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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 20, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and charlie stayt. our headlines today. health leaders call for the immediate return of covid restrictions like face masks and home working, as they warn the nhs in england is stumbling into a winter crisis. are you feeling the financial pinch? good morning. the latest inflation figures are out in an hour, expected to show prices are rising at a rapid rate. i take a look at the squeeze on family budgets. the terrible cost of living with extreme sickness in pregnancy — thousands of women share their experiences. good morning. in sport, salah shines again and scores again — two more for the liverpool forward to win a champions league
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thriller in spain. good morning. yesterday a part of the south east reached 21 celsius. today it is going to be mild, not that mild though, and the weather is changeable with rain, heavy showers, gusty winds and sunshine. details later in the programme. good morning. it's wednesday, the 20th of october. our main story. health leaders are demanding the immediate introduction of some coronavirus restrictions in england to avoid "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures, including face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. here's our health editor hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be
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around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. what we have seen is that, although cases have been gradually moving up in the uk since early august, the last week or so there's been a particular surge in infections. and not only in infections, but we're now seeing hospitalisation data going up, people in respiratory care beds, and also deaths starting to rise, whereas deaths have been pretty flat for most of the last two to three months. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure
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on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. managers running care services in england say staff shortages are so acute, they have to make difficult decisions about which patients they can support. the national care forum says it shows the stark reality of the pressure the care system is under. here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. this is vital work, caring for people who are older or disabled, either in a care home like this or in their own home. but it's become so difficult to fill
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jobs, care managers say people are working even longer hours and office staff are filling in gaps in the rota. exhaustion from the pandemic, compulsoryjabs in care homes and better pay being offered in other sectors, are all adding to the problems. 340 care managers with more than 21,000 staff responded to questions from organisations representing them. they had an average of 17% ofjobs vacant. more than two thirds had stopped or limited some services, including saying no to taking patients from hospital. it is estimated together they have turned down nearly 5000 requests for help since september the 1st. i think all of us across the sector, including myself and many others of my peers, are really seriously concerned, because we can't see any end in sight, i guess, to the current situation. the situation is getting progressively worse month on month with no end in sight, and i think with winter coming
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and all the additional pressures that are placed on staffing, under normal circumstances throughout the winter, it really is a grave cause for concern. and we are seeing every single day people saying, "you know, ijust can't do this any more and i'm leaving social care." the government says it is putting more money into the care system, including investing in training and regular recruitment campaigns for staff. alison holt, bbc news. four people have been arrested in connection with a gas explosion at a house in heysham, lancashire, which killed a toddler. two—year—old george hinds died when the blast ripped through his house in may this year. his parents were also injured but survived. a man and a woman have been arrested on suspicion of manslaughter, along with two other men. all four have been released on bail. it's a month since a volcano on one of spain's canary islands erupted, forcing thousands of people to leave their homes. lava is still spewing on la palma, with close to 2,000 buildings
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destroyed and now experts say they have no idea when eruptions will end. 0ur correspondent dan johnson sent this report. it still has the capacity to attract and enthral. but after a month it's become an overbearing backdrop to much of life here, an incredible spectacle with its own mundane chores. ryan does this once a week. "maybe it doesn't affect you directly," he says, "but a family member or someone you know." translation: i want it to end. it's not too worrying to me, but it is for my family. and in the meanwhile we just have to live with it. they have this kind of strong mentality that they say, "it doesn't matter what comes, we go through it and go forward." lukas isn't going forward. this is what happened to the house
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he lived in for 60 years. his wife can't bear to watch. translation: i cannot put into words, losing l the house my father built, which should have been for my children and my grandchildren. it's a miracle we have this flat because i know people who are living in cars and tents and caravans. there is no sign of this eruption easing at all. in fact, if anything, the volcano only gets more active. and it's actually grown over the weeks as the layers of lava have built up and hardened. but there is still fresh lava pouring down the hillsides too, destroying more farmlands, homes and villages, and there are new fires breaking out all the time. there are amazing survival stories. these dogs have been fed by drone for four weeks, and now there is an attempt to use one to rescue them. but there is little hope for the homes still in the way of the lava. and the longer it flows, the further it reaches, smothering more of this island. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma.
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at least 46 people have died as a result of two days of flooding triggered by heavy rain in northern india. images and videos from the state show flooded roads, submerged homes and fallen bridges. floods have also hit the southern state of kerala, where at least 26 people have died in recent days. the man behind popularfilm songs like goldfinger and willy wonka, has died at the age of 90. leslie bricusse had a wide ranging career writing hits for numerous musicals and films. tim allman has more. # there is no life i know. # to compare with pure imagination. you may not know the name, but you'll definitely know his songs. # if you truly wish to be. leslie bricusse — as lyricist and composer — was behind some of the most well—known and most beloved film music of the last 60 years.
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confirming his death on social media, his friend, the actress damejoan collins, said, "one of the giant songwriters of our time has sadly died. i will miss him terribly." sentiments echoed by singer elaine paige, who tweeted she was shocked and saddened by the news, describing him as one of our great songwriters. and nancy sinatra said, "my heart is aching today because one of the loves of my life is gone." # goldfinger! # pretty girl... leslie bricusse was born in london in 1931. in a career spanning more than seven decades, he co—wrote the theme to two james bond films, won two oscars and a grammy, and was involved in the writing of more than 1,000 songs. # the candyman can. in his memoir, he said he was one
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of the luckiest people he knew. generations of film—goers may disagree — luck had nothing to do with it. # cos the candyman thinks it should. incredible, incredible tunes. yes, and quite a lot of the songs i didn't know he was involved in. a lot of them everybody knows. classics. let's go to our own classic, carol. good morning. yesterday was very mild. a very warm in parts of the south—east, where it reached 21 celsius. 70 fahrenheit. today is going to be mild again although we don't expect temperatures to reach those kind of levels. rain sunshine, showers and gusty winds. heavy rain moving across southern england overnight. that will clear away.
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heavy thundery showers pushing north—east through the day, completed by gusty winds. gusty winds through the english channel and the channel islands. later, more heavy showers and stronger winds across the southwest. in between though we have got some sunshine. as we move north across scotland and northern ireland, some sunshine. but this weather front here is a cold front, bringing in some rain. the wind is changing direction behind it to more of a northerly. temperatures today 11 to 17 or 18 degrees. as we head through this evening and overnight at the showers heavy piling across the south. the cold front weakens. behind it clear skies and showers. we are in a colder air stream by then. the showers will be wintry on the in scotland. by the end of the night potentially as far south as the hills in north wales. tomorrow we say goodbye to the remnants of the weather front. drier conditions, a fair bit of sunshine. it will be windy. the wind blowing a
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lot of showers in across hills and coasts in the west, some going as far as the midlands. these are the wind strengths. temperatures a shock to the system compared to what we have been used to. they will also be a wind chill to add onto these levels. ouch! thank you. later this morning we'll get the latest official figures on the cost of living. there's been some big increases recently and nina is taking a look at what a further rise could mean. what does it all feel like, the cost of living? it’s what does it all feel like, the cost oflivinu? v , ,., what does it all feel like, the cost oflivinu? fl, ,., of living? it's bits and bobs here and there that _ of living? it's bits and bobs here and there that most _ of living? it's bits and bobs here and there that most people - of living? it's bits and bobs here and there that most people are | and there that most people are feeling. it is not necessarily a big jump feeling. it is not necessarily a big jump in something but when you are little bits here and there it does add up. lots of people noticing it. yes, the cost of living — or inflation. we get the latest official numbers this morning. it's a close eye on the average price of a basket of goods. 700 products are looked at, which are supposed to reflect where we're spending in order
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to work out what's going up. last month we learned that in august the main inflation index reached 3.2%. that is the biggest month on month leap since records began. but food and fuel prices have of course been going up so some experts say that could go even higher. the bank of england thinks inflation could reach 4% by the end of this year — that is way higher than their target of 2%, a number that would mean the economy was growing at a healthy rate under control. they've warned that if things don't slow down they may have to increase interest rates. why? well, usually that deters spending, encourages saving and slows down the rise in prices. 50p here on groceries, a fiver there on petrol, utility bills spiking may all feel manageable in isolation. but most families will be feeling the pinch in some way. i've been speaking with a family in manchester. this is ruth's kitchen—diner, where it all happens. ruth cooks. mum and dad nigel and susan
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come for a catch—up. jack does his homework on his laptop. and amy checks her messages. and i've come to see if they're feeling the force of inflation. are we ready to talk increases in prices? yes! so exciting, isn't it? laughter. how are things financially? we're just starting to notice the pinch a little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us is energy bill because we were with people's energy, who went bust. so the energy bill is doubling every month. whistle. and that's going from...? £120 to £250. ouch! and ruth is not alone — predictions are that average energy bills could reach £1,600 by next summer. and what about when you go for the big shop for the family? anything you're noticing there? i've noticed that the prices are higher for the overall shop, but where prices stay the same for things which jack likes —
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like grapes and strawberries and things that come in a punnet — the punnets have shrunk, so you don't get as much. and the supermarkets hope you won't notice. yes! laughter. but inflation doesn'tjust impact what we pay for things. if you're on a fixed income, like a pension, or if you have savings, high inflation means, really, you have less in your pot to spend. apart from those long, lovely lunches with your pal susan, what are your outgoings — what do you spend your money on? holidays — pre—pandemic. presents for grandchildren. as well as your teacher pension and your state pension, you have your savings, you have your investments in stocks and shares, as well. when it comes to prices going up and how far that pot of money will go, it won't be going as far soon, will it? it won't. the cash isas obviously are effectively losing value. you hope, i suppose, that the stocks and shares isas might go up, but there's obviously a risk attached to those. there could be some big decisions ahead. and some big decisions
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for ruth, too. her public—sector—linked pay hasn't crept up, her husband lee's salary is stagnant, and christmas is coming. we're not too far off christmas. i'm just going to talk you through amy's list. she wants airpods, telly for the bedroom, tickets for the theatre... ha! how does that make you feel? christmas is difficult because it's everything at once, and because amy's birthday is soon after christmas, actually there's not much of a break before we're back into purchasing presents for the second time. i worry that they're spending too much money on me sometimes — i don't deserve it all. erm _ yeah, when i was putting the list together i did think, i'm not going to ask for that cos it's a lot more money. and does it feel like there's money left for you? you work hard, you look after the kids — are there any treats for ruth? treats for us are quite rare, actually. right. treats are more for the children. ok. so there's... treats for us are the last thing on the agenda, usually. what would be really nice is to be
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able to just occasionally let your hair down and... yeah. ..you know, dream about a really nice holiday or being able to take the children out somewhere — it'd be nice to be able to take jack to the football. so it's things like that, really, that i think we would like to do more of. for lots of busy families — even those with well—paid jobs — there's a winter ahead of putting on an extra jumper, thinking twice about treats, and wondering whether it's worth saving at all... ..if there is any left to put away. thanks to the family for talking to us. interesting hearing that amy is aware of prices going up and thinking twice about her christmas list. it is important to say that none of this is normal at the moment because we are comparing prices to where they were a year ago when we were under lockdown. now because globally we have resumed spending all the time it is naturalfor prices to go up. inevitably it will level off a little bit when it comes
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to inflation. the question is the point at which the bank of england will decide to increase interest rates to slow it down because the prices can't keep going up. we look forward to hearing you explain all to us. we we look forward to hearing you explain all to us.— explain all to us. we get the numbers _ at seven o'clock. 18 minutes past six. it's three months since thousands of afghans were forced to flee their country and make a new home in the uk, but many are still living in hotels that were meant to be temporary. it means they don't have access tojobs, proper healthcare or education as our home editor, mark easton has been finding out. a budget hotel in buckinghamshire is currently home to 160 afghan migrants, mostly children. and after more than two months stuck there, it's the children who often find it hardest. a local primary has offered educational support, but the authorities discourage such arrangements, and that is a source of frustration. my wife and seven children, it's very difficult for us.
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nazeer�*s children missed a lot of school in afghanistan. and after more than two months stuck in uk hotels, he's desperate to get them back into a classroom. i think the permanent education system is not available at the moment. and we are very keen and really trust the government to sort out as soon as possible. finding suitable accommodation for large families is a huge challenge. there are fears some may be in what are called bridging hotels for many months yet. local charities help, but stuck in institutional limbo it seems even basic safeguarding is not always there. we visited some families here that have been in the country for three weeks. and children had unseen bullet holes in their legs, so we were able to muster support, get people to a local walk—in surgery. that's great, but it shouldn't be down to you! that surely is something that should have been spotted? i agree with you. but rather than complain about it, i think i can do something.
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heads, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes. heads, shoulders... in south london one school has found a way to get afghan children out of a local hotel and into class. after meeting a desperate migrant dad, the head at walworth academy realised that if afghan parents applied for an available place, her school was legally bound to take them. so off we went down to that hotel and quite literally sat in the lobby with a gentleman talking to him, which meant that more people and more people kept coming up, and by the next day we got a telephone call here saying, "oh, i understand you've been to this hotel. could you come down and see us? we are really interested in school places". we are so worried we can't go outside. we just work on internet. these three girls, all evacuated from kabul with their families as the taliban seized control, are thrilled to be in school at last. i'm so happy because i love education. our mind is fresh. we get more friends in here. it's too comfortable,
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it's too good for us. when you approached the home office and the department of education, what was the reaction to your offer of places? i think it was just a bit too early in their process. so they turned you down, essentially? they didn't turn us down directly. the education department says it is finding extra school places for afghans and trying to get children into classrooms as soon as possible. but the question is whether the government should be doing more to support the children now. mark easton, bbc news. 21 minutes past six. let's take a look at today's papers. the sun, illustrating a boosterjab "lift—off" with a rocket launch, urges its readers not to "blow it" by missing their vaccinations. the guardian leads with a warning the overnight warning from nhs leaders that government must implement a plan b for england after sharply—rising covid deaths and infections. it says sweeping measures
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could include the return of compulsory face coverings in some settings and more working from home. the times opts for a picture of the queen, who has "politely but firmly" declined an oldie of the year award. the paper reports that her majesty, who is still carrying out her duties aged 95, refused as she felt she didn't meet the criteria. more on this later on. "it's a miracle", says scotland's daily record, which carries an incredible picture of the aftermath of an explosion in ayr and the mum and dad who survived along with their two children, after being saved by hero neighbours. incredible picture. you start. leslie brokers, who we were talking about are just a few minutes ago, i am one of those who is wising up to all the work you did over the years. we were talking about charlie and the chocolate factory, a lot of
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eyeing anecdotes. he was, for example the man who wrote the lyrics for doctor dolittle, rex harrison, if i could talk to the animals. remember that song? he didn't releasin: remember that song? he didn't releasing it. _ remember that song? he didn't releasing it, did _ remember that song? he didn't releasing it, did he? _ remember that song? he didn't releasing it, did he? rex - remember that song? he didn't i releasing it, did he? rex harrison, who was famously _ releasing it, did he? rex harrison, who was famously grumpy... - releasing it, did he? rex harrison, who was famously grumpy... wasl releasing it, did he? rex harrison, - who was famously grumpy... was he?! he was famously grumpy. he presented with the lyrics to the comedy song, he wasn't very happy. he said, face—to—face with the man who wrote it, he said, it's such a silly song. he particularly objected to the rhyming of rhinoceros with of customers. he didn't like biding these. leslie
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said, the song is meant to be funny. rex harrison said, this isn't funny. god protect me! he spoke the song rather than sing it. you god protect me! he spoke the song rather than sing it.— rather than sing it. you are going to do it then. _ rather than sing it. you are going to do it then. a _ rather than sing it. you are going to do it then. a grumpy - rather than sing it. you are going to do it then. a grumpy rex - rather than sing it. you are going - to do it then. a grumpy rex harrison complaining about grammar. yes. and he walked off — complaining about grammar. yes. and he walked off shortly _ complaining about grammar. yes. and he walked off shortly afterwards, - he walked off shortly afterwards, off the production. i he walked off shortly afterwards, off the production.— off the production. i can't think that reminds _ off the production. i can't think that reminds me _ off the production. i can't think that reminds me of! _ off the production. i can't think that reminds me of! this - off the production. i can't think that reminds me of! this is - off the production. i can't think l that reminds me of! this is really quick. this brilliant shop here full of stuff that you can't buy any more. stuff from our youth, probably. i don't remember wine jelly. tinned salmon. it is probably. i don't remember wine jelly. tinned salmon.— probably. i don't remember wine jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum thou~h, is jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum though. is it? _ jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum though. is it? it _ jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum though, is it? it is— jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum though, is it? it is now— jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum though, is it? it is now kept - jelly. tinned salmon. it is a museum though, is it? it is now kept in...? i though, is it? it is now kept in...? essentially it is a shop that has been frozen in time. they have soap, stork margarine, pink salmon. pink
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salmon in a — stork margarine, pink salmon. pink salmon in a tin, _ stork margarine, pink salmon. f “ia; salmon in a tin, presumably? exactly. shopkeeper frank elliott refused to roll with the times in 1971 when the pound was switched from 240 pennies to 100. his store, set up by his dad in cornwall, is basically now a time capsule and a museum. i basically now a time capsule and a museum. . basically now a time capsule and a museum. , ., ., , ., , museum. i remember hearing a story about people — museum. i remember hearing a story about people who _ museum. i remember hearing a story about people who have _ museum. i remember hearing a story about people who have alzheimer's, l about people who have alzheimer's, elderly people, they take them to those kind of museumsjust elderly people, they take them to those kind of museums just to kick—start something, get them reminiscing and thinking. lots kick-start something, get them reminiscing and thinking. lots of care homes _ reminiscing and thinking. lots of care homes do _ reminiscing and thinking. lots of care homes do that _ reminiscing and thinking. lots of care homes do that now. - reminiscing and thinking. lots of care homes do that now. they i reminiscing and thinking. lots of| care homes do that now. they set reminiscing and thinking. lots of - care homes do that now. they set up old fashion shops. at a great idea. 6:25am. seven marathons in seven days — that was the gruelling challenge taken on by kevin sinfield last year, to help his former leeds rhinos team mate rob burrow, who is living with motor neurone disease. kevin's amazing act of friendship raised more than £2 million, and now he wants to push himself even further with his latest challenge.
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graham satchell has been looking back at his fundraising journey so far. dramatic music plays. december last year, and an extraordinary challenge. rugby league legend kevin sinfield running seven marathons in seven days. this is a sensational try! there aren't many in super league who can do that. why seven? it was the number one by his team—mate and best friend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neuron disease in 2019. the run raised millions of pounds for the mnd association. but now there's a new challenge. it was kev's idea. he wanted something hard. and this seemed hard. this is going to be really challenging. wow. i wonder what he might be doing
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next? okay, i'm not going to say it yet! next? okay, i'm not going to say it et! . yet! things will emerge during the mornin:. i yet! things will emerge during the morning- i am _ yet! things will emerge during the morning. i am not _ yet! things will emerge during the morning. i am not going _ yet! things will emerge during the morning. i am not going to - yet! things will emerge during the morning. i am not going to spoil l yet! things will emerge during the l morning. i am not going to spoil the surrise. morning. i am not going to spoil the surprise- it — morning. i am not going to spoil the surprise- it is _ morning. i am not going to spoil the surprise. it is mad. _ and kevin will bejoining us here in the studio just after 8 o'clock this morning, to announce his latest challenge. it isa it is a big one. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. school leaders in london say they're having to make cuts to balance their budgets due to a lack of government funding. the national association of headteachers say more than a quarter had to make cuts. the government says it's providing the biggest uplift to school funding in a decade. a candlelit vigil is being held tonight in memory of a 37—year—old woman who was killed in north london. nicole hurley was a mother of four who was found dead at her home in primrose hill ten days ago. a 40—year—old man has been charged with her murder.
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a photographer who has been capturing images of the capital's homeless says the conditions they live in here are worse than some refugee camps he's seen. anthony dawton usually travels the world taking photographs, but has spent the last 18 months in the city. he says he is shocked by the number of people who are homeless. there was a brief period — a fortnight, maximum — when many, many of the homeless seemed to have been taken off the streets. that lasted for a very short time. and now, today, i see more and more. these people are just like us and we need to look at them, we need to look after them — we must stop walking by. the mayor of london is to become the new chair of a global network of cities committed to tackling climate change. the organisation, known as c40, has members from 100 cities worldwide. sadiq khan will take over from the existing chair — the mayor of los angeles — at the cop26 in glasgow in november. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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much of the metropolitan line has minor delays, trains have been cancelled, that is an ongoing problem. there is no northern line between kennington and battersea power station because of a faulty train. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today, it's the last day of this very mild spell of weather across the capital. from tomorrow, things will be feeling an awful lot colder. now, plenty of wet and windy weather in the forecast for today, we're starting off with still this band of rain clearing eastwards, so it's a rather wet to start to the morning for most, and temperatures are in the mid—teens in celsius so it is a mild start. there will be some sunshine around at times today, but always the chance of some heavy, thundery downpours for much of the rest of the morning, and then another band of rain makes its presence known as we head through into the late afternoon — so it will be a rather wet end to the day. it stays windy throughout, top temperatures lower than they were yesterday — peaking at around 16 degrees celsius for many of us. and then we'll start to see some changes again overnight tonight. so our band of rain continues
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eastwards, there will be some more showers following on behind for a time, and it's a cooler start to the day tomorrow — we've now got a north—westerly wind ushering in that much colder—feeling air. so tomorrow a chillier—feeling day — a big drop in temperature, in fact, with highs of only ten to 12 or 13 degrees celsius for many of us, quite a bit of added wind chill. we're starting off with plenty of cloud and some showers, but there will be some sunshine emerging behind, and a much chillier night on thursday into friday — which is looking dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... the queen may be 95 but she has turned down the oldie of the year trophy — we'll be getting reaction from broadcaster gyles brandreth, who chairs the awards. we'll be finding out what's next
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for the new british number one tennis player cameron norrie. the residents of coronation street are no strangers to disaster — actor sally ann matthews will be joining us on the sofa to tell us about the latest storyline to rock the cobbles. all of that coming up but first... the prime minister has set out the government's plans to achieve net—zero carbon emissions by 2050, saying britain will "lead the charge". among the measures is a push for more electric cars, planting more trees, and installing heat pumps to replace gas boilers — but what does all this mean for us? let's speak now to dr sara walker, director of the centre for energy at newcastle university. good morning to you. we have heard ambitious plans from the government but how are they going to impact on everybody�*s everyday lives, what is the first thing we should all be
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looking for?— looking for? there is a lot of information _ looking for? there is a lot of information in _ looking for? there is a lot of information in the _ looking for? there is a lot of information in the document looking for? there is a lot of- information in the document and i think the first thing we will be looking out for is this grant that is going to come through to help people who are replacing their gas boilers in the next three years, and that will cover £5,000 of the cost towards replacing it with a heat pump. towards replacing it with a heat um -. towards replacing it with a heat um . _ , . ., , , towards replacing it with a heat um -. , .. , , ., towards replacing it with a heat ..um, , , i. , , pump. ok, because they are expensive to start with, — pump. ok, because they are expensive to start with, aren't _ pump. ok, because they are expensive to start with, aren't they? _ pump. ok, because they are expensive to start with, aren't they? not - to start with, aren't they? not perhaps something most people would look at and think they can afford to do in the next 12 months. thea;a look at and think they can afford to do in the next 12 months.— do in the next 12 months. they are more expensive _ do in the next 12 months. they are more expensive and _ do in the next 12 months. they are more expensive and so _ do in the next 12 months. they are more expensive and so the - do in the next 12 months. they are more expensive and so the grant l do in the next 12 months. they are | more expensive and so the grant is really helpful because hopefully that will kick—start the industry and give us some demand for suppliers to develop their supply chains, for installers to get used to installing these, repairing these, maintaining these and for homeowners to get used to a slightly different heating system in the home. �* . different heating system in the home. �* , ., different heating system in the home. i ., , different heating system in the home. �*, ., , ., home. it's not 'ust the cost of bu in: home. it's not 'ust the cost of buying these _ home. it's notjust the cost of buying these things, - home. it's notjust the cost of buying these things, though, | home. it's notjust the cost of. buying these things, though, is home. it's notjust the cost of- buying these things, though, is it? actually installing them is going to be quite expensive and quite
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disruptive perhaps if you have an older property with really thick walls, they are singly harder to put in. what are the other challenges? —— simply harder. installing, the key challenges that heat pumps operate at a slightly lower temperature compared to your typical gas boiler and that is good for your heating system to run at a lower temperature, but what that might mean is that we need to look at the size of the radiator in your house and the pipework in your house to check that it can cope with operating at lower temperatures, and so, if not, that is where it gets a bit disruptive because we have to make the rest of the heating system ready for the heat pump operating at lower temperatures. {jut ready for the heat pump operating at lower temperatures.— lower temperatures. out of 25 million homes _ lower temperatures. out of 25 million homes in _ lower temperatures. out of 25 million homes in the - lower temperatures. out of 25 million homes in the country | lower temperatures. out of 25 i million homes in the country the government is proposing grants for 90,000 of these over three years. is that really enough?—
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that really enough? probably not! but it is a start _ that really enough? probably not! but it is a start for _ that really enough? probably not! but it is a start for us _ that really enough? probably not! but it is a start for us as - that really enough? probably not! but it is a start for us as an - but it is a start for us as an industry to get some experience in this space and, in terms of a new build, as well, at the moment... we have about 30,000 heat pumps going each year and about 10,000 of those are going into a new build so i think it is also important we get the new build sector ready for heat pumps and installing these in larger numbers. �* . pumps and installing these in larger numbers. 3 . . pumps and installing these in larger numbers. �*, . ., ., pumps and installing these in larger numbers. ., . . numbers. let's chat about electric cars because _ numbers. let's chat about electric cars because i _ numbers. let's chat about electric cars because i think— numbers. let's chat about electric cars because i think lots _ numbers. let's chat about electric cars because i think lots of- numbers. let's chat about electricj cars because i think lots of people would look at an electric car and think, in principle, iwould really like to be able to drive one, but they are still really expensive. perhaps too expensive for people to afford. is the infrastructure in place yet? is there enough? the infrastructure _ place yet? is there enough? the infrastructure is _ place yet? is there enough? tue infrastructure is coming place yet? is there enough? he infrastructure is coming along really well and there is definitely a lot more charging points in the public domain compared to three or five years ago. in terms of electric vehicles the costs are also coming
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down, we are seeing quite significant demand for electric vehicles. so what's out there is waiting lists for new electric vehicles. battery technology is improving, the range is improving, so we have models on the market now that have ranges of 158 to 200 miles between charges, and most trips are under ten miles and so it is a really practical option for people so is walking and cycling and i think it is important we also think about active travel. it is really good for our health. t about active travel. it is really good for our health.— about active travel. it is really good for our health. i am going to introduce a _ good for our health. i am going to introduce a bit _ good for our health. i am going to introduce a bit of _ good for our health. i am going to introduce a bit of a _ good for our health. i am going to introduce a bit of a personal- good for our health. i am going to introduce a bit of a personal issue j introduce a bit of a personal issue here because i recently went on a long journey in an electric car with a friend and we couldn't find anywhere to charge it, couldn't have the heater on, couldn't listen to the heater on, couldn't listen to the radio, going to charge a phone and had to drive really slowly because there wasn't a perhaps a point anywhere near us where we could go and plug in. you talk about range anxiety, i think a lot of people will still feel that, won't they? t people will still feel that, won't
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the ? .. , people will still feel that, won't the ? ~' , , ., they? i think they will but we also saw a bit of _ they? i think they will but we also saw a bit of a _ they? i think they will but we also saw a bit of a range _ they? i think they will but we also saw a bit of a range anxiety - they? i think they will but we also saw a bit of a range anxiety with l saw a bit of a range anxiety with the recent concerns about petrol ringing out so i think what we need is that infrastructure to really be clearly marked for people so they know where to go for the nearest chive point, to see more chive points at service stations and to start to see charge points such that it becomes common in our landscape as we move around the country. dr sara walker, it is fascinating to talk to you, thank you so much for your time this morning thank you. it is 6:36am. good morning. we are talking about special players and salah has been creating them is. we will show you the goal in a moment. just talking about what sets players apart. he is
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the first liverpool player to score in nine consecutive matches. think of their rich history, so many great players, it goes to show where he is at the moment and where his performance levels like and it is no wonder. , . . performance levels like and it is no| wonder._ unbelievable wonder. just fantastic. unbelievable what he was — wonder. just fantastic. unbelievable what he was doing _ wonder. just fantastic. unbelievable what he was doing at _ wonder. just fantastic. unbelievable what he was doing at the _ wonder. just fantastic. unbelievable what he was doing at the moment. l a great night for the english clubs in the champions league with wins for both manchester city and liverpool. eleven goals in those two games — and for liverpool, no shortage of drama, as andy swiss reports. so who's for a champions league thriller? well, liverpool and atletico madrid were, as liverpool raced into a 2—0 lead. a shot from mo salah that took a hefty deflection, and one from naby keita that certainly didn't. here's the shot! what about that? but atletico aren't the spanish champions for nothing — and back they roared. two goals from antoine griezmann — 2—2 at the break. and after it, the drama continued. a high boot, and griezmann was sent off. and when liverpool were later awarded a penalty, salah coolly made it 3—2.
