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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 20, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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18 in the south. in the north to 18 in the south. tonight this is front sinks south, opens a door to much colder conditions. notjust tonight but also the course of tomorrow. who is in beirut. conditions. notjust tonight but also the course of tomorrow. jab this is bbc news, these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. some coronavirus restrictions, like more mask—wearing and working from home must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis. that's according to a group of health leaders, as cases continue to rise across the uk. if we don't take these measures, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened.— will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. scientists and exerts are safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking _ safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at _ safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data - safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data on - safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data on an . experts are looking at data on an hourly _ experts are looking at data on an hourly basis and we don't feel that it is time _ hourly basis and we don't feel that it is time for plan b right now. at least 1a people have died
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in a bomb attack on a military bus in the syrian capital of damascus, in the city's worst attack for years. a leaked report from brazillian lawmakers says the country's president, jair bolsonaro, should be charged with murder over his handling of coronavirus. the uk's biggest study into severe sickness during pregnancy finds many women consider terminating their pregnancy because of the condition. they said i could have cracked a rib or torn and intercostal muscle from being sick so much, and that is when they started to take note. it's now a month since a volcano on the spanish island of la palma first erupted, and officials say there are no signs of the lava and ash stopping. hello and welcome if you re watching
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in the uk or around the world. health leaders are demanding the immediate reintroduction of some covid restrictions in england to avoid the nhs "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures, rise in cases means measures including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces should be implemented. daily covid cases across the uk have been rising sharply, with 43,738 cases reported in the latest 24—hour period, which means there were almost 115,000 cases on average per day, cases on average per day in the past week. another 223 people died within 28 days of a positive covid test, which is the highest daily figure since march. in england, the government's plan a for dealing with covid throughout winter is already in place, with boosterjabs set to be offered to 30 million of the most vulnerable people, along with a single dose
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of the vaccine for healthy 12—15 year olds and people advised to wear face coverings in crowded and enclosed spaces. but if the measures do not prevent unsustainable pressure on the nhs other measures could be introduced as part of plan b. these include making face coverings mandatory in some settings, asking people to work from home and the introduction of vaccine passports. our first report this morning is from our health editor, hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week, uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well
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below levels seen injanuary. the last week or so, there has been a particular surge in infections, and not only in infections, but we are now seeing hospitalisation data going up, people in respiratory care beds, and also that are starting to rise, whereas deaths have been pretty flat for most of the last two or three months. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. it's a very simple choice, do we accept — it's a very simple choice, do we accept the _ it's a very simple choice, do we accept the overwhelming evidence from all _ accept the overwhelming evidence from all parts of the health service and do _ from all parts of the health service and do what we can now to reduce the
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risks in_ and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a _ and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way— and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that doesn't disrupt our day—to—day life, or do we somehow— our day—to—day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that a _ somehow cross our fingers and hope that a miracle will happen, and then stumble. _ that a miracle will happen, and then stumble. as— that a miracle will happen, and then stumble, as we have done before, stumble _ stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis?— stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis? we've had our lockdowns. — stumble into crisis? we've had our lockdowns. we _ stumble into crisis? we've had our lockdowns, we managed _ stumble into crisis? we've had our lockdowns, we managed to - stumble into crisis? we've had ouri lockdowns, we managed to reopen stumble into crisis? we've had our - lockdowns, we managed to reopen the economy— lockdowns, we managed to reopen the economy successfully, _ lockdowns, we managed to reopen the economy successfully, we _ lockdowns, we managed to reopen the economy successfully, we managed i lockdowns, we managed to reopen the economy successfully, we managed to| economy successfully, we managed to -et economy successfully, we managed to get people _ economy successfully, we managed to get people back— economy successfully, we managed to get people back to— economy successfully, we managed to get people back to normal— economy successfully, we managed to get people back to normal life, - economy successfully, we managed to get people back to normal life, and i get people back to normal life, and those _ get people back to normal life, and those gains — get people back to normal life, and those gains were _ get people back to normal life, and those gains were very _ get people back to normal life, and those gains were very hard - get people back to normal life, and those gains were very hard one, . get people back to normal life, andl those gains were very hard one, and i don't _ those gains were very hard one, and i don't want — those gains were very hard one, and tdon't want to— those gains were very hard one, and i don't want to reverse _ those gains were very hard one, and idon't want to reverse back- those gains were very hard one, and i don't want to reverse back to - those gains were very hard one, and i don't want to reverse back to a - i don't want to reverse back to a situation — i don't want to reverse back to a situation where _ i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we _ i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have - i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have locked i i don't want to reverse back to a i situation where we have locked up, because _ situation where we have locked up, because i_ situation where we have locked up, because i dont— situation where we have locked up, because i don't think _ situation where we have locked up, because i don't think it's— because i don't think it's necessary _ scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. joining us now is layla mccay, from the nhs confederation. the confederation is calling for the
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government to introduce a plan b in england. thank you forjoining us, why do you think the time is right for that now? taste why do you think the time is right for that now?— for that now? we speak to health leaders every _ for that now? we speak to health leaders every day _ for that now? we speak to health leaders every day and _ for that now? we speak to health leaders every day and they - for that now? we speak to health leaders every day and they tell i for that now? we speak to health| leaders every day and they tell us that they are already working at an incredibly high level of capacity, and then, when you look at that, and you then look at the figures we see that covid—i9 is increasing, it has increased significantly in terms of family people have been diagnosed, but it is also increasing in terms of how many people have ended up in hospital over just the of how many people have ended up in hospital overjust the last of how many people have ended up in hospital over just the last week, it has increased by 10%. and that seems to be certainly on the rise, and thatis to be certainly on the rise, and that is very worrying, because this is notjust that is very worrying, because this is not just a that is very worrying, because this is notjust a situation of, what is covid—i9 doing? but also, what is it doing, in the context of us approaching winter with the nhs already at such a high level of pressure and capacity? 50. already at such a high level of pressure and capacity?- already at such a high level of pressure and capacity? so, is that ressure pressure and capacity? so, is that pressure unsustainable _ pressure and capacity? so, is that pressure unsustainable pressure? j pressure unsustainable pressure? because that seems to be the
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threshold for the government, but, i mean, define unsustainable pressure, i suppose, different things to different people?— i suppose, different things to different people? that's right, it is different _ different people? that's right, it is different and _ different people? that's right, it is different and we _ different people? that's right, it is different and we don't - different people? that's right, it is different and we don't have i different people? that's right, it is different and we don't have a | is different and we don't have a specific definition of that moment when the pressure becomes unsustainable. but what we are hearing is that it is so incredibly difficult now, with numerous predictions and analyses that show us that it will certainly become worse, and the question is, when is the right time to act? there is no point in trying to close the stable door after the horse has bolted. what we are seeing right now is predictions that this winter is going to be incredibly difficult. there are actions that can be taken right now to reduce the risk of all those challenges, to reduce risk of missing out on the fantastic progress that's being made in bringing all those elected cds to everybody that has been waiting for them, orforstaff everybody that has been waiting for them, orfor staff being able everybody that has been waiting for them, or for staff being able to deliver care safely and appropriately, everybody is
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incredibly teen to maintain those fantastic games that have been made over the summer. —— elective procedures. but if we progress in the current trajectory that the uppity me orjust tell us about, then certainly there is this risk that we are going to be in a significant challenge, and, what's the point of waiting until we are already in that challenge, when we can see right now, our healthcare leaders are telling us, but actually, this is a very difficult situation, and it is only october? the business minister was doing interviews this morning and said that the hard—won gains of the last 18 months or so, clearly, no—one wants to lose those, and he said, we don't want to go back into lockdowns. you're not calling for a knockdown, though, you're calling for other measures, typically a? that's right. we're calling for... the scientists are telling us what
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other things we can do to reduce transmission of covid—i9, and we are calling for some of those to be implemented now. we might be talking about things like masks, things like ventilation, making sure that if you are eligible for a booster, you get it as soon as you possibly can, if you are eligible for the vaccine at all, make sure that you get it, as well as the flu vaccine, if you're eligible. things like that can really come together to reduce the risk of transmission of covid—i9, and that is incredibly important, if we can do those things, we really ought to be doing them, and this is the point. ought to be doing them, and this is the oint. ., ~ ought to be doing them, and this is the oint. . ~ i” , ought to be doing them, and this is the oint. ., ~' ,, , . ought to be doing them, and this is the oint. ., ~ ,, , . ., the point. thank you very much for our the point. thank you very much for your thoughts _ the point. thank you very much for your thoughts on _ the point. thank you very much for your thoughts on all— the point. thank you very much for your thoughts on all of _ the point. thank you very much for your thoughts on all of that - the point. thank you very much for your thoughts on all of that layla l your thoughts on all of that layla mccay, from the nhs confederation. let me bring in some more of the messages you have been sending me. this one says... please listen to, if the nhs implement plan b because plan a failed, then care homes would be like prisons and residents like prisoners. do you know what it is like if you have residents with
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learning disabilities, challenging behaviours and dementia? this one says... back yesterday from france, where it is mandatory to produce your pass to or drink in restaurants, takeaways and bars, it is scanned from your phone. this one says... do people realise that plan b includes vaccine passports? she describes those as discriminatory and proven not to work in countries that have them. lucy says... incredible that despite the recent inquiry, the one withjeremy hunt featuring, this was the inquiry carried out by two select committees at westminster, which identified the government's procrastination over electrical mitigating practices as being the cause of many unnecessary deaths, here we are again, plan b is already late, she says, this will kill some of us. this one says... my concern is that vaccination is not as effective as the experts predicted. it is down to the individual to protect themselves
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until the government wakes up. so, the very great majority of these comments coming into me today are in support of plan b, of taking some measures, many people feel it is too late already, plan b should already have been enacted. one more, saying... why are so many people using london underground unmasked, when it is a condition to wear a mask? they should be enforcing it, says this one. keep those comments coming in these on any story we are covering today, you can do that on twitter at @annita—mcveigh and use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. in related news... charities have called for people with weakened immune systems to be given access to walk— in vaccination centres in the uk so more of them can get the third doses they need to fight covid—i9. the centres are reserved at the moment for boosterjabs
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for the over—sos and first doses for 12— to is—year—olds, as well as flu jabs. official figures show price rises dipped slightly in september as the economy continued to reopen. the increase in the cost of living, as measured by the consumer prices index, fell to 3.1% in september, down from 3.2% in august, according to the office for national statistics. higher prices for transport were the biggest contributor to price rises. our economics correspondent andy verity has been looking at the figures. well, annita, this isn't really the end of this surge in the cost of living that we have seen recently, more a temporary respite. a 3.1% rise in the consumer prices index is slightly less than the previous figure of 3.2%. the main reason is what you're comparing it with. in august, we were comparing it with the august before, in 2020, when we had eat out to help out, and prices in restaurants and hotels were artificially depressed
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by the government subsidy. and now we're comparing it with september, when that scheme had finished, and therefore, there is less of a contrast with last year. and therefore the big rise in prices is slightly less in restaurants and hotels. but there are still huge upward pressures on inflation, mainly from the cost of fuel, petrol prices, we didn't actually have the queues at the pumps which featured at the end of september, they aren't priced into these figures, because these figures were conducted on 15th september, rather than after, when the queues started to form, but nevertheless, big upward pressures. so, although we have had a slight easing in retail prices, the prices that producers are paying for their raw materials were up by11.4%, which is partly fuel, also things like metals, iron and steel, those prices are very expensive, which will make it more expensive to buy new cars. that has had a knock—on effect on second—hand car prices, which are up by more than a fifth over the past year. things like airfares are up by 9.7%, carpets are up 9.6%,
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and a few items falling, like meat and coffee and tea, but it is certainly the case that with those raw materials prices going up, the prices at the factory gate were up by 6.7%, that is the highest rise in a year. so, although we've had a temporary respite, it does look very much as if we've got further inflationary pressure coming down the line, and all that adds up to the likelihood of an interest rate rise by the end of this year. andy verity. at least ia people have been killed by a bomb attack on a military bus in damascus. syrian state media says that two blasts hit the vehicle as it passed under a bridge — a third device was defused. it's the deadliest attack in the syrian capital since 2017. the syrian authorities have described it as a terrorist attack. no group has so far said it was responsible. just hours after the attack, the syrian army shelled a residential area in idlib province, held by rebel fighters. witnesses and rescue workers say at least 11 civilians were killed,
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including several school children, on one of the bloodiest days in syria in months. our middle east correspondent anna foster gave me this update from beirut. details at this stage are very sketchy, but we have seen this blackened bus with smoke billowing from the windows. most of our information have come from the syrian state agency, it seems to have been a planned attack with two explosive devices that went off and one more that was found and disarmed. this was right in the centre of damascus, and it's important to point out that damascus is one of the most secure parts of syria. in the last couple of years they even reduced the number of checkpoints in damascus because things were considered to be more secure. it is notable to see an attack of this size in the syrian capital.
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in terms of who has claimed responsibility, so far nobody, but we can read perhaps a little between the lines if we look at what happened one or two hours later in the north—west, in the rebel held enclave of idlib, where we're told perhaps 11 people were killed, including schoolchildren. it's too early to link those two events, but maybe in the future as the day progresses and things become clearer we may see that one was carried out in retaliation for the other. the headlines on bbc news... a group of health leaders say some covid restrictions must immediately be reintroduced, if england is to avoid "stumbling into a winter crisis" — but the government says its plan b isn't needed yet. at least ia people have died
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in a bomb attack on a military bus in the syrian capital of damascus, in the city's worst attack for years. the uk's biggest study into severe sickness during pregnancy finds many women consider terminating their pregnancy because of the condition. later today, a parliamentary inquiry in brazil will present its final findings into president bolsonaro s handling of the covid—i9 pandemic. according to excerpts of the report already leaked to the media, the inquiry will recommend charges including homicide against jair bolsonaro after the brazilian leader was accused of failing to control the virus that has so far killed more than 600,000 brazilians. our south america correspondent katy watson reports from sao paulo. but despite president bolsonaro's bold predictions, covid—i9
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wreaked havoc in brazil. there is no normalfor the hundreds of thousands of families who lost loved ones. and as each new grave was dug, denial at the top continued. all that the government has done and not done has been picked apart in the senate, like the collapse of the health care system in the amazon. at the beginning of this year, hospitals there were running out of oxygen. people suffocating to death. but the government was accused of underplaying the crisis. senators pointing to our report as proof the situation was worse than claimed. and then came the scandal at one of the country's largest health care providers, accused among other things of giving unproven drugs to elderly patients nd covering up deaths of patients who died of covid—i9. prevent senior, though,
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denies the accusations. this man spent four months in icu. the scars from being intubated still very visible. his family refused to believe his only option was palliative care, and thanks to them, he's here today. families were betrayed, he tells me, they feel a weight on their conscience that they could have done something, like my family did. it was an ideological choice made, not a medical one with my treatment. for the senator in charge of publishing the final report, its findings are a foregone conclusion.
