions. indoor seated venues are "strongly recommended" to ask for proof of double vaccination or a negative lateral flow test. and people should work from home where possible. i'm joined by danny altmann, professor of immunology at imperial college london.
4:41 pm
professor, it's good to see you. thank you forjoining us. do you believe it's now time for plan b? i do think we are in a very serious situation. i do not know how much more serious we need to wait for it to get. but at the moment obviously, we have high mortality, higher than any of our neighbours in mainland europe, and these are avoidable deaths for the sake of quite small mitigations, which i guess are part of plan b. �* . ' . of plan b. and is the difference between the — of plan b. and is the difference between the situation - of plan b. and is the difference between the situation here - of plan b. and is the difference between the situation here in l of plan b. and is the difference i between the situation here in the of plan b. and is the difference - between the situation here in the uk and the situation in the rest of europe, is the difference crucially those small mitigating measures you mentioned like wearing masks and vaccine passports and so on? i mentioned like wearing masks and vaccine passports and so on? i think it's the community _ vaccine passports and so on? i think it's the community of _ vaccine passports and so on? i think it's the community of total- vaccine passports and so on? i think it's the community of total votes - vaccine passports and so on? i think it's the community of total votes of| it's the community of total votes of small measures, isn't it? it's ——
4:42 pm
cumulative total. it simply accept and we can't face down this virus by sheer exuberance and confidence, we need clinically proven measures, these are all of the obvious. we don't need some kind of black and white dichotomy between total freedom and total lockdown. we just need a bit of pragmatic intelligence, masks and distancing, work from home where you can, perhaps careful use of certification in some environments, just sensible things. is in some environments, 'ust sensible thins. . ., in some environments, 'ust sensible thins. , ., , , ., ., things. is there a sense that we are sort of victims _ things. is there a sense that we are sort of victims of _ things. is there a sense that we are sort of victims of our _ things. is there a sense that we are sort of victims of our own _ things. is there a sense that we are sort of victims of our own success l sort of victims of our own success here in the uk? the vaccine row that was incredibly successful, world beating, some would argue. and as a result, we have fallen into a sense of complacency because we have such a high take—up of people who have been double jabbed, those people who refuse to get vaccinated are seeing that everyone else is not wearing masks, potential, and lots of other
4:43 pm
people are not wearing masks so they can continue the way they are going, and those people who have been double jabbed our feeling, and those people who have been double jabbed ourfeeling, well, double jabbed our feeling, well, i've double jabbed ourfeeling, well, i've been double jabbed so i'm ok, anyway? i've been double 'abbed so i'm 0k, an a ? . i've been double 'abbed so i'm 0k, an a? ., , anyway? important points. the point i would make — anyway? important points. the point i would make is _ anyway? important points. the point i would make is that _ anyway? important points. the point i would make is that this _ anyway? important points. the point i would make is that this pandemic l i would make is that this pandemic has so stress tested all of us that it's been very steep learning curve, and by that i mean for scientists, for medics, for politicians and for the public and you cannotjust hang on to the assertions you had six months ago and say, well, six months ago we were bidding in vaccination therefore i feel very smug, i think we need to keep looking at the data, appraising the data, israel was ahead of us on pfizer robot and they have suffered breakthrough infections, there must be something going on there, they have now boosted and got on top of it, maybe we should be doing that. we need to keep on top of this. we we should be doing that. we need to keep on top of this.— keep on top of this. we are simply not reacting _ keep on top of this. we are simply not reacting to _ keep on top of this. we are simply not reacting to the _ keep on top of this. we are simply
4:44 pm
not reacting to the situation - keep on top of this. we are simply not reacting to the situation in - not reacting to the situation in front of us, and one wonders, then, what would trigger a plan b? we are in the heat of _ what would trigger a plan b? we are in the heat of battle, _ what would trigger a plan b? we are in the heat of battle, and _ what would trigger a plan b? we are in the heat of battle, and i _ what would trigger a plan b? we are in the heat of battle, and i think- in the heat of battle, and i think we all have become much more scientifically canny than we were 18 months ago, much more canny in looking at the data, and please can i encourage people are whether they are sitting in the department of health or whether they are just sitting pondering whether to get a vaccination or a booster or not, to keep looking at that data and thinking about it, and thinking, hang on a minute, i thought i was safe, it looks like i'm not, that it's a relief it is very end, the more antibodies i have, the safer i will be, let's do some thing about this. —— the deltas and it is a very vicious variant. d0 this. -- the deltas and it is a very vicious variant.— vicious variant. do you think we will no vicious variant. do you think we will go back _ vicious variant. do you think we will go back to _ vicious variant. do you think we will go back to where _ vicious variant. do you think we will go back to where we - vicious variant. do you think we will go back to where we were l vicious variant. do you think we | will go back to where we were in january? will go back to where we were in janua ? , ., ., , ., ., january? the situation is moving all the time in — january? the situation is moving all the time in the _ january? the situation is moving all the time in the heat _ january? the situation is moving all the time in the heat of _ january? the situation is moving all the time in the heat of battle, - january? the situation is moving all the time in the heat of battle, so i the time in the heat of battle, so one could be smug and say it won't quite be like last winter because lots of people are vaccinated, but lots of people are vaccinated, but lots of people are vaccinated, but lots of people are vaccinated with