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then atletico were given a penalty — only for the referee to consult the video and change his mind. victory for liverpool in about the most eventful way possible. earlier there'd been a mancunian master—class, as city blazed past bruges. with ten men they were quite intense to play— with ten men they were quite intense to play but— with ten men they were quite intense to play but the dirty three points are often— to play but the dirty three points are often the often the most important and their ability tonight, not our— important and their ability tonight, not our best football but we got them _ not our best football but we got them and — not our best football but we got them and that is a big step. earlier there'd been a mancunian master—class, as city blazed past bruges. phil foden's pinpoint pass picking outjoao cancelo with impressive results. and it's tapped out brilliantly. that, though, was just the start — as, after extending their lead from the penalty spot, city cruised clear at the break, courtesy of kyle walker at then 19—year—old cole palmer — just moments after coming on as a sub. how's that for an entrance? and although bruges pulled one back, riyad mahrez rounded things off in suitably thumping style.
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5—1 to city — and some statement. andy swiss, bbc news. talking of special players, what about this from lionel mess? what about this from lionel messi? scores level at 2—2 in their champions league tie and he does that, a classy penalty that won it for paris saint—germain against leipzig. a little reminder he's still up there with the very best. celtic just about kept their europa league knockout hopes alive beating hungarian champions ferencvaros. it was a great opener — kyogo furuhashi with a sublime bit of control afterjota's pass. but they only made sure of the win late on. they had a golden chance which went down as an own goal that put them two up, leaving them third in group g. remember earlier this month a number of england footballers opted not to discuss if they've received the covid vaccine? well, figures out from the premier league show 68% of players have now been fully vaccinated — 81% have had at least one jab. jonathan van tam said
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footballers are role models. well, i think they've got, you know, responsibilities to themselves, to their families and to their friends. but, you know, we don't want any more games cancelled. we don't want, you know, any more squads that are short, that can't fulfil fixtures because half of them have got covid. you can choose the time when you get vaccinated — you can't choose the time when you're going to have that chance encounter with covid. and then, if you're a professional sports person, you know, it could knock up something very big in your sporting life. scotland's cricketers are one win away from qualifying for the next stage of the men's t20 world cup. they beat papua new guinea by 17 runs — their second victory this week. richie berrington top scored with 70 off 49 balls before taking an excellent catch as papua new guinea fell short of their target. scotland will progress
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to the main group stage if they beat oman tomorrow and i know the performances of new british number one cameron norrie have captured headlines of late. andy murray, though, offering up a little reminder of his own with another victory over a top 50 player, beating the american frances tiafoe. amazingly every set went to a tie break — he said after he'd never played a match like that — to come through his opening match of the european open. he plays his second round match tomorrow. to put his body through that, it is good he is feeling good butjust doing it for the love of the game at the moment. doing it for the love of the game at the moment-— the moment. there is no stopping him. and the moment. there is no stopping him- and i — the moment. there is no stopping him. and i suppose _ the moment. there is no stopping him. and i suppose there - the moment. there is no stopping him. and i suppose there is - the moment. there is no stopping him. and i suppose there is a - him. and i suppose there is a ti - -|n~ him. and i suppose there is a tipping point- _ him. and i suppose there is a tipping point. wrap _ him. and i suppose there is a tipping point. wrap adele, i him. and i suppose there is a - tipping point. wrap adele, roger federer, big injuries, andy murray has come back from his but there is a tipping point is i'm sure cameron norrie will tell us stuck gee a tipping point is i'm sure cameron norrie will tell us stud— norrie will tell us stuck we will seak norrie will tell us stuck we will s - eak to norrie will tell us stuck we will speak to him _ norrie will tell us stuck we will
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speak to him later. _ norrie will tell us stuck we will speak to him later. he - norrie will tell us stuck we will speak to him later. he will. norrie will tell us stuck we will speak to him later. he will be| speak to him later. he will be challenging — speak to him later. he will be challenging for— speak to him later. he will be challenging for a _ speak to him later. he will be challenging for a grand - speak to him later. he will be| challenging for a grand slams. when elise worsley was searching for an adventure, she looked to female explorers forgotten by history for her inspiration. she's hoping to bring their stories to life and inspire a new generation of adventurers using only the equipment they would have taken with them. meghan owen has been to meet her to find out more. i would love to take this home but there is just no i would love to take this home but there isjust no room. everything is heavy enough as it is.— heavy enough as it is. inspired by women in history, _ heavy enough as it is. inspired by women in history, elise _ heavy enough as it is. inspired by women in history, elise worsley. heavy enough as it is. inspired by| women in history, elise worsley is heavy enough as it is. inspired by i women in history, elise worsley is a modern female adventurer at. t women in history, elise worsley is a modern female adventurer at. i have been following _ modern female adventurer at. i have been following in _ modern female adventurer at. i have been following in the _ modern female adventurer at. i have been following in the footsteps - modern female adventurer at. i have been following in the footsteps of i been following in the footsteps of female explorers from the past but only using what they would have had at the time. this all started when i read a book when i was younger by alexandra dave o neill, female explorerfrom alexandra dave o neill, female explorer from the 1900s. she went through asia for 14 years, the story is incredible, she dresses as a beggar and as man for some bits, or i try to celebrate all these women
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in the past two i guess went taken seriously at the time. she in the past two i guess went taken seriously at the time.— seriously at the time. she was ins - ired seriously at the time. she was inspired to _ seriously at the time. she was inspired to make _ seriously at the time. she was inspired to make the - seriously at the time. she was inspired to make the trips - seriously at the time. she was| inspired to make the trips after suffering from bad anxiety in her early 20s. t suffering from bad anxiety in her earl 20s. . ., ., , suffering from bad anxiety in her earl 20s. . . ., i, ,, early 20s. i had a really stressful few years. _ early 20s. i had a really stressful few years. i _ early 20s. i had a really stressful few years. i got _ early 20s. i had a really stressful few years, i got really _ early 20s. i had a really stressful few years, i got really bad - early 20s. i had a really stressful few years, i got really bad panicl few years, i got really bad panic attacks to that point where i could barely leave the house. at the thought of recreating these expeditions help me in that time, gave easily to focus on. aha, expeditions help me in that time, gave easily to focus on.— expeditions help me in that time, gave easily to focus on. a travel be heled gave easily to focus on. a travel be helped with — gave easily to focus on. a travel be helped with sponsorship _ gave easily to focus on. a travel be helped with sponsorship but - gave easily to focus on. a travel be helped with sponsorship but to - gave easily to focus on. a travel be | helped with sponsorship but to fund raise for women's charities in the two regions she visited. the raise for women's charities in the two regions she visited.— two regions she visited. the first tri i did two regions she visited. the first trip i did was _ two regions she visited. the first trip i did was to _ two regions she visited. the first trip i did was to india _ two regions she visited. the first trip i did was to india and - two regions she visited. the first trip i did was to india and it - two regions she visited. the first trip i did was to india and it was | trip i did was to india and it was abouta trip i did was to india and it was about a month long and we followed in the footsteps of alexandra david neil. we walked about 200 kilometres to the base camp, of the third highest mountain in the world and it is where alexandra naturally got her first views of tibet. there would be times it would get down to —15 degrees at night. luckily she had two hot water bottles that she took with her on her trip, so all night
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long i would fill up these hot water bottles, not getting any sleep. it is really important to have an all—female team for this because the whole point of the project is to inspire women and also celebrate these women from the past. these tri -s took these women from the past. these trips took a — these women from the past. these trips took a lot _ these women from the past. these trips took a lot of _ these women from the past. these trips took a lot of planning - these women from the past. these trips took a lot of planning with - trips took a lot of planning with local guides to trips took a lot of planning with local guide— trips took a lot of planning with local guide trips took a lot of planning with local u-uide ., ., ~ , .,, ,., local guides to make sure i was safe and while i — local guides to make sure i was safe and while i would _ local guides to make sure i was safe and while i would encourage - local guides to make sure i was safe i and while i would encourage everyone to go on an adventure i would stress this is not something to do lightly. the second trip we did was in scotland and in the footsteps of nan shepard, an author and an explorer in the cairngorms. she wrote her book the living mountain during the end of the second world war it so interestingly she would have been on rations at the time so it would have been a lot of stews, potatoes, jam. you can forget your down jackets and waterproof trousers. i had none of that. this is the wooden backpack that. this is the wooden backpack that i made myself to take to india in the himalayas. it is basically
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just a chair that i found on the street in brixton. these are the old leather boots that i wore for my nan shepherd trip in scotland. they are super, super slippery. this is the yak wool coat, this is what i lived in for a month in the snowy mountains. t in for a month in the snowy mountains.— in for a month in the snowy mountains. ., , , ., , , mountains. i hope is to inspire the next generation _ mountains. i hope is to inspire the next generation of— mountains. i hope is to inspire the next generation of female - next generation of female adventurers.— next generation of female adventurers. �* , . , next generation of female adventurers. �* , . .,~ adventurers. anything that makes you feel brave is — adventurers. anything that makes you feel brave is a — adventurers. anything that makes you feel brave is a great _ adventurers. anything that makes you feel brave is a great and _ adventurers. anything that makes you feel brave is a great and i _ adventurers. anything that makes you feel brave is a great and i think- feel brave is a great and i think thatis feel brave is a great and i think that is the message here. hind feel brave is a great and i think that is the message here. and with more plans — that is the message here. and with more plans in _ that is the message here. and with more plans in the _ that is the message here. and with more plans in the pipeline, - that is the message here. and with more plans in the pipeline, watch | more plans in the pipeline, watch this space. meghan owen, bbc news. what she needed was more comfortable weather, i think, for there traumas. carol, what do you have for us? £15. carol, what do you have for us? -15, that is cold! — carol, what do you have for us? -15, that is cold! good _ carol, what do you have for us? »t“3:, that is cold! good morning to you. i have a lot. there is a lot going on with the weather. overnight last night we saw some torrential rain moving across southern england. in
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the last 11 hours in middle wallop we had 32 millimetres of rain. the average for the whole of the month of october is 88, and currently we have some heavy rain moving in across parts of wales and south—west england. today it will be mild again. sunshine and showers will be the order of the day outside these bands of rain that i mentioned. if you are stepping outside these are the temperatures to expect. if we take a look at the radar, this is the rain i was talking about. some very large puddles across parts of the south—east, and here we have more showers coming in. some of them are emerging to give torrential downpours. move north, drier conditions, and when the french are starting to show its hand across the far north—west of scotland, accompanied by gusty winds. for the rest of scotland and also northern ireland, is to go through the morning, something drier and brighter. the same for northern england. you can see all these bright colours indicating that we are still looking at the potential
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for some heavy, thundery downpours accompanied by gusty winds. gusty winds through the english channel as this morning's rain in the south—east to slowly starts to pull away. through the rest of the day, if we follow these showers here, they move northwards and eastwards through the afternoon, the thunder starts to subside a bit, we see sunshine coming in behind them and also ahead of them and then we will see further heavy showers coming in across the south—west, which could also be thundery and gusty winds once again through the english channel and areas adjacent to the english channel. this weather front here is important because as it comes to the south, not only will it bring rain but the wind directional change behind it and we will see a return tomorrow to fresh conditions. temperatures today 11 to 18 degrees. tonight we have all this rain moving across southern counties, again heavyin across southern counties, again heavy in places. a weather front since south, weakening all the time, and behind it colder airfollows on and behind it colder airfollows on
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and it will be cold. so the showers on the hills as could well be wintry. despite the wind we could see a touch of a thrust in the north and sheltered glands. tomorrow we can see the weather front continuing to push southwards as a weak feature into the channel islands. behind it a lot of dry weather, lots of sunshine, but a lot of showers packing in on the north—westerly wind and it will be windy tomorrow. they will be potentially gales down and no sea coast because i. with a full moon tonight and the combination of the spring tide, there is the risk we could see some overtopping. temperatures come at six in lerwick to 13 as we push down towards london. the temperatures are lower and when you factor in the wind chill it will be quite a shock to the wind chill it will be quite a shock to the system. wind chill it will be quite a shock to the system. thank wind chill it will be quite a shock to the s stem. . ,. wind chill it will be quite a shock to the s stem. . ,. , wind chill it will be quite a shock to the s stem. ., ~ , . to the system. thank you very much. pleasure. the uk's biggest study into extreme sickness during pregnancy called hyperemesis gravidarum is published today. based on the data of 5,000 women, who've shared their experiences
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with the bbc, it found that more than half of them considered terminating their pregnancy. daniela relph has been to meet one woman who recorded a video diary about her experience of pregnancy. i don't get the normal experience that other people get. ijust have to sit here for nine months and just... ..wait. i still can't eat, and i can't drink. and i'm hungry. and i'm stressed, and i can't sleep. i just want to get to the end of this pregnancy... ..with a baby. alive. extreme sickness in pregnancy can be brutal. the condition — known as hg — can overwhelm you. i'm so cold. two years ago, laura anderson kept a video diary of her pregnancy. it's a horrible illness.
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just makes you a complete shadow of who you were. two years on, and laura is now mum to ava. we had to try very hard to get pregnant and we'd had four miscarriages and she was very wanted, and she was what kept me going. because i knew the only way to get a baby was to get to that end point, and that's what got me through. but the pregnancy left her feeling isolated and struggling to get help. she wants other women to get better care and treatment. the mentaljourney is actually harder, because that's still left over at the end of it, and that doesn't go away as quickly as the physical symptoms. it's nine months of isolation and feeling completely useless because you can't do anything. and some people have to quit theirjobs, some people have other children that they feel like they're letting down.
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obviously treat the physical first, because that can be very dangerous if not, but so can the mental part of it. laura had wanted more children, but she's forever changed by her hg experience. do you think you'll have any more children? no, no. i very much, at the end of ava's pregnancy, told myself, i am finally done with hg. and i was happy about that. if i could be promised that i wouldn't have hg, i would definitely have another baby. that is the only reason we're not having another baby. it's just too risky for you. yeah, yeah. i can't be a mum if i've got hg. a huge thank you to laura, who use or, for sharing her experience and being honest and giving us access to that diary. dr caitlin dean is chair of the charity pregnancy sickness support and was involved in the report. shejoins us now.
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good morning. first of all, it really brought it home, hearing laura's personal experience when she was regnant. the despair and the condition she was in.— was regnant. the despair and the condition she was in. absolutely and sadl her condition she was in. absolutely and sadly her experience _ condition she was in. absolutely and sadly her experience is _ condition she was in. absolutely and sadly her experience is really - condition she was in. absolutely and sadly her experience is really quite l sadly her experience is really quite common amongst women who are suffering hyperemesis gravidarum. her experiences normal for this condition, it is extreme and isolating and it limits families and a lot of babies end up being terminated even though they were desperately wanted. t terminated even though they were desperately wanted.— desperately wanted. i know you cam ai . n desperately wanted. i know you campaign on — desperately wanted. i know you campaign on this _ desperately wanted. i know you campaign on this but _ desperately wanted. i know you campaign on this but there - desperately wanted. i know you campaign on this but there is i desperately wanted. i know you campaign on this but there is a | campaign on this but there is a reason, because you also have the condition. t reason, because you also have the condition. . ' condition. i did, i suffered with all three of— condition. i did, i suffered with all three of my _ condition. i did, i suffered with all three of my pregnancies. i i condition. i did, i suffered with - all three of my pregnancies. i have three, which is relatively unusual for women with hyperemesis. many women i know only have one child because of this. tett women i know only have one child because of this.— women i know only have one child because of this. tell us a bit about that. how was _ because of this. tell us a bit about that. how was it _ because of this. tell us a bit about that. how was it that _ because of this. tell us a bit about that. how was it that you - because of this. tell us a bit about that. how was it that you are - because of this. tell us a bit about that. how was it that you are able | that. how was it that you are able to make that decision to have more children? by the sounds of what you are saying, the report is outlining,
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it really can make women think twice. well, we had the statistics about thinking about termination, but also about having further children. ~ ,,., , . , children. absolutely. certainly after my first _ children. absolutely. certainly after my first pregnancy - children. absolutely. certainly after my first pregnancy we i children. absolutely. certainly i after my first pregnancy we really questioned whether or not it was possible to have another pregnancy at all. yes, i did consider terminating during my first two pregnancies. my experience was a somewhat different to a lot of other women in that myjob wasn't particularly at risk and we were in a financial position to be able to afford childcare. our home was knocked at risk. a lot of women in britain, that is not the case for them and if you can't afford childcare and don't have family support and if you don't work then your home is at risk and clearly the experience will be very different and you may end up having to choose to terminate in order to maintain your financial stability for your other children and keep a roof over their head. ~ . ., other children and keep a roof over their head-— their head. what about the help eo - le their head. what about the help people get _ their head. what about the help people get at — their head. what about the help people get at the _ their head. what about the help people get at the time? - their head. what about the help people get at the time? i - their head. what about the help people get at the time? i am i people get at the time? i am cautious around saying this because
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there is a danger almost immediately belittling it but the confusion, the grey between morning sickness by feeling really bad during pregnancy, and the condition being something very much more serious.— very much more serious. yeah, i mean, very much more serious. yeah, i mean. there _ very much more serious. yeah, i mean. there is— very much more serious. yeah, i mean, there is a _ very much more serious. yeah, i mean, there is a stigma - very much more serious. yeah, i mean, there is a stigma around | mean, there is a stigma around hyperemesis, still, and that is largely to do with this kind of confusion with morning sickness. morning sickness is very much a normal part of pregnancy. it is expected. fora normal part of pregnancy. it is expected. for a lot of people it is actually quite wanted, particularly if you have a history of miscarriage or are struggling to get pregnant. and so everyone expects a bit of morning sickness, but hyperemesis is not morning sickness, it is a severe convocation of pregnancy and prior to the invention of modern anti—emetics and iv fluids, it was the leading cause of death in early pregnancy. it is a very serious condition and very occasionally women still do die from it. but as a result from this kind of confusion with morning sickness, there is still a stigma around it and it can be really hard to access treatment.
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even i, in my first couple of pregnancies, it and told it was a normal part of pregnancy. so we need access, better access to care and better understanding about the condition. . , , , , ., condition. that brings us up to the lace we condition. that brings us up to the place we are _ condition. that brings us up to the place we are now. _ condition. that brings us up to the place we are now. he's _ condition. that brings us up to the place we are now. he's say - condition. that brings us up to the place we are now. he's say better| place we are now. he's say better access to care, we know that gps, there are huge waiting list, very hard to get face—to—face time with gps to try to get a diagnosis. the problem right now is particularly acute. . . �* acute. yes, it is. indeed. and certainly _ acute. yes, it is. indeed. and certainly our _ acute. yes, it is. indeed. and certainly our charity _ acute. yes, it is. indeed. and certainly our charity saw- acute. yes, it is. indeed. and certainly our charity saw a - acute. yes, it is. indeed. and i certainly our charity saw a huge increase in calls during the pandemic and people being told, well, you know, you'vejust got pregnancy sickness, we have a pandemic going on! that is not acceptable. some of those women end “p acceptable. some of those women end up having to... they have to end a desperately wanted pregnancy because they are not able to access secondary care or even primary care with their gp. just because there is a pandemic, people are still needing
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treatment and for pregnant people that this particular pregnant when there is this misnomer that they have got a normal pregnancy. dr caitlin dean, thank you for sharing your experience and also talking about the work you do, as chair of the charity pregnancy sickness support. for details of organisations which offer advice and support with pregnancy—related issues, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. school leaders in london say they're having to make cuts to balance their budgets due to a lack of government funding. the national association of headteachers say more than a quarter had to make cuts. the government says it's providing the biggest uplift to school funding in a decade. a candlelit vigil is being held tonight in memory of a 37—year—old woman who was killed in north
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london. nicole hurley was a mother of four who was found dead at her home in primrose hill ten days ago. a 40—year—old man has been charged with her murder. a photographer who has been capturing images of the capital's homeless says the conditions they live in here are worse than some refugee camps he's seen. anthony dawton usually travels the world taking photographs, but has spent the last 18 months in the city. he says he is shocked by the number of people who are homeless. there was a brief period — a fortnight, maximum — when many, many of the homeless seemed to have been taken off the streets. that lasted for a very short time. and now, today, i see more and more. these people are just like us and we need to look at them, we need to look after them — we must stop walking by. the mayor of london is to become the new chair of a global
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network of cities committed to tackling climate change. the organisation, known as c40, has members from 100 cities worldwide. sadiq khan will take over from the existing chair — the mayor of los angeles — at the cop26 in glasgow in november. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today, it's the last day of this very mild spell of weather across the capital. from tomorrow, things will be feeling an awful lot colder. now, plenty of wet and windy weather in the forecast for today, a we're starting off with still this band of rain clearing eastwards, so it's a rather wet to start to the morning for most, and temperatures are in the mid—teens in celsius so it is a mild start. there will be some sunshine around at times today, but always the chance of some heavy, thundery downpours for much of the rest of the morning, and then another band of rain makes its presence known as we head
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through into the late afternoon — so it will be a rather wet end to the day. it stays windy throughout, top temperatures lower than they were yesterday — peaking at around 16 degrees celsius for many of us. and then we'll start to see some changes again overnight tonight. so our band of rain continues eastwards, there will be some more showers following on behind for a time, and it's a cooler start to the day tomorrow — we've now got a north—westerly wind ushering in that much colder—feeling air. so tomorrow a chillier—feeling day — a big drop in temperature, in fact, with highs of only ten to 12 or 13 degrees celsius for many of us, quite a bit of added wind chill. we're starting off with plenty of cloud and some showers, but there will be some sunshine emerging behind, and a much chillier night on thursday into friday — which is looking dry. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. our headlines today. health leaders call for the immediate return of covid restrictions like face masks and home working, as they warn the nhs in england is stumbling into a winter crisis. are you feeling the financial pinch? good morning. the latest inflation figures are out in the next few minutes, expected to show prices are rising at a rapid rate. i take a look at what it means for businesses and household budgets.
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good morning. in sport, salah shines again and scores again — two more for the liverpool forward, to win a champions league thriller in spain. the queen turns down an oldie of the year, saying you are only as old as you feel. we ask, is age just a number? i'm 64. i feel about 24! good morning. another mild day. but it is unsubtle. heavy rain, showers and gusty winds. a little bit of sunshine. details coming up. good morning. it's wednesday, the 20th of october. our main story. health leaders are demanding the immediate introduction of some coronavirus restrictions in england to avoid "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures, including face coverings in crowded
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spaces, should be implemented. here's our health editor hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. what we have seen is that, although cases have been gradually moving up in the uk since early august, the last week or so there's been a particular surge in infections. and not only in infections, but we're now seeing hospitalisation data going up, people in respiratory care beds, and also deaths starting to rise, whereas deaths have been pretty flat
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for most of the last two to three months. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. we can speak now to our political correspondent, damian grammaticus. morning, damian.
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so we have a situation where those numbers are stacking up, covid cases, hospitalisations and death rates. the government are sticking to the line that all options are there but they are not doing anything as yet?— there but they are not doing an hinuas et? , anything as yet? that's absolutely riuht. the anything as yet? that's absolutely right. the government _ anything as yet? that's absolutely right. the government says - anything as yet? that's absolutely right. the government says it - anything as yet? that's absolutely right. the government says it is l right. the government says it is keeping — right. the government says it is keeping a — right. the government says it is keeping a close eye on the situation, looking at all of those figures, — situation, looking at all of those figures, and believe that those are in line _ figures, and believe that those are in line with — figures, and believe that those are in line with what they were expecting, was what the model showed — expecting, was what the model showed. therefore, they're monitoring things. they don't have an idea _ monitoring things. they don't have an idea at — monitoring things. they don't have an idea at the minute of moving to tougher— an idea at the minute of moving to tougher restrictions, plan b as it is called — tougher restrictions, plan b as it is called. they believe plan a is working — is called. they believe plan a is working. that basically relies on the vaccination programme. what was interesting, _ the vaccination programme. what was interesting, i think, the vaccination programme. what was interesting, ithink, was the vaccination programme. what was interesting, i think, was that yesterday we saw the cabinet meets and in _
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yesterday we saw the cabinet meets and in the _ yesterday we saw the cabinet meets and in the topics they talked about they had _ and in the topics they talked about they had big issues, climate change, all sorts— they had big issues, climate change, all sorts of— they had big issues, climate change, all sorts of things. but the covid situation — all sorts of things. but the covid situation was the last item on the agenda _ situation was the last item on the agenda. and looking at that, the prime _ agenda. and looking at that, the prime minister said he thought that the vaccination programme was working — the vaccination programme was working as planned and called on people _ working as planned and called on people to — working as planned and called on people to continue to go out to get a vaccine _ people to continue to go out to get a vaccine shots when they are required — a vaccine shots when they are required to. but at the same time we are now— required to. but at the same time we are now seeing this growing pressure, growing calls now coming from the _ pressure, growing calls now coming from the nhs, also from scientists, epidemiologists, looking at the situation, who say they are alarmed by what _ situation, who say they are alarmed by what they are seeing, concerned about _ by what they are seeing, concerned about the _ by what they are seeing, concerned about the spread of infections. and the imprecations of that. nhs bosses yesterday— the imprecations of that. nhs bosses yesterday in parliament, giving evidence, — yesterday in parliament, giving evidence, talking about the pressure already— evidence, talking about the pressure already being felt in the nhs all the way— already being felt in the nhs all the way through to the ambulance service, _ the way through to the ambulance service, the implication for treatment of other treatments they
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have to _ treatment of other treatments they have to give. so, real concern there about _ have to give. so, real concern there about the _ have to give. so, real concern there about the pressures coming in the winter~ _ about the pressures coming in the winter~ the — about the pressures coming in the winter. the government still saying at the _ winter. the government still saying at the minute they are monitoring things. _ at the minute they are monitoring things. not— at the minute they are monitoring things, not moving to a higher level of restrictions.— the latest inflation figures have been released in the last few minutes. nina's here to talk us through the numbers. inflation 3.1% for the month of september. good morning. these are the numbers that we look at every month. they come from close scrutiny of the price of a typical basket of goods, from looking at around 700 goods, from looking at around 700 goods and services. in the last few minutes we have learned that inflation is at 3.1%. they are the latest figures for the month of september. that is compared to 3.2 for the month before. not as high as the months before but still a very high number. driven by increased prices in transport, household goods, prices of food, nonalcoholic drink and household services. although prices at restaurants and hotels made a slight dent in prices going up. they came down slightly.