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but the process is not without its critics. for bolsonaro supporters, the inquiry is seen as biased and vengeful, but everyone agrees it has dented bolsonaro's popularity. 600,000 deaths and counting. while brazil buries the dead, crimes are still being unearthed, but it's up to federal prosecutors to take this investigation further and punish those responsible. we can speak now to octavio ferraz, a professor of law at king's college, london. he's heavily critical of jair bolsonaro and has recently written about what he describes
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as the president's crimes during the pandemic. thank you very much forjoining us today. jair bolsonaro caught covid himself, didn't he, and i think he described it at the time is a little flu. but nearly 22 million cases, and 600,000 deaths later, what do you think this congressional panel will say should happen to him? istai’eiii. will say should happen to him? well, already lifted — will say should happen to him? well, already lifted the _ will say should happen to him? well, already lifted the lid _ will say should happen to him? well, already lifted the lid to _ will say should happen to him? well, already lifted the lid to the _ will say should happen to him? in already lifted the lid to the press, so we know that it is going to say that he has committed nine crimes, it was originally 11 but there was debate between the senators who are members of this commission, and in the end they seem to have agreed, we don't know yet, but we will know this afternoon, in the brazilian parliament and in the brazilian senate, but it is very likely that they will say that he has committed at least nine crimes, and then they will recommend to the attorney—general that legal proceedings are started against him, and many other people who are
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involved as well, but mostly against him as the president. band involved as well, but mostly against him as the president.— him as the president. and how cuickl him as the president. and how quickly could — him as the president. and how quickly could those _ him as the president. and how quickly could those legal- quickly could those legal proceedings start, do you think? i proceedings start, do you think? i think that it is unlikely that the legal proceedings will actually start, because the attorney—general, as most people think, is not willing to open legal proceedings against bolsonaro, he was appointed by bolsonaro, he was appointed by bolsonaro, reappointed very recently, people criticise him for not being neutral, so i don't think that there is a likelihood that the legal proceedings will start, but they could start very quickly, if there was no political will on the part of the attorney—general. band there was no political will on the part of the attorney-general. and if there isn't that _ part of the attorney-general. and if there isn't that political _ part of the attorney-general. and if there isn't that political will, - part of the attorney-general. and if there isn't that political will, is - there isn't that political will, is there isn't that political will, is there any other means, then, for justice to be satisfied and for those who want to see the president answer for the crimes that he is going to be accused of, for them to have their say?— going to be accused of, for them to have their say? well, the only other ossibili have their say? well, the only other possibility is — have their say? well, the only other possibility is impeachment - have their say? well, the only other
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possibility is impeachment in - possibility is impeachment in congress, but that requires two thirds of the members of the lower house to accept, and even before that, the president of the lower house has to be initiated, and the president of the lower house, again, is an ally of bolsonaro, so it's very unlikely that either front, the political impeachment front, or the legal proceedings by the eternal general, will happen now. —— by the attorney—general. but the political damage to bolsonaro, as your clip has shown, has already been done, and so i think the electoral prospects is where he will be more harmed by this report, rather than by legal or political proceedings to take him out of office. yes. by legal or political proceedings to take him out of office. yes, because the next general _ take him out of office. yes, because the next general election _ take him out of office. yes, because the next general election is - take him out of office. yes, because the next general election is about i take him out of office. yes, because the next general election is about a | the next general election is about a year away, the next general election is about a yearaway, perhaps the next general election is about a year away, perhaps a little under a year away, perhaps a little under a year away, perhaps a little under a year away, so, if you doesn't have to answer any questions in the court of law, then you may have to in the court of public opinion yes, exactly. if we have elections! this
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is another important and sad issue in brazil, that he has been talking about, if we have elections next year... so, we have to see what happens like in the american situation, we had all those problems, like, just before the election. in brazil, the problems are likely to be even worse, many people predict, so we will have to wait and see if there are elections, and if there, i think his chances of winning are small, particularly because of his conduct during the pandemic. so, this report will at least damaged him in that electoral scenario, if not in a court of law, as you said. professor octavio ferraz, thank you very much, professor of law at king's college london. mt; professor of law at king's college london. y , .,, a study into a condition that causes extreme sickness during pregnancy
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has found that more than half of the women affected considered having an abortion because of their symptoms. the survey of five thousand women with hyperemesis gravidarum is the biggest of its kind ever carried out in the uk. the condition isn't widely known, but the duchess of cambridge suffered with severe vomiting during all three of her pregnancies. daniela relph has been to meet one woman who recorded a video diary about her experience of pregnancy. i don't get the normal experience that other people get. ijust have to sit here for nine months and just... ..wait. i still can't eat, and i can't drink. and i'm hungry. and i'm stressed, and i can't sleep. i just want to get to the end of this pregnancy... ..with a baby. alive. extreme sickness in pregnancy can be brutal.
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the condition — known as hg — can overwhelm you. i'm so cold. two years ago, laura anderson kept a video diary of her pregnancy. it's a horrible illness. just makes you a complete shadow of who you were. two years on, and laura is now mum to ava. we had to try very hard to get pregnant and we'd had four miscarriages and she was very wanted, and she was what kept me going. because i knew the only way to get a baby was to get to that end point, and that's what got me through. but the pregnancy left her feeling isolated and struggling to get help. she wants other women to get better care and treatment. the mentaljourney is actually harder, because that's still left over at the end of it, and that doesn't go away as quickly as the physical symptoms.
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it's nine months of isolation and feeling completely useless because you can't do anything. and some people have to quit theirjobs, some people have other children that they feel like they're letting down. obviously treat the physical first, because that can be very dangerous if not, but so can the mental part of it. laura had wanted more children, but she's forever changed by her hg experience. do you think you'll have any more children? no, no. i very much, at the end of ava's pregnancy, told myself, i am finally done with hg. and i was happy about that. if i could be promised that i wouldn't have hg, i would definitely have another baby. that is the only reason we're not having another baby. it's just too risky for you. yeah, yeah. i can't be a mum if i've got hg. susie verrill is mum of three who had the condition in her last two pregnancies.
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thank you very much for talking to us today to share your experiences, so, your second and third pregnancies, fine with the first baby but then in the second pregnancy you developed hyperemesis gravidarum. what would set off the sickness? 50. gravidarum. what would set off the sickness? , ., ., sickness? so, first of all, hyperemesis _ sickness? so, first of all, hyperemesis gravidarum | sickness? so, first of all, i hyperemesis gravidarum is characterised as extreme sickness, nausea and dehydration. anything in fact can actually trigger the sickness, it can be anything from colours or movement, your sense of smell is heightened, and so even having your own children, family members, around you, it'sjust impossible, because anything can trigger the vomiting, and the whole aim is to try and prevent that from happening, because you are looking at vomiting up to, often, 50 times a day, and quite often as well you're
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not having a treatment in place to prevent that, so you're just dealing with it on your own at home. that with it on your own at home. at its worst, described _ with it on your own at home. at its worst, described what _ with it on your own at home. at its worst, described what a _ with it on your own at home. at its worst, described what a typical day was like for you with lift—off? abs, was like for you with lift—off? typical day isjust being in your typical day is just being in your bedroom with a bowl, which hopefully you will have someone come and empty for you, you are often also suffering from a condition which is extreme saliva, which can leave you feeling as though you're drowning. you can occasionally watch the television but quite often you try and catch up with sleep, because during the night your sleep is often broken so that you can vomit. you are essentiallyjust existing, there is no comfort, there is nojoy in your life, you are just existing. and for that to go on for nine months, that is almost a year, you really do have to understand that it is very serious for the women that i going through this duffel and you know you said that your partner effectively turned into your carer for those two pregnancies, when you
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went to your gp and indeed to hospital, how much did the medical professionals you encountered know about this condition? unfortunately, not enough. and that is an ongoing problem. thank fully, nancy support were there and i found out about them fairly quickly in my second pregnancy. with the third, i already had them on hand. with the third pregnancy as well, i had to let them know when i was looking to conceive that they could put in a plan for me under the guide of a doctor who specialises in pregnancy and women's health. 50. specialises in pregnancy and women's health. ., , ., specialises in pregnancy and women's health. . , . . health. so, what help and treatment did ou health. so, what help and treatment did you get? — health. so, what help and treatment did you get? because _ health. so, what help and treatment did you get? because presumably i health. so, what help and treatment i did you get? because presumably that was a big factor in deciding to have another baby, because as we've heard from this survey, many women decide that they just can't from this survey, many women decide that theyjust can't have another child because they can't go through that again, but you obviously felt that again, but you obviously felt that you have the support around you, so what was the plan?
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conditions. notjust tonight but also the course of tomorrow. that you have the support around you, so what was the plan? there are anti-emetics — you, so what was the plan? there are anti-emetics available, _ you, so what was the plan? there are anti-emetics available, that - you, so what was the plan? there are anti-emetics available, that depends| anti—emetics available, that depends on whether there doctor wants to give them to you, there is the option to go into hospital and have drips, but again quite often the hospital that you are going to may not have that option available, and you have to sit in a writing room, ordinarily in and weight, so we have to deal with women who can't go to beds, there are are options that they are not always well known, sometimes you'll come against a doctor who isn't willing to do that, they will recommend things like ginger biscuits, which isjust not a solution, and really you are fending for yourself, and that is why so many women instead turned to what they feel is their only option, and thatis they feel is their only option, and that is termination, and it is incredibly sad, because these babies are very much wanted and often very much planned for.—
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are very much wanted and often very much planned for. yes, 596 of women surve ed much planned for. yes, 596 of women surveyed saying _ much planned for. yes, 596 of women surveyed saying they _ much planned for. yes, 596 of women surveyed saying they had _ much planned for. yes, 596 of women surveyed saying they had terminated | surveyed saying they had terminated a pregnancy that was very much wanted. so i suppose the big message that you want to get out, and the charity wants to get out is that there is support and advice out there is support and advice out there for women, and also to encourage more medical professionals to general plan all of this and know how to deal with the condition. yes. how to deal with the condition. yes, we would love _ how to deal with the condition. yes, we would love women _ how to deal with the condition. yes, we would love women to _ how to deal with the condition. is: we would love women to know they are not alone and they don't feel they have the close support network, there is a network always available. you can have one—to—one conversations with people on whatsapp, we have a great volunteer system, also they can give you medical advice and information to take with you to a doctor so that you can advocate for yourself at a time when you reallyjust have such little energy. time when you really 'ust have such utue energy.— time when you really “ust have such utue energy.— little energy. thank you very much for sharing — little energy. thank you very much for sharing your — little energy. thank you very much for sharing your experience - little energy. thank you very much for sharing your experience with i little energy. thank you very much l for sharing your experience with us.
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it's a month since a volcano on one of spain's canary islands erupted, forcing thousands of people to leave their homes. lava is still spewing on la palma, with close to 2,000 buildings destroyed and now experts say they have no idea when eruptions will end. our correspondent dan johnson sent this report. it still has the capacity to attract and enthrall, but after a month it's become an overbearing backdrop to much of life here. an incredible spectacle with its own mundane chores. ryan does this once a week. "maybe it doesn't affect you directly," he says, "but a family member or someone you know." translation: i want it to end. it's not too worrying for me but it is for my family and in the meanwhile, we just have to live with it. this kind of strong mentality that they say, "it doesn't matter what comes, we go through it, and go forward."
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lucas isn't going forward. this is what happened to the house he lived in for 60 years. his wife cannot bear to watch. translation: | cannot put| into words, losing the house that should have been for my children and grandchildren. it's a miracle we have this flat because i know people are sleeping in cars and tents and caravans. there is no sign of this eruption easing at all, and in fact, if anything, the volcano only gets more active and it's actually grown over the weeks as the layers of lava have built up and hardened, but there is still fresh lava pouring down the hillside as well, destroying more farmland, homes and villages, and there are new fires breaking out all the time. there are amazing survival stories. these dogs have been fed by drone for four weeks and now there's an attempt to use one to rescue them. but there is little hope for the home is still
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in the way of the lava. and the longer it flows, the further it reaches, smothering more of this island. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. breaking news and sports are just coming into us, newcastle united confirming that steve bruce has left his position as head coach by mutual consent, says ucas or united. manager steve bruce leaving his position, he said after the loss to spurs last sunday is that he was planning on coming into his work the next day and so on until he heard otherwise, now he has heard. newcastle united confirming steve bruce has left his position as head coach by mutual consent, the club of course under new ownership, saudi
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ownership, their loss to tottenham last sunday, the speculation was rife, of course, but steve bruce was my future with the club. he was playing his 1000th game as a manager in that match, and it got to the right start with two goals, but then tottenham took the lead in the final score was 3—2, now steve bruce leaving his position as manager as head coach with newcastle united by mutual consent, says the club. we will have a look at that in more detail very soon, we hope to speak to one of our sports correspondence about that. we will do that very soon. the real madrid striker karim benzema goes on trial in france this morning accused of complicity in the attempted blackmail of a former international team—mate, in a case known as
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the "sextape affair". benzema stands accused of helping a group of alleged blackmailers. four other men are also on trial. hugh schofield is live in paris. a pretty complex case, just outlined the background to all of it. 2015, karim benzema mathieu valbuena are both on the national side, they were! great —— they were at clairefontaine, the pass on information and offer help to mathieu valbuena to suppress the trouble that he has got, which is a
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sextape, he knows it's out there showing him, and karim benzema says to mature valbuena that he can help him, there won't be any coffees. the hosting hinges on whether she was helping blackmailers, or doing it out of concern for his team—mates and genuinely wanted to help the prosecution case clearly believes that benzema knew very well that he was acting on behalf or shady types, making an approach on them, and he wanted money from valbuena. that is why he is facing a charge and complicity in the attempted blackmail. no one is suggesting he wanted any money, he certainly didn't need it, but he was acting on behalf of people who knew. the first
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thing we are all looking forward to today's weather benzema with turned up. he hasn't, perfectly legitimate reasons, it was laid out first thing, he was in kiev last night, real madrid's bitchery there, so he won't be attending there is another big match on sunday, he will be attending that, they are angry, they thinkjustice is more important than football, but he can be represented by his lawyers and he will do. it's three months since thousands of afghans were forced to flee their country and make a new home in the uk but many are still living in hotels that were meant to be temporary. it means they don't have access to jobs, proper health care or education as our home editor, mark easton has been finding out. a budget hotel in buckinghamshire is currently home to 160 afghan
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migrants, mostly children. and after more than two months stuck there, it's the children who often find it hardest. a local primary has offered educational support, but the authorities discourage such arrangements, and that is a source of frustration. my wife and seven children, it's very difficult for us. nazeer�*s children missed a lot of school in afghanistan. and after more than two months stuck in uk hotels, he's desperate to get them back into a classroom. i think the permanent education system is not available at the moment. and we are very keen and really trust the government to sort out as soon as possible. finding a suitable accommodation for large families is a huge challenge. there are fears some may be in what are called bridging hotels for many months yet. local charities help, but stuck in institutional limbo it seems even basic safeguarding
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is not always there. we visited some families here that have been in the country for three weeks. and children had unseen bullet holes in their legs, so we were able to muster support, get people to a local walk—in surgery. that's great, but it shouldn't be down to you! that surely is something that should have been spotted? i agree with you. but rather than complain about it, i think i can do something. heads, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes. heads, shoulders... in south london one school has found a way to get afghan children out of a local hotel and into class. after meeting a desperate migrant dad, the head at walworth academy realised that if afghan parents applied for an available place, her school was legally bound to take them. so off we went down to that hotel and quite literally sat in the lobby with a gentleman talking to him, which meant that more people and more people kept coming up, and by the next day we got a telephone call here saying,
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"oh, i understand you've been to this hotel. could you come down and see us? we are really interested in school places". we are so worried we can't go outside. we just work on internet. these three girls, all evacuated from kabul with their families as the taliban seized control, are thrilled to be in school at last. i'm so happy because i love education. our mind is fresh. we get more friends in here. it's too comfortable, it's too good for us. when you approached the home office and the department of education, what was the reaction to your offer of places? i think it was just a bit too early in their process. so they turned you down, essentially? they didn't turn us down directly. the education department says it is funding extra school places for afghans and trying to get children into classrooms as soon as possible. but the question is whether the government should be doing more to support the children now. mark easton, bbc news.
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with me now is dr nooralhaq nasimi, the founder of the afghan and central asian association, which supports refugees in feltham, west london. thank you forjoining us on bbc news today, and when i spoke to you in the summer, you told me how you would use your own experience of seeing the taliban in 1999 with your young family to help these new latest arrivals from afghanistan. what is life like for them currently in the uk? ., ., what is life like for them currently in the uk? ., ., in the uk? so, good morning and thank ou in the uk? so, good morning and thank you for— in the uk? so, good morning and thank you for inviting _ in the uk? so, good morning and thank you for inviting me, - in the uk? so, good morning and thank you for inviting me, i - in the uk? so, good morning and| thank you for inviting me, i would like first of all to an general to say thank you very much of the british government for creating thousands of afghan people in the last two months, but on the other hand, looking at the situation the afghan people are living in a regional hotels, i think it concerns everyone, all of us, the situation
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they are now currently facing, particularly the local authorities, think they are still not in a position to provide adequate support to the newly arrived people in terms of giving them a temporary accommodation, moving from bridging hotels to permanent accommodation. temporary accommodation is a very big challenge for local authorities, lack of access to an education to those children who are staying at the bridging hotels, they are not having access to local schools, that is why the association is working very hard to contact local councillors is well as the home office to see how we can work
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together to solve some of the challenges faced by the community. are you effectively doing, and other associations, are you doing the work that the authority should be doing? this is an important question that you just pointed out, i think the local authorities, you just pointed out, i think the localauthorities, it's local authorities, it's difficult for a small gross organisation to tackle a very important issue that is faced by thousands of newly arrived community without the support and cooperation and partnership with the home office, the local council and local governments. therefore i would like to ask the home office as well as the local government whether we could maybe look at the strategy, how they manage to support the syrian refugees in a few years, sorry, a few years ago. i think the approach was slightly different than
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the situation of the african people facing at the moment. —— the situation the afghan people are facing. on the other hand, this is our priority, how we can make sure to tell the world and the newly arrived community how the uk is a welcoming society, and it's an open society that everyone treats equally. society that everyone treats e . uall . ., society that everyone treats euuall . ., . society that everyone treats euuall. ., . , society that everyone treats euuall. ., ., , ., equally. you have spoken about housin: , equally. you have spoken about housing. you've _ equally. you have spoken about housing, you've spoken - equally. you have spoken about housing, you've spoken about i equally. you have spoken about - housing, you've spoken about access to education, but if you could pinpoint some of the initial, i suppose, what would you call them? the initial thing is that the arrivals from afghanistan need, namely paperwork, the ability to access money, some of these fundamentals, id papers and so on, is that what they need help with first and foremost from the government? i first and foremost from the government?— first and foremost from the covernment? , . ., government? i remember when i came to the uk in — government? i remember when i came to the uk in 1999| — government? i remember when i came to the uk in 1999| had _ government? i remember when i came
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to the uk in 1999| had similar- to the uk in 1999! had similar challenges at that time, but then, thanks to the british refugee council who rent and introduce me to the british red cross, dave mentors spent almost a month of near my family to sort some of the problems at the time, they helped us with the local school in the local gps, they also help me find someone from social services to fill some of the application forms for housing or may be child benefit and so many other things, so now i think the problem is the local governments at this
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stage, there is no cooperation across organisations such as the british red cross, may be, or the refugee council, all the afghan and central asian association. i think they can reduce some of the challenges there that the community faces at the time.— faces at the time. thank you very much forjoining _ faces at the time. thank you very much forjoining us _ faces at the time. thank you very much forjoining us today, - faces at the time. thank you very much forjoining us today, from l faces at the time. thank you very l much forjoining us today, from the afghan and central asian association. breaking newsjust association. breaking news just coming association. breaking newsjust coming in, the kremlin has announced that president putin will not be travelling to glasgow for the cop26 conference, it is due to begin on the back a week and a half is time, it has been described as the last best chance to keep the average global temperature from rising, more
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than 1.5 celsius, and of course cooperation and unity from all countries has been urged by everyone attending and organising the summit. the leaders of more than 200 countries are expected to attend, but president putin will not be one of them. the kremlinjust but president putin will not be one of them. the kremlin just announcing that vladimir putin will not be travelling to glasgow for the cop26 summit, the united nations climate change summits, and questions also over the attendance of the chinese president, so confirmation from the kremlin that president putin will not be there. obviously it had been absolutely hoped by the organisers that he would be among the attendees, and we were write reaction from the uk government which is organising this conference very to that news. the select committee investigating january's attempted insurrection at the united states capitol has unanimously approved a report recommending a key associate of president trump be held in contempt of congress.