4:45 pm
the imperfect defences against delta, so we will perhaps be less bad than that but worse than where we should be. haifa bad than that but worse than where we should be— bad than that but worse than where we should be. ., ., i. , ., we should be. how do you explain the failure of people _ we should be. how do you explain the failure of people to _ we should be. how do you explain the failure of people to take _ we should be. how do you explain the failure of people to take up _ we should be. how do you explain the failure of people to take up in - we should be. how do you explain the failure of people to take up in the - failure of people to take up in the numbers that the rest of us hoped booster vaccines? i numbers that the rest of us hoped booster vaccines?— numbers that the rest of us hoped booster vaccines? i look at the date and i feel quite _ booster vaccines? i look at the date and i feel quite desperate _ booster vaccines? i look at the date and i feel quite desperate about - booster vaccines? i look at the date and i feel quite desperate about it l and i feel quite desperate about it because from where i sit, and i have been studying viruses and immunity my entire adult life, the more neutralising antibody you have on board, the less likely it is that something bad will happen to you and the way you get those neutralising antibodies is by being vaccinated, and we have seen the data that there was vaccines and all protective immunity can wane and therefore a booster is the answer. i don't have to sit more clearly than that, please believe me. —— i don't know how to say it more clearly than that. ~ . how to say it more clearly than that. ~ , ., ., how to say it more clearly than that. ~ ., ., . ., ., ~ that. message loud and clear. thank ou for that. message loud and clear. thank you for that- — so how are businesses
4:46 pm
reacting to the possibility of restrictions returning? earlier my colleague, ben thompson, asked kate nicholls, the chief executive of uk hospitality that question. it would have a significant impact on businesses in hospitality. they have had 18 months of very restricted trading. they are not by any means back into a positive state of trading where they are making a profit, and therefore to have restrictions reimposed at this point in time, at this point in the recovery, would have a significant hit on their revenues. so we know from introducing vaccine passports, and working from home, that can have an impact of 20% to 40% on revenues for many of our businesses. and thatjust pushes them back down to making a loss, means that they are less likely to be viable longer term and we will see business failures and job losses as a result unless there is substantive government support to sit alongside that, if restrictions are reimposed. that neatly gets me to my next question. what's the biggest fear in the industry? is it about the reintroduction of these measures now
4:47 pm
with a view, perhaps, to saving christmas, for want of a better phrase, or if the restrictions aren't reintroduced now there is a danger this could get much worse at one of the busiest times of the year for the hospitality industry. we are already into our busiest trading time. about 40% of our profits come between halloween and christmas. we lost that last year. we lost most of our major trading days in 2020 and 2021 in easter. and businesses have only really been reopened for the last two and a half months. so i think if you introduced measures now, particularly working from home, that would have a real impact on our town and city centre businesses that are still in that survival mode, as it were, and that would have a cooling effect on our confidence. so it would have significant impact in the busiest trading period already, if you reintroduce them now. so i think i'm heartened by the business secretary saying now is not the time, we don't need to move to plan b, we do need the government to stick with plan a and
4:48 pm
we need to make sure that any decision is notjust looking at the health implications but looking wider atjobs, business viability, and the economy. and, you know, it's quite clear that neither of these options is an alternative, neither of them are anything the industry would want to see, but i wonder whether it's about accepting some restrictions now to make sure that by christmas, business can operate at full capacity. i think if you put in those restrictions now, businesses won't be able to operate, they won't be trading viably. you will see an accelerated period of business failure. we are already losing 16 businesses a week at the moment with closures. these businesses are incredibly fragile. if we lose this trading period now we won't save christmas for these businesses. they will not survive. and actually, you do need to make sure the economy can remain open, that we remain trading and we can remain viable. we have talked about this many times, about businesses having had a very
4:49 pm
difficult 18 months. we're nowjust getting a sense of the businesses that will now not reopen. you walk down many a high street and you look around and think perhaps they are just being a bit slow to reopen but the reality is they have gone under. are we starting to get a sense ofjust how bad this last year has been? yes, in the 18 months covid has hit, we've lost 12,000 businesses. we've lost one in ten of our hotels and restaurants, 6% of our pub estate. but in our towns and city centres, that are disproportionately affected by the lack of people working from offices, we've seen one in five businesses go under already and that's in the last 18 months. those that have come out the other side have depleted reserves, shattered balance sheets, and arejust holding on, so we can't afford anything that knocks them off track. and actually, if we impose restrictions now that's exactly what we would see, so these businesses would not trade through and be able to survive. you would see business failures accelerated now, without that government support.