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prices going up slightly quicker than comfortable. the bank of england's target for inflation is still at 2%, the point at which growth is seen to be steady and where businesses can plan. so this period of high inflation has led to the governor saying they will have to act to slow things down, quite possibly meaning they will have to increase interest rates, because that encourages saving and discourages taking on debt. just a quick note of caution though. we are comparing prices now to during the lockdown period. this is a time when consumers are able to quickly spend again. it's not a huge surprise and we shouldn't feel too spooked by this increase. but it does mean for public sector pay workers, for example, if you have had a pay freeze, and businesses hoping to recover, things feel tough, slightly out of control in terms of what to predict. things will they think, get even tougher in the short term. the bank of england predicting inflation could reach 4% by the end of the year and that is why they will be
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compelled to act, probably quite soon, increasing interest rates to take control of that situation. thank you. managers running care services in england say staff shortages are so acute, they have to make difficult decisions about which patients they can support. the national care forum says it shows the stark reality of the pressure the care system is under. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. this is vital work, caring for people who are older or disabled, either in a care home like this or in their own home. but it's become so difficult to fill jobs, care managers say people are working even longer hours and office staff are filling in gaps in the rota. exhaustion from the pandemic, compulsoryjabs in care homes and better pay being offered in other sectors, are all adding to the problems. 340 care managers with more than 21,000 staff responded to questions from organisations representing them. they had an average
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of 17% ofjobs vacant. more than two thirds had stopped or limited some services, including saying no to taking patients from hospital. it is estimated together they have turned down nearly 5000 requests for help since september the 1st. i think all of us across the sector, including myself and many others of my peers, are really seriously concerned, because we can't see any end in sight, i guess, to the current situation. the situation is getting progressively worse month on month with no end in sight, and i think with winter coming and all the additional pressures that are placed on staffing, under normal circumstances throughout the winter, it really is a grave cause for concern. and we are seeing every single day people saying, "you know, ijust can't do this any more and i'm leaving social care." the government says it is putting more money into the care system, including investing in training and regular recruitment campaigns for staff. alison holt, bbc news.
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four people have been arrested in connection with a gas explosion at a house in heysham, lancashire, which killed a toddler. two—year—old george hinds died when the blast ripped through his house in may this year. his parents were also injured but survived. a man and a woman have been arrested on suspicion of manslaughter, along with two other men. all four have been released on bail. north korea has confirmed it has test—fired a new submarine—launched ballistic missile, for the first time in two years. the launch violates multiple un security council resolutions/ an emergency meeting is being held later today. north korea has carried out multiple weapons tests in recent weeks, prompting the us to urge them to refrain from further action and engage in talks. the british songwriter behind popularfilm songs like goldfinger and willy wonka, has died at the age of 90.
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leslie bricusse had a prolific career writing hits for numerous musicals and films. in a career lasting 70 years, he had written at least 1,000 songs and won two oscars. the time now is 11 minutes past seven. we can have a look at the weather with carol. good morning. we have had a pretty wet night. particularly across parts of england and wales. torrential rain, now some torrential showers from the south—west. but despite all of that it is going to be another mild day. not quite as mild as yesterday. some of us will have a combination of sunshine and showers. we have got all of these showers piling in from the south—west, moving north through the day. these are notjust heavy they
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moving north through the day. these are not just heavy they are moving north through the day. these are notjust heavy they are thundery and accompanied by gusty winds. later we will see some more coming into the south—west. gusty winds across southern counties, the channel islands and the english channel islands and the english channel generally. for scotland, for northern ireland, you have got something drier and brighter, some sunshine. this weather front is going to bring in some rain. not the change —— note the change in the wind direction, a colder direction. in the south we are still in the milder south—west of these. temperatures today, 11 in their wake to 17 or 18 in london and cardiff. tonight we have got more rain putting across southern areas. that will be heavy. colder airfollows putting across southern areas. that will be heavy. colder air follows on behind. there will be some showers. some will be wintry on higher ground as far south as north wales. in the shelter in the lands we could see a touch of frost. tomorrow is going to be a cold day. there will be some sunshine. a few showers on the wind. the wind will be gusty, even gales
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down the north sea coastline but you really will feel the draft. thank you. let's return to our top story now. downing street says it's keeping a very close eye on rising covid cases, but a so—called plan b to control the virus in england this winter, has yet to be discussed. so, what is the picture at the moment? the government's latest coronavirus figures show, there were 43,738 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means there were almost 45,000 cases on average per day in the past week. the number of people in hospital with covid is rising again — it's now 7,749. another 223 deaths were recorded yesterday — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive test. it's the highest daily figure since the middle of march. so, how concerned should we be about the next few months? let's speak to professor adam finn
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from the university of bristol, who also sits on thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. good morning. great to see you this morning. lots of people listening to those numbers that we have just been reading out will be worrying about the rise in cases. can you just explain what is happening right now with those numbers?— with those numbers? yeah, good morninu. with those numbers? yeah, good morning. these _ with those numbers? yeah, good morning. these numbers - with those numbers? yeah, good morning. these numbers are - morning. these numbers are definitely— morning. these numbers are definitely going up. we have been watching — definitely going up. we have been watching these numbers over the last weeks _ watching these numbers over the last weeks and _ watching these numbers over the last weeks and i_ watching these numbers over the last weeks and i think all hoping that they would go up and down and not increase. _ they would go up and down and not increase, but i think there is no denying — increase, but i think there is no denying that this is a real increase. although i have not seen a survey— increase. although i have not seen a survey showing it, my personal observation, and yours may be the same: _ observation, and yours may be the same, essentially there is no sign that anyone is now doing anything to try to _ that anyone is now doing anything to try to avoid — that anyone is now doing anything to try to avoid spreading the infection around _ try to avoid spreading the infection around it— try to avoid spreading the infection around. it feels here in bristol like everybody has gone back to
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normal — like everybody has gone back to normal habits. nobody is wearing a mask _ normal habits. nobody is wearing a mask the — normal habits. nobody is wearing a mask. the bars and the restaurants are all— mask. the bars and the restaurants are all full, — mask. the bars and the restaurants are all full, crowded with people. i suspect— are all full, crowded with people. i suspect what i don't know that most people _ suspect what i don't know that most people are _ suspect what i don't know that most people are not really doing lateral flow tests to try and regulate the spread _ flow tests to try and regulate the spread of— flow tests to try and regulate the spread of the infection. as a result we are _ spread of the infection. as a result we are seeing more infection than at any other— we are seeing more infection than at any other point in the pandemic. you are in ihistol— any other point in the pandemic. are in bristol at any other point in the pandemic. gm. are in bristol at the moment. looking at the figures for cheltenham, stroud, swindon, bath and north east somerset, cheltenham and north east somerset, cheltenham and the rate is up 458% of the last week. as you havejust and the rate is up 458% of the last week. as you have just said, and the rate is up 458% of the last week. as you havejust said, the figures are, people will be concerned by these numbers. can boosterjabs get us through the winter? is that what will solve this, or at least start to turn things around?— this, or at least start to turn things around? this, or at least start to turn thins around? ~ , ,., .,, things around? whether it is booster “abs or the things around? whether it is booster jabs or the rest _ things around? whether it is booster jabs or the rest of _ things around? whether it is booster jabs or the rest of the _ things around? whether it is booster jabs or the rest of the vaccine - jabs or the rest of the vaccine programme, i jabs or the rest of the vaccine programme, lam jabs or the rest of the vaccine programme, i am afraid it is only very— programme, i am afraid it is only very much— programme, i am afraid it is only very much part of the picture. relying — very much part of the picture. relying on the vaccine programme to kind of— relying on the vaccine programme to kind of take care of the problem is not going — kind of take care of the problem is not going to be a solution, i'm afraid — not going to be a solution, i'm afraid. these vaccines are extremely
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.ood afraid. these vaccines are extremely good at _ afraid. these vaccines are extremely good at preventing you from ending up good at preventing you from ending up in hospital on a ventilator, or even _ up in hospital on a ventilator, or even dying — up in hospital on a ventilator, or even dying of this infection, but their— even dying of this infection, but their ability to stop you actually getting — their ability to stop you actually getting the attraction at all, or pass— getting the attraction at all, or pass it — getting the attraction at all, or pass it on. _ getting the attraction at all, or pass it on, a modest. it obvious to contribute — pass it on, a modest. it obvious to contribute to — pass it on, a modest. it obvious to contribute to reducing transmission of the _ contribute to reducing transmission of the virus — contribute to reducing transmission of the virus. but it by no means solves— of the virus. but it by no means solves the — of the virus. but it by no means solves the problem. so if we want to see figures— solves the problem. so if we want to see figures going back down, and we want to— see figures going back down, and we want to reverse the current trend, which _ want to reverse the current trend, which is _ want to reverse the current trend, which is up. — want to reverse the current trend, which is up, we are going to have to do more _ which is up, we are going to have to do more than — which is up, we are going to have to do more than that. it really is time that everyone got the message that they can't— that everyone got the message that they can'tjust go that everyone got the message that they can't just go back to normal if they can't just go back to normal if they want— they can't just go back to normal if they want to avoid further restrictions later in the year. the nhs restrictions later in the year. t'te nhs confederation restrictions later in the year. tte nhs confederation saying it is now time to adapt and adopt. widespread use of face masks once again and working from home, it sounds very much like you think that is the obvious next step?— much like you think that is the obvious next step? well, yes. i mean, obvious next step? well, yes. i mean. in _ obvious next step? well, yes. i mean. in a _ obvious next step? well, yes. i mean. in a way _ obvious next step? well, yes. i mean, in a way what _ obvious next step? well, yes. i mean, in a way what i - obvious next step? well, yes. i mean, in a way what i wonder. obvious next step? well, yes. i i mean, in a way what i wonder is, obvious next step? well, yes. i - mean, in a way what i wonder is, why are we— mean, in a way what i wonder is, why are we not— mean, in a way what i wonder is, why are we not being encouraged to do that? _ are we not being encouraged to do that? the — are we not being encouraged to do that? the government is not very
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keen_ that? the government is not very keen on— that? the government is not very keen on restricting people's liberties. certainly they understandably don't want to shut down _ understandably don't want to shut down the — understandably don't want to shut down the economy again. why are we not being _ down the economy again. why are we not being encouraged at the very least _ not being encouraged at the very least to— not being encouraged at the very least to take the measures i was 'ust least to take the measures i was just outlining? so that we can all contribute — just outlining? so that we can all contribute to reducing the increase here _ contribute to reducing the increase here at _ contribute to reducing the increase here. at the moment i am hearing nothing _ here. at the moment i am hearing nothing about that. your headline is mention— nothing about that. your headline is mention of— nothing about that. your headline is mention of the prime minister speaking _ mention of the prime minister speaking last night about the vaccine — speaking last night about the vaccine programme. but it can'tjust be the _ vaccine programme. but it can'tjust be the vaccine programme. it has to be the vaccine programme. it has to be more _ be the vaccine programme. it has to be more than that.— be more than that. let's talk about facemasks for _ be more than that. let's talk about facemasks for a _ be more than that. let's talk about facemasks for a moment. - be more than that. let's talk about facemasks for a moment. i - be more than that. let's talk about facemasks for a moment. i know i be more than that. let's talk aboutl facemasks for a moment. i know we have spoken about this before. just remind everybody about the science. what difference does it make when people start wearing masks again? tt people start wearing masks again? it depends a bit on what kind of mask you are _ depends a bit on what kind of mask you are wearing. if you are wearing a reasonably good quality cloth mask, — a reasonably good quality cloth mask, or— a reasonably good quality cloth mask, ora a reasonably good quality cloth mask, or a surgical mask, and particularly _ mask, or a surgical mask, and particularly if you are doing that when _ particularly if you are doing that when you — particularly if you are doing that when you are indoors with other people — when you are indoors with other people around, that will substantially reduce the risk if you
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.ot substantially reduce the risk if you got the _ substantially reduce the risk if you got the virus and you are not aware of it, _ got the virus and you are not aware of it. or— got the virus and you are not aware of it. or even— got the virus and you are not aware of it, or even if you have symptoms, of it, or even if you have symptoms, of you _ of it, or even if you have symptoms, of you giving — of it, or even if you have symptoms, of you giving that infection to the people _ of you giving that infection to the people around you. it will stop you putting _ people around you. it will stop you putting aerosols into the air containing the virus that other people — containing the virus that other people will breathe. if you were an ffp people will breathe. if you were an up to— people will breathe. if you were an ffp to mask, the kind of masks we use in_ ffp to mask, the kind of masks we use in hospitals, that will in fact also _ use in hospitals, that will in fact also reduce the risk of you yourself getting _ also reduce the risk of you yourself getting the infection from other people — getting the infection from other people by breathing the air that they breathed out, or they were breathing — they breathed out, or they were breathing while talking. you can actually — breathing while talking. you can actually protect yourself if you use actually protect yourself if you use a higher— actually protect yourself if you use a higher quality mask. but at the very least— a higher quality mask. but at the very least if you wear a mask of any sort, _ very least if you wear a mask of any sort. you _ very least if you wear a mask of any sort. you can — very least if you wear a mask of any sort, you can contribute to stopping the virus _ sort, you can contribute to stopping the virus being spread about. you mentioned _ the virus being spread about. gm, mentioned right at the start of this that where you live you are seeing people not wearing masks so much, behaving completely as normal. do you think there is a feeling of fatigue about mask wearing at the moment? ~ �* ., ., , ., ., ., moment? well, i'm not a behavioural scientist but — moment? well, i'm not a behavioural scientist but my _ moment? well, i'm not a behavioural scientist but my general— moment? well, i'm not a behavioural scientist but my general observation. scientist but my general observation about— scientist but my general observation
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about people around me is that we all tend _ about people around me is that we all tend to — about people around me is that we all tend to kind of look sideways at each other— all tend to kind of look sideways at each other and copy each other's behaviour~ — each other and copy each other's behaviour. and if no one is wearing a mask, _ behaviour. and if no one is wearing a mask, it — behaviour. and if no one is wearing a mask, it actually feels quite difficult — a mask, it actually feels quite difficult to wear a mask. it makes you stand — difficult to wear a mask. it makes you stand out. after the restrictions were lifted, my observation was that most of the people _ observation was that most of the people working in the shops and at least _ people working in the shops and at least half— people working in the shops and at least half of the people going in and buying things were wearing masks. — and buying things were wearing masks, but gradually that has disappeared. when i go into the supermarket now i seem to be one of 'ust supermarket now i seem to be one of just a _ supermarket now i seem to be one of just a handful of people that are wearing — just a handful of people that are wearing masks. ithink just a handful of people that are wearing masks. i think we are all 'ust wearing masks. ! think we are all just sort— wearing masks. ! think we are all just sort of— wearing masks. i think we are all just sort of going with the flow. nobody— just sort of going with the flow. nobody is telling us not to. yeah, i think— nobody is telling us not to. yeah, i think some — nobody is telling us not to. yeah, i think some encouragement would be useful— think some encouragement would be useful in_ think some encouragement would be useful in that context. with think some encouragement would be useful in that context.— useful in that context. with the numbers as _ useful in that context. with the numbers as they _ useful in that context. with the numbers as they stand - useful in that context. with the numbers as they stand today, i useful in that context. with the - numbers as they stand today, what type of modelling, what prediction, what can you see coming down the line in the next few weeks and months? . . months? predicting the future is alwa s a months? predicting the future is always a dangerous _ months? predicting the future is always a dangerous business - months? predicting the future is j always a dangerous business but months? predicting the future is - always a dangerous business but that is what _ always a dangerous business but that is what our—
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always a dangerous business but that is what our mathematical modelling colleagues have to try to do. niall ferguson — colleagues have to try to do. niall ferguson yesterday talking on the bbc was _ ferguson yesterday talking on the bbc was saying that the doubling time at _ bbc was saying that the doubling time at the moment is about five weeks _ time at the moment is about five weeks if— time at the moment is about five weeks if you take an average, which is very— weeks if you take an average, which is very different from last year, when _ is very different from last year, when we — is very different from last year, when we were seeing cases going up, doubling _ when we were seeing cases going up, doubling almost less than, in less than a _ doubling almost less than, in less than a week. and that reflects the fact that _ than a week. and that reflects the fact that the vaccine programme is having _ fact that the vaccine programme is having an — fact that the vaccine programme is having an impact, in particular on hospitalisations and deaths. and that is— hospitalisations and deaths. and that is what is going up steadily but only— that is what is going up steadily but only slowly. but if we leave things — but only slowly. but if we leave things as — but only slowly. but if we leave things as they are at the moment that will— things as they are at the moment that will continue and will ultimately double up to the point where _ ultimately double up to the point where we — ultimately double up to the point where we won't be able to cope any more _ where we won't be able to cope any more and — where we won't be able to cope any more. and we will be back to the bad old days— more. and we will be back to the bad old days of— more. and we will be back to the bad old days of being asked to stay at home _ old days of being asked to stay at home and — old days of being asked to stay at home and restrict all of our normal activities — home and restrict all of our normal activities. we can stop that. we can prevent— activities. we can stop that. we can prevent that — activities. we can stop that. we can prevent that from happening if we take the _ prevent that from happening if we take the measures we have just been discussing. _ take the measures we have just been discussing, continue with our normal lives, _ discussing, continue with our normal lives, wear— discussing, continue with our normal lives, wear masks, do lateral flow tests _ lives, wear masks, do lateral flow tests and — lives, wear masks, do lateral flow tests and try to avoid going for
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long _ tests and try to avoid going for long periods into enclosed places with large numbers of people. if we all did _ with large numbers of people. if we all did that — with large numbers of people. if we all did that now then the figures would _ all did that now then the figures would go — all did that now then the figures would go down again.— all did that now then the figures would go down again. professor adam finn, thank would go down again. professor adam finn. thank you _ would go down again. professor adam finn, thank you very _ would go down again. professor adam finn, thank you very much _ would go down again. professor adam finn, thank you very much indeed. - finn, thank you very much indeed. thank you. police are investigating a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out, leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. it's led to calls for a boycott of nightclubs in at least 30 towns and cities. let's speak to zara owen, who was a victim of such an attack, and superintendent kathryn craner from nottinghamshire police. morning to you both. morning. zara, what happened _ morning to you both. morning. zara, what happened to — morning to you both. morning. zara, what happened to you? _ morning to you both. morning. zara, what happened to you? so, - morning to you both. morning. zara, what happened to you? so, it - morning to you both. morning. zara, what happened to you? so, it was i what happened to you? so, it was last monday night actually, i went out with— last monday night actually, i went out with my friends to a nightclub in the _ out with my friends to a nightclub in the city — out with my friends to a nightclub in the city. nothing more than what we would _ in the city. nothing more than what we would usually do. i remember going _ we would usually do. i remember going in. — we would usually do. i remember going in, going to the bar, going to
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the toilet. — going in, going to the bar, going to the toilet, and until that moment my memory— the toilet, and until that moment my memory is— the toilet, and until that moment my memory is blank until i get home and i am memory is blank until i get home and i am getting — memory is blank until i get home and i am getting my phone charger. i know— i am getting my phone charger. i know i_ i am getting my phone charger. i know i didn't drink as much as i usually— know i didn't drink as much as i usually would on a night out. the fact that — usually would on a night out. the fact that i — usually would on a night out. the fact that i don't remember anything is terrifying to me. because this is something — is terrifying to me. because this is something that is a very rare occasion— something that is a very rare occasion for me. i've never suffered memory— occasion for me. i've never suffered memory loss. and the next morning i woke _ memory loss. and the next morning i woke up— memory loss. and the next morning i woke up with — memory loss. and the next morning i woke up with a really painful back. so you _ woke up with a really painful back. so you had — woke up with a really painful back. so you had some kind of bruising? | so you had some kind of bruising? i didn't have any bruising but i found a pin— didn't have any bruising but i found a pin prick— didn't have any bruising but i found a pin prick in— didn't have any bruising but i found a pin prick in my leg which was the epicentre — a pin prick in my leg which was the epicentre of— a pin prick in my leg which was the epicentre of all the pain. i was limping — epicentre of all the pain. i was limping around. that was the only form _ limping around. that was the only form of— limping around. that was the only form of support i could really have because _ form of support i could really have because i— form of support i could really have because i was in so much agony. you sa about because i was in so much agony. you say about your _ because i was in so much agony. gm, say about your memory, you don't remember a moment in time when you felt something during the evening? t felt something during the evening? i could have done on the night but unfortunately i have got a full black— unfortunately i have got a full black of—
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unfortunately i have got a full black of memory. in fairness, yes, i could _ black of memory. in fairness, yes, i could have — black of memory. in fairness, yes, i could have felt it back on that club night _ could have felt it back on that club night and — could have felt it back on that club night and realised somebody had hit me, something hasjust gone inside me. me, something hasjust gone inside me but _ me, something hasjust gone inside me. but from that point forward i don't _ me. but from that point forward i don't know— me. but from that point forward i don't know from points capital a to b. ., ., , ., ., don't know from points capital a to b. ., ., , .. b. you are trying to 'oin the dots and think you _ b. you are trying to 'oin the dots and think you may _ b. you are trying to join the dots and think you may well- b. you are trying to join the dots and think you may well have - b. you are trying to join the dots| and think you may well have been b. you are trying to join the dots - and think you may well have been the victim of someone putting a needle into you. have you heard about this before, in amongst your friends or contemporaries?— before, in amongst your friends or contemporaries? yes, so as a young erson at contemporaries? yes, so as a young person at university _ contemporaries? yes, so as a young person at university i _ contemporaries? yes, so as a young person at university i am _ contemporaries? yes, so as a young person at university i am hearing - person at university i am hearing stories— person at university i am hearing stories of— person at university i am hearing stories of people who have been to nightclubs — stories of people who have been to nightclubs and they have been injected — nightclubs and they have been injected. i've heard stories of someone _ injected. i've heard stories of someone having an injected through their hand _ someone having an injected through their hand ortheir someone having an injected through their hand or their back. i was aware — their hand or their back. i was aware of— their hand or their back. i was aware of this post going around of the back— aware of this post going around of the back incident. that is what kind of gave _ the back incident. that is what kind of gave me — the back incident. that is what kind of gave me the realisation... can ou of gave me the realisation... can you explain _ of gave me the realisation... can you explain that? _ of gave me the realisation... can you explain that? i _ of gave me the realisation... can you explain that? i don't - of gave me the realisation... can you explain that? i don't know. of gave me the realisation... can l you explain that? i don't know the full extent of _ you explain that? i don't know the full extent of it, _ you explain that? i don't know the full extent of it, but _ you explain that? i don't know the full extent of it, but it _ you explain that? i don't know the full extent of it, but it was - you explain that? i don't know the full extent of it, but it was a - you explain that? i don't know the full extent of it, but it was a post | full extent of it, but it was a post of someone to make everyone aware that her_ of someone to make everyone aware that her friend had been injected in
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the back _ that her friend had been injected in the back. this kind of gave me an idea that — the back. this kind of gave me an idea that it— the back. this kind of gave me an idea that it had happened to me. superintendent, good morning. how many times are you hearing cases like this and stories like this's? morning. it is awful to hear anyone who has— morning. it is awful to hear anyone who has been— morning. it is awful to hear anyone who has been enjoying _ morning. it is awful to hear anyone who has been enjoying an - morning. it is awful to hear anyone who has been enjoying an eveningl morning. it is awful to hear anyone. who has been enjoying an evening in nottingham — who has been enjoying an evening in nottingham city— who has been enjoying an evening in nottingham city centre, _ who has been enjoying an evening in nottingham city centre, that - who has been enjoying an evening in nottingham city centre, that they. nottingham city centre, that they have been— nottingham city centre, that they have been the _ nottingham city centre, that they have been the victim _ nottingham city centre, that they have been the victim of _ nottingham city centre, that they have been the victim of crime. i nottingham city centre, that theyl have been the victim of crime. for the last— have been the victim of crime. for the last few— have been the victim of crime. for the last few months _ have been the victim of crime. for the last few months we _ have been the victim of crime. for the last few months we have - have been the victim of crime. for the last few months we have seen| have been the victim of crime. for. the last few months we have seen an increase _ the last few months we have seen an increase in_ the last few months we have seen an increase in reports— the last few months we have seen an increase in reports where _ the last few months we have seen an increase in reports where people - increase in reports where people believe _ increase in reports where people believe that _ increase in reports where people believe that drugs _ increase in reports where people believe that drugs may - increase in reports where people believe that drugs may have - increase in reports where peoplel believe that drugs may have been increase in reports where people - believe that drugs may have been put in their— believe that drugs may have been put in their drink — believe that drugs may have been put in their drink, due _ believe that drugs may have been put in their drink, due to _ believe that drugs may have been put in their drink, due to the _ believe that drugs may have been put in their drink, due to the fact - believe that drugs may have been put in their drink, due to the fact they - in their drink, due to the fact they have _ in their drink, due to the fact they have experienced _ in their drink, due to the fact they have experienced a _ in their drink, due to the fact they have experienced a distinctly- have experienced a distinctly different _ have experienced a distinctly different feeling _ have experienced a distinctly different feeling to _ have experienced a distinctly different feeling to the - have experienced a distinctly. different feeling to the normal reaction — different feeling to the normal reaction to— different feeling to the normal reaction to alcohol. _ different feeling to the normal reaction to alcohol. we - different feeling to the normal reaction to alcohol. we have l different feeling to the normal i reaction to alcohol. we have also received — reaction to alcohol. we have also received a — reaction to alcohol. we have also received a small— reaction to alcohol. we have also received a small number- reaction to alcohol. we have also received a small number of- reaction to alcohol. we have also i received a small number of reports where _ received a small number of reports where people — received a small number of reports where people are _ received a small number of reports where people are telling _ received a small number of reports where people are telling us, - received a small number of reports where people are telling us, as- received a small number of reportsl where people are telling us, as zara has, that— where people are telling us, as zara has, that this — where people are telling us, as zara has, that this has _ where people are telling us, as zara has, that this has been _ where people are telling us, as zara has, that this has been associated i has, that this has been associated with a _ has, that this has been associated with a pain — has, that this has been associated with a pain or— has, that this has been associated with a pain or mark— has, that this has been associated with a pain or mark on— has, that this has been associated with a pain or mark on the - has, that this has been associated with a pain or mark on the part. has, that this has been associated with a pain or mark on the part of| with a pain or mark on the part of their— with a pain or mark on the part of their body, — with a pain or mark on the part of their body, or— with a pain or mark on the part of their body, or a _ with a pain or mark on the part of their body, or a scratching - their body, or a scratching sensation, _ their body, or a scratching sensation, and _ their body, or a scratching sensation, and so- their body, or a scratching sensation, and so they - their body, or a scratching i sensation, and so they have their body, or a scratching - sensation, and so they have been physically— sensation, and so they have been physically spiked _ sensation, and so they have been physically spiked. obviously - sensation, and so they have been physically spiked. obviously we i sensation, and so they have been. physically spiked. obviously we are taking _ physically spiked. obviously we are taking these — physically spiked. obviously we are taking these reports _ physically spiked. obviously we are taking these reports very _ physically spiked. obviously we are| taking these reports very seriously. we have _ taking these reports very seriously. we have put— taking these reports very seriously. we have put dedicated _ taking these reports very seriously. we have put dedicated resources. taking these reports very seriously. i we have put dedicated resources into