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steve bannon has refused to appear before the panel, claiming he's not legally obliged to disclose private white house communications. here's our north american correspondent david willis. steve bannon was one of donald trump's closest advisers. he served briefly as white house chief of staff and was pardoned of criminal charges in one of mr trump's final acts in office. now he may find himself facing charges again in connection with the siege on the us capitol building injanuary this year — an insurrection which delayed the certification ofjoe biden's presidential victory, left dozens of police officers injured and sent lawmakers running for their lives. the select committee setup to investigate the violence believes steve bannon has crucial evidence relating to events leading up to the siege, but he is refusing to cooperate with them, and now the committee is getting tough. mr bannon stands alone in his
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complete defiance of our subpoena. that's not acceptable. no one in this country, no matter how wealthy or how powerful, is above the law. left unaddressed, this defiance may encourage others to follow mr bannon done the same path. then came this from one of the two republicans on the committee. based on the committee's investigation, it appears that mr bannon had substantial advance knowledge of the plans forjanuary 6th, and likely had an important role in formulating those plans. the committee voted unanimously to hold steve bannon in contempt of congress. the matter will now go to a full vote of the house later this week, whereupon it will be up to the us justice department to decide whether to pursue criminal charges against steve bannon. behind all this is donald trump. earlier this week, he filed
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a lawsuit seeking to prevent the select committee from gaining access to the white house documents relating to the january the 6th attack. like the former president, steve bannon is citing the legal doctrine of executive privilege as his reason for refusing to testify. but lawmakers are determined to get to the bottom of the events surrounding the attack on the 6th of january. as well as a fine, criminal contempt of congress carries the prospect of up to a year behind bars. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. let's get more now on the news that steve bruce has been sacked as the manager of newcastle united after just over two years in charge at stjames' park. let's get more from our sports presenter, austin halewood. it seems like a new broom, new saudi owners, and they decided they don't
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want the existing manager. absolutely, it's news that hasn't really come as too much of a surprise to newcastle fans and football fans in general. they perhaps expected this news to come, as you say, just 13 days after that saudi backed takeover of newcastle football club, and bruce has been at the team for two years, he has been a lifetime fan of newcastle, but he's not been too popular with fans, and the new owners thanked him for his time at the club, in the search for a new manager is already under way, we could see someone else take over, his assistant will take over the next few games, they play crystal palace at the weekend, so he will take over for that one, so crystal palace at the weekend, so he will take overfor that one, so in crystal palace at the weekend, so he will take over for that one, so in a statement on the website, steve bruce said he was grateful for everyone connected to the club for the opportunity to manage this unique football club, it's a club
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with incredible support and they hoped the new owners can take it forward to where we all want it to be. i wish everyone the very best of luck for the rest of the season and beyond. steve bruce clearly very disappointed to be leaving his position as manager, but perhaps not the most surprising news. what position as manager, but perhaps not the most surprising news.— the most surprising news. what is the most surprising news. what is the reaction _ the most surprising news. what is the reaction from _ the most surprising news. what is the reaction from the _ the most surprising news. what is the reaction from the fans - the most surprising news. what is the reaction from the fans going l the most surprising news. what is| the reaction from the fans going to be? this the reaction from the fans going to be? �* , ,. , the reaction from the fans going to be? ~ , , ., be? as i said, they have never really taken — be? as i said, they have never really taken to _ be? as i said, they have never really taken to him _ be? as i said, they have never really taken to him too - be? as i said, they have never really taken to him too much. | be? as i said, they have never| really taken to him too much. i think they perhaps will understandably disappointed to see the manager losesjob, but at understandably disappointed to see the manager loses job, but at the same time i think they were hoping for this news to come, really. steve bruce, as i mentioned, is from the area, a fan of the club, but he did manage their local rivals, sunderland, for a couple of seasons, and that never really sat too well with the newcastle fans, so i think they perhaps will thank him for the time that he has had their guiding them to 12th and 13th finishes in
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them to 12th and 13th finishes in the league, which is quite good under the circumstances at the club, but i think they will perhaps be hoping for a bit more success, because of course they are in the bottom three in the premier league at the moment, so they will be hoping someone else can take things forward for them in a better way. thank you very much, we will have much more on that story throughout the rest of the day. the british songwriter, behind popularfilm songs like goldfinger and willy wonka has died at the age of 90. lesley bricusse had a prolific career writing hits for numerous musicals and films. in a career lasting 70 years he had written at least 1,000 songs and won two oscars.
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yourjoanna will be here do next, for then a look the weather. hello, again. yesterday, in parts of the south—east, where the sun came out, the temperature reached 21 degrees. today is going to be mild, but not that mild. and then tomorrow we get into some cold, arctic air. that doesn't last, either, because as we head into the weekend, things turn that bit warmer once again. today, we've had some heavy rain moving away from the south—east, heavy showers pushing towards the north—east, accompanied by thunderstorms and gusty winds. they will be replaced later with more heavy showers coming in across the south—west and gusty winds, too, in areas adjacent to the english channel. temperatures up to about 17 in london. yesterday, we had 21. you can see where we've got the showers in the afternoon. if anything, the thunder risk will diminish. a sunny afternoon further north, ahead of this weather front. note the difference in the direction of the wind, it will be coming from the north. but ahead of that front, we are still looking
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at south—westerlies, with temperatures, about 11—18. this evening and overnight, these showers continue to cross southern england and south wales. the weather front slips southwards as a weak feature, showers packing in on the wind behind it, some of which will be wintry on the higher ground as far south as north wales. and it's going to be a colder night than we've been used to of late. tomorrow, this weather front clears quite quickly, allowing a lot of sunshine. but on this brisk wind we will see further showers coming in, gales down the north sea coastline, and here, too, with the spring tides, we could see some overtopping. but it is going to feel cold. the temperatures are lower than they have been, and then there is the wind chill to consider as well. on friday, high pressure builds, so we will see some sunshine across central and eastern areas. the cloud will be building in from the west during the day with a few showers, and it won't not feel as cold as it is going to on thursday. the winds will not be as strong, either. on saturday, still a fair bit of cloud around, with some showers, ahead of this next band of rain
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which is coming our way in from the west, into northern ireland and western scotland during the day, with temperatures 10—11t. on sunday, that band of rain will cross us and the outlook for the rest of the week remains unsettled with rain at times or showers coming in on westerlies.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... some covid restrictions, like more mask wearing and working from home, must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis. that's according to one group of health leaders — as cases continue to rise across the uk. if we don't take these measures, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data on an hourly basis and we don't feel that it is time for plan b right now. steve bruce is out as head coach of newcastle united, with the club saying he's left by mutual consent — two weeks after they were taken over by a saudi—backed consortium. a leaked report from brazillian lawmakers says the country's
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president, jair bolsonaro, should be charged with murder over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. the uk's biggest study into severe sickness during pregnancy finds many women consider terminating their pregnancy because of the condition. i was being sick after 30 times a day some days and i spend a lot of it in hospital. police investigate a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. it's now a month since a volcano on the spanish island police investigate a number of reports from women who say of la palma first erupted, and officials say there are no signs of the lava and ash stopping.
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health leaders are demanding the immediate reintroduction of some covid restrictions in england to avoid the nhs "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures, including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. daily covid cases across the uk have been rising sharply — with 43,738 cases reported in the latest 26 hour period, which means there were almost 65,000 cases on average per day, in the past week. another 223 people died within 28 days of a positive covid test, which is the highest daily figure since march. in england, the government's plan a for dealing with covid throughout winter is already in place with boosterjabs set to be offered to 30 million of the most vulnerable people,
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along with a single dose of the vaccine for healthy 12—15 year olds and people advised to wear face coverings in crowded and enclosed spaces. but if the measures do not prevent �*unsustainable pressure' on the nhs other measures could be introduced as part of plan b. these include making face coverings mandatory in some settings, asking people to work from home and the introduction of vaccine passports. our health editor hugh pym reports. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary.
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we are now seeing data going up, people in respiratory beds and also, deaths have started to rise, where they have been pretty flat for most of the last two months. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. it isa it is a very simple choice, do we accept the overwhelming evidence and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that does not disrupt
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our day—to—day life, or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that a miracle will happen? then stumble, as we have done before, stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis. brute stumble, as we have done before, stumble into crisis.— stumble into crisis. we have had a lock downs — stumble into crisis. we have had a lock downs and _ stumble into crisis. we have had a lock downs and we _ stumble into crisis. we have had a lock downs and we have _ stumble into crisis. we have had a lock downs and we have managed | stumble into crisis. we have had a l lock downs and we have managed to over come _ lock downs and we have managed to over come of the economy. those gains _ over come of the economy. those gains were — over come of the economy. those gains were very hard one and i don't want _ gains were very hard one and i don't want to— gains were very hard one and i don't want to reverse back to a situation where _ want to reverse back to a situation where we — want to reverse back to a situation where we have a lock downs, i don't think— where we have a lock downs, i don't think it's _ where we have a lock downs, i don't think it's necessary. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. some newsjust some news just through from a buckingham palace that the queen has
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cancelled _ buckingham palace that the queen has cancelled a trip to northern ireland today— cancelled a trip to northern ireland today and — cancelled a trip to northern ireland today and has accepted medical advice _ today and has accepted medical advice to— today and has accepted medical advice to rest for the next few days — advice to rest for the next few da s. ., ., ., ., ., ., ., days. no more information than that, but she is not — days. no more information than that, but she is not going _ days. no more information than that, but she is not going to _ days. no more information than that, but she is not going to northern - but she is not going to northern ireland as had been planned and will be resting for the next few days. you might have seen that yesterday, she turned down the offer of the award of oldie of the year because she said at 95, she is not old enough because you are only as old as you feel. that indicates how she is feeling more generally but we are just hearing now that she is reluctantly accepting medical advice to rest for the next few days and has cancelled a trip to northern ireland. back to those covid—19 figures and calls for more restrictions to be brought in with the number of cases going up. joining me now is dr kishan bodalia, a junior doctor working in a & e. we have spoken to him before about
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working on the wards. what ruc in on the wards? that working on the wards. what ruc in on the wards? �* ., ., the wards? at the moment, i am workin: the wards? at the moment, i am working in _ the wards? at the moment, i am working in accident _ the wards? at the moment, i am working in accident and - the wards? at the moment, i am l working in accident and emergency the wards? at the moment, i am - working in accident and emergency in birmingham and in the last few weeks we have seen an increase in the number of patients coming in of all age groups, young and old. covid—19 can affect everyone. as a result we are seeing some who have become seriously unwell, some who have unfortunately passed away, so covid—19 is still here. unfortunately passed away, so covid-19 is still here.- unfortunately passed away, so covid-19 is still here. when you say across all age _ covid-19 is still here. when you say across all age groups, _ covid-19 is still here. when you say across all age groups, is _ covid-19 is still here. when you say across all age groups, is that - covid-19 is still here. when you say across all age groups, is that as - covid-19 is still here. when you say across all age groups, is that as it | across all age groups, is that as it ever was or are you saying any change in the sort patients coming through? it change in the sort patients coming throu~h? . ' . change in the sort patients coming throu~h? , ' . ., through? it is difficult to generalise _ through? it is difficult to generalise for _ through? it is difficult to generalise for the - through? it is difficult to generalise for the whole | through? it is difficult to i generalise for the whole of through? it is difficult to - generalise for the whole of the country because i have my own experience from working in accident and emergency. at the very start of the pandemic, last year, we were seeing mostly elderly patients coming in. those are the patients who are becoming more unwell but as
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time progressed, we started a seat people falling seriously unwell, often requiring admission to the intensive care unit.— often requiring admission to the intensive care unit. what about the atients in intensive care unit. what about the patients in terms _ intensive care unit. what about the patients in terms of _ intensive care unit. what about the patients in terms of vaccinations? l patients in terms of vaccinations? how many of them are double vaccinated? i how many of them are double vaccinated?— how many of them are double vaccinated? ~' ., ., ., vaccinated? i think the roll-out of the vaccination _ vaccinated? i think the roll-out of the vaccination roll-out _ vaccinated? i think the roll-out of i the vaccination roll-out programme the vaccination roll—out programme has been brilliant from my experience and patients who are coming in, most of them who i have seen myself, have been a double vaccinated, which means the severity of the illness that they are suffering with is much less. for example, last week i saw a lady in her 30s who had come in feeling short of breath but if she had not had the vaccination, it is possible that your symptoms which have been much worse. that your symptoms which have been much worse-— much worse. what is it like on the wards in terms _ much worse. what is it like on the wards in terms of— much worse. what is it like on the wards in terms of having - much worse. what is it like on the wards in terms of having the - wards in terms of having the resources to cope with what is going on at the moment? i am resources to cope with what is going on at the moment?— on at the moment? i am working in accident and _ on at the moment? i am working in accident and emergency _ on at the moment? i am working in accident and emergency so - on at the moment? i am working in accident and emergency so we - on at the moment? i am working in accident and emergency so we are l on at the moment? i am working in i accident and emergency so we are the first port of call where patients come in before getting admitted to
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hospital. i have colleagues in the wards and they are saying the pressures are going up and this is what we are about going into the winter. ~ ., ., , ., ~' what we are about going into the winter. ~ ., ., ~ ., winter. what do you think about, i know obviously _ winter. what do you think about, i know obviously this _ winter. what do you think about, i know obviously this is _ winter. what do you think about, i know obviously this is beyond - winter. what do you think about, i j know obviously this is beyond your brief, but in terms of what you're experiencing and how you're feeling about the winter ahead, would you like to see more come in? i about the winter ahead, would you like to see more come in?- like to see more come in? i would not like to — like to see more come in? i would not like to see _ like to see more come in? i would not like to see restrictions - like to see more come in? i would not like to see restrictions but - like to see more come in? i would not like to see restrictions but in i not like to see restrictions but in situation of a pandemic with covid—19 where people's lives are being lost, then my role as a doctor is to promote health. if this requires us to take on extra precautions such as pushing the use of face coverings or encouraging people to work from home or vaccine passports, for example, then we must do so to protect the population, but also to protect the nhs from such pressures. for also to protect the nhs from such ressures. ., ., ., , pressures. for all of us, there will be that dreaded _ pressures. for all of us, there will be that dreaded feeling _ pressures. for all of us, there will be that dreaded feeling of, - pressures. for all of us, there will be that dreaded feeling of, oh, i pressures. for all of us, there will i be that dreaded feeling of, oh, here