4:50 pm
just a reminder, the health secretary will be leading a briefing from downing street at 5pm, so in about ten minutes' time. sajid javid will bejoined by about ten minutes' time. sajid javid will be joined by doctorjenny harris from the uk health security agency and professor steve harris, did will get the thoughts of our health correspondent and political correspond in what they believe sajid javid might have to say foot of the briefing comes, of course, after a statement from the nhs federation today which says measures including mandatory face coverings including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces should be unfermented. here's our health editor. —— should be implemented. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried
4:51 pm
about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. some working in intensive care say they are already under pressure. in some hospitals one in five beds are already occupied with covid patients. at the same time, we have increased numbers of non—covid emergency patients appearing at the doors of our hospitals and at the doors of the intensive care unit. also trying to support the restoration of major complex surgery, for which there are many, many people on waiting lists. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings,
4:52 pm
vaccine passports and more working from home. it is a very simple choice, do we accept the overwhelming evidence and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that does not disrupt our day—to—day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that a miracle will happen? and then stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis. this morning, ministers ruled out plan b for england for now. ministers and scientists are looking at data on an hourly basis. we don't feel it is time for plan b right now. i think what we are trying to do is get people who haven't been vaccinated to get those vaccinations up, increase the uptake of the boosterjab. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said
4:53 pm
the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. with me now is our health correspondent, jim reed. we just heard that the key message the government wants to put out is the government wants to put out is the booster programme and increasing take—up there. we know there will be questions for sajid javid on a plan b, so first, what will they say about the bicester programme? thea;r about the bicester programme? they will want to focus, _ about the bicester programme? they will want to focus, as _ about the bicester programme? tue: will want to focus, as you about the bicester programme? t'ta: will want to focus, as you heard, about the bicester programme? ttaz1: will want to focus, as you heard, on pan rather than will want to focus, as you heard, on pan ratherthan plan will want to focus, as you heard, on pan rather than plan b, so that's boosters, testing, and treatments. —— on a plan a. there's been some criticism about the speed of the booster roll—out, particularly in england, so we might hear ways that they could make that easier, make it easier and quickerfor they could make that easier, make it easier and quicker for people who have already had their second jab
4:54 pm
six months ago, at least six months ago, to sign up for their third. you might hear some more details about that. also some new treatments. so we had a couple of weeks ago about the first new treatments in terms of sort of tablet you can take that deal, not with the underlying symptoms of covid, but actually with the virus itself. now, they're going to the regulatory process at the moment. we had the first test result, they are very positive, couple of weeks ago. there's also no something called the antiviral task force within the government that's looking at ways could be rolled out quickly as soon as they are approved, so we are like that you more about that at this press conference in about 15 minutes' time. �* . conference in about 15 minutes' time. �* , ., ., conference in about 15 minutes' time. �*, ., ., ., time. ok, let's get on to what i susect time. ok, let's get on to what i suspect a _ time. ok, let's get on to what i suspect a lot — time. ok, let's get on to what i suspect a lot of _ time. ok, let's get on to what i suspect a lot of journalists - suspect a lot ofjournalists will want to know for the press conference, plan b. how is the government explaining that it is not moving to plan b, given the rise in cases and infections,
4:55 pm
hospitalisations and deaths? this is where it gets _ hospitalisations and deaths? this is where it gets completed _ hospitalisations and deaths? this is where it gets completed when - hospitalisations and deaths? this is where it gets completed when you | where it gets completed when you look across the uk, because every nation has very different rules here. so if you look specifically at england, the idea is to focus on this plan a, so that's a vaccine and testing at the moment, unless, the phrase is, there is unsustainable pressure on the nhs. if it gets to that stage there could be this move to plan b. if you're watching this in scotland, wales and a certain extent northern ireland, the measures they are talking about bringing in in england are effectively already in place on the other three nations, so that's mandatory mask wearing, in places that are very crowded, so just yesterday scotland said they would keep the mask mandate for pupils in school in scotland, for example, you haven't had that in england for a while. so this is a real difference they're talking about. also the use of vaccine passports, already being used in scotland for places like nightclubs, wales as well, to a certain extent northern ireland, there it's slightly more voluntary. we haven't seen that in england. it
4:56 pm