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this to _ we have put dedicated resources into this to understand _ we have put dedicated resources into this to understand what _ we have put dedicated resources into this to understand what is _ this to understand what is happening _ this to understand what is happening we— this to understand what is happening. we are - this to understand what is - happening. we are investigating this to understand what is _ happening. we are investigating them more robustly— happening. we are investigating them more robustly my— happening. we are investigating them more robustly my cctv _ happening. we are investigating them more robustly my cctv inquiries, - more robustly my cctv inquiries, forensic— more robustly my cctv inquiries, forensic submissions, _ more robustly my cctv inquiries, forensic submissions, and - more robustly my cctv inquiries, i forensic submissions, and working closely— forensic submissions, and working closely with — forensic submissions, and working closely with all— forensic submissions, and working closely with all the _ forensic submissions, and working closely with all the licensed - closely with all the licensed premises _ closely with all the licensed premises in _ closely with all the licensed premises in the _ closely with all the licensed premises in the city - closely with all the licensed premises in the city centre. closely with all the licensed - premises in the city centre. fire closely with all the licensed premises in the city centre. are you offerin: premises in the city centre. are you offering any — premises in the city centre. are you offering any advice _ premises in the city centre. are you offering any advice or _ premises in the city centre. are you offering any advice or guidance - premises in the city centre. are you offering any advice or guidance to i offering any advice or guidance to people who may be going into nightclubs at the moment about how to protect themselves, or be more aware of this?— aware of this? nottingham is a really popular _ aware of this? nottingham is a really popular and _ aware of this? nottingham is a really popular and vibrant - aware of this? nottingham is a really popular and vibrant city. | aware of this? nottingham is a . really popular and vibrant city. we welcome — really popular and vibrant city. we welcome thousands of people into the i'iili'it welcome thousands of people into the night time _ welcome thousands of people into the night time economy every weekend to safely— night time economy every weekend to safely enjoy their evening. we work really— safely enjoy their evening. we work really hard — safely enjoy their evening. we work really hard with partners, venues, to ensure — really hard with partners, venues, to ensure the safety of people who are attending there. and our focus will be _ are attending there. and our focus will be on — are attending there. and our focus will be on any perpetrators. if we believe _ will be on any perpetrators. if we believe people are taking drugs or sharp— believe people are taking drugs or sharp objects into premises with the intention— sharp objects into premises with the intention of administering any substances to people, then we will obviously _ substances to people, then we will obviously take that really seriously, we will be investigating
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that and _ seriously, we will be investigating that and prosecuting anybody. someone like zara, who is with us this morning, is very openly talked about what happened to her. after the event, which is inevitably what is probably going to happen, someone wakes up in the morning and think they have a mark on their leg... in practical terms, they have a mark on their leg... in practicalterms, can they have a mark on their leg... in practical terms, can you tell if a needle has been injected? can you test their blood? what can you do? yes, we can do forensic examinations and we _ yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can— yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can look— yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can lookat— yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can look at the _ yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can look at the site _ yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can look at the site of- yes, we can do forensic examinations and we can look at the site of any - and we can look at the site of any mark— and we can look at the site of any mark and — and we can look at the site of any mark and use _ and we can look at the site of any mark and use medical— and we can look at the site of any mark and use medical experts - and we can look at the site of any mark and use medical experts to| and we can look at the site of any - mark and use medical experts to help with that _ mark and use medical experts to help with that but— mark and use medical experts to help with that. but yes, _ mark and use medical experts to help with that. but yes, it _ mark and use medical experts to help with that. but yes, it is _ mark and use medical experts to help with that. but yes, it is a _ with that. but yes, it is a challenge _ with that. but yes, it is a challenge if— with that. but yes, it is a challenge if people - with that. but yes, it is a challenge if people don'tj with that. but yes, it is a - challenge if people don't know with that. but yes, it is a _ challenge if people don't know when this might _ challenge if people don't know when this might have _ challenge if people don't know when this might have happened _ challenge if people don't know when this might have happened to- challenge if people don't know when this might have happened to them i this might have happened to them within— this might have happened to them within a _ this might have happened to them within a premises. _ this might have happened to them within a premises. from _ this might have happened to them within a premises. from those - this might have happened to theml within a premises. from those that have _ within a premises. from those that have made. — within a premises. from those that have made. who _ within a premises. from those that have made, who have _ within a premises. from those that have made, who have reported - within a premises. from those that i have made, who have reported being injected _ have made, who have reported being injected or— have made, who have reported being injected or scratched, _ have made, who have reported being injected or scratched, none _ have made, who have reported being injected or scratched, none of- have made, who have reported being injected or scratched, none of them i injected or scratched, none of them have seen— injected or scratched, none of them have seen anybody— injected or scratched, none of them have seen anybody do _ injected or scratched, none of them have seen anybody do this - injected or scratched, none of them have seen anybody do this to - injected or scratched, none of themj have seen anybody do this to them, so we _ have seen anybody do this to them, so we don't — have seen anybody do this to them, so we don't have _ have seen anybody do this to them, so we don't have any— have seen anybody do this to them, so we don't have any descriptions i have seen anybody do this to them, | so we don't have any descriptions to pass out _
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so we don't have any descriptions to pass out make _ so we don't have any descriptions to pass out. make these _ so we don't have any descriptions to pass out. make these reports - so we don't have any descriptions to pass out. make these reports of - pass out. make these reports of suspicious— pass out. make these reports of suspicious activity. _ pass out. make these reports of suspicious activity. we - pass out. make these reports of suspicious activity. we have - pass out. make these reports of i suspicious activity. we have made arrests _ suspicious activity. we have made arrests. someone _ suspicious activity. we have made arrests. someone who _ suspicious activity. we have made arrests. someone who felt - suspicious activity. we have made i arrests. someone who felt someone pass my— arrests. someone who felt someone pass my behaviour— arrests. someone who felt someone pass my behaviour was _ arrests. someone who felt someone pass my behaviour was suspicious. i pass my behaviour was suspicious. they— pass my behaviour was suspicious. they have — pass my behaviour was suspicious. they have been _ pass my behaviour was suspicious. they have been detained - pass my behaviour was suspicious. they have been detained by - pass my behaviour was suspicious. they have been detained by doori they have been detained by door staff _ they have been detained by door staff we — they have been detained by door staff we will _ they have been detained by door staff. we will always _ they have been detained by door staff. we will always take - they have been detained by door staff. we will always take actioni they have been detained by doori staff. we will always take action in relation _ staff. we will always take action in relation to— staff. we will always take action in relation to those. _ staff. we will always take action in relation to those.— relation to those. zara, did you reported? _ relation to those. zara, did you reported? has— relation to those. zara, did you reported? has anything - relation to those. zara, did you - reported? has anything happened? well, i reported on the saturday night _ well, i reported on the saturday night i— well, i reported on the saturday night. i was saying my story and everything. they asked for a you're in sample _ everything. they asked for a you're in sample to — everything. they asked for a you're in sample to test. i found at the next _ in sample to test. i found at the next day— in sample to test. i found at the next day i — in sample to test. i found at the next day i didn't need to. it had been _ next day i didn't need to. it had been awhile since the event. i had tried _ been awhile since the event. i had tried to _ been awhile since the event. i had tried to get — been awhile since the event. i had tried to get my blood tested at the hospital— tried to get my blood tested at the hospital through my gp because of the risk— hospital through my gp because of the risk of— hospital through my gp because of the risk of hiv with a dirty needle. but until— the risk of hiv with a dirty needle. but until now i have not received any treatment whatsoever to see if there _ any treatment whatsoever to see if there was — any treatment whatsoever to see if there was a — any treatment whatsoever to see if there was a drug in may, which al bestie _ there was a drug in may, which al bestie has— there was a drug in may, which al bestie has left my system now, to see if— bestie has left my system now, to see if i_ bestie has left my system now, to see if i am — bestie has left my system now, to see if i am a — bestie has left my system now, to see if i am a carrier of hepatitis b
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or hiv, _ see if i am a carrier of hepatitis b or hiv, if— see if i am a carrier of hepatitis b or hiv, ifi— see if i am a carrier of hepatitis b or hiv, if i was injected with a dirty— or hiv, if i was injected with a dirty needle. or hiv, if i was in'ected with a dirty needle.— or hiv, if i was in'ected with a dirty needle. or hiv, if i was in'ected with a di needle. , ., _ , ., dirty needle. obviously it will be a cause for concern. _ dirty needle. obviously it will be a cause for concern. glad _ dirty needle. obviously it will be a cause for concern. glad you - dirty needle. obviously it will be a cause for concern. glad you are i dirty needle. obviously it will be a i cause for concern. glad you are ok. thank you for sharing your story. thank you for sharing your story. thank you. and superintendent, thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. more than a quarter of school leaders in london say they are having to make cuts to balance a lack of government funding. the national association of headteachers say more than 35% will be forced to do so soon. the government says it's providing the biggest uplift to school funding in a decade. a candlelit vigil is being held tonight in memory of a 37—year—old woman who was killed in north london. nicole hurley was a mother of four who was found dead at her home in primrose hill ten days ago. a 40—year—old man has been
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charged with her murder. a photographer who has been capturing images of the capital's homeless says the conditions they live in here are worse than some refugee camps he's seen. anthony dawton usually travels the world taking photographs, but has spent the last 18 months in the city. he says he is shocked by the number of people who are homeless. there was a brief period — a fortnight, maximum — when many, many of the homeless seemed to have been taken off the streets. that lasted for a very short time. and now, today, i see more and more. these people are just like us and we need to look at them, we need to look after them — we must stop walking by. the mayor of london is to become the new chair of a global network of cities committed to tackling climate change. the organisation, known as c40, has members from 100 cities worldwide. sadiq khan will take over from the existing chair — the mayor of los angeles — at the cop26 in glasgow in november.
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lots of train cancellations this morning. there are minor delays on the northern line between kennington and battersea power station. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today, it's the last day of this very mild spell of weather across the capital. from tomorrow, things will be feeling an awful lot colder. now, plenty of wet and windy weather in the forecast for today, we're starting off with still this band of rain clearing eastwards, so it's a rather wet to start to the morning for most, and temperatures are in the mid—teens in celsius so it is a mild start. there will be some sunshine around at times today, but always the chance of some heavy, thundery downpours for much of the rest of the morning, and then another band of rain makes its presence known as we head through into the late afternoon — so it will be a rather wet end to the day. it stays windy throughout, top temperatures lower than they were yesterday — peaking at around 16 degrees celsius for many of us. and then we'll start to see some changes again overnight tonight. so our band of rain continues eastwards, there will be some more showers following on behind
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for a time, and it's a cooler start to the day tomorrow — we've now got a north—westerly wind ushering in that much colder—feeling air. so tomorrow a chillier—feeling day — a big drop in temperature, in fact, with highs of only ten to 12 or 13 degrees celsius for many of us, quite a bit of added wind chill. we're starting off with plenty of cloud and some showers, but there will be some sunshine emerging behind, and a much chillier night on thursday into friday — which is looking dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. health leaders are demanding the immediate introduction of some coronavirus restrictions in england to avoid "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures including face coverings in crowded spaces and a return to working from home, should be implemented.
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we're joined now by business secretary, kwasi kwarteng. very secretary, kwasi kwarteng. good morning to you, t kwarteng. very good morning to you, mr kwarteng— very good morning to you, mr kwarteng.- how - very good morning to you, mr kwarteng.- how do - very good morning to you, mr kwarteng.- how do you | very good morning to you, mr- kwarteng.- how do you assess kwarteng. hello. how do you assess the severity — kwarteng. hello. how do you assess the severity of _ kwarteng. hello. how do you assess the severity of the _ kwarteng. hello. how do you assess the severity of the situation - kwarteng. hello. how do you assess the severity of the situation we - kwarteng. hello. how do you assess the severity of the situation we are now in? , ., , , ., ., now in? obviously we are looking at data. ministers, _ now in? obviously we are looking at data. ministers, scientists, - now in? obviously we are looking at data. ministers, scientists, experts| data. ministers, scientists, experts are looking at data on an hourly basis and we don't feel that it is the time for plan b right now will stop i think what we are trying to do is get people who have not been vaccinated to get those vaccinations up, increase the uptake of the boosterjab, and what we have to remember in all of this is that the vaccination roll—out has actually allowed us to get back to some kind of normality. now, some of the data is critical, is going in a direction which we are concerned about, but if we look at the number of deaths and
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hospitalisation rates, those are much lower than they were at the beginning of the year and we feel the vaccine roll—out has been successful and we are going to have a good economic recovery, the fastest—growing country in the g7, 7.5% predicted this year, and we just want to keep going, keep the economy going and keep people getting back to normal life while obviously, as you say, looking critically at the data. we always need to put _ critically at the data. we always need to put the _ critically at the data. we always need to put the precautionary i critically at the data. we always - need to put the precautionary words in there. fastest—growing from the lowest point, that is the issue there, isn't it? let's go back to thoughts about what is happening right now. we were speaking a short time ago to adam finn, who is on the jcvi. in contrast to what you were saying a moment ago, he said the vaccine programme is not going to be a solution. if we want to reverse the current trend, we have got to do
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more. so that is adam finn from the jcvi saying you have to actively do something different. if i'm understanding what you are saying currently, the government position in england is that we are just going to hold on for a while longer and not do anything different. why are you so at odds with what thejcvi are saying? t you so at odds with what the jcvi are saying?— you so at odds with what the jcvi are saying? i am not so at odds, i don't think- _ are saying? i am not so at odds, i don't think. what _ are saying? i am not so at odds, i don't think. what we _ are saying? i am not so at odds, i don't think. what we are - are saying? i am not so at odds, i don't think. what we are trying i are saying? i am not so at odds, i don't think. what we are trying to j don't think. what we are trying to do, i am saying we have to increase take—up of the boosterjab, that is really important. that is not simply carrying on as before, we are actively encouraging people, we aged people in vulnerable groups to have a third jab and we are trying to push that, that will give us more protection. but what i am very keen to stress is that we have had our lockdown is, we have managed to reopen the economy successfully, we have managed to get people back to
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normal life, and those gains were very hard won and i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have lockdown is. i don't think it is necessary. but have lockdown is. i don't think it is necessary-— have lockdown is. i don't think it is necessary. but that is precisely the oint, is necessary. but that is precisely the point. isn't — is necessary. but that is precisely the point, isn't it? _ is necessary. but that is precisely the point, isn't it? that _ is necessary. but that is precisely the point, isn't it? that is - the point, isn't it? that is precisely what adam finn was saying. matthew taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation, they are saying precisely that. now is the time to act, to do something. for example, face masks. if nothing else, to encourage people, officially, a government message saying we encourage people. not obligate people to wear face masks more often, encourage them. now is the time when you can actively affect the growing infection rate. so, as i have tried to say, the infection rate was always likely to go infection rate was always likely to 9° up, infection rate was always likely to go up, increase as we opened up the economy because as people go back to normal life, the infection rate was bound to go up. but what was
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critically important was the hospitalisation rate white which is also going up, mr kwarteng. i need to interrupt you because the hospital rate is going up. neil ferguson talked about being comfortable because we always knew the rate was go up. currently, he is expecting the doubling time in the infection rate at about five weeks. the situation is that if nothing is done differently, in five weeks' time, those infection rates have doubled. now, surely, if you know that, that is the modelling, why would you not do something now rather than wait and watch a? this t rather than wait and watch a? as i have said. — rather than wait and watch a? as i have said. we _ rather than wait and watch a? is i have said, we review the data. rather than wait and watch a? is t have said, we review the data. we are not waiting and watching, we are simply trying to analyse data as we see it and come up with the right... the right policies. now, that is
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something which could change, but at the moment we think that the course we are plotting is the right one, and as you remember, all through this period we have had people experts say that lockdown should be longer, we should go back into lockdown, other people have been saying that we shouldn't have lockdown. and we have had a balanced approach as a government and i think, so far, even though i don't want to inject any hint of complacency, i think so far our approach is working. th complacency, i think so far our approach is working.— complacency, i think so far our approach is working. in what sense? for: ive approach is working. in what sense? forgive me--- _ approach is working. in what sense? forgive me... if— approach is working. in what sense? forgive me... if the _ approach is working. in what sense? forgive me... if the situation - approach is working. in what sense? forgive me... if the situation we - forgive me... if the situation we have, according _ forgive me... if the situation we have, according to _ forgive me... if the situation we have, according to the _ forgive me... if the situation we | have, according to the statistics, either at the infection rate is growing, the death rate is growing, the hospitalisation rate is growing, so the policy you have got is working in what respect? so. so the policy you have got is working in what respect? so, if you look at the — working in what respect? so, if you look at the beginning _ working in what respect? so, if you look at the beginning of _ working in what respect? so, if you look at the beginning of the - working in what respect? so, if you look at the beginning of the year, i look at the beginning of the year, when we had a maximum of huge daily toll of deaths, the rates now, even
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though it has picked up a little bit, is much lower, as is the hospitalisation rates, and this is a virus that we are learning to live with. now, clearly, any increase is concerning and we are monitoring the data, as i say, on a daily basis, but for now we think that this policy is working. it can be reviewed at any stage. we talk to the experts you have quoted, but i don't see any cause for changing the course at this minute.— don't see any cause for changing the course at this minute. would you, as the government _ course at this minute. would you, as the government minister _ course at this minute. would you, as the government minister we - course at this minute. would you, as the government minister we are - the government minister we are speaking to today, for example, encourage people, actively encourage people, to wear face encourage people, actively encourage people, to wearface masks routinely? t people, to wear face masks routinely?— people, to wear face masks routinel ? . . ., routinely? i wear a face mask in ublic routinely? i wear a face mask in public places. — routinely? i wear a face mask in public places, particularly - routinely? i wear a face mask in public places, particularly on . public places, particularly on public places, particularly on public transport, and people generally, as i notice, on the tube in london, tend to wear... they do wearface masks, and face masks are worn, so that is something which i
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think is a good thing. so worn, so that is something which i think is a good thing.— worn, so that is something which i think is a good thing. so you would encouraue think is a good thing. so you would encourage more _ think is a good thing. so you would encourage more people _ think is a good thing. so you would encourage more people to - think is a good thing. so you would encourage more people to do - think is a good thing. so you would| encourage more people to do that? think is a good thing. so you would i encourage more people to do that? i think people should do what they feel, you know, what they feel is the right thing to do stop i think they have to be respectful to other people, keep themselves safe, and the public, as well.— the public, as well. there are real concerns today _ the public, as well. there are real concerns today and _ the public, as well. there are real concerns today and you _ the public, as well. there are real concerns today and you will- the public, as well. there are real concerns today and you will have i concerns today and you will have seen at 7am the latest inflation rate figure of 3.1%. that is causing people quite a lot of hardship in terms of the regular cost of living. you know very well about this. what are your concerns for people's weekly, daily bills? t are your concerns for people's weekly, daily bills?— are your concerns for people's weekly, daily bills? i think it is a real cause _ weekly, daily bills? i think it is a real cause of _ weekly, daily bills? i think it is a real cause of some _ weekly, daily bills? i think it is a real cause of some concern - weekly, daily bills? i think it is a . real cause of some concern because clearly we want inflation rates to be lower. you mentioned this, one of the causes are slightly higher inflation is the fact that the economy is rebounding, and you have made the point that it was from a low point but it is still a fast rebound and when you see quite, you know, strong economic growth, there
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is always the danger you will have inflation. another critical question is, how long will that inflation last were i speak to the governor of the bank of they are hopeful that the bank of they are hopeful that the inflation rate will be contained, that is something they are looking at actively, and you will note the bank of england is responsible for the interest rate, which is clearly a big tool in terms of dealing with inflation.— which is clearly a big tool in terms of dealing with inflation. would you like to share _ of dealing with inflation. would you like to share some _ of dealing with inflation. would you like to share some of— of dealing with inflation. would you like to share some of that. .. - of dealing with inflation. would you like to share some of that. .. as - of dealing with inflation. would you like to share some of that. .. as i i like to share some of that... as i understand it, the bank of england is talking about inflation possibly reaching 4%. i though the numbers you are talking about? t reaching 4%. i though the numbers you are talking about?— you are talking about? i read all sorts of things. _ you are talking about? i read all sorts of things. i _ you are talking about? i read all sorts of things. i am _ you are talking about? i read all sorts of things. i am asking - you are talking about? i read all i sorts of things. i am asking about our sorts of things. i am asking about your conversations _ sorts of things. i am asking about your conversations yellow - sorts of things. i am asking about your conversations yellow and, i sorts of things. i am asking about i your conversations yellow and, well, there was private conversations. t there was private conversations. i read lots of analysis from city economists and there is a debate at the moment as to how long this inflation will last. i'm confident that it will be contained, but we will have to wait and see. do you
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think people _ will have to wait and see. do you think people who _ will have to wait and see. do you think people who are _ will have to wait and see. do you think people who are on - will have to wait and see. do you think people who are on a - will have to wait and see. do you i think people who are on a modest will have to wait and see. do you - think people who are on a modest or low incomes... i am talking about the green push we had a lot of detail on yesterday. how is it that those people are going to be able to afford the new boilers they are going to be encouraged to come up with a grant of £5,000, which has been welcomed in many areas... how is it that those people are going to have enough money to afford the extra for the sum of £11,000 cost of the new environmentally friendly boilers? ., ., ~' ~' the new environmentally friendly boilers? ~ ., , boilers? look, ithink that is something — boilers? look, ithink that is something which _ boilers? look, ithink that is something which is - boilers? look, ithink that is something which is not - boilers? look, ithink that is| something which is not going boilers? look, i think that is . something which is not going to boilers? look, i think that is - something which is not going to be forced on people tomorrow or next week. it is something that will be phased in over the next few years and, as you said, there will be lots of support for people to make that transition. we don't want to simply impose costs and impose, you know, change on people who can't afford it, and that is why we have committed i think £450 million to the boiler upgrade grant yesterday
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and we have got lots of schemes where we can try and bring people along with us by people in this country who want to say, the majority of whom want to see change and climate change addressed to bring us through the transition. it is not something we want to impose, you know, as a government, and people, nor do we want to impose additional costs and burdens, we need to bring people with us and thatis need to bring people with us and that is why we have a number of schemes that help people adopt new technology. schemes that help people adopt new technolo: . . . schemes that help people adopt new technolo: . . , ., schemes that help people adopt new technolo: . . , . . ~ technology. kwasi kwarteng, thank ou for technology. kwasi kwarteng, thank you for your _ technology. kwasi kwarteng, thank you for your time _ technology. kwasi kwarteng, thank you for your time this _ technology. kwasi kwarteng, thank you for your time this morning. - you for your time this morning. thank you. a little while ago we were looking for one particular image. here it is. it sums up the night, sums up his season so far, no salah, when you are assessing performance levels, when you consider he has scored in nine consecutive matches now, the vessel liverpool player ever to do that, —— mo salah. it says it all. where he stands alongside the best
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in the world. he keeps producing and he did so on the biggest stage of all. it was quite a night for liverpool against atletico madrid. 3—2 the final score in a match that had everything. salah gave them an early lead. goal of the night came from naby keita, his volley put them two up. but atletico would soon be back in it, thanks to two first half goals from antoine griezmann. he was then sent off. mo salah winning it from the penalty spot. 12 goals in 12 games for him. not the cleanest of victories but a win's a win forjurgen klopp. with ten men they were quite intense to play. er... but the dirty three points are very often the most important and they were dirty tonight, of course. it's not our best football, but we got them and that's a big step. elsewhere, a new name to look out for — teenager cole palmer scored his first champions league goal as they beat bruges 5—1. he'd only been on the field a couple of minutes.
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guardiola calling it one of their best european performances. so what can we expect of city's latest academy graduate? i know how it works with the younger players in all the countries, especially this one, as well, so it is the calm, be patient, like we have done with phil. his position is the second team, he is taking on our rhythm and principles and of course he is a playerfor ourfuture. talking of special players... what about this from lionel messi? scores level at 2—2 in their champions league tie. he scored a classy penalty that won it for paris saint—germain against leipzig. a little reminder he's still up there with the very best. celtic just about kept their europa league knockout hopes alive beating hungarian champions ferencvaros. it was a great opener, kyogo furuhashi with a sublime bit of control
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afterjota's pass. but they only made sure of the win late on, they had a golden chance, which went down as own goal that put them two up, leaving them third in group g. scotland's cricketers are one win away from qualifying for the next stage of the men's t20 world cup. they beat papua new guinea by 17 runs, their second vioctory this week. richie berrington top scored with 70 off 49 balls before taking an excellent catch as papua new guinea fell short of their target. scotland will progress to the main group stage if they beat oman tomorrow. we'll be hearing from cameron norrie, the new british men's number one, on the programme later. andy murray, though, offering up a little reminder of what took him to the top. another battling perofrmance and another victory another battling performance and another victory over a top 50 player, beating the american frances tiafoe.