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we go again, potentially. for someone like you on the front line of it and have had to deal with what you have had to deal with over the period since the pandemic began, how do you feel about what may lie ahead? i do you feel about what may lie ahead? . ., ., ., , ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult — ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult to _ ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult to say. _ ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult to say. i _ ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult to say. i feel _ ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult to say. i feel a _ ahead? i feel a mixture of emotions, it is difficult to say. i feel a bit - it is difficult to say. i feel a bit anxious at times, worrying if cases go up, we will see higher numbers of patients who are seriously unwell, young people and old people. it does worry me a lot and thinking back to vibrio, march, iwas worry me a lot and thinking back to vibrio, march, i was redeployed to the intensive care unit and that was an unbelievably emotional and physically difficult time for me and for my colleagues. they are experiences we will never get over, so i am very worried that covid—19 could get out of hand so i think it's important that we do things such as getting double jab, get the blisters and maintain social distancing, where face mask for example. it distancing, where face mask for examle. . distancing, where face mask for examle. , , , example. it is completely understandable _ example. it is completely understandable of - example. it is completely understandable of course | example. it is completely - understandable of course when you
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say that you're going through experiences there that you will not ever get over. how much of a toll and you think it has taken on you? it has been a massive learning experience, for sure. i am generally a very happy person and i am very resilient and i have an incredible team of staff who are very supportive. we all work very well together, so we have gotten through this but from my own mental health, i like to do music, just to make myself feel good but for other people as well. it is notjust health care professionals, we are feeling the hit of a pandemic but i feeling the hit of a pandemic but i feel for everyone else in the public, people who are at home in lockdown so it is important that we learn to adapt with covid—19, taken restrictions as we need to. for example, making facemasks compulsory at certain times so that we can move forward and enjoy good times again. that would be good, thank you very
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much. back to the news i brought you about the queen cancelling her trip to northern ireland. we are hearing that she has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest for the next vides. . . . medical advice to rest for the next vides. , ., , .., medical advice to rest for the next vides. , .,, .., ., medical advice to rest for the next vides. , ., ., , vides. this has come out of the blue in the last few _ vides. this has come out of the blue in the last few minutes, _ vides. this has come out of the blue | in the last few minutes, a statement saying that the queen will not be carrying out of the engagements she had planned in northern ireland. she isn't feeling too well and on the advice of her doctors. the language used is, reluctantly accepted, extremely disappointed that she won't be able to go, but she is following the advice of doctors and resting at windsor castle at the moment. we have been given advice that this is not a covid—19 related issue, she hasjust been
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that this is not a covid—19 related issue, she has just been told to rest. she has had a very busy few days and she is 95 years old so we must buy that in mind. there isn't any sense of alarm here. daily her doctors have felt that she has done a number of engagements, we saw her at windsor castle with international business leaders. i was with her a week ago at windsor abbey, the first time we saw her walking with a walking stick and it was perhaps a sign that she is getting a little extra support now she is in her mid—905. she has been busy and it was kelly felt by the medical team that she should have some rest, so she will not be going to northern ireland but they are hopeful that the engagements she has around glasgow will carry on.— the engagements she has around glasgow will carry on. yesterday she turned down — glasgow will carry on. yesterday she turned down all _ glasgow will carry on. yesterday she turned down all the _ glasgow will carry on. yesterday she turned down all the of _ glasgow will carry on. yesterday she turned down all the of the _ glasgow will carry on. yesterday she turned down all the of the year - turned down all the of the year award, which i assume is an indication of more generally how she feels. iiii indication of more generally how she feels. , ., ., ., ., indication of more generally how she feels. ., ., ., ., ., feels. if you want to get a flavour of her mood. _ feels. if you want to get a flavour of her mood, that _ feels. if you want to get a flavour of her mood, that was _ feels. if you want to get a flavour of her mood, that was a - feels. if you want to get a flavour of her mood, that was a very - feels. if you want to get a flavour| of her mood, that was a very good sign, her rejection of that award
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and again, the language, reluctantly accepted the advice of her doctors. we are told she is feeling fine but she needs to rest. if we are told she is feeling fine but she needs to rest.— she needs to rest. if you're watching — she needs to rest. if you're watching on _ she needs to rest. if you're watching on bbc— she needs to rest. if you're watching on bbc two, - she needs to rest. if you're watching on bbc two, time she needs to rest. if you're i watching on bbc two, time to she needs to rest. if you're - watching on bbc two, time to say goodbye. charities have called for people with weakened immune systems to be given access to walk— in vaccination centres in the uk — so more of them can get the third doses they need to fight covid—19. the centres are reserved at the moment for boosterjabs for the over—505 and first doses for 12 to 15—year—olds, as well as flu jabs. i can discuss this further with gemma peters who's the chief executive of blood cancer uk. thank you very much forjoining pass. tell us more about what is happening with immunocompromised people in terms of who is eligible and how many are getting the maximum?— and how many are getting the maximum? �* ,, ., ., .,,
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maximum? anki for having me. people with compromised _ maximum? anki for having me. people with compromised immune _ maximum? anki for having me. people with compromised immune systems i maximum? anki for having me. people| with compromised immune systems are eligible to have a third dose of the vaccine, which is difficult —— different from a booster. that was decided in september and it is very important because people with blood cancer who have a compromised immune system both are more vulnerable to covid—19 but also, they respond less well to the vaccines so there is a growing body of evidence that tells us that a third dose to stimulate the immune system of a vaccine taken eight weeks apart can make a really significant difference for some people. it might be the first time for start producing antibodies to the vaccine so that is why it was decided at the beginning of september, that we should move fast to get people there there dose. as you know, it has been very challenging and the roll—out has not gone as we would have hoped. what gone as we would have hoped. what are the issues _ gone as we would have hoped. what are the issues as _ gone as we would have hoped. what are the issues as far _ gone as we would have hoped. what are the issues as far as _ gone as we would have hoped. what are the issues as far as you
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understand?— are the issues as far as you understand? , , ., ., understand? sadly, it is a whole lethora understand? sadly, it is a whole plethora of _ understand? sadly, it is a whole plethora of issues. _ understand? sadly, it is a whole plethora of issues. i— understand? sadly, it is a whole plethora of issues. i think - understand? sadly, it is a whole plethora of issues. i think this i plethora of issues. i think this programme of their doses was launched before the posters and one of the problems is that the booster programme and the third dose programme and the third dose programme have glided and created huge confusion, both among care professionals and among the patient community so we are hearing from patients who are being told by their gp or nurses that there isn't such a thing as a third dose and what they need is a booster. that is busily causing them a lot of anxiety, but also, we are hearing from people who have known they need it, turned up to vaccine centres, clutching a letter they have had and have been turned away or have broken down in tears. this community have had such a dreadful time during the pandemic and now this is adding to the toll for them.
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and now this is adding to the toll forthem. it and now this is adding to the toll for them. . . and now this is adding to the toll for them. , , ., , ., ., for them. it seems really odd that somethin: for them. it seems really odd that something as _ for them. it seems really odd that something as basic— for them. it seems really odd that something as basic as _ for them. it seems really odd that something as basic as that - for them. it seems really odd that something as basic as that is - something as basic as that is causing so many problems. how do you fix it and where does the responsibility for that lie? i think it is a really _ responsibility for that lie? i think it is a really simple _ responsibility for that lie? i think it is a really simple fix, - responsibility for that lie? i think it is a really simple fix, which - responsibility for that lie? i think it is a really simple fix, which is. it is a really simple fix, which is that mass vaccination centres which are currently not open to this group need to be opened up and certainly, in england, the nhs people to tell them they were eligible last week. that letter should be the passport to get the vaccine and it should be straightforward. i think that is the answer, that is what we have to do now and i wish we had done that in september when this was announced and that whole population would have had their third dose by now. we are now not in that place but we need to move to do that as quickly as possible and the responsibility for that sits with the nhs decision—makers who need to decide thatis decision—makers who need to decide that is the right way to roll it out. it that is the right way to roll it out. . . that is the right way to roll it out. , . ., , that is the right way to roll it out. , ., ., , ., that is the right way to roll it out. .. ., ,., , that is the right way to roll it out. , . ., , ., , .,, ., that is the right way to roll it out. .. ., ,., , ., ., out. it is a group of people who do feel very vulnerable. _ out. it is a group of people who do feel very vulnerable. it _ out. it is a group of people who do feel very vulnerable. it is - out. it is a group of people who do feel very vulnerable. it is always i feel very vulnerable. it is always impossible to generalise but what is
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your understanding of how people in that group are living their lives right now? have any of them gone back to anything like normal? it has been incredibly _ back to anything like normal? it has been incredibly difficult, _ back to anything like normal? it has been incredibly difficult, our- been incredibly difficult, our support line isjust been incredibly difficult, our support line is just completely overwhelmed with people who cannot go back to normal. they know they are more susceptible to coloured covid—19 will stop. it is incredibly worrying and as the rest of society moves back and abandons mask wearing and social distancing, it gets even harder for people also we have heard stories of people being pressured into going back to work and they need to do that financially for their family but actually feeling like they are putting their lives on the line. sadly, this is another thing that has not gone well for this community and i think we just need to stop and think about how is it that we protect and support this group who will not be able to go
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back to normal life until we've got really great treatments and until we have vaccines that work for them. thank you forjoining us. steve bruce is stepping down as newcastle united manager afterjust over two years in charge at st james' park. the club say he's leaving by mutual consent. his departure comes two weeks after a saudi arabian—backed consortium took over. less than two weeks after the saudi takeover the overriding emotion for me and otherfans is relieved. i have nothing against steve bruce as a man but the football we have played this season and for a while has not been good enough and this season we have not yet won a game. we are sleepwalking towards relegation to the fact he has now gone, we are hoping the club can start winning some games and escape relegation, which was a real threat. you
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some games and escape relegation, which was a real threat.— which was a real threat. you laid at all at his door, _ which was a real threat. you laid at all at his door, do _ which was a real threat. you laid at all at his door, do you? _ which was a real threat. you laid at all at his door, do you? i _ which was a real threat. you laid at all at his door, do you? i don't - which was a real threat. you laid at all at his door, do you? i don't see | all at his door, do you? i don't see an one all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else _ all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else door— all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else door we _ all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else door we can _ all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else door we can lay - all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else door we can lay it - all at his door, do you? i don't see anyone else door we can lay it at. l anyone else door we can lay it at. players on the pitch to the playing of the game but from a tactical side of the game but from a tactical side of you, there wasn't any tactics that we could see. the players looked as if they didn't know they were doing and that falls the manager's door. 50 were doing and that falls the manager's door.— were doing and that falls the manager's door. were doing and that falls the manaaer's door. ., ., , manager's door. so who would be the erson to manager's door. so who would be the person to take — manager's door. so who would be the person to take over _ manager's door. so who would be the person to take over and _ manager's door. so who would be the person to take over and turn - manager's door. so who would be the person to take over and turn things i person to take over and turn things around as far as you are concerned? there's a lot of speculation as to whom i get thejob there's a lot of speculation as to whom i get the job and there are many of those who have been touted by the bookies. i would like to see someone like the former russia government manager, i feel he can steady the ship. i just feel like he can come in and hopefully score some
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goals. we need to start winning games. goals. we need to start winning names. , . , , games. presumably with the new owners, games. presumably with the new owners. there — games. presumably with the new owners, there are _ games. presumably with the new owners, there are pretty - games. presumably with the new owners, there are pretty deep i owners, there are pretty deep pockets to attract someone who is going to be a big deal? yes. pockets to attract someone who is going to be a big deal?— going to be a big deal? yes, of course, going to be a big deal? yes, of course. we _ going to be a big deal? yes, of course, we all— going to be a big deal? yes, of course, we all know— going to be a big deal? yes, of course, we all know how - going to be a big deal? yes, of course, we all know how much | going to be a big deal? yes, of- course, we all know how much money these new owners of ours apparently have an so, getting a good manager shouldn't be too difficult but of course, those managers, a lot of them are at other clubs, so do we take one from another club? i see that as unlikely. you could mention brendan rodgers for example who is at leicester. i don't see them leaving their clubs despite the money we have. i think we will go for someone who is out of work and build the foundations at newcastle before going for a massive household name and pushing on for success in years to come. name and pushing on for success in years to come-— name and pushing on for success in years to come. thank you for “oining us. official figures show price rises dipped slightly in september as the economy continued to reopen. the increase in the cost of living, as measured by the consumer prices index,
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fell to 3.1% in september, down from 3.2% in august, according to the office for national statistics. higher prices for transport were the biggest contributor to price rises. later today, a parliamentary inquiry in brazil will present its final findings into president bolsonaro s handling of the covid—19 pandemic. according to excerpts leaked to the media, the inquiry will recommend charges including homicide against jair bolsonaro after the brazilian leader was accused of failing to control the virus that has so far killed more than 600,000 brazilians. our south america correspondent katy watson reports from sao paulo. but despite president bolsonaro's bold predictions, covid—19 wreaked havoc in brazil. there is no normalfor the hundreds
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of thousands of families who lost loved ones, and as each new grave was dug, denial at the top continued. all that the government's town and not done has been picked apart in the senate. like the collapse of the health care system in the amazon. at the beginning of this year, hospitals there were running out of oxygen, people suffocating to death. but the government was accused of underplaying the crisis, senators pointing to our report as proof the situation was worse than claimed. and then came the scandal at one of the country's largest health care providers. accused, among other things, of giving unproven drugs to elderly patients and covering up deaths of patients who died of covid—19. prevent senior, though, denies the accusations. tadeu spent four months in icu, the scars from being intubated still very visible.
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his family refused to believe his only option this palliative care, and thanks to them, he's here today. families were betrayed, tadeu tells me. they feel the weight on their conscience — but they could have done something, like my family did. it was an ideological choice made, not a medical one, with my treatment. for the senator in charge of publishing the final report, its findings are a foregone conclusion. but the process is not
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without its critics. for bolsonaro's supporters, the enquiry has been seen as biased and vengeful — but everyone agrees it's dented bolsonaro's popularity. 600,000 deaths and counting. while brazil buries the dead, crimes are still being unearthed. but it's up to federal prosecutors to take this prosecution further and punish those responsible. katie watson, bbc news, in sao paulo. at least 16 people have been killed by a bomb attack on a military bus in damascus. syrian state media says that two blasts hit the vehicle as it passed under a bridge; a third device was defused. it's the deadliest attack in the syrian capital since 2017. the syrian authorities have described it as a terrorist attack — no group has so far said
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it was responsible. just hours after the attack, the syrian army shelled a residential area in idlib province, held by rebel fighters. witnesses and rescue workers say at least 11 civilians were killed, including several school children. a study into a condition that causes extreme sickness during pregnancy has found that more than half of the women affected considered having an abortion because of their symptoms. the survey of 5,000 women with hyperemesis gravidarum is the biggest of its kind ever carried out in the uk. the condition isn't widely known, but the duchess of cambridge suffered with severe vomiting during all three of her pregnancies. professor catherine williamson is the senior author of the report.