we see that as part of this plan b? at the moment, the government in england are saying we are not there yet, we haven't seen this unsustainable pressure on the nhs, and we have seen this increase in cases, we haven't yet seen it with a sharp increase in hospitalisations and deaths. you've started to see it go and deaths. you've started to see it 9° up and deaths. you've started to see it go up in england but not anywhere near the levels we saw back in january, february this year. until we start to see that, i think the argument from ministers in england is, we don't need to go that far in putting these extra measures at the moment. ., �* . putting these extra measures at the moment. ., �* , ., y�* putting these extra measures at the moment. ., h ., j .., moment. that's what they're counting on, it moment. that's what they're counting on. it seems- — moment. that's what they're counting on, it seems. we _ moment. that's what they're counting on, it seems. we are _ moment. that's what they're counting on, it seems. we are seeing - moment. that's what they're counting on, it seems. we are seeing an - on, it seems. we are seeing an increase in hospitalisation but not a steep increase was a bit that has become vertiginous, effectively, and the deaths start going up, then that, it's at that point that we may see this plan beat been rolled out. but what the nhs confederation is saying, look, and that's to already
4:57 pm
heavy winter pressures, flu and so on, to the backlog of cases that need to be dealt with in terms of other operations and other illnesses, and then add on top of that the exhaustion of nhs staff. and there is another issue that people have got here, as well, that sometimes it's very difficult to know when to put in measures because by the time you have actually acted, it might be too late. and we have learned this through the pandemic. so the argument from some nhs leaders is it's better to come early and fast, and therefore kind of wave of any concerns the line. of course that's difficult, if you put in measures now, that might have impacts on business, the economy, people's jobs, impacts on business, the economy, people'sjobs, it's very impacts on business, the economy, people's jobs, it's very difficult thing for scientists and politicians to work out when to go. you heard people like niall ferguson, the scientist, talking yesterday across the media about how he would like to see a faster roll—out of these
4:58 pm
boosters, notjust for over see a faster roll—out of these boosters, not just for over 50s see a faster roll—out of these boosters, notjust for over 50s but also in that 12 to 15 age group, younger children, as well, that's been pretty slow england. —— neil ferguson said that. if you look at vaccination among teenagers, just 15% of that group have been vaccinated, in scotland, 47.5%. so there is room for the government to do more on plan a, that's their argument, before moving to the extra restrictions. ., ., ., ~ restrictions. thanks for that. and 'ust a restrictions. thanks for that. and just a reminder, _ restrictions. thanks for that. and just a reminder, a _ restrictions. thanks for that. and just a reminder, a little - restrictions. thanks for that. and just a reminder, a little after - restrictions. thanks for that. and just a reminder, a little after the | just a reminder, a little after the top of the hour, we are expecting sajid javid, the health secretary, to give a press briefing from downing street, that's coming up. now time for a look at the weather. a marked change is occurring in our weather as i speak. we are transitioning into much colder air that will stay with us through the rest of the week, and tomorrow it will feel especially cold as we pick up will feel especially cold as we pick up and nagging northerly wind. it's all been about the southerlies and south—westerly through the first part of the week, look at that
4:59 pm
transition from amber to blue for thursday and friday. stormy times ahead across southern reaches of the uk into the small hours of thursday thanks to a storm affecting northern france, widespread gales, heavy rain, then weather six south across the uk and that's a marker for the colder air feeding the uk and that's a marker for the colder airfeeding down from the uk and that's a marker for the colder air feeding down from the north. and three thursday that northerly wind will be a well—established feature. any early cloud and rain to the south should clear it was there will be a lot of sunshine but some showers drifting into the far north and west. driven through on that gusty wind, gusts of wind across scotland, 40, may be close to 50 mph. these are the temperatures you would see on the thermometer, it will feel much colder, though, in the wind.
5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines... health leaders call for the return of some covid measures in england to tackle rising infection rates — but the government says it has no plans to do so, and rules out any further lockdowns. now, these are inconvenient measures but if we take them, hopefully we can stem the rising tide of infection and hospitalisation and will not have to go further. we have manaued will not have to go further. we have managed to — will not have to go further. we have managed to get _ will not have to go further. we have managed to get people _ will not have to go further. we have managed to get people back- will not have to go further. we have managed to get people back to - will not have to go further. we have i managed to get people back to normal life, managed to get people back to normal life. and _ managed to get people back to normal life, and those gains were very hard won and _ life, and those gains were very hard won and i_ life, and those gains were very hard won and i do— life, and those gains were very hard won and i do not want to reverse back_ won and i do not want to reverse back to _ won and i do not want to reverse back to a — won and i do not want to reverse back to a situation where we have lockdowns, — back to a situation where we have lockdowns, i do not think it necessary. we'll be live in downing street for a government news conference by the health secretary, sajid javid in the next few minutes.
5:01 pm
the uk's cost of living rises by more than 3%

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on