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amazingly every set went to a tie break. he said after he'd never played a match like that, to come through his opening match of the european open. he plays his second round match tomorrow. the current england men's football has been one of the most successful, reaching the final of a major tournament for the first time since 1966. it's also one of the most diverse. but they have had difficulties to overcome too, facing racist abuse in wc qualifiers, and after losing to italy on penalties in that final in the euros. and its a challenge they ve met head on, with black players and staff from inside the camp taking the lead. as part of black history month, alex howell has been talking to some of those leaders. bukayo saka, step up and take huge responsibility on his young shoulders. i rememberjust standing there thinking, you know, he's going to need support, and who do you want around you? you want your family, normally. well, he can't get to them yet. so ijust felt, i'm standing with you.
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i've grown to really - like and support these guys, but every single one, - not only the black players, but there is a connection - because of our backgrounds. chris powell is one of the most visible black coaches in the country, and over the last two years has been part of england's recent tournament success. a former international himself, he's seen progress both on and off the pitch. my generation, you know, i was fortunate enough to play this wonderful game. i couldn't really have the voice we wanted, we couldn't really speak up. john barnes now. john barnes, one of the greatest players to play in this country and play for england. might go all the way for england, barnes... he scored arguably one of the best goals ever for england away in brazil, and he flew home, there was national front on the plane. now, he couldn't say anything. now, i think people of all backgrounds are quite happy to speak about treatment of others,
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and not be afraid. if anyone's ever going - through something, you know, i off the pitch, whether it be racial, | we'll always speak about it and see what the best solution is. we're such a tight—knit squad, we come together, whether it be an on—the—field issue _ or an off—the—field issue. the visible black leadership doesn't stop in the senior side. the england under—21s captain marc guehi understands the importance of his role. for loads of kids out there, seeing someone like me, or someone that they look like, you know, in a position of, you know, privilege and responsibility, i think it's a really massive thing. when you grow up in an african home, as well, like mine, you know, i've got amazing leaders in my mum, in my dad, you know, uncles and aunties, as well. i was definitely someone that was there for my team—mates, trying to help them in any way i can. even now i'm still learning and trying to be the best leader i can possibly be.
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having leaders throughout the setup that players feel they can go to means that even in one of england's most heartbreaking moments, there was something positive for players and coaches to look at. we all have our part to play, every single one of us. i actually said it to them, because of raheem, because of tyrone, because of marcus, you don't realise how powerful you guys are now. alex howell, bbc news. fascinating to hear from chris powell and i guess it illustrates the importance of visibility, certainly within the england setup and the relationship he has with the young black players and how much he has helped them. you think about the racist abuse they have experience in batches, the fallout from that penalty shoot out and the racist abuse suffered online after the euros. having him there has been crucial. ., ,., euros. having him there has been crucial. ., , ., crucial. there are some young leaders in _ crucial. there are some young leaders in that _ crucial. there are some young leaders in that team, - crucial. there are some young leaders in that team, which i crucial. there are some young leaders in that team, which is | crucial. there are some young -
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leaders in that team, which is great to see. �* ., .,, to see. and gareth southgate has been keen to _ to see. and gareth southgate has been keen to promote _ to see. and gareth southgate has been keen to promote that. - to see. and gareth southgate has| been keen to promote that. thank to see. and gareth southgate has - been keen to promote that. thank you ve much, been keen to promote that. thank you very much. see _ been keen to promote that. thank you very much. see you — been keen to promote that. thank you very much, see you later _ been keen to promote that. thank you very much, see you later on. - been keen to promote that. thank you very much, see you later on. how- been keen to promote that. thank you very much, see you later on. how is. very much, see you later on. how is carol doing? wednesday morning, how's it going?— carol doing? wednesday morning, how's it going? well, not too badly, actuall , how's it going? well, not too badly, actually. thank _ how's it going? well, not too badly, actually, thank you. _ how's it going? well, not too badly, actually, thank you. good _ how's it going? well, not too badly, actually, thank you. good morning. | actually, thank you. good morning. weather—wise we have a touch of everything — weather—wise we have a touch of everything in the weather and over the next _ everything in the weather and over the next couple of days. we are looking — the next couple of days. we are looking at — the next couple of days. we are looking at a mild day again, not quite _ looking at a mild day again, not quite the — looking at a mild day again, not quite the dizzy heights of yesterday, and sunshine and showers, and some _ yesterday, and sunshine and showers, and some starting off with sums loose _ and some starting off with sums loose skies. not all of us, some starting — loose skies. not all of us, some starting up _ loose skies. not all of us, some starting up like this with a lot of cloud _ starting up like this with a lot of cloud, drizzle or rain or some heavy showers _ cloud, drizzle or rain or some heavy showers and — cloud, drizzle or rain or some heavy showers and gusty winds, as you can see in— showers and gusty winds, as you can see in eastbourne. here it is mild and it— see in eastbourne. here it is mild and it will— see in eastbourne. here it is mild and it will be mild for all of us today— and it will be mild for all of us today but— and it will be mild for all of us today but look what happens tonight and tomorrow. the blues across our charts, _ and tomorrow. the blues across our charts, bridges will plummet that it will be _ charts, bridges will plummet that it will be short—lived because with then— will be short—lived because with then have — will be short—lived because with then have our next batch of milder air by— then have our next batch of milder air by comparison coming our way as we head _ air by comparison coming our way as we head through the weekend. we have had some _ we head through the weekend. we have had some torrential rain moving eastwards— had some torrential rain moving eastwards through the course of the night, _
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eastwards through the course of the night, still— eastwards through the course of the night, still with us in the south—east but look at all of this. heavy. _ south—east but look at all of this. heavy, thundery, downpours, coming in from _ heavy, thundery, downpours, coming in from the _ heavy, thundery, downpours, coming in from the south—west accompanied by gusty— in from the south—west accompanied by gusty winds, moving steadily north—east was. we do think it is moving _ north—east was. we do think it is moving a — north—east was. we do think it is moving a bit— north—east was. we do think it is moving a bit faster than the charts suggest. _ moving a bit faster than the charts suggest, so it will push up through the midlands, eventually getting up towards _ the midlands, eventually getting up towards northern england. for scotland. _ towards northern england. for scotland, northern ireland, you have a drier— scotland, northern ireland, you have a drier day— scotland, northern ireland, you have a drier day in— scotland, northern ireland, you have a drier day in prospect with some sunshine — a drier day in prospect with some sunshine. having said that, some showers — sunshine. having said that, some showers in — sunshine. having said that, some showers in the north—west and then we have _ showers in the north—west and then we have in— showers in the north—west and then we have in that weather front coming our way _ we have in that weather front coming our way in _ we have in that weather front coming our way in from the north. you can see the _ our way in from the north. you can see the progress that these heavy thundery— see the progress that these heavy thundery showers make, than should ease the _ thundery showers make, than should ease the afternoon but they will be replaced _ ease the afternoon but they will be replaced in the south—west by more showers. _ replaced in the south—west by more showers, gusty winds through the english _ showers, gusty winds through the english channel and southern coastal counties _ english channel and southern coastal counties as— english channel and southern coastal counties as well as the channel islands — counties as well as the channel islands. temperatures from 18 to 11 degrees _ islands. temperatures from 18 to 11 degrees in — islands. temperatures from 18 to 11 degrees. in the south we still have a south—westerly wind but behind this weather front the wind fears and changes to more of a northerly wind, _ and changes to more of a northerly wind which — and changes to more of a northerly wind, which is a colder direction for us — wind, which is a colder direction for us. overnight the showers continue _ for us. overnight the showers continue to be heavy across southern
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areas, _ continue to be heavy across southern areas. where — continue to be heavy across southern areas, where the front seating south, — areas, where the front seating south, we _ areas, where the front seating south, we all the time, cold air filtering — south, we all the time, cold air filtering in _ south, we all the time, cold air filtering in behind it. a lot of showers _ filtering in behind it. a lot of showers around and they are likely to be _ showers around and they are likely to be wintry and higher ground. as far south— to be wintry and higher ground. as far south as — to be wintry and higher ground. as far south as north wales. even though— far south as north wales. even though it — far south as north wales. even though it will be a windy night we can still— though it will be a windy night we can still see a touch of frost in some — can still see a touch of frost in some sheltered glens. we eventually say about _ some sheltered glens. we eventually say about as relevant tomorrow and a lot of _ say about as relevant tomorrow and a lot of sunshine but this show is coming — lot of sunshine but this show is coming in — lot of sunshine but this show is coming in from the strong north—westerly winds, still wintry in the _ north—westerly winds, still wintry in the hills— north—westerly winds, still wintry in the hills that have gales down that noisy— in the hills that have gales down that noisy coastline and we have the spring _ that noisy coastline and we have the spring tide — that noisy coastline and we have the spring tide. note the difference of the temperatures, six to 13 degrees and it— the temperatures, six to 13 degrees and it will— the temperatures, six to 13 degrees and it will feel colder than that because — and it will feel colder than that because of the wind chill. on friday something — because of the wind chill. on friday something milder and dry comes our way, once _ something milder and dry comes our way, once again we will have brightness in the east coming in from _ brightness in the east coming in from the — brightness in the east coming in from the west with my showers but the winds— from the west with my showers but the winds will ease and those are our temperatures, the winds will ease and those are ourtemperatures, eight to the winds will ease and those are our temperatures, eight to about 40 degrees, _ our temperatures, eight to about 40 degrees, so — our temperatures, eight to about 40 degrees, so not quite tropical but better— degrees, so not quite tropical but better than it will be on their state — better than it will be on their state. . .. better than it will be on their
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state. . ~' , ., better than it will be on their state._ pleasure. | the queen may be 95 but she has turned down the oldie of the year trophy because she feels she doesn't meet the criteria. the monarch "politely but firmly" declined the award saying you're only as old as you feel. so is age just a number? dave guest has been to a bingo hall in wigan to find out. age. 52. it's a numbers game. 57. but how old do you have to be... 74. ..to be considered old? 81. i would say 65. 70, 75, i'd say. anything from, like, 50 onwards. 50? 50, i would say, yeah. well, they say you're only as old as you feel, but who exactly are they? well, they include her majesty the queen. as probably the world's most famous nonogenarian the oldie of the year award thought she'd be
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the ideal recipient. but the 95—year—old monarch politely declined, saying she didn't believe she fitted the criteria, as one is only as old as one feels. her majesty gave no clue as to what this was in her case, but is her premise correct? are you only as old as you feel? i'm 64. and how old do you feel? about 24! 72. and how old do you feel? about 60. so what is your advice, your secret, whatever you want to call it, feeling younger than your years? keep coming to bingo, morning, noon and night. yeah. her majesty's late husband, duke of edinburgh, received the award in 2011. but it seems she has no intention of following suit. dave guest, bbc news, wigan. broadcaster gyles brandreth chairs the oldie of the year awards, hejoins us now. good morning. great to see you. is this the best response you have ever had about these awards? mellie this the best response you have ever had about these awards?— had about these awards? well, it's very exciting _ had about these awards? well, it's very exciting to _ had about these awards? well, it's very exciting to get _ had about these awards? well, it's very exciting to get one _ had about these awards? well, it's very exciting to get one of - had about these awards? well, it's very exciting to get one of these i very exciting to get one of these letters with a wonderful... it came
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from a moral castle, i couldn't have been more excited. but then when i read it, her majesty believes you are as old as you feel, and as such the queen does not believe she meets the queen does not believe she meets the relevant criteria to be able to accept and hope you will find a more where that recipient, and indeed we did find where the recipient, we were very lucky that her royal highness the duchess of cornwall who is a spring chicken in her early 70s came along to present the awards. one of the winners this year was delia smith, the great cook, who has turned 80, amazingly, he reminded us that actually your soul does not age, your body does as the years go by but your soul does not. we had two doctors from blackburn who receive the awards and they are both still practising in their 805. gps in blackburn saving the nhs between a for more than 110 years. the idea of the award is to reward people who still have snapped in their salary.
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marvellous! taste still have snapped in their salary. marvellous!— still have snapped in their salary. marvellous! ~ ., , still have snapped in their salary. marvellous! . ., , , marvellous! we thought she might be eliaible but marvellous! we thought she might be eligible but clearly _ marvellous! we thought she might be eligible but clearly she _ marvellous! we thought she might be eligible but clearly she is _ marvellous! we thought she might be eligible but clearly she is far - marvellous! we thought she might be eligible but clearly she is far too - eligible but clearly she is far too young —— snapped in their celery. maybe she will feel more like accepting in a few years. has its set ou accepting in a few years. has its set you back _ accepting in a few years. has its set you back rather? _ accepting in a few years. has its set you back rather? you - accepting in a few years. has its set you back rather? you are . accepting in a few years. has its set you back rather? you are an j set you back rather? you are an immensely positive person but you must have chatted about it and thought what a wonderful idea, send a letter, penned it all properly. what was your letter of commendation, what did it say? tt commendation, what did it say? tt came about because maureen lipman, newly again, had just met the queen had just visited coronation street. we were having the judges meeting and said the queen is in such marvellous form, and we have just had the pandemic and she is out and about, she clearly has snap in her celery and that wonderful speech, we will meet again, she is the ideal person. and her mother, the late queen elizabeth the queen mother had accepted one of these awards a few years ago. the duke of edinburgh,
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talking as a backhanded comment, when he got the award at about 98 when he got the award at about 98 when he got the award at about 98 when he said i suppose it is nice to be remembered, thank you for reminding me that bits are falling off. he accepted it so we thought the time was right. i wrote after the time was right. i wrote after the queen at balmoral castle and received this reply and i have to say, when you look at the papers today, there are pictures of the queen at windsor castle meeting a whole crowd of international business people, you see what her diary is for the autumn, how she will be at the cup meeting in glasgow —— the cop in glasgow, the platinumjubilee glasgow —— the cop in glasgow, the platinum jubilee next year, obviously he doesn't have time so we have given the award this year to an array of remarkable people including sir geoff hurst who is younger than the queen, and he is pretty fit. he is turning 80 and looks pretty sharp and could score a goal or two. leslie carol, the internationalfilm
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star, she is now 90, she got an award. but the queen, who is the oldest of the lot, well, just felt far too young for it! one of the people she knows, a lady called margaret, who managed to knit the whole of sandringham house, a huge model made of knitting wool, she is 92 and needed it to raise money for charities. she was another of our oldies of the year. all of these people have snapped in their celery and are, as the queen says, as young as they feel. taste and are, as the queen says, as young as they feel-— as they feel. we have 'ust seen ima . es as they feel. we have 'ust seen images of h as they feel. we have 'ust seen images of that - as they feel. we have just seen images of that fantastic - as they feel. we have just seen images of that fantastic knitted j images of that fantastic knitted castle. it is amazing. do you think the queen is right when she tells you that her philosophy is you are only as old as you feel? what is your take on this?— only as old as you feel? what is your take on this? well, i tell you what my take _ your take on this? well, i tell you what my take is, _ your take on this? well, i tell you what my take is, and _ your take on this? well, i tell you what my take is, and i _ your take on this? well, i tell you what my take is, and i was - your take on this? well, i tell you what my take is, and i was very i what my take is, and i was very lucky that i knew the duke of edinburgh because i was the chairman
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of one of his charities and he believed in looking up and out and knock down and in and he believed in keeping busy, keep on going. that was his philosophy. you may remember at the last of the jubilees how they were on that boat and the rain was coming down but they were there, rain orshine, the coming down but they were there, rain or shine, the queen keeps going and i think that is what she will do. t and i think that is what she will do. . , . . and i think that is what she will do. . , ., ., ., ., do. i really what we are asking in a wa how do. i really what we are asking in a way how old _ do. i really what we are asking in a way how old are — do. i really what we are asking in a way how old are you? _ do. i really what we are asking in a way how old are you? are - do. i really what we are asking in a way how old are you? are we - way how old are you? are we allowed... way how old are you? are we allowed- - -— allowed... you certainly are allowed! — allowed... you certainly are allowed! younger _ allowed... you certainly are allowed! younger than - allowed... you certainly are - allowed! younger than springtime is the answer. i am 73. i am 73. right. but how the answer. i am 73. i am 73. right. itut how old — the answer. i am 73. i am 73. right. itut how old do _ the answer. i am 73. i am 73. right. but how old do you _ the answer. i am 73. i am 73. right. but how old do you feel? _ the answer. i am 73. i am 73. right. but how old do you feel? just - but how old do you feel? just startini but how old do you feel? just starting out? _ but how old do you feel? just starting out? how _ but how old do you feel? just starting out? how old - but how old do you feel? just starting out? how old do - but how old do you feel? just starting out? how old do you| but how old do you feel? just - starting out? how old do you feel? about 18. starting out? how old do you feel? about 18- my _ starting out? how old do you feel? about 18. my wife _ starting out? how old do you feel? about 18. my wife says, _ starting out? how old do you feel? about 18. my wife says, but - starting out? how old do you feel? about 18. my wife says, but you i about 18. my wife says, but you behave as if you were 11! time to grow up. she would like me to act more like my age.— grow up. she would like me to act more like my age. people to achieve aie at
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more like my age. people to achieve age at different _ more like my age. people to achieve age at different times. _ more like my age. people to achieve age at different times. when - more like my age. people to achieve age at different times. when you . age at different times. when you are... picking age, 40, 50, did you think in your head, you are thinking, 73 sounds... you know, that sounds probably elderly, and now you either and you are thinking, do you know what? i can do whatever... life is good, full of opportunity. t whatever... life is good, full of opportunity-— opportunity. ithink activity, i reall do opportunity. ithink activity, i really do think— opportunity. ithink activity, i really do think activity - opportunity. ithink activity, i really do think activity is - really do think activity is important. when i was ten years of age, my headmaster said to me, busy people are happy people and i always remember that. people are happy people and i always rememberthat. i people are happy people and i always remember that. i think having a purpose in life is key and also being part of the network is key. we all need to be part of leaves on a tree, part of something growing larger than ourselves and still developing and as long as you have connections with other people and as long as you are busy, i think you will be happy and you can feel youthful and you obviously have to try to keep fit, as well. tt’s youthful and you obviously have to try to keep fit, as well.— try to keep fit, as well. it's been lovely talking — try to keep fit, as well. it's been lovely talking to _ try to keep fit, as well. it's been lovely talking to you _ try to keep fit, as well. it's been lovely talking to you once - try to keep fit, as well. it's been lovely talking to you once again, thank you very much. house lovely talking to you once again, thank you very much.— lovely talking to you once again, thank you very much. how old do you feel? it depends _
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thank you very much. how old do you feel? it depends on _ thank you very much. how old do you feel? it depends on the _ thank you very much. how old do you feel? it depends on the day, - thank you very much. how old do you feel? it depends on the day, it - feel? it depends on the day, it de-ends feel? it depends on the day, it depends on — feel? it depends on the day, it depends on the _ feel? it depends on the day, it depends on the day, _ feel? it depends on the day, it depends on the day, really. i i feel? it depends on the day, it i depends on the day, really. i feel 27. . depends on the day, really. i feel 27- - right _ depends on the day, really. i feel 27. . right there. _ stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. our headlines today. health leaders call for the immediate return of covid restrictions, as they warn the nhs in england is stumbling into a winter crisis.
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the government says the current rules are working. i don't want to reverse back to a situation — i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have locked downs — situation where we have locked downs i — situation where we have locked downs. i don't think it is necessary. price rises continue with inflation at 3.1%. transport, food and household services are costing more. how long will it last? and what does it means for businesses and household budgets? kevin sinfield is the rugby league star who raised millions for motor neurone disease research — now he's about to take on an even tougher challenge. he's here to reveal all why high drama and hollywood style stunts are making a splash on corination street this week good morning. another mild day ahead. sunshine and showers. some of the showers are fairly potent, thundery with gusty winds. rain to clear the south—east. details coming up.
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good morning. it's wednesday the 20th of october. our main story. health leaders are demanding the immediate introduction of some coronavirus restrictions in england to avoid "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures, including face coverings in crowded spaces, should be implemented. here's our health editor hugh pym. the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. relying on the vaccine programme to kind of take care of the problem
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relying on the vaccine programme to kind of take care of the problem is not going to be a solution, i'm afraid. these vaccines are extremely good at preventing you from ending up good at preventing you from ending up in hospital or on a ventilator, or even dying from this infection, but their ability to stop you actually getting the infection at all, or pass it on, are modest. it obviously contributes to reducing transmission of the virus but by no means solves the problem. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance
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of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. in the last half hour, the business secretary told us he doesn't think there is any need for another lockdown. we've had our lock downs. we've managed — we've had our lock downs. we've managed to reopen the economy successfully. we've managed to get people _ successfully. we've managed to get people back to normal life. and those _ people back to normal life. and those gains were very hard won. and i those gains were very hard won. and i don't _ those gains were very hard won. and i don't want — those gains were very hard won. and i don't want to reverse back to a situation — i don't want to reverse back to a situation where we have locked downs — situation where we have locked downs i — situation where we have locked downs. i don't think it is necessary. we're joined now by our medical editor, fergus walsh. morning, fergus. what pressures are on the nhs as we head into the winter? there is a lot of concern from health — there is a lot of concern from health leaders about where things are heading. around one in five icu beds _ are heading. around one in five icu beds are _ are heading. around one in five icu beds are currently occupied by covid
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patients _ beds are currently occupied by covid patients. now that may not sound a lot in— patients. now that may not sound a lot in terms— patients. now that may not sound a lot in terms of, that leaves 80%, and it— lot in terms of, that leaves 80%, and it is— lot in terms of, that leaves 80%, and it is a — lot in terms of, that leaves 80%, and it is a lot lower than we saw in wintet _ and it is a lot lower than we saw in wintet 0f— and it is a lot lower than we saw in winter. of the nhs has been coping with covid _ winter. of the nhs has been coping with covid now for nearly two years and staff— with covid now for nearly two years and staff are exhausted. and what we have to _ and staff are exhausted. and what we have to look _ and staff are exhausted. and what we have to look at are trends in terms of covid _ have to look at are trends in terms of covid. both hospital admissions and deaths are increasing by more than about— and deaths are increasing by more than about 10% over the past week. now, _ than about 10% over the past week. now. they— than about 10% over the past week. now, they are still way lower than they were — now, they are still way lower than they were injanuary, about one fifth of— they were injanuary, about one fifth of the level of daily hospital admissions. back injanuary we were getting _ admissions. back injanuary we were getting 4000 covid admissions a day. and it's _ getting 4000 covid admissions a day. and it's now— getting 4000 covid admissions a day. and it's now below 1000. and we had a bi- and it's now below 1000. and we had a big number of deaths yesterday, more _ a big number of deaths yesterday, more than — a big number of deaths yesterday, more than 200. although they often are higher— more than 200. although they often are higher on tuesday. and looking
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at the _ are higher on tuesday. and looking at the trend, there are going in the wrong _ at the trend, there are going in the wrong way — at the trend, there are going in the wrong way. and that is the concern. and on— wrong way. and that is the concern. and on top— wrong way. and that is the concern. and on top of— wrong way. and that is the concern. and on top of that we have got everything else that traditionally comes— everything else that traditionally comes in— everything else that traditionally comes in winter. we have got a potential— comes in winter. we have got a potential rise in flu cases, flu is very— potential rise in flu cases, flu is very unpredictable. and we have got other— very unpredictable. and we have got other winter viruses. and we have .ot other winter viruses. and we have got record — other winter viruses. and we have got record waiting lists. looking at it all in_ got record waiting lists. looking at it all in the — got record waiting lists. looking at it all in the round, that is why nhs leaders _ it all in the round, that is why nhs leaders are — it all in the round, that is why nhs leaders are so worried. vaccination is still seen as the main tool to combat covid—19, but rates and doses being administered are lagging, aren't they? yes. the uk was really at the forefront _ yes. the uk was really at the forefront at the beginning, the first country to license a covid vaccine — first country to license a covid vaccine back in december last year. and in_ vaccine back in december last year. and in some — vaccine back in december last year. and in some ways it is slightly a victim _ and in some ways it is slightly a victim of— and in some ways it is slightly a victim of its own success because, although— victim of its own success because, although the vaccines do give very strong _ although the vaccines do give very strong protection, it does wane
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slightly — strong protection, it does wane slightly. and so, the uk's covid rates _ slightly. and so, the uk's covid rates are — slightly. and so, the uk's covid rates are well above those in most of the _ rates are well above those in most of the rest — rates are well above those in most of the rest of europe. now back in september, we had the plan to immunise _ september, we had the plan to immunise more than 30 million people with booster doses, more than six months _ with booster doses, more than six months after their second dose. under— months after their second dose. under 4— months after their second dose. under 4 million have received a third _ under 4 million have received a third else _ under 4 million have received a third else. but that still leaves millions— third else. but that still leaves millions more eligible who either have not— millions more eligible who either have not been called or have not come _ have not been called or have not come forward. then the other area is boosters. _ come forward. then the other area is boosters, boost tos for children 12 to 15—year—olds. in scotland that my is about _ to 15—year—olds. in scotland that my is about 15% — to 15—year—olds. in scotland that my is about 15% who have had a dose. yesterday— is about 15% who have had a dose. yesterday the government made it clear they— yesterday the government made it clear they they would encourage parents — clear they they would encourage parents to take their children to vaccine — parents to take their children to vaccine centre is to try and pick up
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the pace _ vaccine centre is to try and pick up the pace of— vaccine centre is to try and pick up the pace of immunisation. fergus, _ the pace of immunisation. fergus, thank you very much indeed. fergus, thank you very much indeed. fergus walsh. fergus, thank you very much indeed. fergus walsh-— fergus walsh. let's talk to nina about inflation _ fergus walsh. let's talk to nina about inflation figures. - fergus walsh. let's talk to nina | about inflation figures. statistics out of this morning. this affects people, doesn't it? it is all your spending. tt people, doesn't it? it is all your spending. it is how far our it is all your spending. it is how far your pot _ it is all your spending. it is how far your pot of _ it is all your spending. it is how far your pot of money - it is all your spending. it is how far your pot of money will - it is all your spending. it is how far your pot of money will go i far your pot of money will go compared to how much things are costing. good morning. how quickly a going cute —— up? that's the question inflation answers — by scrutinising a typical "basket of goods" taken from hundreds of goods and services. for the month of september inflation was 3.1%. slightly lower than 3.2% the month before — but still uncomfortably high. why? you won't be surprised — increases in food prices, transport costs, and household services like having building and plumbing work done. that's been offset though by prices of hotels and restaurants not increasing as quickly. 3.1% is much higher than the bank of england's target of 2% ; that's where growth is steady,
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and businesses can plan. the recent average has been beyond that. the governor has said he will have to act to slow things down. quite possibly meaning increasing interest rates slightly. that encourages people to save and discourages people from taking on debt. should we be worried? well, we are in an extraordinary period of spending. we are coming out of a lockdown. this acceleration was predicted and shouldn't, theoretically, keep going. but what it means for your pocket is significant. for public sector workers who have had a pay freeze, for people on universal credit losing their top up, and for businesses seeking to recover things are feeling tough. and the warning is that this will increase for the next few months. tough times ahead. thank you. police are investigating a number of reports from women
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them incapacitated and with memory loss. victims say they have been pierced with a needle in their leg, hands and back, it's led to calls for a boycott of nightclubs in at least 30 towns and cities. over the last few months we have seen _ over the last few months we have seen an— over the last few months we have seen an increase in reports where people _ seen an increase in reports where people believe that drugs may have been put _ people believe that drugs may have been put in their drink, due to the fact they— been put in their drink, due to the fact they have experienced a distinctly different feeling to their— distinctly different feeling to their normal reaction to alcohol. but we _ their normal reaction to alcohol. but we have also received a small number— but we have also received a small number of— but we have also received a small number of reports where people are telling _ number of reports where people are telling us, _ number of reports where people are telling us, as zara has, that this has been — telling us, as zara has, that this has been associated with a pain or a mark— has been associated with a pain or a mark on _ has been associated with a pain or a mark on a _ has been associated with a pain or a mark on a part of their body. 11 mark on a part of their body. it minutes— mark on a part of their body. 11 minutes past eight. now it is time for carol, who has been predicting things getting a little bit colder. morning. time for the big coat? that's right. not today but tomorrow. good morning. it is still mild today but tomorrow you will really notice the difference in the
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temperature. today is notjust mild, it is fairly unsettled and changeable. lovely picture here from poole in dorset. we have had some torrential rain pulling in from the south—west, some heavy thundery downpours, and we have still got some rain to lose from the south—east. the rain from the south eastis south—east. the rain from the south east is moving —— west is moving eastwards. it will be replaced later in the west by further heavy showers and gusty winds through the english channel, southern counties of england and the channel islands. in between these two areas we should see some brightness and sunny spells developed. ahead of them in northern ireland and scotland, again a lot of dry weather. sunshine for you. through the day we have got a weather front coming in across the north west, introducing some rain. note the change in the wind direction to a northerly. it will turn colder. this is what is bringing the cold weather. in the south—west there are still south—westerly winds. this evening and overnight these showers gather force and move across southern england and south wales. a weather
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front in northern scotland sinks south. clear skies behind. front in northern scotland sinks south. clearskies behind. it front in northern scotland sinks south. clear skies behind. it is going to be windy and that wind will blow in a lot of showers, which will be wintry on higher ground. as far south as north wales. it is also going to be a cold night. tomorrow then we start off with the remnants of this front, moving away. a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine but it will be a windy day. showers packing in on that went from the north west. gusty winds down the north west. gusty winds down the north sea coastline. look at these temperatures. six to maybe 15 degrees. add on the wind chill and it will feel colder than that. get your coat out for tomorrow. thank you. seven marathons in seven days — that was the gruelling challenge taken on by kevin sinfield last year, to help his former leeds rhinos team mate rob burrow, who is living with motor neurone disease. kevin's amazing act of friendship raised more than £2 million. and now he wants to push himself even further with his latest endeavour,
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as graham satchell reports dramatic music plays. december last year, and an extraordinary challenge. rugby league legend kevin sinfield running seven marathons in seven days. this is a sensational try! there aren't many in super league who can do that. why seven? it was the number worn by his team—mate and best friend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2019. the run raised millions of pounds for the mnd association. but now there's a new challenge. it was kev's idea. he wanted something hard. and this seemed hard. this is going to be really challenging. the medical team at leeds at university checking fitness levels. they will play a key part in what kevin has planned next. he is going to run 100 miles in 24 hours, almost four marathons back to back,
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with no sleep. when you think about the seven in seven and what an unbelievable achievement that was, but that was four hours on, 20 hours off. he is not going to sleep. so, it is going to be tough and there are serious risks. kev will do it. he will need the support of everybody, but the support team and everybody in the country to get behind him, but he will absolutely do it. the route takes kev from the leicester tigers stadium where he is a coach, through nottingham, mansfield and rotherham, to the leeds rhinos ground. tom is a key part of the team. he has plotted the route. if you are running that distance, any hills and elevation is going to be a problem really, in that you ideally want it as flat as possible. but obviously if you are covering such a large part of the country, avoiding all hills is almost impossible. the money kev has already raised has helped countless families with mnd, like kirsty.