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one in100 one in 100 women will suffer from one in 100 women will sufferfrom it during their pregnancy. those statistics that i was talking about tell a story. more than half considering terminating the pregnancy and actually, 5% of those spoken to the survey did. that really gives an indication of how awful must be?— awful must be? absolutely. the survey has _ awful must be? absolutely. the survey has illustrated _ awful must be? absolutely. the survey has illustrated how- survey has illustrated how distressing it can be for women. as you say, half of the women consider determination and some actually did terminate the pregnancy. also, about 7% of women had regular suicidal thoughts as a consequence of the condition. we found that almost 70% were bedbound, which means they were unable to perform the activities of daily living, go to work, after other children, so it can be very, very distressing. flan
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other children, so it can be very, very distressing.— other children, so it can be very, very distressing. can you describe and explain _ very distressing. can you describe and explain what _ very distressing. can you describe and explain what it _ very distressing. can you describe and explain what it is _ very distressing. can you describe and explain what it is like. - very distressing. can you describe and explain what it is like. for- and explain what it is like. for women that — and explain what it is like. fr?" women that have the condition, it comes on relatively early on in pregnancy, around seven, eight or nine weeks. often before it is apparent from looking at them that women are pregnant, and they can be absolutely affected by the condition. the nausea itself is a very debilitating symptom and some women are vomiting very, very regularly throughout the day and night, unable to get out of bed and there are other risks associated with this if you vomit a lot, some of the salts in your blood such as potassium or sodium can become low and this can cause problems with heart rhythms which can be potentially life—threatening. also severe deficiencies which can affect the way the brain works and women can be at risk from thrombosis because of dehydration, so it can be potentially very serious. it is
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incredibly important that clinicians and also the public are aware of how badly women can be affected by it. does it continue throughout the pregnancy because what is traditionally called morning sickness does not? i traditionally called morning sickness does not?- sickness does not? i would discourage _ sickness does not? i would discourage people - sickness does not? i would discourage people from i sickness does not? i would - discourage people from thinking that this condition is covered by the term, morning sickness, which is a little outdated now. this condition is a very severe condition unlike the much more common nausea of occasional vomiting that some women have in early pregnancy. this can last all day, it can be at any time of the day and one in five women have symptoms throughout the entirety of the pregnancy. others do get better towards the second half of the pregnancy is there any treatment for it? there are treatments and there is actually an excellent royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists guidelines which outline the
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treatments that have a very good safety record pregnancy. it is very important people know this because with terrible consequences of using village might years ago for vomiting in pregnancy, caused a reluctance but there are a number of drugs with very good safety data now than can be used and when used in combination, can improve the symptoms for many women with this condition. i was assuming there wasn't a treatment when you're survey shows how the people are suffering with it. it would seem from the statistics you have got don't get treatment from it. taste statistics you have got don't get treatment from it.— statistics you have got don't get treatment from it. we did find in our survey _ treatment from it. we did find in our survey that _ treatment from it. we did find in our survey that the _ treatment from it. we did find in our survey that the majority - treatment from it. we did find in our survey that the majority of i our survey that the majority of women were treated, butjust under half had to request treatment, so i think we as clinicians and researchers have work to do to educate the public and our colleagues that really can be taken to treat this condition safely. we
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still don't have the perfect drug and we definitely need more research to find better drugs, but there are drugs that can be safely. i5 to find better drugs, but there are drugs that can be safely. is it understood _ drugs that can be safely. is it understood why _ drugs that can be safely. is it understood why somebody would get it? it understood why somebody would get it? , ., ., ., understood why somebody would get it? , ., , ., understood why somebody would get it? , ., �* ., it? it is a good question. again, we have more — it? it is a good question. again, we have more to _ it? it is a good question. again, we have more to do. _ it? it is a good question. again, we have more to do. it _ it? it is a good question. again, we have more to do. it is _ it? it is a good question. again, we have more to do. it is clear - it? it is a good question. again, we have more to do. it is clear there i have more to do. it is clear there is a genetic component to the condition and we are delighted that we have just been funded by the research arm of the nhs to do a big uk genetic study where hopefully we will understand that better. but mothers and sisters of affected women have it more commonly, and there is a high recurrence rate in subsequent pregnancies. so there is definitely a genetic component. there is likely a hormonal component as well, and some conditions make women more likely to develop it. taste women more likely to develop it. we mentioned the duchess of cambridge. she had three children and i think she did sufferfrom it she had three children and i think she did suffer from it during all
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three of those pregnancies. you say there is a high risk of having it in subsequent pregnancies. does it put people off having any more babies if they have had it once? yes. people off having any more babies if they have had it once?— they have had it once? yes, it does and the results _ they have had it once? yes, it does and the results from _ they have had it once? yes, it does and the results from this _ they have had it once? yes, it does and the results from this survey i they have had it once? yes, it does| and the results from this survey are completely consistent with what i see in my own clinical practice. a sizeable proportion of women who have had it in one pregnancy are very reluctant to have subsequent pregnancies. some women request sterilisation, i have even looked at a woman who wanted to have a surrogacy because they do not feel able to have another pregnancy and this is consistent with the feeling of women wear 5% sadly terminated a wanted pregnancy because the clinical and mental health consequences of the condition can be so bad. . .. consequences of the condition can be so bad. . ~' ,, consequences of the condition can be so bad. ., ,, i. ., ., ,, ., consequences of the condition can be so bad. ., ,, ., ., ,, ., , so bad. thank you for talking to us, and a art so bad. thank you for talking to us, and a part of— so bad. thank you for talking to us, and a part of the — so bad. thank you for talking to us, and a part of the reason _ so bad. thank you for talking to us, and a part of the reason for- so bad. thank you for talking to us, and a part of the reason for the - and a part of the reason for the study, which is the largest study ever conducted, is to shine a light on something that isn't widely
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understood. that is what we're doing here right thank you. for details of organisations which offer advice and support with pregnancy related issues, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello, some of us have already seen some torrential downpours this morning and we still have heavy showers in the forecast pushing northwards and eastwards with gusty winds. the thunder risked starting to diminish through the afternoon. more heavy showers in the south—west, gusty winds through the english channel but some sunshine in southern england, much of scotland and northern ireland before this by the front sinks south of any further rain. through tonight the front will continue to sink south. we will have heavy showers towards the south—east, they will clear. colder airfollows south—east, they will clear. colder air follows on behind south—east, they will clear. colder airfollows on behind and we south—east, they will clear. colder air follows on behind and we will see some wintry nests on higher
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ground is as far south as north wales. it will be a cold night, especially the further north you travel. tomorrow we lose our front from the south, there will be more sunshine. gusty winds and deals possible, but the showers packing in and it is going to feel much colder thanit and it is going to feel much colder than it has. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... some covid restrictions must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis, according to one group of health leaders — but the government says changes aren't needed yet. if we don't take these measures, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. ministers, scientists and experts are looking at data on an hourly basis and we don't feel that it is time
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for plan b right now. the queen has cancelled a planned visit to northern ireland, after doctors advised her to rest for the next few days — buckingham palace say her majesty is in good spirits. steve bruce is out at newcastle united, with the club saying he's left by mutual consent two weeks after they were taken over by a saudi arabia backed consortium. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's austin. well, there's only one place to start and that's because in the last hour newcastle united have sacked steve bruce as manager. just 13 days after the saudi—backed takeover of the club, bruce departs after two years on tyneside. his assistant graham jones takes temporary charge... with newcastle second from bottom in the table. well, lets get more on this with our football reporter alistair macgowan...
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it is not too much of a surprise. i think steve bruce himself following the takeover of the saudi led consortium did an interview when he basically said new owners mean new managers and as you mentioned 13 days after that takeover took place, he is now left the club by mutual consent. it is one of those were if you have seen results recently in newcastle, that also points to an expectation he may leave, they have won seven of their last 38 games. second bottom of the premier league. they have not won this season in the premier league as well. the biggest indication this may come came on saturday, sorry, on sunday when the played tottenham. they lost 3—2 after having made a good start. in front of the new owners, the crowd turned on steve brewster was the end of that game asking for him to be
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sacked. in fact they were chanting you are going to get sacked in the morning. three days later, the fact that has come to pass, i don't think it was unexpected. it shows the new saudi regime that has come in has made a clear decision about how they want to go forward.— want to go forward. absolutely, they ut a want to go forward. absolutely, they put a statement _ want to go forward. absolutely, they put a statement on _ want to go forward. absolutely, they put a statement on the _ want to go forward. absolutely, they put a statement on the club - want to go forward. absolutely, they put a statement on the club website | put a statement on the club website saying the process of recruiting a new manager is already under way. how soon do you think they are going to want to have someone in place? the people i have spoken to, among the new owners, say they want to take their time and that is the position one of the part owners has been consistent about. they want to take their time and be clear and make a good analysis of all the candidates involved. there are various names that have been right for the club but a couple of the candidates that seem to be emerging i the manager who almostjoined
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tottenham hotspur last summer, and the manager who used to be at bournemouth and he would link up potentially with the likes of callum wilson, ryan fraser and matt richard to work with him at bournemouth as well. he has got a link in as well. there is a clear decision. by putting grahamjones in charge, he was and assistant that came from bournemouth, they have bought themselves a little bit of breathing space so they can make a clear decision about the next manager. they face bristol palace —— crystal palace on saturday. the biggest thing the club needs is to get results fast because the lesson they wanted to do is end up getting relegated after such a huge investment. absolutely. —— the last thing they wanted to do. investment. absolutely. -- the last thing they wanted to do.— thing they wanted to do. thanks so much. that's all the sport for now. police in nottinghamshire
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are investigating a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. emily anderson reports. zara owen is a first—year student at the university of nottingham, and hasn't been living in the city for long. she was on a night out with friends last week at pryzm nightclub, and it was here she think she was injected with a needle in her leg. i have no recollection of the nightclub, what had happened to me there, but the next morning i had an agonising pain in my leg, and i couldn't walk on it. i had a huge limp which was causing me great pain. it's still terrifying, the fact that it happened to me, and i don't know when it could have happened or where in the club or anything that happened. a spokesperson for pryzm nightclub has said, while these incidents are rare, they take all reports of this nature very seriously, and will do all they can to make sure they don't happen
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on their premises. in a separate incident at stealth nightclub on the 12th of october, a woman says she felt a pinch on the back of her arm before blacking out and being taken to hospital. she believes she was injected with a mystery liquid. stealth nightclub has said it's absolutely unacceptable for women to live in fear of being spiked by needles on a night out, and it takes reports of this nature very seriously. students at nottingham trent university held a meeting to discuss improving women's safety in the city. we have a whole initiative coming out regarding bottle stops, which at the moment are being given away for free behind most bars, and then we've got nightcaps that we are trying to invest in, so, like, scrunchies that double up as cup covers. zara says she feels apprehensive about going out in nottingham in the future, but says she won't let fear stop her from enjoying student life.
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let's speak to nadia whittome, labour mp for nottingham east. welcome and thank you very much for joining us. how do you respond to that? i joining us. how do you respond to that? ., , joining us. how do you respond to that? . , .., _ ., that? i have been contacted by a number of _ that? i have been contacted by a number of constituents - that? i have been contacted by a number of constituents who - that? i have been contacted by a number of constituents who are | number of constituents who are frankly terrified of going out because of the reports there have been of spoken incidents by injection, notjust in nottingham but across the country, in clubs. what we have to be really careful of is this conversation doesn't become one about what can women do and putting the responsibility on women. women should be able to go out freely and enjoy themselves without fear of assault, sexual or otherwise. this is part of a much wider problem of male violence from sexual harassment to rape. we need immediate measures to prevent this from happening in to deal with it when it does, but also long—term
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much deeper change because this isn't something that is going to be stopped by spiking measures and bottle tops. if we don't deal with the cultural problem of misogyny, then this is going to keep happening. then this is going to keep happening-— then this is going to keep haueninu. ., ., ., happening. how do you deal with that? it is... — happening. how do you deal with that? it is... when _ happening. how do you deal with that? it is... when you _ happening. how do you deal with that? it is... when you say - happening. how do you deal with that? it is... when you say it - happening. how do you deal with that? it is... when you say it is i that? it is... when you say it is important it doesn't become a conversation around what can women do, the thing that is so frightening for women with this is that there is very little that anyone can do to protect themselves and their situation. it really does need to be a conversation around how to stop anybody getting this sort of stuff into a club and being able to administer it. what is the answer to that? .,. , administer it. what is the answer to that? .. , , administer it. what is the answer to that? , , , i. that? exactly, it is very difficult at this stage — that? exactly, it is very difficult at this stage to _ that? exactly, it is very difficult at this stage to know _ that? exactly, it is very difficult at this stage to know what - that? exactly, it is very difficult at this stage to know what the l at this stage to know what the solutions are. i think we have an idea of what the solutions are not.
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after sarah everard in particular trusting the police —— trust in the police is an all—time low. it has been shattered and police officers and club is not going to be a shot women. i have written to the police and crime commissioner in nottinghamshire to request an urgent update on actions being taken, and i've also met with nottingham's women's centre and i am organising a meeting with the women's centre, campaigning groups in nottingham, student unions, students and other women who are extremely worried for their safety. and from that meeting, we will have a set of demands to take to the home secretary and take to the police about what they should be doing. in a to the police about what they should be doinu. . , to the police about what they should be doini . ., , ., to the police about what they should be doini. . ., ., be doing. in a few days, an online etition be doing. in a few days, an online petition to — be doing. in a few days, an online petition to make _ be doing. in a few days, an online petition to make it _ be doing. in a few days, an online petition to make it a _ be doing. in a few days, an online petition to make it a legal- petition to make it a legal requirement for nightclubs to thoroughly search guests on entry has got over hundred and 26,000 signatures. that means it would now
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be considered by parliament for a debate because it has gone over the threshold necessary for that very quickly. is that something labour might get behind? making that a legal requirement for nightclubs? this should be debated in parliament. it is one of a number of things that should be considered. i am keen not to... look, this has been happening in the past two weeks and i don't want to come on and speak on behalf or speak other women who have experienced this. i think the solutions need to come with their involvement. and that is really important where people have been... had their consent and bodies violated to be part of deciding what the solutions should be. but that is one possibility. you the solutions should be. but that is one possibility-— one possibility. you said you have been contacted _ one possibility. you said you have been contacted by _ one possibility. you said you have been contacted by a _ one possibility. you said you have been contacted by a number - one possibility. you said you have been contacted by a number of i been contacted by a number of constituents who are concerned. have
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you been contacted by people who have been injected and spiked? do they know what has even happened to them because in this situation people blacked out and they don't know? i people blacked out and they don't know? . . people blacked out and they don't know? . , .., _ people blacked out and they don't know? . , .., ,, ., know? i have been contacted by one erson know? i have been contacted by one person who — know? i have been contacted by one person who has _ know? i have been contacted by one person who has been _ know? i have been contacted by one person who has been injected - know? i have been contacted by one person who has been injected or- person who has been injected or suspects being injected, and numerous other people who have either witnessed it or are extremely worried about their own safety. the point about knowing whether this has happened to you is an important one because one of the problems is people being able to quickly access collecting evidence by a blood sample or a you're in sample. that is something that needs to be urgently locked at. people being able to collect evidence properly and quickly, so that an investigation can happen.
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and quickly, so that an investiuation can ha en. . .. investigation can happen. thank you ve much investigation can happen. thank you very much for— investigation can happen. thank you very much forjoining _ investigation can happen. thank you very much forjoining us. _ do get in touch on twitter, you can get in touch directly, if you have had any experience of that. it's three months since thousands of afghans were forced to flee their country and make a new home in the uk but many are still living in hotels that were meant to be temporary. it means they don't have access tojobs, proper healthcare or education as our home editor, mark easton has been finding out. a budget hotel in buckinghamshire is currently home to 160 afghan migrants, mostly children. and after more than two months stuck there, it's the children who often find it hardest. a local primary has offered educational support, but the authorities discourage such arrangements, and that is a source of frustration. my wife and seven children, it's very difficult for us. nazeer�*s children missed a lot of school in afghanistan.
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and after more than two months stuck in uk hotels, he's desperate to get them back into a classroom. i think the permanent education system is not available at the moment. and we are very keen and really trust the government to sort out as soon as possible. finding a suitable accommodation for large families is a huge challenge. there are fears some may be in what are called bridging hotels for many months yet. local charities help, but stuck in institutional limbo it seems even basic safeguarding is not always there. we visited some families here that have been in the country for three weeks. and children had unseen bullet holes in their legs, so we were able to muster support, get people to a local walk—in surgery. that's great, but it shouldn't be down to you! that surely is something that should have been spotted? i agree with you. but rather than complain about it, i think i can do something. heads, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes. heads, shoulders...
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in south london one school has found a way to get afghan children out of a local hotel and into class. after meeting a desperate migrant dad, the head at walworth academy realised that if afghan parents applied for an available place, her school was legally bound to take them. so off we went down to that hotel and quite literally sat in the lobby with a gentleman talking to him, which meant that more people and more people kept coming up, and by the next day we got a telephone call here saying, "oh, i understand you've been to this hotel. could you come down and see us? we are really interested in school places". we are so worried we can't go outside. we just work on internet. these three girls, all evacuated from kabul with their families as the taliban seized control, are thrilled to be in school at last. i'm so happy because i love education. our mind is fresh. we get more friends in here. it's too comfortable, it's too good for us. when you approached the home office
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and the department of education, what was the reaction to your offer of places? i think it was just a bit too early in their process. so they turned you down, essentially? they didn't turn us down directly. the education department says it is funding extra school places for afghans and trying to get children into classrooms as soon as possible. but the question is whether the government should be doing more to support the children now. mark easton, bbc news. with me now is matt simmons, afghanistan veteran and founder of emsliafghans — a community—based organisation that provides a taskforce to support other agencies and afghan refugees. thank you forjoining us. that phrase institutional limbo is not a nice one but we were seeing in our report the consequences of that and what it means. what is your
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experience of that? it what it means. what is your experience of that?- what it means. what is your experience of that? it is echoing what has been _ experience of that? it is echoing what has been said _ experience of that? it is echoing what has been said in _ experience of that? it is echoing what has been said in your - experience of that? it is echoing i what has been said in your report, we are finding exactly the same. it was a mammoth task to get them out of the country and they are now in hotels. there does seem to be gaps in certain places and these gaps are where organisations such as ours can fill. there is going to be concerns about safeguarding and security, and those boundaries out there, and they should be there. i started up being a veteran with a sense of connection to afghanistan and there are other agencies out there, and it is about being proactive in getting inside to provide the support we can. it is a volunteering _ provide the support we can. it is a volunteering organisation, - provide the support we can. it is a volunteering organisation, you i provide the support we can. it is a volunteering organisation, you talk about the gaps that need to be filled by organisations like yours. why is the system... i suppose it is
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too big a question. why are people falling through the cracks like that? i falling through the cracks like that? 4' falling through the cracks like that? ~ , ., that? ithink it is overwhelmed. it wasn't set — that? ithink it is overwhelmed. it wasn't set up _ that? ithink it is overwhelmed. it wasn't set up to — that? ithink it is overwhelmed. it wasn't set up to take _ that? ithink it is overwhelmed. it wasn't set up to take this - that? ithink it is overwhelmed. it wasn't set up to take this amount | l that? i think it is overwhelmed. it| wasn't set up to take this amount of people in. we have tried to mobilise fast and go through the steps and
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think steps ahead of how we can provide the support, and others are doing the same as well but it is a huge task. the hotels i have visited, hotel is a 500 people, when we visited on saturday has got 1200 people in it. we have got little hotels that have got seven or eight families, so it needs some collaboration between government and local authorities and between agencies such as ours and organisations. between agencies such as ours and organisations-— between agencies such as ours and organisations. what are you seeing in terms of — organisations. what are you seeing in terms of mood? _ organisations. what are you seeing in terms of mood? because - organisations. what are you seeing in terms of mood? because there i organisations. what are you seeing - in terms of mood? because there must be enormous relief to have left what they left behind. i imagine feelings have changed quite quickly when you stuck somewhere and don't realise what the future is for you. that stuck somewhere and don't realise what the future is for you.- what the future is for you. that is it, we what the future is for you. that is it. we are — what the future is for you. that is it, we are seeing _ what the future is for you. that is it, we are seeing frustration - it, we are seeing frustration because that communication is not filtering through. it is very difficult and you can see the uplift is and as we come into a hotel, i think it is having that human interaction and of course when there is 1200 people and everyone have got their own jobs within the hotel, you can see the morale when we did go inside and we can actually spend some time with them. i had taken my daughter in with us and she has played with afghan children. it is really heart—warming when we do go in, but you can sense frustration there. . . in, but you can sense frustration there. , ., ., ., . there. there is that overarching resettlement _ there. there is that overarching resettlement scheme _ there. there is that overarching resettlement scheme that - there. there is that overarching | resettlement scheme that these afghans are part of, the run by the
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home office, that brings specific funding to look after them and find somewhere for them to resettle, and it could be anywhere in the uk. i have seen reports of some afghans getting so frustrated actually that they are opting out of that and leaving the hotels, they are saying they are homeless in order to try and get emergency housing support. is that something you are seeing? i haven't seen any of that. or experienced any of that. all i can say is that it is down to the local authorities to find them housing, and of course there is a housing shortage anyway, so it is going to be a long time that afghans are within hotels, and we are going to continue providing the support and there is other agencies looking at getting them into employment. we are looking at education resources we can provide inside the hotel. one of
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them is a buddy box that has been designed by mark l. we are trying to provide the right support in hotels because it is going to be a long time. . .. because it is going to be a long time. . ~' ,, because it is going to be a long time. . «i i. because it is going to be a long time. . «i . ., because it is going to be a long time. . . ., ., time. thank you so much for “oining us. buckingham palace says the queen has cancelled a trip to northern ireland and has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest for the next few days. the queen, who's 95, is said to be in good spirits but disappointed. the trip was due to last two days and scheduled to take place today and tomorrow. i'm joined now by royal commentator by royal commentator richard fitzwilliams. the statement accompanying the council to visit is a fairly upbeat one. what are your thoughts? yen; one. what are your thoughts? very clearl the one. what are your thoughts? very clearly the queen _ one. what are your thoughts? - clearly the queen herself who hates disappointing others is very reluctant not to go, but obviously it appears just precautionary and it
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seems she has been advised by her doctors that a period of rest is important. it is a very difficult balance and the palace have managed so well in recent years, the queen is a role model for those of advanced age. it is a matter of balancing commitments. in this case, i think we can be very thankful that it is an upbeat statement. there is no link with the covid and it doesn't seem the queen is unwell. it is merely a matter of balancing things, especially with the cop26 summit looming up so soon at the end of the month. in summit looming up so soon at the end of the month-— of the month. in general, how is her health and how _ of the month. in general, how is her health and how busy _ of the month. in general, how is her health and how busy is _ of the month. in general, how is her health and how busy is she? - of the month. in general, how is her health and how busy is she? in - health and how busy is she? i�*i general, the queen is extraordinarily robust. on tuesday
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she hosted a glittering reception for top business leaders. she has been receiving ambassadors by video link and also in person, and as we know, it is so important she has opened the scottish and welsh parliaments recently. she has been increasing her activities, that is what she wants to do and with the pandemic having receded in recent months, this is what she has been able to do. obviously, there is clearly some concern of anyone of an advanced age when they are advised that they ought to rest, but the tone of the statement leads me to believe it is simply a precautionary matter and most hopefully matus will be resolved very, very soon and we will be seeing the queen... emin, she was a of course when she was
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using a walking stick and a couple of occasions —— she was seen. this attracted some comment, but i think it is a matter of balancing. she hasn't gone on long hard fight since the end of 2015, she has been using lefts not stares recently. it is a matter of adjusting to fit the activities of the worlds's most high—profile head of state who is of quest 95. i high-profile head of state who is of quest 95. .. . high-profile head of state who is of quest 95. ~' . , , high-profile head of state who is of quest 95. .. . , . . quest 95. i like that yesterday she olitel , quest 95. i like that yesterday she politely. we _ quest 95. i like that yesterday she politely. we are — quest 95. i like that yesterday she politely, we are told, _ quest 95. i like that yesterday she politely, we are told, turned - quest 95. i like that yesterday she politely, we are told, turned down j politely, we are told, turned down the offer to be all the other year because she says that 95 she does not feel she is the most worthy recipient of it because she says you are only as old as you feel. that recipient of it because she says you are only as old as you feel.- are only as old as you feel. that is are only as old as you feel. that is a wonderful— are only as old as you feel. that is a wonderful and _ are only as old as you feel. that is a wonderful and the _ are only as old as you feel. that is a wonderful and the queen - are only as old as you feel. that is a wonderful and the queen has i a wonderful and the queen has famously said i must seem to be believed, and i speakfor famously said i must seem to be believed, and i speak for everybody when i say we look forward very much indeed to seeing her performing her
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duties as she would wish, which she has done so brilliantly in a rain that has lasted so many decades. there is no question at all, i am sure she, as her late husband would have wanted, is looking forward to being back. and also on the schedules, so far as soon as she possibly can. cop26 is tremendously important and i have a feeling this might be linked to that. and therefore a purely precautionary. thank you so much forjoining us. we're just hearing the health secretary is going to be holding a press conference later this afternoon. it sounds like return to those daily briefings on the state of covid. that is going to be a press conference later this afternoon, in
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the few minutes we will have prime ministers questions. let stuck to our political correspondent. just a quick thought. on the news conference later this afternoon on covid. . . . conference later this afternoon on covid. ,, ., . covid. this is “ust announced. the health covid. this isjust announced. the health secretary _ covid. this isjust announced. the health secretary will _ covid. this isjust announced. the health secretary will be _ covid. this isjust announced. the health secretary will be talking, i health secretary will be talking, not quite sure what the exact reason for that is, but we note today we have had figures in the nhs in england coming out, calling for measures to be taken, more measures to prevent the spread of covid, worried about the impact on the nhs. the growing case numbers, impact on being able to perform other treatments, impact on nhs call handlers, ambulance services and saying they really want things like mask wearing and that such a thing to come in, so we will see. it may well be that is about the need to keep up with that boosterjab campaign. we will see. that certainly is one of the issues of concern at the minute for the
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government. concern at the minute for the government-— concern at the minute for the government. prime ministers questions _ government. prime ministers questions about _ government. prime ministers questions about to _ government. prime ministers questions about to begin, - government. prime ministers - questions about to begin, looking inside the chamber. the prime minister is not there yet. what are you expecting today? it is minister is not there yet. what are you expecting today?— you expecting today? it is an open da . you expecting today? it is an open day- there — you expecting today? it is an open day- there is _ you expecting today? it is an open day. there is nhs _ you expecting today? it is an open day. there is nhs issues - you expecting today? it is an open day. there is nhs issues in - you expecting today? it is an open day. there is nhs issues in the i day. there is nhs issues in the background, where we are with the pandemic, quite high numbers we have seeing an concern within the nhs, does comes in the wake of the killing of sir david a miss. —— amess. and questions rising about the security of mps, and online issues. they may well figure as well, so that might be something that mps well, so that might be something that mp5 or the opposition leader sir keir starmer chooses look into as well. it sir keir starmer chooses look into as well. . . ,., . .. sir keir starmer chooses look into as well. , . . ,, ., , sir keir starmer chooses look into as well. , . ., , ,, as well. it is a packed house. still no sin as well. it is a packed house. still no sign of — as well. it is a packed house. still no sign of the _ as well. it is a packed house. still no sign of the prime _ as well. it is a packed house. still no sign of the prime minister. -
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as well. it is a packed house. still no sign of the prime minister. i i as well. it is a packed house. still. no sign of the prime minister. i am hearing that this is the last question, i think, hearing that this is the last question, ithink, that hearing that this is the last question, i think, that isjust being answered. the speaker is on his feet, let us listen in as the prime minister makes his way into the chamber. we now start with questions. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others will stop i shall have a further such meetings later today. david amess and james brokenshire were both tragically taken from us. both served in this place with integrity and served their constituents well. as we offer our heartfelt love and prayers to their families, theirfamilies have families, their families have offered families, theirfamilies have offered as a new path to a new politics, built on kindness and love. mr speaker, sarah everard and
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claudia lawrence were both from york. right now, women are filling and safe. many women are unsafe and the very people that should be protecting us are telling as to engage with potential perpetrators to identify them, to flag down a bus or know the laws of arrest better. confidence in the police has taken its toll. as women, we are confident and determined to change this. so that every girl and every woman can live at home without fear, can go to school or work without harassment, can go online without objectification and can walk our streets safely again. what steps were the prime minister take to ensure women can lead on this work and by when? i think are very much for her question and she raises a most important issue, one of the most important issue, one of the most important that this country faces. i want all people in this country, particularly women, to feel
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confident in our police force and i believe they can and that they should. what we are doing now to ensure women can feel safe. i think the whole house understands is to ensure that we deal with the systemic problems in the kernel justice system to ensure that men get prosecuted for rape and primes of serious sexual and domestic violence in the way that they should and that we secure the conviction is that we should, mr speaker, and that when we secure those convictions, those individuals get the tough sentencing that they deserve. that is what the side of the house believes in. having a prematurely born child in intensive care means for families everyday can be a struggle, practically, financially and
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emotionally. trying to continue with life as normal while wracked with worry and guilt that never leaves you isjust worry and guilt that never leaves you is just not possible. that is why the prime minister because my commitment to deliver pay for parents in the situation is so important. when the prime ministers meet with me to discuss how quickly we can put this through parliament so parents are getting the support as quickly as possible? mrs bigger, i will make sure _ as quickly as possible? mrs bigger, i will make sure my _ as quickly as possible? mrs bigger, i will make sure my honourable - i will make sure my honourable friend has the relevant meeting as fast as we can organise it. i know that many parents, particularly those who have premature and sick babies, feel that the current system is not working well for them and thatis is not working well for them and that is why i can tell my honourable friend that we will legislate to allow parents of children in neonatal care to take extended leave. details of this policy were published last year and we will bring forward the legislation as soon as possible. can i pay tribute to ernie ross, a
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formidable campaigner who served this place with great distinction for three decades. mr speaker, this place with great distinction forthree decades. mr speaker, i will pay my respects and tribute to james brokenshire imagery after this. can i thank the whole house for the way the tribute to sir david amess were handled on monday? we saw the best of this house and i want to see if we can use that colour to spirit to make progress on one of theissues spirit to make progress on one of the issues that was raised on monday, tackling violent extremism. it is three years since the government promised an online safety bill. but it is not yet before the house. meanwhile, the damage caused by harmful content online is worse than ever. dangerous algorithms on facebook and instagram and hope not hate has shown me an example of violent extremism and propaganda on tick—tock. what i was shown has been reported to the moderators but it
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stayed online because apparently, it did not contravene the guidelines. i find it hard to believe. will the prime minister build on the desire shown by this house on monday to get things done and committed to bring forward the second reading of the online safety bill by the end of this calendar year? if he does, we will support it. i think the right honourable gentleman for the spirit in which he is approaching this issue and i what he says about the need for cooperation across the house because the safety of mps, indeed of all public servants is a vital importance in the online safety bill is of huge importance, it is one of the most important tools in our armoury. what we are doing is ensuring that we crackdown on companies that promote illegal and dangerous content and we will be
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toughening up those provisions but mr speaker, what we are also going to do is ensure that the online safety bill does complete its stages before this house before christmas and i delighted, or rather we do bring it forward before christmas in the way he suggests, and i delighted, mr speaker, that he is offering his support and we look forward to that. i thank the prime minister. i think from that, this isjust i thank the prime minister. i think from that, this is just a i thank the prime minister. i think from that, this isjust a challenge, that this scrutiny will be finished in early december and at the second reading could be before the end of this calendar year. but we do need to get on with this. telegram has been described as the app of choice for extremists and mr speaker, if you can believe it, as we were paying tribute to sir david amess on
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monday, telegram users could access videos of murders and violent threats against politicians, the lgbt community, women and choose, as we were paying our respects. some of these posts are illegal. all of them are harmful and hope not hate have said that telegram has facilitated a subculture that cheerleaders are terrorists. tough sanctions are clearly needed, yet under the government has my current proposals, directors of platforms failing to crackdown on extremism would still not face kernel functions. why is that? this government has put forward an online bill and he has heard what i have said about the second reading before christmas and in the spirit in which he announced he began his
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questioning, i can tell him we will continue to look at ways in which we can toughen up those provisions and to come down hard on those who irresponsibly allow dangerous and extremist content to permeate the intranet. but mr speaker, and i am delighted that he is taking this new top line and i very much hope that he will get the rest of his party in the lobbies with us to join him. i did start in the collegiate spirit and i will continue in a collegiate spread because i listened harder to what was being said on the opposite benches on monday about the concerns about this issue. we do need to recognise the measures in the bill but we do need tough and effective sanctions and that means criminal sanctions and that means criminal sanctions and that does matter, mr speaker. it is frankly beyond belief that as the mirror reported
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yesterday, lio hours of hateful content could be easily accessed online. the prime minster and the government could stop this by making it clear that directors of companies are criminally liable for failing to tackle this type of material on their sites. we don't need to delay so in the club to spirit we saw in this house on monday, will the prime minister commit to taking this away, looking at it again and working with all of us to strengthen his proposed legislation? i have already said that we are willing to look at anything to strengthen the legislation. i have said we are willing to bring it forward and we will bring it forward to second reading for christmas and yes of course, mr speaker, we will have a criminal sanctions with tough sentences for those who are responsible for allowing this foul content to permeate the intranet. but what we hope for also is that no matter how top the proposals we just, the opposition will support
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it. we are making progress, we have second reading committed to before christmas, that is a good thing and i think the prime minister is now committed to criminal sanctions. at the moment there are the position that aggression. if we are making progress on that, we are beginning to address some of the issues that were identified on the house on monday. can i turn to the report the commission for countering extremism which was setup in commission for countering extremism which was set up in the wake of commission for countering extremism which was setup in the wake of the manchester bombing. eight months ago, that commission made recommendations to plug gaps in existing legislation of strategy. gaps that extremists have been able to exploit and are continuing to exploit. yet the former head of our counterterrorism police who led those recommendations suggest this week, i have had no feedback from the home office of their plans in relation to our report on the
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absence of a coherent, legal framework to tackle extremism. given the seriousness of the matter and the seriousness of the matter and the clear need for action, why has the clear need for action, why has the government not responded to this important work and when the prime minister now commit to act swiftly on the commission's recommendations? mr speaker, the government and the home secretary work with all parties to tackle violent extremism in the uk has one of the strongest counterterrorism and counter extremism systems in the world as a consequence of which, we have foiled 31 terrorist plots is internally 17 and i pay tribute to the work of sir mark who i worked closely within london and all those who are involved in foiling those terrorist plots. i can tell you that they will receive the complete support of this house and of this government and nor will we allow them to be released of those who are convicted to be released early from prison. that was
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one of the most important things this government passed and which that party opposed. really? after the week we have just had, i really don't want to see that kind of knock—about. either we take this seriously, and i am taking my lead from those on the opposite benches on monday and what they were saying about the need to tackle this, eitherwe saying about the need to tackle this, either we take it seriously and pull together or we do a disservice to those we paid tribute to. there are clearly problems with the government's counter extremism strategy. internet users are increasingly likely to come across extremist content online. the government's own independent reviewer has said there is no evidence that the government's key the radicalisation programme is
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affected. we have seen a spate of lone attacker killings with the perpetrator invariably radicalised online. we all want to stop this across this house but at the moment, things are getting worse, not better, so what urgent plans does the prime is to have it to fix these glaring problems? mr the prime is to have it to fix these glaring problems?— the prime is to have it to fix these glaring problems? mr speaker, i am all in favour — glaring problems? mr speaker, i am all in favour of _ glaring problems? mr speaker, i am all in favour of collegiate _ glaring problems? mr speaker, i am all in favour of collegiate and - all in favour of collegiate and cooperative approach, in which case, i think it would be a fine thing if the opposition would withdraw their opposition to our measures to stop the early release of serious extremist and violent offenders. that's all i am trying to say. in a collegiate approach, and i'm sure thatis collegiate approach, and i'm sure that is what the people of this country would wish to see, but we will continue to do everything we can to strengthen our counterterrorism operation and to support all those who are involved in as safe. obviously it is too early to draw any particular
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conclusions from the appalling killing of our colleague but we will draw all militant conclusions from that investigation. the inescapable desire of this house on monday to find tom down on extremism, the hate and the abuse that festers online is incredibly welcome. but closing down anonymous accounts would not have prevented the murder ofjo cox, nor of pc keith palmer, and although we don't know the full circumstances, nor would it have saved search david amess. if we are to get serious about stopping violent attacks, we need to stop online spaces being safe spaces for terrorists. we need to ensure that unaccountable, arrogant social media companies take responsibility for their platforms. we need to end the delays, get on with the legislation and clean out the cesspit once and for all. mr
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speaker, i prosecuted terrorists and i have prosecuted extremists. i have worked with sir mark and others. we have worked hard on tackling social media companies on these issues. i started collegiate league and i will continue collegiate league, we know what it takes, we can help, so will the prime minister now capture the spread that we have seen this week and agreed to work with us now on a cross—party basis so that we can tackle violent extremism and its enablers together? mr speaker, iam enablers together? mr speaker, i am delighted tojoin the right honourable gentleman in committing to tackling online harms together, to tackling violent extremism together and that is what the government is doing and that is why we brought forward the online harms bill. that is why we are investing a record sum in tackling counterterrorism. but mr speaker, i must say that what i think the whole country and the whole house would
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certainly want to see in addition, if i can say this to the right honourable friend in a collegiate spirit, in addition is a commitment by the labour party in future to support measures and not to allow the early release of those terrorists and those convicted of those offences from a prison. if i hear that from the labour party, i think it would be a fine thing. mr speaker, knowing my right honourable friend's mr speaker, knowing my right honourable friends a commitment and his understanding of the exciting potential for improving his understanding of the exciting potentialfor improving mental potential for improving mental health potentialfor improving mental health treatments for conditions such as depression, trauma and addiction, will he cut through the current barriers to research into compounds so that british public receive and british science research and british pharmaceutical companies enable the potential treatments into these most debilitating conditions to be delivered at the earliest possible opportunity?