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i'd like to thank kevin for everyone with mnd, good luck. and if kev needed any more motivation, listen to this from rob's family. 100 miles in one day, without no sleep? you are crazy! you know we think you are amazing. thank you for doing everything you have done for my dad and people with mnd. good luck on your next challenge. when kevin sinfield reaches the leeds rhinos ground he will actually have run 101 miles, fitting for a man who has always gone the extra mile. that was a report by graham satchell. we're nowjoined by kevin sinfield and campaigner cris hoskin, who lost six family members to mnd. and sports scientist,
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professor greg whyte, also joins us from marlow. chris, we are going to come to you in a second because we have spoken before. i know your story is amazing. but kevin... are you mad? how on earth are you going to do this? ., how on earth are you going to do this? . ., , ., ., ~' how on earth are you going to do this? . ., , ., ., ,, ., ., this? yeah, really looking forward to it, actually. _ this? yeah, really looking forward to it, actually. i— this? yeah, really looking forward to it, actually. ithink— this? yeah, really looking forward to it, actually. i think what - this? yeah, really looking forward to it, actually. i think what we - this? yeah, really looking forward to it, actually. i think what we did| to it, actually. i think what we did last year— to it, actually. i think what we did last year was incredible for all of us. last year was incredible for all of us and — last year was incredible for all of us and to— last year was incredible for all of us. and to get another chance to show— us. and to get another chance to show how— us. and to get another chance to show how much we care is really important — show how much we care is really important. we look to go again. let's _ important. we look to go again. let's talk— important. we look to go again. let's talk through the actual challenge. you are going to leave from your current club, which is leicester, then you are going to run onto to get to leeds? yes. leicester, then you are going to run onto to get to leeds?— onto to get to leeds? yes. yeah, since the seven _ onto to get to leeds? yes. yeah, since the seven in _ onto to get to leeds? yes. yeah, since the seven in seven - onto to get to leeds? yes. yeah, since the seven in seven we - onto to get to leeds? yes. yeah, since the seven in seven we have| since the seven in seven we have racked _ since the seven in seven we have racked our— since the seven in seven we have racked our brains of what to do next _ racked our brains of what to do next. people got behind it so much and really—
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next. people got behind it so much and really enjoyed it too. to find something that groups people is tough _ something that groups people is tough but it made sense. i came across— tough but it made sense. i came across something called big dogs backyard — across something called big dogs backyard ultra, which is a race in america — backyard ultra, which is a race in america it — backyard ultra, which is a race in america. it was on your site actually _ america. it was on your site actually. that inspired me. it is a run that— actually. that inspired me. it is a run that takes place every hour at a certain— run that takes place every hour at a certain distance. we said let's do this 24—hour is. i switched to rugby union. _ this 24—hour is. i switched to rugby union. i— this 24—hour is. i switched to rugby union. i am — this 24—hour is. i switched to rugby union. iam at— this 24—hour is. i switched to rugby union, i am at leicester tigers now. worked _ union, i am at leicester tigers now. worked out — union, i am at leicester tigers now. worked out the distance between leicester — worked out the distance between leicester and leeds. you get to around — leicester and leeds. you get to around that 100 miles mark. just as well it wasn't _ around that 100 miles mark. just as well it wasn't for _ around that 100 miles mark. just as well it wasn't for really, _ around that 100 miles mark. just as well it wasn't for really, isn't - around that 100 miles mark. just as well it wasn't for really, isn't it? . well it wasn't for really, isn't it? it is, yeah. well it wasn't for really, isn't it? it is, yeah-— well it wasn't for really, isn't it? itis, eah. ., ., . ., ., it is, yeah. you have affected a lot of --eole it is, yeah. you have affected a lot of people with _ it is, yeah. you have affected a lot of people with what _ it is, yeah. you have affected a lot of people with what you _ it is, yeah. you have affected a lot of people with what you are - it is, yeah. you have affected a lotj of people with what you are doing. rob obviously has. and chris, you have. we slightly deliberately kept due to a part of this morning. you have not met before. you have been very much affected because of your
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own personal story. just so people understand, that i know you want to talk to kevin in a moment, would you mind just explaining to us, because we said about the loss in your family? we said about the loss in your famil ? . we said about the loss in your famil ? , .,, , we said about the loss in your famil ? , , ., family? yes, the loss started with my grandad _ family? yes, the loss started with my grandad in _ family? yes, the loss started with my grandad in the _ family? yes, the loss started with my grandad in the 1930s. - family? yes, the loss started with my grandad in the 1930s. mnd . family? yes, the loss started with - my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around _ my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then— my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then as — my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then as such. _ my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then as such. in— my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then as such. in 1991, - my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then as such. in 1991, my- my grandad in the 1930s. mnd wasn't around then as such. in 1991, my dad | around then as such. in 1991, my dad passed _ around then as such. in 1991, my dad passed away — around then as such. in 1991, my dad passed away in— around then as such. in 1991, my dad passed away. in 2005, _ around then as such. in 1991, my dad passed away. in 2005, my— around then as such. in 1991, my dad passed away. in 2005, my youngestl passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died — passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at— passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at the — passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at the age _ passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at the age of— passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at the age of 27 _ passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at the age of 27 with - passed away. in 2005, my youngest son died at the age of 27 with mnd.| son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an _ son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an uncle — son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an uncle and _ son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an uncle and a _ son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an uncle and a cousin - son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an uncle and a cousin in - son died at the age of 27 with mnd. then an uncle and a cousin in 2013. then an uncle and a cousin in 2013 and 2014 — then an uncle and a cousin in 2013 and 2014 and _ then an uncle and a cousin in 2013 and 2014. and just _ then an uncle and a cousin in 2013 and 2014. and just this— then an uncle and a cousin in 2013 and 2014. and just thisjanuary, i then an uncle and a cousin in 2013i and 2014. and just thisjanuary, my one remaining— and 2014. and just thisjanuary, my one remaining song, _ and 2014. and just thisjanuary, my one remaining song, the _ and 2014. and just thisjanuary, my one remaining song, the age - and 2014. and just thisjanuary, my one remaining song, the age of- and 2014. and just thisjanuary, my one remaining song, the age of 45, died of— one remaining song, the age of 45, died of mnd~ — one remaining song, the age of 45, died of mnd~ so— one remaining song, the age of 45, died of mnd. so it's— one remaining song, the age of 45, died of mnd. so it's kind _ one remaining song, the age of 45, died of mnd. so it's kind of, - one remaining song, the age of 45, died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's- died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's 'ust died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's just there — died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's just there with _ died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's just there with us _ died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's just there with us all— died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's just there with us all the - died of mnd. so it's kind of, it's just there with us all the time. i just there with us all the time. well, — just there with us all the time. well, i— just there with us all the time. well, i wiii— just there with us all the time. well, i will say _ just there with us all the time. well, i will say on _ just there with us all the time. well, i will say on behalf - just there with us all the time. well, i will say on behalf of. well, i will say on behalf of everyone listening to the story, i am so sorry for your loss because it has been over a long period of time. kevin, that is so shocking?— kevin, that is so shocking? yeah, it's devastating. _ kevin, that is so shocking? yeah, it's devastating. and _ kevin, that is so shocking? yeah, it's devastating. and i _ kevin, that is so shocking? yeah, it's devastating. and i think- kevin, that is so shocking? yeah, it's devastating. and i think for i it's devastating. and i think for people — it's devastating. and i think for people like chris, to see the devastation that has been caused is
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why we _ devastation that has been caused is why we are — devastation that has been caused is why we are trying to help, trying to provide _ why we are trying to help, trying to provide a _ why we are trying to help, trying to provide a bit of hope. is why we are trying to help, trying to provide a bit of hope.— provide a bit of hope. is there an hini provide a bit of hope. is there anything you _ provide a bit of hope. is there anything you want _ provide a bit of hope. is there anything you want to - provide a bit of hope. is there anything you want to set - provide a bit of hope. is there anything you want to set to i provide a bit of hope. is there . anything you want to set to kevin directly? anything you want to set to kevin directl ? . anything you want to set to kevin directl ? , ., ~' directly? yes, i do. i think kevin ou are directly? yes, i do. i think kevin you are an _ directly? yes, i do. i think kevin you are an amazing _ directly? yes, i do. i think kevin you are an amazing person - directly? yes, i do. i think kevin you are an amazing person and i directly? yes, i do. i think kevin i you are an amazing person and the things— you are an amazing person and the things that — you are an amazing person and the things that you _ you are an amazing person and the things that you are _ you are an amazing person and the things that you are doing _ you are an amazing person and thej things that you are doing stemmed from a _ things that you are doing stemmed from a friendship _ things that you are doing stemmed from a friendship between - things that you are doing stemmed from a friendship between you - things that you are doing stemmed from a friendship between you and | from a friendship between you and rob _ from a friendship between you and rob but _ from a friendship between you and rob but i — from a friendship between you and rob but i don't _ from a friendship between you and rob. but i don't think— from a friendship between you and rob. but i don't think you - from a friendship between you and rob. but i don't think you realise i rob. but i don't think you realise the bigger— rob. but i don't think you realise the bigger picture _ rob. but i don't think you realise the bigger picture of— rob. but i don't think you realise the bigger picture of what - rob. but i don't think you realise the bigger picture of what it - rob. but i don't think you realisej the bigger picture of what it does for us _ the bigger picture of what it does for us i— the bigger picture of what it does for us i also— the bigger picture of what it does for us. i also volunteer— the bigger picture of what it does for us. i also volunteer for- the bigger picture of what it does for us. i also volunteer for the . the bigger picture of what it does i for us. i also volunteer for the mnd association — for us. i also volunteer for the mnd association. and _ for us. i also volunteer for the mnd association. and i— for us. i also volunteer for the mnd association. and i know— for us. i also volunteer for the mnd association. and i know that - for us. i also volunteer for the mnd association. and i know that your. association. and i know that your challenge — association. and i know that your challenge is— association. and i know that your challenge is going _ association. and i know that your challenge is going to _ association. and i know that your challenge is going to help - association. and i know that your challenge is going to help us - association. and i know that your challenge is going to help us at i association. and i know that your. challenge is going to help us at the association — challenge is going to help us at the association to— challenge is going to help us at the association to look— challenge is going to help us at the association to look further- challenge is going to help us at the association to look further into - association to look further into research — association to look further into research. that _ association to look further into research. that is _ association to look further into research. that is really- association to look further into i research. that is really important because — research. that is really important because it — research. that is really important because it last _ research. that is really important because it last time _ research. that is really important because it last time we _ research. that is really important because it last time we were - research. that is really important because it last time we were on i research. that is really important i because it last time we were on the programme — because it last time we were on the programme we _ because it last time we were on the programme we were _ because it last time we were on the programme we were talking - because it last time we were on the programme we were talking about i because it last time we were on the i programme we were talking about the importance _ programme we were talking about the importance of— programme we were talking about the importance of research _ programme we were talking about the importance of research and _ programme we were talking about the importance of research and the - importance of research and the funding — importance of research and the funding that _ importance of research and the funding that we _ importance of research and the funding that we were _ importance of research and the funding that we were trying - importance of research and the funding that we were trying toi importance of research and the i funding that we were trying to get from the — funding that we were trying to get from the government. _ funding that we were trying to get from the government. but - funding that we were trying to get| from the government. but beyond that, _ from the government. but beyond that, although _ from the government. but beyond that, although some _ from the government. but beyond that, although some of— from the government. but beyond that, although some of us- from the government. but beyond that, although some of us who - from the government. but beyondj that, although some of us who are volunteering, _ that, although some of us who are volunteering, you _ that, although some of us who are volunteering, you give _ that, although some of us who are volunteering, you give us - volunteering, you give us inspiration _ volunteering, you give us inspiration. you - volunteering, you give us inspiration. you give - volunteering, you give us inspiration. you give us. volunteering, you give us - inspiration. you give us inspiration to try— inspiration. you give us inspiration to try to— inspiration. you give us inspiration to try to find — inspiration. you give us inspiration to try to find different _ inspiration. you give us inspiration to try to find different ideas. - inspiration. you give us inspiration to try to find different ideas. you i to try to find different ideas. you .ive to try to find different ideas. you give us _ to try to find different ideas. you give us hope _ to try to find different ideas. you give us hope that— to try to find different ideas. you give us hope that there - to try to find different ideas. you give us hope that there may- to try to find different ideas. you give us hope that there may be i to try to find different ideas. you give us hope that there may be a future _ give us hope that there may be a future. because _ give us hope that there may be a future. because without - give us hope that there may be a future. because without hope - give us hope that there may be a future. because without hope i. future. because without hope i couldn't— future. because without hope i couldn't live _ future. because without hope i couldn't live like _ future. because without hope i couldn't live like i— future. because without hope i couldn't live like i do. - future. because without hope i couldn't live like i do. it's- couldn't live like i do. it's impossible. _ couldn't live like i do. it's impossible. and - couldn't live like i do. it's impossible. and then- couldn't live like i do. it's. impossible. and then when i couldn't live like i do. it's- impossible. and then when i see couldn't live like i do. it's— impossible. and then when i see you, i impossible. and then when i see you, i think. _ impossible. and then when i see you, i think. do— impossible. and then when i see you, i think. do you — impossible. and then when i see you, i think, do you know— impossible. and then when i see you, i think, do you know what? _ impossible. and then when i see you, i think, do you know what? i- impossible. and then when i see you, i think, do you know what? i am - i think, do you know what? i am going _ i think, do you know what? i am going to — i think, do you know what? i am going to do _
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i think, do you know what? i am going to do what _ i think, do you know what? i am going to do what i _ i think, do you know what? i am going to do what i can. - i think, do you know what? i am going to do what i can. so - i think, do you know what? i am going to do what i can. so i - i think, do you know what? i am going to do what i can. so i do i i think, do you know what? i am - going to do what i can. so i do what i going to do what i can. so i do what i can— going to do what i can. so i do what ican in— going to do what i can. so i do what ican in my— going to do what i can. so i do what i can in my little _ going to do what i can. so i do what i can in my little way. _ going to do what i can. so i do what i can in my little way. but— going to do what i can. so i do what i can in my little way. but going - i can in my little way. but going back— i can in my little way. but going back to — i can in my little way. but going back to my— i can in my little way. but going back to my story, _ i can in my little way. but going back to my story, when - i can in my little way. but going back to my story, when my- i can in my little way. but going back to my story, when my dad| i can in my little way. but going - back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, _ back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, when— back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, when i — back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, when i said _ back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, when i said mnd— back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, when i said mnd very- back to my story, when my dad died in 1991, when i said mnd very few. in 1991, when i said mnd very few people _ in1991, when i said mnd very few people knew— in 1991, when i said mnd very few people knew what _ in 1991, when i said mnd very few people knew what i _ in 1991, when i said mnd very few people knew what i was _ in 1991, when i said mnd very few people knew what i was talking i people knew what i was talking about — people knew what i was talking about now _ people knew what i was talking about. now they _ people knew what i was talking about. now they do. _ people knew what i was talking about. now they do. and - people knew what i was talking about. now they do. and that i people knew what i was talkingi about. now they do. and that is partly— about. now they do. and that is partly down _ about. now they do. and that is partly down to _ about. now they do. and that is partly down to people _ about. now they do. and that is partly down to people like - about. now they do. and that is - partly down to people like yourself. and i— partly down to people like yourself. and i think— partly down to people like yourself. and i think from _ partly down to people like yourself. and i think from the _ partly down to people like yourself. and i think from the whole - partly down to people like yourself. and i think from the whole of - partly down to people like yourself. and i think from the whole of the i and i think from the whole of the mnd— and i think from the whole of the mnd family. _ and i think from the whole of the mnd family, mnd— and i think from the whole of the mnd family, mnd warriors, - and i think from the whole of the | mnd family, mnd warriors, mnd patients, — mnd family, mnd warriors, mnd patients, mnd— mnd family, mnd warriors, mnd patients, mnd association, - mnd family, mnd warriors, mnd patients, mnd association, i- mnd family, mnd warriors, mnd| patients, mnd association, i want mnd family, mnd warriors, mnd. patients, mnd association, i want to .ive patients, mnd association, i want to give you _ patients, mnd association, i want to give you a _ patients, mnd association, i want to give you a massive _ patients, mnd association, i want to give you a massive heartfelt - patients, mnd association, i want to give you a massive heartfelt thank i give you a massive heartfelt thank you. give you a massive heartfelt thank ou. . ~' give you a massive heartfelt thank ou. . ~ , ., give you a massive heartfelt thank ou. . .. ,, is give you a massive heartfelt thank you-_ is that _ give you a massive heartfelt thank you._ is that going - give you a massive heartfelt thank you._ is that going to i you. thank you. is that going to hel ou you. thank you. is that going to help you along _ you. thank you. is that going to help you along that _ you. thank you. is that going to help you along that 101 - you. thank you. is that going to help you along that 101 mile - help you along that 101 mile journey? help you along that 101 mile 'ourne ? , , help you along that 101 mile | journey?_ because help you along that 101 mile - journey?_ because the journey? definitely. because the imortant journey? definitely. because the important thing _ journey? definitely. because the important thing to _ journey? definitely. because the important thing to remember. journey? definitely. because the i important thing to remember about this challenge, i know it's meant to be 100 miles, but it is 101. that's why it's the extra mile. yeah. how much help are you going to have along the way? its. much help are you going to have along the way?— much help are you going to have aloni the wa ? . ., ., along the way? a lot. the same team as last year. — along the way? a lot. the same team as last year, which _ along the way? a lot. the same team as last year, which is _ along the way? a lot. the same team as last year, which is brilliant, - as last year, which is brilliant, getting — as last year, which is brilliant, getting everybody back together. because — getting everybody back together. because of the restrictions in place with covid — because of the restrictions in place with covid last year it was massively condensed and shortened.
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hopefully— massively condensed and shortened. hopefully this year people can come out and _ hopefully this year people can come out and support. and yeah, people beeping _ out and support. and yeah, people beeping their hornss last year, just made _ beeping their hornss last year, just made such— beeping their hornss last year, just made such a difference. you beeping their hornss last year, 'ust made such a difference- made such a difference. you know what i'm mindful— made such a difference. you know what i'm mindful of _ made such a difference. you know what i'm mindful of sitting - made such a difference. you know what i'm mindful of sitting here i what i'm mindful of sitting here with you two? it is beautiful what you said. i am so conscious, kevin, you said. i am so conscious, kevin, you are so much happier talking about the running and the tooting of the horns than you are hearing the tributes. but it's real, isn't it? you know this. you must have people having these conversations routinely all the time, people you have never spoken to?— spoken to? yeah, the response has been incredible. _ spoken to? yeah, the response has been incredible. i've _ spoken to? yeah, the response has been incredible. i've been - spoken to? yeah, the response has been incredible. i've been called i been incredible. i've been called lots of— been incredible. i've been called lots of things since the seven and seven _ lots of things since the seven and seven, people told me the marathon man now. _ seven, people told me the marathon man now, which is crazy. we set out trying _ man now, which is crazy. we set out trying to _ man now, which is crazy. we set out trying to do — man now, which is crazy. we set out trying to do something for a mate. when _ trying to do something for a mate. when i _ trying to do something for a mate. when i read about this challenge and what we _ when i read about this challenge and what we are attempting, 16 times harder— what we are attempting, 16 times harder than a marathon. to step up from _ harder than a marathon. to step up from a _
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harder than a marathon. to step up from a marathon to 100 miles, you should _ from a marathon to 100 miles, you should have — from a marathon to 100 miles, you should have six to nine months of training — should have six to nine months of training. but the reality is people diagnosed with mnd don't always get six months. we have to go for it. i'm six months. we have to go for it. i'm going — six months. we have to go for it. i'm going to— six months. we have to go for it. i'm going to talk about something on the telly we have never spoken publicly about before. day five of the seven in seven, i don't even think you remember this, but we have all seen those pictures of you running your seven marathons in seven days, day five was a real challenge. you are not well, were you? you are not in brilliant physical shape. your body was starting to react significantly to what, to the challenge. i was worried about you on day five and i found one very special person, an endurance athlete specialist dr greg white. morning, greg. do you rememberthat, white. morning, greg. do you remember that, when i got in touch and i said, i'm worried? you went
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puffy faced...? and i said, i'm worried? you went puffy faced- - - ?— and i said, i'm worried? you went puffy faced. . . ? yes, my body started to swell. puffy faced. . . ? yes, my body started to swell- and — puffy faced. . . ? yes, my body started to swell- and i _ puffy faced. . . ? yes, my body started to swell. and i thought, _ puffy faced. . . ? yes, my body started to swell. and i thought, oh _ puffy faced. . . ? yes, my body started to swell. and i thought, oh my - to swell. and i thought, oh my goodness. _ to swell. and i thought, oh my goodness. we _ to swell. and i thought, oh my goodness, we are _ to swell. and i thought, oh my goodness, we are going - to swell. and i thought, oh my goodness, we are going to - to swell. and i thought, oh my goodness, we are going to kill| to swell. and i thought, oh my - goodness, we are going to kill him. found greg. you goodness, we are going to kill him. found greg-— found greg. you take up the story. you contacted _ found greg. you take up the story. you contacted me _ found greg. you take up the story. you contacted me and _ found greg. you take up the story. you contacted me and i _ found greg. you take up the story. i you contacted me and i immediately knew what— you contacted me and i immediately knew what it — you contacted me and i immediately knew what it was. _ you contacted me and i immediately knew what it was. it _ you contacted me and i immediately knew what it was. it is _ you contacted me and i immediately knew what it was. it is so _ you contacted me and i immediately knew what it was. it is so common i you contacted me and i immediatelyi knew what it was. it is so common on these _ knew what it was. it is so common on these type _ knew what it was. it is so common on these type of— knew what it was. it is so common on these type of challenges. _ knew what it was. it is so common on these type of challenges. what - knew what it was. it is so common on these type of challenges. what we . these type of challenges. what we have to _ these type of challenges. what we have to imagine _ these type of challenges. what we have to imagine is— these type of challenges. what we have to imagine is that _ these type of challenges. what we have to imagine is that these - these type of challenges. what we l have to imagine is that these types of challenge — have to imagine is that these types of challenge are _ have to imagine is that these types of challenge are a _ have to imagine is that these types of challenge are a massive - have to imagine is that these types of challenge are a massive physical assault— of challenge are a massive physical assault on— of challenge are a massive physical assault on the _ of challenge are a massive physical assault on the body. _ of challenge are a massive physical assault on the body. often - of challenge are a massive physical assault on the body. often we - of challenge are a massive physical| assault on the body. often we think about— assault on the body. often we think about the _ assault on the body. often we think about the legs _ assault on the body. often we think about the legs and _ assault on the body. often we think about the legs and the _ assault on the body. often we think about the legs and the feed. - assault on the body. often we think about the legs and the feed. you i about the legs and the feed. you imagine — about the legs and the feed. you imagine what _ about the legs and the feed. you imagine what is— about the legs and the feed. you imagine what is going _ about the legs and the feed. you imagine what is going on - about the legs and the feed. you imagine what is going on inside i about the legs and the feed. youi imagine what is going on inside of the body — imagine what is going on inside of the body what— imagine what is going on inside of the body. what you _ imagine what is going on inside of the body. what you get _ imagine what is going on inside of the body. what you get is - imagine what is going on inside of the body. what you get is the - imagine what is going on inside ofi the body. what you get is the huge inflammatory— the body. what you get is the huge inflammatory response. _ the body. what you get is the huge inflammatory response. so - the body. what you get is the huge inflammatory response. so what i the body. what you get is the huge . inflammatory response. so what kevin has just _ inflammatory response. so what kevin hasjust described, _ inflammatory response. so what kevin hasjust described, this— inflammatory response. so what kevin hasjust described, this puffiness, - hasjust described, this puffiness, even _ hasjust described, this puffiness, even in _ hasjust described, this puffiness, even in places— hasjust described, this puffiness, even in places like _ hasjust described, this puffiness, even in places like the _ hasjust described, this puffiness, even in places like the hands, - hasjust described, this puffiness, i even in places like the hands, where you don't— even in places like the hands, where you don't expect _ even in places like the hands, where you don't expect it, _ even in places like the hands, where you don't expect it, and _ even in places like the hands, where you don't expect it, and what- even in places like the hands, where you don't expect it, and what then i you don't expect it, and what then also does — you don't expect it, and what then also does is — you don't expect it, and what then also does is a _ you don't expect it, and what then also does is a cascade _ you don't expect it, and what then also does is a cascade from - you don't expect it, and what then also does is a cascade from that i also does is a cascade from that which _ also does is a cascade from that which can— also does is a cascade from that which can often _ also does is a cascade from that which can often make _ also does is a cascade from that which can often make you - also does is a cascade from that which can often make you feel i also does is a cascade from that i which can often make you feel like you have _ which can often make you feel like you have got — which can often make you feel like you have got the _ which can often make you feel like you have got the flu. _ which can often make you feel like you have got the flu. you - which can often make you feel like you have got the flu. you feel- which can often make you feel like you have got the flu. you feel hoti you have got the flu. you feel hot and sweaty — you have got the flu. you feel hot and sweaty, particularly- you have got the flu. you feel hot and sweaty, particularly at - you have got the flu. you feel hot and sweaty, particularly at night i and sweaty, particularly at night when _ and sweaty, particularly at night when you — and sweaty, particularly at night when you sleep _ and sweaty, particularly at night when you sleep. kevin - and sweaty, particularly at night when you sleep. kevin has - and sweaty, particularly at night - when you sleep. kevin has described it beautifully. — when you sleep. kevin has described it beautifully, making _ when you sleep. kevin has described it beautifully, making sure _ when you sleep. kevin has described it beautifully, making sure you - when you sleep. kevin has described it beautifully, making sure you have| it beautifully, making sure you have .ot it beautifully, making sure you have got the _ it beautifully, making sure you have got the right— it beautifully, making sure you have got the right people _ it beautifully, making sure you have got the right people looking - it beautifully, making sure you have got the right people looking after. got the right people looking after you to _ got the right people looking after you to make _ got the right people looking after you to make sure _ got the right people looking after you to make sure that _ got the right people looking after you to make sure that you - got the right people looking after you to make sure that you tackle| you to make sure that you tackle those _ you to make sure that you tackle those kind — you to make sure that you tackle those kind of— you to make sure that you tackle those kind of problems - you to make sure that you tackle those kind of problems as - you to make sure that you tackle those kind of problems as you i you to make sure that you tackle|
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those kind of problems as you go along _ those kind of problems as you go along is— those kind of problems as you go along is absolutely— those kind of problems as you go along is absolutely crucial- those kind of problems as you go along is absolutely crucial to - those kind of problems as you go along is absolutely crucial to geti along is absolutely crucial to get to the _ along is absolutely crucial to get to the finish _ along is absolutely crucial to get to the finish line. _ along is absolutely crucial to get to the finish line.— to the finish line. what does he need to do _ to the finish line. what does he need to do for— to the finish line. what does he need to do for this _ to the finish line. what does he need to do for this next - to the finish line. what does he - need to do for this next challenge? work as hard as he possibly can! it's work as hard as he possibly can! it's a _ work as hard as he possibly can! it's a very — work as hard as he possibly can! it's a very. very— work as hard as he possibly can! it's a very, very tough _ work as hard as he possibly can! | it's a very, very tough challenge. and the — it's a very, very tough challenge. and the real— it's a very, very tough challenge. and the real top _ it's a very, very tough challenge. and the real top piece _ it's a very, very tough challenge. and the real top piece is, - it's a very, very tough challenge. and the real top piece is, often i it's a very, very tough challenge. i and the real top piece is, often you look at _ and the real top piece is, often you look at it— and the real top piece is, often you look at it and — and the real top piece is, often you look at it and you _ and the real top piece is, often you look at it and you think— and the real top piece is, often you look at it and you think seven - look at it and you think seven kilometres— look at it and you think seven kilometres in— look at it and you think seven kilometres in an _ look at it and you think seven kilometres in an hour, - look at it and you think seven kilometres in an hour, no- look at it and you think seven - kilometres in an hour, no problem. it is kilometres in an hour, no problem. it is repeating — kilometres in an hour, no problem. it is repeating that— kilometres in an hour, no problem. it is repeating that for— kilometres in an hour, no problem. it is repeating that for 24 _ kilometres in an hour, no problem. it is repeating that for 24 hours- it is repeating that for 24 hours solid _ it is repeating that for 24 hours solid not— it is repeating that for 24 hours solid. not only _ it is repeating that for 24 hours solid. not only have _ it is repeating that for 24 hours solid. not only have you - it is repeating that for 24 hours solid. not only have you got. it is repeating that for 24 hoursi solid. not only have you got the physical— solid. not only have you got the physical demands, _ solid. not only have you got the physical demands, but - solid. not only have you got the physical demands, but it- solid. not only have you got the physical demands, but it is- solid. not only have you got the physical demands, but it is the. physical demands, but it is the sleep — physical demands, but it is the sleep deprivation _ physical demands, but it is the sleep deprivation that - physical demands, but it is the sleep deprivation that will- physical demands, but it is the. sleep deprivation that will really start to — sleep deprivation that will really start to take _ sleep deprivation that will really start to take its _ sleep deprivation that will really start to take its toll. _ sleep deprivation that will really start to take its toll. i— sleep deprivation that will really start to take its toll. i think - sleep deprivation that will really start to take its toll. i think the i start to take its toll. i think the key to— start to take its toll. i think the key to it — start to take its toll. i think the key to it for— start to take its toll. i think the key to it for kevin _ start to take its toll. i think the key to it for kevin is _ start to take its toll. i think the key to it for kevin is really - start to take its toll. i think the key to it for kevin is really to i key to it for kevin is really to make — key to it for kevin is really to make sure _ key to it for kevin is really to make sure you _ key to it for kevin is really to make sure you can _ key to it for kevin is really to make sure you can make - key to it for kevin is really to make sure you can make thej key to it for kevin is really to - make sure you can make the absolute most of _ make sure you can make the absolute most of those — make sure you can make the absolute most of those recovery _ make sure you can make the absolute most of those recovery periods - make sure you can make the absolute most of those recovery periods in - most of those recovery periods in those _ most of those recovery periods in those hours _ most of those recovery periods in those hours. they— most of those recovery periods in those hours. they will— most of those recovery periods in those hours. they will be - most of those recovery periods in those hours. they will be short. i most of those recovery periods in i those hours. they will be short. you may only— those hours. they will be short. you may only get — those hours. they will be short. you may only get 15 _ those hours. they will be short. you may only get 15 minutes _ those hours. they will be short. you may only get 15 minutes every- those hours. they will be short. you may only get 15 minutes every hourl may only get 15 minutes every hour to recoven — may only get 15 minutes every hour to recoven but _ may only get 15 minutes every hour to recover. but it— may only get 15 minutes every hour to recover. but it is— may only get 15 minutes every hour to recover. but it is making - may only get 15 minutes every hour to recover. but it is making sure . to recover. but it is making sure you optimise _ to recover. but it is making sure you optimise those _ to recover. but it is making sure you optimise those 15— to recover. but it is making sure you optimise those 15 minutes, i you optimise those 15 minutes, making — you optimise those 15 minutes, making sure _ you optimise those 15 minutes, making sure that _ you optimise those 15 minutes, making sure that things - you optimise those 15 minutes, making sure that things like . making sure that things like nutrition _ making sure that things like nutrition, hydration, - making sure that things like | nutrition, hydration, making making sure that things like - nutrition, hydration, making sure you are _ nutrition, hydration, making sure you are getting _ nutrition, hydration, making sure you are getting as _ nutrition, hydration, making sure you are getting as much - nutrition, hydration, making sure you are getting as much rest - nutrition, hydration, making sure you are getting as much rest as. nutrition, hydration, making sure i you are getting as much rest as you possibly— you are getting as much rest as you possibly can — you are getting as much rest as you possibly can, because _ you are getting as much rest as you possibly can, because obviously- possibly can, because obviously there _ possibly can, because obviously there will— possibly can, because obviously there will be _ possibly can, because obviously there will be a _ possibly can, because obviously there will be a lot _ possibly can, because obviously there will be a lot of _ possibly can, because obviously there will be a lot of people - possibly can, because obviously- there will be a lot of people wanted to talk— there will be a lot of people wanted to talk to _ there will be a lot of people wanted to talk to you — there will be a lot of people wanted to talk to you at _ there will be a lot of people wanted to talk to you at that _ there will be a lot of people wanted to talk to you at that time. - there will be a lot of people wanted to talk to you at that time. but - to talk to you at that time. but optimise — to talk to you at that time. but optimise that _ to talk to you at that time. but optimise that recovery. - to talk to you at that time. but optimise that recovery. and i to talk to you at that time. buti optimise that recovery. and i'm to talk to you at that time. but - optimise that recovery. and i'm sure you keep _ optimise that recovery. and i'm sure you keep on —
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optimise that recovery. and i'm sure you keep on top _ optimise that recovery. and i'm sure you keep on top of— optimise that recovery. and i'm sure you keep on top of the _ optimise that recovery. and i'm sure you keep on top of the sleep - you keep on top of the sleep deprivation _ you keep on top of the sleep deprivation because - you keep on top of the sleep deprivation because that - you keep on top of the sleep deprivation because that is i you keep on top of the sleep i deprivation because that is the you keep on top of the sleep - deprivation because that is the one thing _ deprivation because that is the one thing that— deprivation because that is the one thing that will— deprivation because that is the one thing that will really— deprivation because that is the one thing that will really start - deprivation because that is the one thing that will really start to - deprivation because that is the one thing that will really start to hurt i thing that will really start to hurt as the _ thing that will really start to hurt as the challenge _ thing that will really start to hurt as the challenge goes _ thing that will really start to hurt as the challenge goes on. - thing that will really start to hurt as the challenge goes on. ok, i thing that will really start to hurt as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, iood as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, good advice? _ as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, good advice? good _ as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, good advice? good advice. - as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, good advice? good advice. i - as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, good advice? good advice. i can . as the challenge goes on. ok, kev, i good advice? good advice. i can give ou hel good advice? good advice. i can give you help on — good advice? good advice. i can give you help on sleep — good advice? good advice. i can give you help on sleep deprivation. - good advice? good advice. i can give you help on sleep deprivation. we i good advice? good advice. i can give | you help on sleep deprivation. we do that all the time. here's a special message for you from rob well, mate, another crazy challenge is approaching. i would say good luck is approaching. ! would say good luck but— is approaching. ! would say good luck but i— is approaching. i would say good luck but i know you will absolutely smash _ luck but i know you will absolutely smash it — luck but i know you will absolutely smash it i— luck but i know you will absolutely smash it. i often said i would do the same — smash it. i often said i would do the same for you but these challenges are beyond my means. my family— challenges are beyond my means. my family will— challenges are beyond my means. my family will be behind you and i think— family will be behind you and i think the — family will be behind you and i think the whole country is as well. on behalf— think the whole country is as well. on behalf of me and all the sufferers out there, thanks from the bottom _ sufferers out there, thanks from the bottom of— sufferers out there, thanks from the bottom of our hearts. you are so highly— bottom of our hearts. you are so highly thought of. i know you will smash— highly thought of. i know you will smash some sort of record for 100 miles _ smash some sort of record for 100 miles good — smash some sort of record for 100 miles. good look kev. ps, i deleted this by— miles. good look kev. ps, i deleted this by accident and had to make this by accident and had to make this up— this by accident and had to make this up again, so you better kill it! it's true, he did. chris, you get
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the last word. i have watched you smiling all the way through the chat listening to kevin. that is the point, isn't it, you have to find something to make you get through things? something to make you get through thins? . something to make you get through thins? , ., , something to make you get through thins? , .,, ., something to make you get through thins? , ., things? yes. people asked me last time i was things? yes. people asked me last time i was on _ things? yes. people asked me last time i was on here _ things? yes. people asked me last time i was on here how _ things? yes. people asked me last time i was on here how i _ things? yes. people asked me last time i was on here how! managed| things? yes. people asked me last. time i was on here how i managed to .et time i was on here how i managed to get through— time i was on here how i managed to get through it — time i was on here how i managed to get through it without _ time i was on here how i managed to get through it without breaking into i get through it without breaking into tears _ get through it without breaking into tears the — get through it without breaking into tears. the reason— get through it without breaking into tears. the reason i— get through it without breaking into tears. the reason i do— get through it without breaking into tears. the reason i do and - get through it without breaking into tears. the reason i do and i- get through it without breaking into tears. the reason i do and i can't. tears. the reason i do and i can't is because — tears. the reason i do and i can't is because i— tears. the reason i do and i can't is because i have _ tears. the reason i do and i can't is because i have got _ tears. the reason i do and i can't is because i have gotjohn- tears. the reason i do and i can't is because i have gotjohn on- tears. the reason i do and i can't is because i have gotjohn on the shoulder— is because i have gotjohn on the shoulder and _ is because i have gotjohn on the shoulder and james _ is because i have gotjohn on the shoulder and james on _ is because i have gotjohn on the shoulder and james on the - is because i have gotjohn on the . shoulder and james on the shoulder saying _ shoulder and james on the shoulder saying to _ shoulder and james on the shoulder saying to me. — shoulder and james on the shoulder saying to me. go. _ shoulder and james on the shoulder saying to me, go, mum, _ shoulder and james on the shoulder saying to me, go, mum, girl. - shoulder and james on the shoulder saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i shoulder and james on the shoulder. saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing— saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it— saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it for— saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it forthem— saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it for them and _ saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it for them and the _ saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it for them and the rest - saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it for them and the rest of- saying to me, go, mum, girl. and i'm doing it for them and the rest of my. doing it for them and the rest of my family _ doing it for them and the rest of my family and — doing it for them and the rest of my family and in _ doing it for them and the rest of my family. and i'm close _ doing it for them and the rest of my family. and i'm close to _ doing it for them and the rest of my family. and i'm close to tears - doing it for them and the rest of my family. and i'm close to tears now. | family. and i'm close to tears now. i family. and i'm close to tears now. i can't _ family. and i'm close to tears now. ican't thank— family. and i'm close to tears now. i can't thank you _ family. and i'm close to tears now. i can't thank you enough, - family. and i'm close to tears now. i can't thank you enough, kevin. i i can't thank you enough, kevin. it's unbelievable _ i can't thank you enough, kevin. it's unbelievable what _ i can't thank you enough, kevin. it's unbelievable what you - i can't thank you enough, kevin. it's unbelievable what you are i it's unbelievable what you are doing — it's unbelievable what you are doini. ., , , . it's unbelievable what you are doini. ., ,, . ., doing. full of respect for you, kevin. doing. full of respect for you, kevin- we _ doing. full of respect for you, kevin. we wish _ doing. full of respect for you, kevin. we wish you _ doing. full of respect for you, kevin. we wish you luck. - doing. full of respect for you, kevin. we wish you luck. you | doing. full of respect for you, i kevin. we wish you luck. you are going to need it. t kevin. we wish you luck. you are going to need it.— kevin. we wish you luck. you are going to need it. i should also say that we will _ going to need it. i should also say that we will be _ going to need it. i should also say that we will be following - going to need it. i should also say that we will be following you - going to need it. i should also say| that we will be following you every single step of the way.— single step of the way. thank you. thank ou single step of the way. thank you. thank you greg- — single step of the way. thank you. thank you greg. thank _ single step of the way. thank you. thank you greg. thank you. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning, i'm sonja jessup. more than a quarter of school leaders in london say they're having to make cuts to balance their budgets due to a lack of government funding. the national association of headteachers says a further 35% predict they will be forced to do so soon. the government says it's providing the biggest increase in funding in a decade. police are investigating an attack on a night bus in east london which has left one person in a life—threatening condition in hospital. it happened near mile end tube station last night. police say some passengers also suffered minor injuries. a man's been arrested. a photographer who has been capturing images of the capital's homeless says the conditions they live in here are worse than some refugee camps he's seen. anthony dawton usually travels the world taking photographs, but has spent the last 18 months in the city. he says he is shocked by the number of people who are homeless. there was a brief period —
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a fortnight, maximum — when many, many of the homeless seemed to have been taken off the streets. that lasted for a very short time. and now, today, i see more and more. these people are just like us and we need to look at them, we need to look after them — we must stop walking by. the mayor of london is to become the new chair of a network of a hundred cities around the world committed to tackling climate change. it's known as c40, and sadiq khan will take over from the existing chair, the mayor of la, next month. signalfailure causing signal failure causing problems signalfailure causing problems in the bakelite, severe delays between harrow wilson and stonebridge park and minor delays and the rest of the line. ongoing problems in the metropolitan line, as well. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today, it's the last day of this very mild spell of weather across the capital. from tomorrow, things will be
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feeling an awful lot colder. now, plenty of wet and windy weather in the forecast for today, we're starting off with still this band of rain clearing eastwards, so it's a rather wet to start to the morning for most, and temperatures are in the mid—teens in celsius so it is a mild start. there will be some sunshine around at times today, but always the chance of some heavy, thundery downpours for much of the rest of the morning, and then another band of rain makes its presence known as we head through into the late afternoon — so it will be a rather wet end to the day. it stays windy throughout, top temperatures lower than they were yesterday — peaking at around 16 degrees celsius for many of us. and then we'll start to see some changes again overnight tonight. so our band of rain continues eastwards, there will be some more showers following on behind for a time, and it's a cooler start to the day tomorrow — we've now got a north—westerly wind ushering in that much colder—feeling air. so tomorrow a chillier—feeling day — a big drop in temperature, in fact, with highs of only ten to 12 or 13 degrees celsius for many of us,
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quite a bit of added wind chill. we're starting off with plenty of cloud and some showers, but there will be some sunshine emerging behind, and a much chillier night on thursday into friday — which is looking dry. i'm back in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. rip—off britain live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. angela, julia and gloria can tell us what's coming up today. good what's coming up today. morning. good what's comini u- toda . mornini. ., thanks, charlie and sally — and thanks again to all you lovely breakfast viewers for getting in touch with your thoughts and comments while we were live on air yesterday. you sent loads of them, and i hope you'll do the same again today when we take a look at the scammers holding social media accounts to ransom — even stars like the actress rakie ayola are being targeted.
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i got igota i got a message which was terrifying _ i got a message which was terrifying. hello, - i got a message which was terrifying. hello, your- i got a message which was - terrifying. hello, your account has been _ terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked — terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked by— terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked by us. _ terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked by us. if— terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked by us. if you - terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked by us. if you want. terrifying. hello, your account has been hacked by us. if you want to| been hacked by us. if you want to .et been hacked by us. if you want to get your— been hacked by us. if you want to get your account _ been hacked by us. if you want to get your account back, _ been hacked by us. if you want to get your account back, you - been hacked by us. if you want to get your account back, you have i been hacked by us. if you want to. get your account back, you have to pay, _ get your account back, you have to pay. otherwise _ get your account back, you have to pay, otherwise your— get your account back, you have to pay, otherwise your account - get your account back, you have to pay, otherwise your account will. get your account back, you have to| pay, otherwise your account will be deleted _ pay, otherwise your account will be deleted forever. _ pay, otherwise your account will be deleted forever. hot— pay, otherwise your account will be deleted forever.— deleted forever. not a good situation- — also today — we have got exclusive stats on the epidemic of scam text messages. they're often so convincing it's easy to get sucked in — and the numbers of people who have been are genuinely staggering. but fear not — we've got all the advice you need on how to avoid being tricked by text. plus, the cost of living crisis — gas bills soaring, food prices spiralling, and many of you stuck in the middle. but you don't need to be powerless. personal finance expert alice tapper is here to answer your questions — and she's armed with advice that will help you save on everything from your food shopping to your takeaway treats. so if you've got questions for her email us right now, ripoffbritain@bbc. co. uk. and we look forward to your company once again at 9.15.
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see you then. we will see you then. health leaders are calling for some covid restrictions to be reintroduced in england to avoid "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says action must be taken now to curb a further rise in coronavirus cases. lets speak to their chief executive matthew taylor and professor charlotte summers who is an icu consultant and professor of intensive care medicine at the university of cambridge. matthew taylor, what needs to happen now? the matthew taylor, what needs to happen now? ,, ., .., matthew taylor, what needs to happen now? ,, ., , now? the nhs and care system is facini a now? the nhs and care system is facing a perfect — now? the nhs and care system is facing a perfect storm. _ now? the nhs and care system is facing a perfect storm. it - now? the nhs and care system is facing a perfect storm. it is - now? the nhs and care system is facing a perfect storm. it is a - facing a perfect storm. it is a combination of the fact that winter is always tough for a variety of reasons. we have thousands of disease patients in hospital as well as long covid patients and it is rising. we have pent up demand of
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the last 18 months, notjust in terms of people on waiting lists but people who have not been able to go to a doctor, who announced that sadly presenting with quite advanced symptoms. the whole health service, whether it is the ambulance service, mental health, a is under immense pressure and it is only the middle of october. the commits and it would only enact plan b if the health service was at risk and we are saying it is and we need to take measures now, like wearing masks in crowded places, avoiding unnecessary indoor meetings, working from home if you can. these are inconvenient measures, but if we take them then hopefully we can stem the rising tide of infection and hospitalisation and we won't have to go further. but what we have to be absolutely clear about is that if we don't take these measures and things carry on as they are, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened and so we need to act now and not stumble into a crisis. good
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mornini , and not stumble into a crisis. good morning. it — and not stumble into a crisis. good morning. it is _ and not stumble into a crisis. good morning. it is a _ and not stumble into a crisis. good morning, it is a charlie _ and not stumble into a crisis. good morning, it is a charlie here. - and not stumble into a crisis. good morning, it is a charlie here. we spoke to kwasi kwarteng, who is speaking to media outlets this morning, and his response to what you have clearly identified, if i can summarise, is we are monitoring the figures hour by hour and now is not the time for further or at different action.— not the time for further or at different action. well, we beg to different action. well, we beg to differ from _ different action. well, we beg to differ from health _ different action. well, we beg to differ from health service - differ from health service perspective. i speak to help leaders every day and they report a service thatis every day and they report a service that is under immense pressure and there is all the evidence suggesting there is all the evidence suggesting the pressure will grow and it is important to say it is the governments themselves who said that the criteria for determining whether or not to enact plan b was the safeguarding of the health and care system. so i understand that these are measures that may be difficult, inconvenient. they are a lot less problematic than if we for example had to go to full lockdown. nobody wants that to happen so we can take a variety of measures, which other
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parts of europe by taking even though they have lower infection rates than us. we can take those measures, carry on with normal life, and hopefully head off the worst of this coming winter crisis.— this coming winter crisis. doctor charlotte summers, _ this coming winter crisis. doctor charlotte summers, we - this coming winter crisis. doctor charlotte summers, we could i this coming winter crisis. doctor. charlotte summers, we could see this coming winter crisis. doctor- charlotte summers, we could see you nodding along, you clearly agree. absolutely. matthew is entirely i’i l ht absolutely. matthew is entirely right in — absolutely. matthew is entirely right in everything he said. tell me about the sort _ right in everything he said. tell me about the sort of— right in everything he said. tell me about the sort of pressures - right in everything he said. tell me about the sort of pressures you - right in everything he said. tell me} about the sort of pressures you are aware of at the moment, where we are in mid october. in aware of at the moment, where we are in mid october-— in mid october. in mid october we are in a situation _ in mid october. in mid october we are in a situation where _ in mid october. in mid october we are in a situation where one - in mid october. in mid october we are in a situation where one in - in mid october. in mid october we are in a situation where one in five intensive _ are in a situation where one in five intensive care beds in the uk is occupied — intensive care beds in the uk is occupied by someone who has a coronavirus. now, this means that that bed _ coronavirus. now, this means that that bed is — coronavirus. now, this means that that bed is not available to other patients— that bed is not available to other patients and at the same time we have _ patients and at the same time we have increased numbers of non—disease macro emergency patients for all the reasons matthew has outlined — for all the reasons matthew has outlined appearing at our hospitals and in _ outlined appearing at our hospitals and in the — outlined appearing at our hospitals and in the intensive care unit and we are— and in the intensive care unit and we are also— and in the intensive care unit and we are also trying to support the
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restoration of major complex surgery. _ restoration of major complex surgery, of which there are many, many— surgery, of which there are many, many people on waiting lists trying to do— many people on waiting lists trying to do all— many people on waiting lists trying to do all three of those things at a time _ to do all three of those things at a time when — to do all three of those things at a time when we have fewer staff than we did _ time when we have fewer staff than we did at— time when we have fewer staff than we did at the beginning of the pandemic because people have left intensive _ pandemic because people have left intensive care having had a torrid 18 months. — intensive care having had a torrid 18 months, and the staff we do have are exhausted. we are providing more and more _ are exhausted. we are providing more and more care less and less resource the moment — and more care less and less resource the moment-— the moment. professor, can you line u . the moment. professor, can you line u- the the moment. professor, can you line up the dots — the moment. professor, can you line up the dots for— the moment. professor, can you line up the dots for us _ the moment. professor, can you line up the dots for us on _ the moment. professor, can you line up the dots for us on this _ the moment. professor, can you line up the dots for us on this one? - the moment. professor, can you line up the dots for us on this one? on i up the dots for us on this one? on one hand the government says that the measures we are taking are at the measures we are taking are at the correct ones at the moment. but what we know is, with the infection rate rising, that has an immediate knock—on effect, there are real people in the real world, they have family, connections which means people are taken out of the workplace, for example, and i know thatis workplace, for example, and i know that is something the nhs, indeed a care home staff, as well, that is having a very real and immediate impact. it having a very real and immediate im act. , having a very real and immediate imact. , , , having a very real and immediate imact. , ~ having a very real and immediate imact. , , , ~' impact. it is, because like everyone else nhs staff _ impact. it is, because like everyone else nhs staff and _ impact. it is, because like everyone else nhs staff and social—
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impact. it is, because like everyone else nhs staff and social care - impact. it is, because like everyone else nhs staff and social care staff| else nhs staff and social care staff are also _ else nhs staff and social care staff are also exposed to coronavirus that is circulating at very high level in our community. i understand that the government— our community. i understand that the government had said they are monitoring things very closely and will take _ monitoring things very closely and will take action when the nhs comes under— will take action when the nhs comes under sustained pressure. but at what _ under sustained pressure. but at what point — under sustained pressure. but at what point are we going to say that that pressure is sustained enough? we are _ that pressure is sustained enough? we are arguing i think collectively from _ we are arguing i think collectively from me — we are arguing i think collectively from me and matthew that, at the moment, — from me and matthew that, at the moment, there are simple things that we can— moment, there are simple things that we can do— moment, there are simple things that we can do that would mitigate us having _ we can do that would mitigate us having to — we can do that would mitigate us having to take more drastic action if we _ having to take more drastic action if we wait — having to take more drastic action if we wait much longer.— if we wait much longer. matthew ta lor, if we wait much longer. matthew taylor. what _ if we wait much longer. matthew taylor, what are _ if we wait much longer. matthew taylor, what are the _ if we wait much longer. matthew. taylor, what are the consequences if we wait much longer. matthew- taylor, what are the consequences of not taking action at this point? if you put covid to one side, what about other people coming into the nhs for other reasons other than a covid? what are the consequences for them? ladle covid? what are the consequences for them? ~ ., covid? what are the consequences for them? ~ . ., ., , covid? what are the consequences for them? . . ., , ,, them? we are already missing important _ them? we are already missing important targets _ them? we are already missing important targets which - them? we are already missing important targets which relate | them? we are already missing i important targets which relate to quality of care and patient safety, so we are missing targets for how long it takes people to be seen in
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emergency departments, ambulance services are finding it very difficult to meet their response times and are unable to do so in many cases. and as the professor said, we have people on waiting lists and they are notjust patiently waiting. some of them having to but there are people with deteriorating conditions and if they are not addressed they, too, will end up the emergency department. so if we don't act now, we will be compromising the quality of care and we will be compromising patient safety. and that is a situation now. but it could become much worse over the next couple of months, and so it is a very simple choice. do we accept the overwhelming evidence from all parts of the health service and do what we can now to reduce the risks in a way that doesn't disrupt our day—to—day life with or do we somehow cross our fingers and hope that the miracle will happen and then stumble, as we have done before, into crisis? it is a clear
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choice and i think all parts of the health service will call on government, and the public as a whole, just watch them at this time of need. by the way, it is notjust plan b, we are calling for a plan b plus, the public themselves, they have heroically done over the last 18 months, to do what they can. get those boosterjab, the flu jab, treat the health service responsibly, use 111. if the gp offers you a digital appointment, take it, if you need a face—to—face appointment, you will get it. don't use an emergency appointment unless you genuinely have an emergency. treat health and care staff with concern and compassion. we need national mobilisation to get through this difficult winter.— this difficult winter. matthew ta lor, this difficult winter. matthew taylor, chief _ this difficult winter. matthew taylor, chief executive - this difficult winter. matthew taylor, chief executive of - this difficult winter. matthewj taylor, chief executive of the this difficult winter. matthew - taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation, and professor matthew taylor, know you will echo that. we will check in with you and see how things are progressing. —— professor charlotte summers, you will echo
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that. we've had an update on the cost of living in the uk. it's not great, is it because now, and people have opinions about it. if you go on whatsapp, go out insolvent and ask, people will have felt it somehow. yes, the cost of living — or inflation. the experts keep a close eye on the average prices in a basket of goods — and work out what's going up and how quickly. inflation in september was at 3.1%. slightly lower than 3.2% the month before, but still much higher than economists would like. the largest contributor to inflation last month was an increases to fuel costs and car prices. there were also increases to the price of food and household services. the bank of england expects inflation could reach li% this winter and warns if things don't slow down they may increase interest rates. why? well, you'd get more for your savings and more interest on your debt so making that move does slow down spending.