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i think my honourable friend, i know he has a very active interest in this area. what i can say to him is that we will consider the advisory council on the misuse of drugs recent advice on reducing barriers to research with controlled drugs and we will be getting back to him as soon as possible. can ijoin with the leader of the opposition and sending condolences to the family of david amess. in 11 days, world leaders will gather in glasgow for cop26. this is our best chance and very likely our last chance and very likely our last chance to confront the climate emergency. that is why it was such a devastating blow that on the eve of cop26, uk government rejected the scottish clusters bid to gain one track status. today's journal has
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said there is no valid reason and no acceptable excuse for this decision and have called for a u—turn on this colossal mistake imagery. we know this decision was not made on a technical logical grounds, this devastating decision was purely clinical. scotland's north—east was a promise this investment in 2014. it is a promise that has been broken time and time again so, mr speaker, when the prime ministerfinally live up when the prime ministerfinally live up to those promises or does he think they are simply not worth the leaflets they are written on? we remain absolutely committed to helping industrial clusters across the whole of the country and of course including scotland and i know that there was disappointment about the acorn bid in aberdeen and that is why it has been selected as a reserve cluster but there can be no
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more vivid testimony to this government's commitment to scotland or indeed fighting climate change than the whole world is about to come to scotland, mr speaker, to look at what scotland is doing to help tackle climate change and i congratulate the people of scotland on their efforts.— on their efforts. people across scotland are — on their efforts. people across scotland are looking _ on their efforts. people across scotland are looking for - on their efforts. people across i scotland are looking for answers today and they are getting none. all they see is yet another tory broken promise. it is bad enough that this uk government is holding back carbon capture in scotland but across—the—board they are proving a barrier stop tidal stream energy has the potential to generate 20% of uk generation capacity, exactly the same as nuclear. all this industry needsis same as nuclear. all this industry needs is a ring fenced budget of £71 million, a drop in the ocean, compared to the £23 billion that this government is throwing at the
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nuclear plants but the uk government are failing to give their support, threatening projects like hm in northern scotland, so at the very least, today, stand up and guarantee a ring fenced budget for tidal stream energy and save this renewable industry from being lost overseas. mr speaker, i congratulate the right honourable gentleman on raising tidal energy. he is absolutely right. i have seen the amazing projects that are under way and we are certainly looking at, we are putting huge sums into clean and green energy generation and he is far to gloomy, mr speaker, about the prospects of acorn in aberdeen. i thinking needs to be seized within unaccustomed spirit of optimism because actually, the acorn project still has strong potential and that is why it has been selected as a
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reserve cluster, and he should not spread gloom in the heat. this alwa s a spread gloom in the heat. this always a pleasure _ spread gloom in the heat. this always a pleasure to _ spread gloom in the heat. t�*i 3 always a pleasure to follow the honourable man, the new quiet man of politics and long may it continue! the weekend before last i went to see with the brixton trollers and the fish market is now turning over £1.4 a week. they are looking forward to their share of the levelling up a fund but also to the previously announced £100 million fishery scheme. when will we see that launched under the prime minister reaffirmed his commitment to our coastal and our fishing sector? i to our coastal and our fishing sector? .. , to our coastal and our fishing sector? ~' , ., ., sector? i think my other friend for what he is — sector? i think my other friend for what he is doing _ sector? i think my other friend for what he is doing for— sector? i think my other friend for what he is doing for fishing - sector? i think my other friend for what he is doing for fishing and i sector? i think my other friend for| what he is doing for fishing and for the coastal communities fund books and in particular. i understand the fish market in brixton was outstandingly successful the other day. what we are going to do is make sure we continue to support fishing
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and seafood businesses across the country and the scheme has proved funding and a further £100 million is being made available through the uk seafood fund to support our fisheries. if cop26 fisheries. if c0 p26 is fisheries. if cop26 is to be successful, people must be at the heart of our net zero emissions. fortoo must be at the heart of our net zero emissions. for too long, the uk economy has left too many people behind. with wealth, and investment. devolving powers over the crown estate would bring half £1 billion worth of offshore wind and tidal stream potential under welsh control. assets of course currently controlled by westminster. scotland meanwhile already has these powers. will he support my bill to devolve the management of the crown estate to wales? ~ ~ ,,, ., ,, .,, ,
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to wales? well, mr speaker, as she already knows. _ to wales? well, mr speaker, as she already knows, the _ to wales? well, mr speaker, as she already knows, the crown _ to wales? well, mr speaker, as she already knows, the crown works - already knows, the crown works closely with the welsh government and with natural resources in wales and with natural resources in wales and i sorry to have to tell her that my view is that the crown estate in wales, the devolution of the estate would fragment the berkut and complicate existing processes and make it more difficult for wales to move forward jeanette zero. delivering new homes is key to levelling up, as is putting that power in the hands of local people and making sure that we build the right number in the right places. my constituents are concerned about over intensive developments in our local plant. will the prime minister confirmed that the minimum housing requirement is 4896 and another 10,000 as claimed by the labour run council? i’m
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10,000 as claimed by the labour run council? �* ., , , , ., council? i'm not surprised to say that my honourable _ council? i'm not surprised to say that my honourable friend - council? i'm not surprised to say that my honourable friend is - that my honourable friend is completely right. this government is determined to give the people of this country the homes they need. we are building record numbers of homes but we are with two hour kinder, gentler politics to be accurate about what is going on and this government does not set local housing targets and i understand that the draft plan is subject to consultation. i encourage him and his constituents to make their views known. mr his constituents to make their views known. ~ ,,, ., ,, his constituents to make their views known. ~ .«i ., ., ., his constituents to make their views known. ~ ., ., ., ., known. mr speaker, tomorrow at 2:50 - m, known. mr speaker, tomorrow at 2:50pm. my _ known. mr speaker, tomorrow at 2:50pm, my constituency - known. mr speaker, tomorrow at 2:50pm, my constituency wilful i 2:50pm, my constituency wilful silent as we mark exactly 50 years since scotland's largest peacetime explosion ripped through the area. ten shops were demolished by the ignition of gas which had escaped from a fractured gas main in either shops. a passing bus was caught up in the blast. 22 people died, mostly
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women, and over 100 were injured. tomorrow, 50 years on, community and families will come together for a memorial service. will the prime minister joined memorial service. will the prime ministerjoined me in acknowledging the terrible losses that many families locally suffered and the continuing sorrow in the community and in reflecting the victims of the disaster must never be forgotten. i think the honour lady for her raising this anniversary and she is right to commemorate the victims of the disaster and our thoughts and our condolences continue to be with the families of those who lost loved ones and of course we must everything in our power to make sure that no such tragedy is repeated. the fillings of greater manchester police which have led to it being placed in special measures are well documented. including the failure to record 80,000 crimes in a single
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year and those included domestic violence and sexual offences but it is important that the force addresses what a recent manchester evening news investigation called its culture of denial and secrecy. after the horrific murder of sarah everard, it is crucial that we tackle the corrupt culture. will my right honourable friend, the prime minister, thereforejoin me and calling for greater manchester police to urgently review its internal culture and also, will he consider reforming the law of whistle—blowing so people in greater manchester police and other organisations can speak up against wrongdoing in confidence with mark yes, it is vital that people should have the confidence to speak up against wrongdoing where ever they find it, particularly in the police. i do believe that the people of greater manchester deserve better stop i support and agree with what she says. i will say one thing, it is the responsibility of the mayor
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of greater manchester to ensure that the police force acts to ensure that the police force acts to ensure that the police force acts to ensure that the police act swiftly to address the police act swiftly to address the failures that his constituents are currently finding. i would like tojoin are currently finding. i would like to join colleagues are currently finding. i would like tojoin colleagues in paying tribute to the honourable member for southend—on—sea. paying tribute to the honourable memberfor southend—on—sea. he paying tribute to the honourable member for southend—on—sea. he was a good friend and an esteemed parliamentarian. i also wish to pay tribute to the right honourable member who served this house and country and will be missed by members across the house. mr speaker, heating bills, food shops and fuel costs are all rising at a staggering speed. this winter, millions of families on universal credit will be forced to choose between eating or heating. given the
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crisis in living costs we are now facing, will the prime minister reconsider his scrapping of the universal credit uplift and reinstate the £20 a week lifeline he has just taken away? mr reinstate the £20 a week lifeline he has just taken away?— has just taken away? mr speaker, what we are _ has just taken away? mr speaker, what we are doing _ has just taken away? mr speaker, what we are doing is _ has just taken away? mr speaker, what we are doing is ensuring - has just taken away? mr speaker, | what we are doing is ensuring that we keep costs of heating down with the price cap, that we put, we've increased the warm homes allowance by 150,000, £150 for many homes and we havejust given by 150,000, £150 for many homes and we have just given local councils and other half £1 billion to help herfamilies over the and other half £1 billion to help her families over the winter. the most important thing that is happening in this country is that wages are going up. there is a huge jobs boom now in this country, thanks to the policies of this government has pursued.
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iam sure i am sure my right honourable friend would agree that homeless people should be assisted are not arrested. the review of the repeal of the vacancy act 1824 has now been concluded. does my right honourable friend agree with me that it is now time the amendments to the police crime sentencing and courts bill, which have been considered in the other place, should be adopted so we can consign the vacancy act to the history books forever, but give the police they need the powers they need to combat trespass, anti—social behaviour and aggressive begging? mi; behaviour and aggressive begging? my unable friend as a passionate campaigner on this issue and he has done a lot of good things in this area —— my honourable friend. no one should be criticised for having nowhere to live and i think the time has come to be considered the vagrancy act but to redouble our efforts to fight homelessness, as i think we have done successfully over
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the pandemic, and we must continue to do. . , the pandemic, and we must continue todo. _ ., , to do. university hospitals coventry and warwickshire _ to do. university hospitals coventry and warwickshire nhs _ to do. university hospitals coventry and warwickshire nhs trust - to do. university hospitals coventry and warwickshire nhs trust has - to do. university hospitals coventry i and warwickshire nhs trust has dealt with more than 600 attacks on staff during the pandemic. to deter further attacks, staff in the hospital a&e department are now wearing body cameras. it is simply not right that doctors and nurses should have to go to such lengths just to feel safe at work. well the prime ministerjoined me in condemning those abhorrent attacks and say what immediate steps he will take to better protect our nhs heroes as they go about their work, treating patients and saving lives? ijoined treating patients and saving lives? i joined the treating patients and saving lives? ijoined the honourable lady opposite, absolutely, in condemning attacks on all public servants and especially on nhs staff who are trying to save people and help
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people. what we are doing and have already done is to toughen the sentences for those who insult or harass public servants. the sentences for those who insult or harass public servants.— harass public servants. the final cuestion. harass public servants. the final question. given _ harass public servants. the final question. given the _ harass public servants. the final question. given the recent - harass public servants. the final| question. given the recent tragic circumstances _ question. given the recent tragic circumstances that _ question. given the recent tragic circumstances that has _ question. given the recent tragic| circumstances that has inevitably been a focus on the security of members and their staff, one aspect thatis members and their staff, one aspect that is often overlooked is the fact that is often overlooked is the fact that it that is often overlooked is the fact thatitis that is often overlooked is the fact that it is our staff who are on the front line in receiving the abusive e—mails and correspondence, and they take the hostile phone calls. they are private citizens simply trying to earn a living, to put food on the table and pay for their rent or their mortgage. yet they are caught up their mortgage. yet they are caught up in this vicious cycle of venom and abuse that is directed towards us. with my right honourable friend the prime minister take this
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opportunity to acknowledge the fantastic work that our staff do and give them the credit that they so rightly deserve? i give them the credit that they so rightly deserve?— rightly deserve? i think that my riiht rightly deserve? i think that my right honourable _ rightly deserve? i think that my right honourable friend - rightly deserve? i think that my right honourable friend spokel rightly deserve? i think that my i right honourable friend spoke for the entire house of commons for kids we all know that it is our staff who are so often in the front line. you have to deal with anger, intemperance behaviour and abuse, and the cup with it many recently. —— they cope with it magnificently. we have seen some house of commons staff who have paid for their sacrifice, even with their lives. i thoroughly echo and support and concur with what my honourable friend has said.— friend has said. order. studio: _ friend has said. order. srumo: that - friend has said. order. srumo: that was - friend has said. order. i studio: that was prime friend has said. order. _ studio: that was prime minister's questions. we are going to stay in the house of commons because there are going to be tributes to james
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brokenshire. there is now a minutes silence in the commons.
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thank you. james was a politician who commanded affection and respect for his— who commanded affection and respect for his colleagues, no matter which part he _ for his colleagues, no matter which part he represented in the parliamentary career spanning 16 years _ parliamentary career spanning 16 years. james's culture of public life was— years. james's culture of public life was immense, he served as successive _ life was immense, he served as successive governments, ministerial role successive governments, ministerial roie of— successive governments, ministerial role of office was serving a secretary of state for northern ireiand, — secretary of state for northern ireland, and each of the secretary of state _ ireland, and each of the secretary of state for housing, communities and locai— of state for housing, communities and local government and local government. his commitment to serving _ government. his commitment to serving his— government. his commitment to serving his constituents was... i
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will serving his constituents was... i wiii always— serving his constituents was... i will always rememberjames for his positivity. _ will always rememberjames for his positivity, his good sense of humour and for— positivity, his good sense of humour and for being one of the most friendly. _ and for being one of the most friendly, thoughtful well liked in the house of commons. his passing was a _ the house of commons. his passing was a profound loss to us all, i thoughts — was a profound loss to us all, i thoughts go out to his wife cathy and the — thoughts go out to his wife cathy and the three children who are here today— and the three children who are here today to _ and the three children who are here today to watch our tribute. i want today to watch our tribute. i want to remind — today to watch our tribute. i want to remind people of the family out with us— to remind people of the family out with us and it is great they have turned — with us and it is great they have turned up — with us and it is great they have turned up today, and thank you. we now come _ turned up today, and thank you. we now come to — turned up today, and thank you. we now come to the points and we stuck with the _ now come to the points and we stuck with the prime minister.— with the prime minister. thank you. i am sure with the prime minister. thank you. i am sure the _ with the prime minister. thank you. i am sure the whole _ with the prime minister. thank you. i am sure the whole house - with the prime minister. thank you. i am sure the whole house will - with the prime minister. thank you. i am sure the whole house willjoinl i am sure the whole house willjoin me and you in expressing our deep sorrow over the tragically early death of james sorrow over the tragically early death ofjames brokenshire. and in sending our heartfelt condolences his wife cathy and their three children sophie, gemma and ben, who
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are with us today, for the loss of a beloved husband and father. the many tributes paid to james are testament to the affection, respect and esteem to the affection, respect and esteem to which he is remembered and his skill as an politician who served his his country under three prime ministers some of the most sensitive and demanding positions in government. i worked closely with james for the first time when i was mayor of london and he was the honourable memberfor mayor of london and he was the honourable member for hornchurch, and then old bexley and the cup. i saw how much he cared for the interests of his constituents, always taking the time to stop and talk to people and listen to what they had to say, unflappable, earnest, sincere, and he brought those same down—to—earth qualities into other areas of his life. being photographed baking cakes in his kitchen, starting a twitter frenzy
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on the vital question of whether he owned two ovens or four. and once when challenged by an interviewer to choose between southend or the south of france, his reply was swift, south end, i am an essex boy and proud of my roots. he will be delighted to know his birthplace has now achieved city status in tribute to his friend david amess his campaign he supported. it was james's diligence, composure and experience as a lawyer, steeped in the art of negotiating last—minute deals, that proved so valuable to the government. he held five ministerialjobs, including two in cabinet, secretary of state for northern ireland and in housing communities, and everyone of them was fraught with traps for the unwary and opportunities for error. that he improved his reputation in each post shows that we have lost an
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astute politician of rare ability. james served with particular distinction in the home office as a security and immigration minister, where he was fondly known by civil servants as gb. oh good, they would say, we have got tojb on this one, and he often reflected that working on the home office was to be on the receiving end of incessant incoming fire from the media. it usually fell to him to brave the barrage when things got really sticky. so, it is no wonder that on his last day, officials presented james with an authentic military grade tin hat. during that tumultuous period, which i remember well, during that tumultuous period, which i rememberwell, he during that tumultuous period, which i remember well, he helped to keep our country safe, he oversaw the superb security operation that protected the london olympic and paralympic games in 2012. he was central to getting rid of the
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admiral, sending him packing after a decade of legal wrangles, and he steered the ground—breaking modern slavery bill through parliament, giving police and law enforcement agencies power they need to, some of most dangerous and repellent criminals of all. through all this, he would help individuals in need, including taking the time to meet people with direct experience of government decisions. it was after a conversation with a homeless man in bristol, that he acted to strengthen the rights of tenants and give them a greater sense of security in their homes. we can only imagine how much more good he would have done if he had been given a chance. james was in the prime of his life, with a huge amount still to offer his
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country and it was the fates that he, a nonsmoker, should have been struck down by lung cancer. —— cruellest of fates. his tenacious fight showed the depth of his courage and his character. after his first bout with the disease, as colleagues will remember, he was backin colleagues will remember, he was back in this house within weeks, serving in government and helping his constituents. he campaigned for better lung cancer screening, becoming the first honourable member to secure a debate on this issue in the house. he sought to dispel the stigma and misperceptions around the disease. and whenjames stigma and misperceptions around the disease. and when james fell sick disease. and whenjames fell sick again earlier this year, even in the midst of his ordeal, he summoned the strength to record a video message encouraging others to seek help and early treatment. every member of this house weld him then to pull
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three, but sadly it was not to be. james was a gentleman politician and i hope my right honourable friend the memberfor i hope my right honourable friend the member for maidenhead will allow me to court her words, that politics and parliament would be the better if there were more people of his calibre involved. and politics and parliament at the ricoh for his loss. —— i have the ricoh. i could not agree more. james's absence will be sorely felt in this house, in the great departments where he served and by all the people whose lives he touched. studio: beautiful tribute from the prime minister to james brokenshire, the highly respected conservative mp and minister who served as secretary of state for northern ireland. he
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died at the age of 53 of lung cancer and the prime minister there said he was a gentleman politician. let's go to a political correspondent at westminster. it is now the moment for tributes to james brokenshire in the house. they were previously tributes to david amess. the deaths of those two men who are very popular in the house. cross party is weighing on mp5. it had an impact on prime mps. it had an impact on prime minister's questions in terms of the leader of the opposition sir keir starmer wanted to have a much more joint approach going forward in terms of the way social media is dealt with. terms of the way social media is dealt with-— terms of the way social media is dealt with. . , ., dealt with. that is right, what we saw there. _ dealt with. that is right, what we saw there, twice _ dealt with. that is right, what we saw there, twice now _ dealt with. that is right, what we saw there, twice now this - dealt with. that is right, what we saw there, twice now this week, | saw there, twice now this week, members of parliament paid their respects, both times to conservative
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mps who have died. they have lost. so, both respected mps, sir david amess and james brokenshire. obviously a very different circumstances, but both well liked members of the house. and that has informed, as you are suggesting there, the tone, and the tenor of what we are hearing in parliament today, and picking up from earlier this week, and that was evident in those exchanges we saw between sir keir starmer and the prime minister, sir keir starmer very conscious of that. obviously, of that tone and trying talking about it, saying he wanted to pick up on the message from earlier in the week that mps wanted to pick up on the message from earlier in the week that mp5 on all sides wanted to do something to tackle this culture of online extremism, online abuse and hatred. he honed in on that and there are a couple of interesting things. one is he was pressing the government about the online harm spell that they have
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been preparing. the prime minister said that... and sir keir starmer was asking if it would come forward. the prime minister will say we will ensure it completes its dayjust for christmas so pointing to some progress on that. sir keir starmer then focusing even more uncertain specific companies, social media companies, he was talking about tick—tock, he was talking about telegram, a messaging app which encrypts messages. talking about those being used to spread harmful content. and he was talking about the need for sanctions, he said because there is still not criminal sanctions against the bosses of those companies if they continued to spread that sort of content. the prime minister said we will have criminal sanctions with tougher sentences to allow... for those who allowed the spell content to permeate the internet. possibly pushing forward there. then keir
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starmer asking whether government hadn't responded to some recommendations following the manchester bombing. borisjohnson manchester bombing. boris johnson came manchester bombing. borisjohnson came back with an attack on the labour party about its position earlier in the year on the police crime sentencing bill saying the labour party had. tougher sentences on criminals. that brought a measured but rebuke from keir starmer who said he wanted to stick to this effort to work together. very much that tone coming through, evenif very much that tone coming through, even if at times there was a little bit of back and forth of politics. thank you. buckingham palace says the queen has cancelled a trip to northern ireland today, and has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest. she's 95 and said to be in good spirits, but disappointed. the bbc�*s royal correspondent daniela relph says the tone of the statement is calm.
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it is interesting the languages uses words like reluctantly accepted and extremely disappointed she will be able to go to northern ireland, but she is following the advice of doctors and resting at windsor castle at the moment. we have been given advice that this is not a covid—19 related issue, she has just been told to rest. she has had a very busy few days and she is 95 years old so we must bear that in mind. there isn't any sense of alarm here. clearly her doctors have felt that she has done a number of engagements, we saw her at windsor castle with international business leaders. i was with her a week ago at westminister abbey, the first time we saw her walking with a walking stick and it was perhaps a sign that she is getting a little extra support now she is in her mid—905. she has been busy and it was clearly felt by the medical team that she should have some rest, so she will not be going to northern ireland but they are hopeful that the engagements she has around
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around cop will carry on. a group of mps and campaigners want discrimination towards people with afro—textured hair to become a form of racism. a letter signed by kimjohnson mp and backed by the halo collective and glamour magazine asks for textured hair to be a protected characteristic. they've asked the equality watchdog — whose job it is to promote and enforce equality and non—discrimination laws — to publish new guidance to protect afro hair. one of the people leading the campaign is l'myah sherae — she's the founder of the all—party parliamentary group for race and equality in education. she setup she set up the enact a quality group to work with parliamentarians to advocate for recent quality. welcome. thank you forjoining us. —— race equality. do you want to see afro textured hair to be protected and why? afro textured hair to be protected and wh ? . .. and why? yes, i think her discrimination _ and why? yes, i think her discrimination can - and why? yes, i think her discrimination can be - and why? yes, i think her discrimination can be so i
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and why? yes, i think her - discrimination can be so damaging and why? yes, i think her _ discrimination can be so damaging to black communities in particular. damaging not only to self—confidence but to mental health and self—esteem as well. i think it is extremely important that the equality and human rights commission and the government more broadly do much more to protect afro hair but also to eradicate racial disconnection more broadly. eradicate racial disconnection more broadl . ., . ., eradicate racial disconnection more broadl. ., . ., ,, ., ., broadly. how much hair dissemination do ou broadly. how much hair dissemination do you think — broadly. how much hair dissemination do you think that _ broadly. how much hair dissemination do you think that is? _ broadly. how much hair dissemination do you think that is? the _ broadly. how much hair dissemination do you think that is? the research - do you think that is? the research thinks for itself. _ do you think that is? the research thinks for itself. over _ do you think that is? the research thinks for itself. over 5096 - do you think that is? the research thinks for itself. over 5096 of - do you think that is? the research| thinks for itself. over 5096 of black thinks for itself. over 50% of black children have been sent home as a result of wearing their hair naturally or in protected hairstyles. and over 50% of black adults have said that hair discrimination has negative scratch a negatively impacted their mental health and self—esteem. the statistics are clear. much more needs to be done on a national level. . , ., , . level. have you experienced it yourself? _ level. have you experienced it yourself? i — level. have you experienced it yourself? i have. _ level. have you experienced it yourself? i have. i— level. have you experienced it yourself? i have. i have- level. have you experienced it yourself? i have. i have even. yourself? i have. i have even experienced _ yourself? i have. i have even experienced it _ yourself? i have. i have even experienced it at _ yourself? i have. i have even experienced it at the - yourself? i have. i have even experienced it at the houses| yourself? i have. i have even i experienced it at the houses of parliament. i will never forget the time i was in an event and a
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colleague of mine actually said that a rake was needed for it might hair. that was one of my first ever roles at the houses of parliament. and that determined me to do more. it spurred me on. it is incredibly important that both the commission and the government to the skull to action and take steps in the right direction to enact change. istethat action and take steps in the right direction to enact change. what did ou do? direction to enact change. what did you do? how— direction to enact change. what did you do? how did _ direction to enact change. what did you do? how did you _ direction to enact change. what did you do? how did you respond - direction to enact change. what did you do? how did you respond when someone said that to you? it you do? how did you respond when someone said that to you?- someone said that to you? it was many years _ someone said that to you? it was many years ago _ someone said that to you? it was many years ago now _ someone said that to you? it was many years ago now but - someone said that to you? it was many years ago now but i - someone said that to you? it was many years ago now but i did - someone said that to you? it was i many years ago now but i did raise it formally as we disconnection and racial bias. at the age, it may how important it is to use your voice but i don't think the onus should be on the individual, the onus should be on those in power, so policies and legislation, and practices in place to ensure that not only do workplace employers, but also schools, do not continue to carry out this form of racial discrimination, it is a really
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intrinsic aspect of discrimination more broadly. intrinsic aspect of discrimination more broadly-— intrinsic aspect of discrimination more broadl . ~ . , . ., more broadly. what difference would it make if textured _ more broadly. what difference would it make if textured hair _ more broadly. what difference would it make if textured hair would - more broadly. what difference would it make if textured hair would be - more broadly. what difference would it make if textured hair would be a i it make if textured hair would be a protected characteristic? is that legislation that would currently cover discrimination in any form, already cover that? what would the difference be? i already cover that? what would the difference be?— difference be? i think the equality act, that covers _ difference be? i think the equality act, that covers racial _ act, that covers racial discrimination. however, ithink act, that covers racial discrimination. however, i think it is very difficult to enforce on the ground and that is why we have seen so many case studies in recent years, and they have really been brought to light. i think many parents and schoolchildren, black adults more broadly, have found it really difficult to use the equality act to tackle this type of discrimination. not only will this hopefully push the government to replicate a similar official guidance by making a clear stance to tackle this, but we hope also has an
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impact on employers and small institutions and educational institutions and educational institutions more broadly. it is aood to institutions more broadly. it is good to talk — institutions more broadly. it is good to talk to _ institutions more broadly. it is good to talk to you. _ institutions more broadly. it is good to talk to you. thank you for joining us. police in nottinghamshire are investigating a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. emily anderson reports. zara owen is a first—year student at the university of nottingham, and hasn't been living in the city for long. she was on a night out with friends last week at pryzm nightclub, and it was here she think she was injected with a needle in her leg. i have no recollection of the nightclub, what had happened to me there, but the next morning i had an agonising pain in my leg, and i couldn't walk on it. i had a huge limp which was causing me great pain. it's still terrifying, the fact that it happened to me, and i don't know when it could have happened or where in the club or anything that happened. a spokesperson for pryzm nightclub has said, while these incidents are rare,
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they take all reports of this nature very seriously, and will do all they can to make sure they don't happen on their premises. in a separate incident at stealth nightclub on the 12th of october, a woman says she felt a pinch on the back of her arm before blacking out and being taken to hospital. she believes she was injected with a mystery liquid. stealth nightclub has said it's absolutely unacceptable for women to live in fear of being spiked by needles on a night out, and it takes reports of this nature very seriously. students at nottingham trent university held a meeting to discuss improving women's safety in the city. we have a whole initiative coming out regarding bottle stops, which at the moment are being given away for free behind most bars, and then we've got nightcaps that we are trying to invest in, so, like, scrunchies that double up as cup covers. zara says she feels apprehensive about going out in nottingham in the future, but says
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she won't let fear stop her from enjoying student life. it's a month since a volcano on one of spain's canary islands erupted, forcing thousands of people to leave their homes. lava is still spewing on la palma, with close to 2,000 buildings destroyed and now experts say they have no idea when eruptions will end. our correspondent dan johnson sent this report. it still has the capacity to attract and enthrall, but after a month it's become an overbearing backdrop to much of life here. an incredible spectacle with its own mundane chores. ryan does this once a week. "maybe it doesn't affect you directly," he says, "but a family member or someone you know." translation: i want it to end. it's not too worrying for me but it is for my family and in the meanwhile, we just have to live with it.
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this kind of strong mentality that they say, "it doesn't matter what comes, we go through it, and go forward." lucas isn't going forward. this is what happened to the house he lived in for 60 years. his wife cannot bear to watch. translation: i cannot put| into words, losing the house that should have been for my children and grandchildren. it's a miracle we have this flat because i know people are sleeping in cars and tents and caravans. there is no sign of this eruption easing at all, and in fact, if anything, the volcano only gets more active and it's actually grown over the weeks as the layers of lava have built up and hardened, but there is still fresh lava pouring down the hillside as well, destroying more farmland, homes and villages, and there are new fires breaking out all the time. there are amazing survival stories. these dogs have been fed by drone for four weeks and now there's
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an attempt to use one to rescue them. but there is little hope for the home is still in the way of the lava. and the longer it flows, the further it reaches, smothering more of this island. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. the queen of cakes mary berry has been honoured for a lifetime of cooking, writing and baking. in a ceremony at windsor castle earlier she was made a dame commander by the prince of wales. the former bake offjudge has published more than 50 books during a career spanning more than five decades. dame mary, to give her official title, has also been recognised for her charity work. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello, today has been a mixture of sunshine and heavy downpours. it is not as mild as yesterday and threw the rest of the week, it is
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going to be feeling colder. yesterday with the winds from the south, all tropics, we sought damages of 21 in the south—east. we have cut off that supply of warmer air and tomorrow the winds will be around from the north bringing much colder air our ways. these are the temperatures late afternoon, early evening, still quite mild to wet the south—east and east anglia. some showers around. rain heading into scotland which will continue to move southwards of warmer air and tomorrow the winds will be around from the north bringing much colder air our ways. these are the temperatures late afternoon, early evening, still quite mild to wet the south—east and east anglia. some showers around. rain heading into scotland which will continue to move southwards overnight and lot going on overnight. damages will be lower than they have been for the past few nights, especially in that colder air in the north. we have got rain to clear away from the south and south—east early on thursday, and then sunshine and showers. the bulk of the showers in the north and the west pushing for the irish sea, over the tops of the high ground. in
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scotland, there could be some wintry nests. and driven by strong gusty winter gales. combined with some spring tides. these are the temperatures, 89 degrees, could make 15 towards the south wales where it is not as windy. that colder still in place on friday as news of high pressure beginning to push into western areas. that means more cloud of the uk. ahead of that, for many eastern areas, it is likely to be dry with such an at times. it will not be as windy or feel is called on friday, the temperatures are around 11 to 14 celsius. heading into the weekend and that high pressure moves across. it will be a cooler night on friday night and then we have got this approaching weather system coming in from the atlantic. many places are going to be dry on saturday. some sunshine on times, always best in eastern areas. we
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have got the rain hang on until later in the day for northern ireland. more of a southerly breeze, the temperatures will be more widely at 14 or 15 celsius.
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today at one, the government rejects calls to bring back some coronavirus measures in england, despite rising infections and deaths. health leaders warn the nhs could be overwhelmed, without the government's plan b, including mandatory face coverings, and vaccine passports. if we don't take these measures, and things carry on as they are, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. ministers, scientists, experts, are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel that it is the time for plan b, right now. across the uk, infections, hospitalisations and deaths are rising by at least 10%, week on week. also this lunchtime: the cost of living fell slightly last month, but is itjust a blip?

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