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so 50p here on groceries. a fiver there on petrol. a bump in utility bills. they may all feel manageable in isolation. but most households will be feeling the pinch in some way. i've been speaking with a family in manchester. this is ruth's kitchen—diner, where it all happens. ruth cooks. mum and dad nigel and susan come for a catch—up. jack does his homework on his laptop. and amy checks her messages. and i've come to see if they're feeling the force of inflation. are we ready to talk increases in prices? yes! so exciting, isn't it? laughter. how are things financially? we're just starting to notice the pinch a little bit. whereabouts is that? the biggest one for us is energy bill because we were with people's energy, who went bust. so the energy bill is doubling every month. whistle. and that's going from...?
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£120 to £250. ouch! and ruth is not alone — predictions are that average energy bills could reach £1,600 by next summer. and what about when you go for the big shop for the family? anything you're noticing there? i've noticed that the prices are higher for the overall shop, but where prices stay the same for things which jack likes — like grapes and strawberries and things that come in a punnet — the punnets have shrunk, so you don't get as much. and the supermarkets hope you won't notice. yes! laughter. but inflation doesn'tjust impact what we pay for things. if you're on a fixed income, like a pension, or if you have savings, high inflation means, really, you have less in your pot to spend. apart from those long, lovely lunches with your pal susan, what are your outgoings — what do you spend your money on? holidays — pre—pandemic. presents for grandchildren. as well as your teacher pension and your state pension, you have your savings, you have your investments in stocks and shares, as well.
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when it comes to prices going up and how far that pot of money will go, it won't be going as far soon, will it? it won't. the cash isas obviously are effectively losing value. you hope, i suppose, that the stocks and shares isas might go up, but there's obviously a risk attached to those. there could be some big decisions ahead. and some big decisions for ruth, too. her public—sector—linked pay hasn't crept up, her husband lee's salary is stagnant, and christmas is coming. we're not too far off christmas. i'm just going to talk you through amy's list. she wants airpods, telly for the bedroom, tickets for the theatre... ha! how does that make you feel? christmas is difficult because it's everything at once, and because amy's birthday is soon after christmas, actually there's not much of a break before we're back into purchasing presents for the second time. i worry that they're spending too much money on me sometimes — i don't deserve it all. er...
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yeah, when i was putting the list together i did think, i'm not going to ask for that cos it's a lot more money. and does it feel like there's money left for you? you work hard, you look after the kids — are there any treats for ruth? treats for us are quite rare, actually. right. treats are more for the children. 0k. so there's. .. treats for us are the last thing on the agenda, usually. what would be really nice is to be able to just occasionally let your hair down and... yeah. ..you know, dream about a really nice holiday or being able to take the children out somewhere — it'd be nice to be able to take jack to the football. so it's things like that, really, that i think we would like to do more of. for lots of busy families — even those with well—paid jobs — there's a winter ahead of putting on an extra jumper, thinking twice about treats, and wondering whether it's worth saving at all... ..if there is any left to put away. thanks to ruth for letting
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us invade at tea time. they're noticing inflation — and ruth and lee are on good incomes. millions of public—sector workers who've had a pay freeze will also be feeling it. and for some people on universal credit things will be much, much harder. on top of that, businesses are having to cope with disrupted supply chains and inflated costs. these are unusual times driven by emerging from lockdown — prices will go up if you all stop spending, then all start again at the same time. but however big that inflationary dent is making in your income — be that income low or high — it's set to get bigger before it comes down. thank you for explaining all of that. are going to talk about a tennis success story now. cameron norrie only turned professional four years ago, but�*s it's been quite a rise for the newest star of british tennis. the 26—year—old is now the men's british number one, a member of the world's top 16,
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and a masters series champion after his victory at indian wells. hejoins us now from roehampton. good morning. number one. how does that sound? a, , good morning. number one. how does that sound? , , , good morning. number one. how does that sound?— that sound? money, guys. yeah, i'm so ha-- . that sound? money, guys. yeah, i'm so happy- i— that sound? money, guys. yeah, i'm so happy. i couldn't _ that sound? money, guys. yeah, i'm so happy. i couldn't be _ that sound? money, guys. yeah, i'm so happy. i couldn't be and - that sound? money, guys. yeah, i'm so happy. i couldn't be and i - so happy. i couldn't be and i couldn't be more pleased with myself and my team. all pretty surreal at the moment and it is kind of hitting me now the last 2a hours, it has just been my phone blowing up and me catching up with all of my messages and everything so it has been amazing and i am so happy that my hard work has finally come through. and it was hard work at times, you were set down in indian wells, what happened? it were set down in indian wells, what ha ened? ., , were set down in indian wells, what ha ened? ., ., were set down in indian wells, what hauened? ., were set down in indian wells, what ha ened? .,, ., . ., were set down in indian wells, what ha ened? .,, ., q ., happened? it was a tricky one in the final and i ended _ happened? it was a tricky one in the final and i ended up _ happened? it was a tricky one in the
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final and i ended up a _ happened? it was a tricky one in the final and i ended up a breakdown . happened? it was a tricky one in the | final and i ended up a breakdown and the guy was managing to dig deep and get a sneaky breakdown and played a couple of huge games and at 5—4, i don't really remember too much in that game and i was in the zone and hit a couple of big winners and i was back to myself and the third set is just a blur and the two weeks in generaljust where is just a blur and the two weeks in general just where amazing is just a blur and the two weeks in generaljust where amazing so just all credit to the team and a fun two weeks and i loved every moment of it. ,., ., ., , ., it. good morning, it is charlie. i am a big fan— it. good morning, it is charlie. i am a big fan of— it. good morning, it is charlie. i am a big fan of tennis. - it. good morning, it is charlie. i am a big fan of tennis. what - it. good morning, it is charlie. i am a big fan of tennis. what i i it. good morning, it is charlie. i- am a big fan of tennis. what i would like you to do, because you are going to be a new name and face to quite a lot of people, they are used to andy murray, tim henman and the guys who have held that role in the past. we had a little get to know
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you session with cameron norrie. what do we need to know about you? well... well, i grew up in new zealand and then moved over to london when i was 16 or 17 and then i ended up going to university in the states, so i have moved around a little bit but i am living here in london now, based out of the ntc. yeah, i don't know, i love my tennis, i love my sport and i'm a big sports fan in general. but, yeah... it big sports fan in general. but, eah. .. ., , ., big sports fan in general. but, eah... . ., , big sports fan in general. but, eah... ., ., , , ., yeah... it was a horrible question, wasn't it? — yeah... it was a horrible question, wasn't it? that _ yeah... it was a horrible question, wasn't it? that was _ yeah... it was a horrible question, wasn't it? that was really - yeah... it was a horrible question, wasn't it? that was really mean. l yeah... it was a horrible question, i wasn't it? that was really mean. can i 'ust wasn't it? that was really mean. can liust finish — wasn't it? that was really mean. can i just finish with _ wasn't it? that was really mean. can i just finish with a _ wasn't it? that was really mean. can ijust finish with a thought? - wasn't it? that was really mean. can i just finish with a thought? give - ijust finish with a thought? give me a better _ ijust finish with a thought? give me a better question _ ijust finish with a thought? (1: a: me a better question is! ijust finish with a thought? give me a better question is! you - i just finish with a thought? give | me a better question is! you have i just finish with a thought? give - me a better question is! you have to net used me a better question is! you have to get used to — me a better question is! you have to get used to rubbish _ me a better question is! you have to get used to rubbish questions, - me a better question is! you have to get used to rubbish questions, it - get used to rubbish questions, it comes with the terror story —— with the territory of being a pigsty. you have been working— a long time but
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you had a great run recently. is there something going on different in your head, what has changed? yeah, i mean, it's been a phenomenal yearfor me and yeah, i mean, it's been a phenomenal year for me and it's yeah, i mean, it's been a phenomenal yearfor me and it's nice yeah, i mean, it's been a phenomenal year for me and it's nice that things have come together and most of all just things have come together and most of alljust being me, enjoying my tennis on the court and i think my worst level has gone up a notch and doing the fundamentals better, serve and return. most of all, it'sjust doing the fundamentals better, serve and return. most of all, it's just a lot of fun to be playing at that level, especially at the bigger tournaments. like i have been saying, i couldn't be more enjoyable and so pleased to win a title like indian wells and to see the other names that have won there, it is special. names that have won there, it is secial. ., i. names that have won there, it is secial. ., , ., special. you said your phone has blown u- special. you said your phone has blown up over — special. you said your phone has blown up over 24 _ special. you said your phone has blown up over 24 years - special. you said your phone has blown up over 24 years and - special. you said your phone has blown up over 24 years and you | special. you said your phone has - blown up over 24 years and you have been getting tonnes of messages. tell me the best messages and who they were from. i think my favourite was when i called my parents and they were in
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tears back home and that was priceless for me and i can't tell you too much about the other messages, i haven't even caught up with them all. but it was nice to see all the support from all of my friends, my family and i am running on a high right now and hopefully come back to life at some point. you are at the tennis _ come back to life at some point. you are at the tennis centre so i think you're going to go out and practice. good luck, congratulations, let's hope it keeps going for you when you. hope it keeps going for you when ou. ., 4, hope it keeps going for you when ou. ., ~ , ., hope it keeps going for you when ou. . q , , hope it keeps going for you when you. thank you, guys, i appreciate that. cameron _ you. thank you, guys, i appreciate that. cameron norrie. _ you. thank you, guys, i appreciate that. cameron norrie. we - you. thank you, guys, i appreciate that. cameron norrie. we are - you. thank you, guys, i appreciate i that. cameron norrie. we are getting to know him — that. cameron norrie. we are getting to know him better— that. cameron norrie. we are getting to know him better only _ that. cameron norrie. we are getting to know him better only 15 _ that. cameron norrie. we are getting to know him better only 15 players . to know him better only 15 players in the world better than him. that is incredible, _ in the world better than him. that is incredible, and _ in the world better than him. that is incredible, and cool as cucumber, carry on working today. ladle is incredible, and cool as cucumber, carry on working today.— is incredible, and cool as cucumber, carry on working today. we are going to talk about — carry on working today. we are going to talk about coronation _ carry on working today. we are going
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to talk about coronation street. - if you're a fan of the cobbles you'll know the residents of weatherfield are no strangers to disaster and this week's storyline promises to be one of the most dramatic yet. the so—called "horror nation street" halloween special has everything from a collapsed sinkhole, a fireball car crash and an escaped convict — let's take a look. i emphasises moist document that is why i wanted to be the first bit so you had to read that. leanne! neil! jenny? get away from there! what? move away, it's not safe! what... wow. sally ann matthews, who plays
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jenny connor, joins us now. good morning. good morning. really aood to good morning. good morning. really good to see — good morning. good morning. really good to see it- _ good morning. good morning. really good to see it. we _ good morning. good morning. really good to see it. we have _ good morning. good morning. really good to see it. we have probably - good to see it. we have probably seen bits of what is happening that may not everybody at home has seen so i'm going to ask this question carefully stocking up no spoilers are. things like taking a really dramatic tone can i say? just another day _ dramatic tone can i say? just another day in _ dramatic tone can i say? jut another day in weatherfield. this week is great, it is the super soap week, kicks off the itv autumn season and monday, wednesday and friday take place over i—storey day. because it's manchester it rains! but even by manchester standards it is raining an awful lot and there are so many stories intertwined and they are all affected by the rain and this horrific thing that happens in the middle of the street, which i am not giving anything away to say sinkhole appears and starts to kind of swallow up various residents.
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literally. of swallow up various residents. literall . ., , of swallow up various residents. literall . . , , ., of swallow up various residents. literall . ., , , literally. that is you, is it? ok, people-- _ literally. that is you, is it? ok, people... 0k. _ literally. that is you, is it? ok, people... ok, some _ literally. that is you, is it? ok, people... ok, some people - literally. that is you, is it? ok, people... ok, some people getj people... ok, some people get swallowed by it. if you were preparing for a scene in which you .et preparing for a scene in which you get swallowed by a sinkhole, if you weal’, _ get swallowed by a sinkhole, if you wear. and — get swallowed by a sinkhole, if you wear, and you may or may not have done _ wear, and you may or may not have done this, _ wear, and you may or may not have done this, what would that be like? laughter— laughter i don't know how i'm supposed to answer these questions! 5am i don't know how i'm supposed to answer these questions! sam kerr you ma have answer these questions! sam kerr you may have watched _ answer these questions! sam kerr you may have watched other— answer these questions! sam kerr you may have watched other people. - answer these questions! sam kerr you may have watched other people. if - answer these questions! sam kerr you may have watched other people. if it l may have watched other people. if it were may have watched other people. if it were somebody else, falling down a sinkhole, say, ithink were somebody else, falling down a sinkhole, say, i think the first thing you do is say kudos to our art department. the designers. there is no blueprint for, how does tele make a sinkhole? just isn't a manual you can go to. i think if somebody was about to go through grassy earth and you wanted to give that effect of the ground moving, then somebody might actuallyjust the ground moving, then somebody might actually just stand on the ground moving, then somebody might actuallyjust stand on a piece
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of foam with some turf on top and squish theirfeet down of foam with some turf on top and squish their feet down and it looks like the earth is going down underneath somebody. that like the earth is going down underneath somebody. that is what mi . ht underneath somebody. that is what might happen- _ underneath somebody. that is what might happen. that _ underneath somebody. that is what might happen. that is _ underneath somebody. that is what might happen. that is ingenious - underneath somebody. that is what| might happen. that is ingenious and the ice for five _ might happen. that is ingenious and the ice for five and _ might happen. that is ingenious and the ice for five and have _ might happen. that is ingenious and the ice for five and have done - the ice for five and have done something brilliant they were coming up something brilliant they were coming up with all of these various plans for how we can... there is a section where somebody is in a storm pipe and the water has to rise. but, of course, that is very hard to do. you have to have a hose pipe in there to fill the water so the set lois into a swimming pool. iflhili fill the water so the set lois into a swimming pool.— a swimming pool. chili pull for a moment? _ a swimming pool. chili pull for a moment? this _ a swimming pool. chili pull for a moment? this might _ a swimming pool. chili pull for a moment? this might be - a swimming pool. chili pull for a moment? this might be the - a swimming pool. chili pull for a - moment? this might be the number to show everybody this clip. well, we can't go up. can't carry both— well, we can't go up. can't carry both of— well, we can't go up. can't carry both of us, — well, we can't go up. can't carry both of us, not sure this letter could, — both of us, not sure this letter could, either.— both of us, not sure this letter could, either. ., ., , , could, either. you go, then, because there is probably _
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could, either. you go, then, because there is probably a _ could, either. you go, then, because there is probably a way _ could, either. you go, then, because there is probably a way out _ could, either. you go, then, because there is probably a way out up - there is probably a way out up there. �* there is probably a way out up there. . , ., there is probably a way out up there. �* ,, . there is probably a way out up there. �* . �* there is probably a way out up there. . ., �* ., ., there. are you mad?! i'm not leaving ou down there. are you mad?! i'm not leaving you down here! _ there. are you mad?! i'm not leaving you down here! we _ there. are you mad?! i'm not leaving you down here! we will— there. are you mad?! i'm not leaving you down here! we will both - there. are you mad?! i'm not leaving you down here! we will both freeze l you down here! we will both freeze to death if we _ you down here! we will both freeze to death if we don't _ you down here! we will both freeze to death if we don't try! _ you down here! we will both freeze to death if we don't try! sam - you down here! we will both freeze to death if we don't try! sam vakal to death if we don't try! sam vaka we will be ok. we just need to to death if we don't try! sam vaka we will be ok. we just nee we will be ok. we 'ust need to stick it out a bit longer. — we will be ok. we just need to stick it out a bit longer. i _ we will be ok. we just need to stick it out a bit longer. i could _ we will be ok. we just need to stick it out a bit longer. i could have - it out a bit longer. i could have 'ust said it out a bit longer. i could have just said it _ it out a bit longer. i could have just said it was _ it out a bit longer. i could have just said it was me, _ it out a bit longer. i could have just said it was me, couldn't i? laughter let's just play the clip! laughter let's'ust -la the cli! ., laughter let's'ustla the cli! ., let's 'ust play the clip! that was ou let's just play the clip! that was ou in let's just play the clip! that was you in there- — let's just play the clip! that was you in there. it _ let's just play the clip! that was you in there. it was _ let's just play the clip! that was you in there. it was a. _ let's just play the clip! that was you in there. it was a. even - let's just play the clip! that was i you in there. it was a. even though it was dark. _ you in there. it was a. even though it was dark, we _ you in there. it was a. even though it was dark, we can _ you in there. it was a. even though it was dark, we can see. _ you in there. it was a. even though it was dark, we can see. you - you in there. it was a. even though it was dark, we can see. you are i it was dark, we can see. you are with your — it was dark, we can see. you are with your ex _ it was dark, we can see. you are with your ex ex. _ it was dark, we can see. you are with your ex ex, told _ it was dark, we can see. you are with your ex ex, told us - it was dark, we can see. you are with your ex ex, told us through | with your ex ex, told us through that stop you lots of things have happened in their relationship but ultimately they love each other and they love each other ultimately they love each other and they love each othe— they love each other dearly, but they love each other dearly, but they realise _ they love each other dearly, but they realise that _ they love each other dearly, but they realise that maybe - they love each other dearly, but they realise that maybe they - they love each other dearly, but i they realise that maybe they don't make each of their lives are not the happiest with them together but i think i had always intended to be friends and so whenjenny gets the news thatjohnny is going to up sticks and move to bali, she is
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devastated. sticks and move to bali, she is devastated-— sticks and move to bali, she is devastated. ., . ., ., devastated. bali?! yellow waqar younis that _ devastated. bali?! yellow waqar younis that bit _ devastated. bali?! yellow waqar younis that bit of _ devastated. bali?! yellow waqar younis that bit of the _ devastated. bali?! yellow waqar younis that bit of the story - devastated. bali?! yellow waqar younis that bit of the story are. l younis that bit of the story are. sorry... did you watch coronation street when you are young? i was sorry... did you watch coronation street when you are young? i was in it when i was — street when you are young? i was in it when i was young! _ it when i was young! laughter at forget i said that. you are in street when were young. i worked this out. you would know better than anyone else because you are in it when you were young. they used to be quiet storylines about gusset, and i go way back with coronation street when it was about gusset and they have a natter about things. it has changed quite a bit, hasn't it find on! hang on a minute now, charlie. there was a disaster where the viaduct collapsed, a lorry crashed into the rovers. i remember it may be tracey barlow... into the rovers. i remember it may be tracey barlow. . .— be tracey barlow... baby tracy! yeah, i started _ be tracey barlow... baby tracy!
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yeah, i started in _ be tracey barlow. .. baby tracy! yeah, i started in december- be tracey barlow... baby tracy! i yeah, i started in december at... i yeah, i started in decemberat... i wasn't _ yeah, i started in decemberat... i wasn't baby— yeah, i started in decemberat... i wasn't baby tracey. i started in december— wasn't baby tracey. i started in december 1985 so i have been there a lon- december 1985 so i have been there a long time _ december 1985 so i have been there a long time. my dad tried to kill rita when _ long time. my dad tried to kill rita when he _ long time. my dad tried to kill rita when he was hit by a tram so we have always— when he was hit by a tram so we have always done _ when he was hit by a tram so we have always done drama and as the years have gone _ always done drama and as the years have gone on, that's drama has kind of grown _ have gone on, that's drama has kind of grown and — have gone on, that's drama has kind of grown and i think an audience are so used _ of grown and i think an audience are so used to— of grown and i think an audience are so used to seeing, on whatever channel— so used to seeing, on whatever channel and whatever drama, explosions and, you know, violence and visual— explosions and, you know, violence and visual effects that there are no longer— and visual effects that there are no longer is _ and visual effects that there are no longer is shocking so you had to tell bigger and brighter stories this is— tell bigger and brighter stories this is one of those stories. | tell bigger and brighter stories this is one of those stories. i am correct it — this is one of those stories. i am correct it in _ this is one of those stories. i am correct it in so _ this is one of those stories. i am correct it in so many _ this is one of those stories. i am correct it in so many ways - this is one of those stories. i am correct it in so many ways a. - this is one of those stories. i am correct it in so many ways a. i i this is one of those stories. i am | correct it in so many ways a. i am aroin to correct it in so many ways a. i am going to give _ correct it in so many ways a. i am going to give you _ correct it in so many ways a. i am going to give you the _ correct it in so many ways a. i am going to give you the 60 - correct it in so many ways a. i am going to give you the 60 years of coronation — going to give you the 60 years of coronation street but next time i come _ coronation street but next time i come back— coronation street but next time i come back i will test you. shall we do that? let's— come back i will test you. shall we do that? let's do _ come back i will test you. shall we do that? let's do that. _ come back i will test you. shall we do that? let's do that. we - come back i will test you. shall we do that? let's do that. we know i do that? let's do that. we know there are some _ do that? let's do that. we know there are some very _ do that? let's do that. we know there are some very big - do that? let's do that. we know| there are some very big numbers coming up that have not been screened yet. tiny hint what might be coming?— screened yet. tiny hint what might be comina? . �* ., , be coming? can't tell you anything, ou have be coming? can't tell you anything, you have to — be coming? can't tell you anything, you have to keep — be coming? can't tell you anything, you have to keep watching. - be coming? can't tell you anything, you have to keep watching. we -
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be coming? can't tell you anything, i you have to keep watching. we moved out to— you have to keep watching. we moved out to a _ you have to keep watching. we moved out to a special studio for the storm — out to a special studio for the storm drain and all the water stumps and i was _ storm drain and all the water stumps and i was there six days and i loved it, i and i was there six days and i loved it. i have _ and i was there six days and i loved it. i have the — and i was there six days and i loved it, i have the time of my life —— water— it, i have the time of my life —— water stunts. abby and corey... as we saw, _ water stunts. abby and corey... as we saw, well, _ water stunts. abby and corey... as we saw, well, charlie didn't... abbie — we saw, well, charlie didn't... abbie and _ we saw, well, charlie didn't... abbie and corey work swallowed up by a sinkhole _ abbie and corey work swallowed up by a sinkhole. you will be watching tonight — a sinkhole. you will be watching toniaht. ., ., ., ., tonight. you have done a good 'ob. we see tonight. you have done a good 'ob. we there fl tonight. you have done a good 'ob. we see there story i tonight. you have done a good 'ob. we see there story ofi tonight. you have done a good 'ob. we see there story of the i we see there story of the confrontation.— we see there story of the confrontation. this is where everyone — confrontation. this is where everyone watching - confrontation. this is where everyone watching at i confrontation. this is where everyone watching at home| confrontation. this is where l everyone watching at home in particular charlie. coronation street is on itv1 tonight at 7.30 you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. some coronavirus restrictions like more mask—wearing and working from home must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis. that's according to a group of health leaders as cases continue to rise across the uk. if we don't take these measures and things carry on as they are, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. ministers, scientists, experts, are looking— ministers, scientists, experts, are looking at— ministers, scientists, experts, are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we _ looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel that it's the time for plan— and we don't feel that it's the time for plan b — and we don't feel that it's the time for plan b right now. do you think it's time for plan b to deal with rising cases or are you concerned about the impact of renewed restrictions? also let me know if you've been able to get either your third main

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