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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 20, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm lewis vaughanjones. our top stories. a report recommending that steve bannon, a key ally of donald trump, be held in contempt, is approved by us lawmakers investigating january's riot on capitol hill. ahead of a key climate change summit — the uk government unveils plans to be carbon neutral by 2050. north korea says it's successfully tested a new submarine—launched ballistic missile — the white house has condemned the launch. we're in the canary islands — where the volcanic eruption on la palma continues to spew lava, a month on — and with no end in sight.
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the select committee investigating january's attack on the united states�* capitol has unanimously approved a report which recommends that steve bannon — a former aide to president trump — be held in contempt of congress.steve bannon refused to appear before the panel. the report says that he had specific knowledge of the events planned forjanuary the sixth before they happened. donald trump has urged former aides to reject the panel's requests, claiming the right to withhold information because of executive privilege. the chair of the committee democratic congressman bennie thompson expressed astonishment that mr bannon hadn't given evidence: and when you think about what we are investigating, the
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violent attack on the seat of our democracy, perpetrated by fellow citizens, and our constitution, an attempt to stop the certification of an election, a shocking teeny, shocking that anyone would not do anything in their power, to assist our investigation. so it is a shame that mr bannon has put us in this position but we won't take no for an answer. a mob of donald trump supporters staged an
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insurrection at the us capitol and they are pressing ahead with getting steve bannon to give testimony. testimony that he is seeking to avoid giving to this committee on the grounds that there is executive privilege attached to the documents that he might forward to them. i have to say, there's a feeling today that this is going to go all the way to the house vote later in the then perhaps be referred to the attorney general of the district of columbia and then to the usjustice department for steve bannon to be held potentially in contempt of congress. it is a milestone in the committee's work and this is a committee that is, they say, extremely determined to find out whom you've worked, what the causes of that insurrection where and who ultimately should be to blame for it and to prevent it from happening again. for potential
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is he is held in contempt of congress. gives an idea of what that means. congress. gives an idea of what that mean— that means. well, it is a serious _ that means. well, it is a serious offence - that means. well, it is a serious offence which i that means. well, it is a - serious offence which carries a fine and possible term of imprisonment ranging from one month to a year in prison. i think it is very unlikely that will happen. the sort of prosecutions are extremely rare and they tend to get bogged down in legal quagmire, if you like. this is intended more to send a message to other people that the committee wants to get the testimony of including donald trump's form as chief of staff, it is not intending to mess around. it does not want these people to be able to hide behind these sorts of legal shields, it wants them to come forward and shed everything they know about the events of that day. they believe steve bannon, for example, new quite
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a bit in the run—up to the 6th ofjanuary and he a bit in the run—up to the 6th of january and he was contact they believe with donald trump on the day in question and that he had advance knowledge of some of the violence that was going to occur that day.- going to occur that day. keep ou going to occur that day. keep you up-to-date _ going to occur that day. keep you up-to-date with - going to occur that day. keep you up-to-date with the - going to occur that day. keep| you up-to-date with the work going to occur that day. keep you up—to—date with the work of that committee. north korea has confirmed it test—fired a new submarine—launched ballistic missile — for the first time in two years. we've received this image — which we are unable to independently verify. north korean state media spoke of the pride and honour of having succeeded. earlier the south korean military reported that one missile had landed in waters off the coast of japan. the un security council are thought to be meeting later on wednesday — a move prompted by britain and the united states with the us in particular reacting angrily to the launch— labelling the move as a threat to the region. here's white house press secretaryjen psaki.
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we condemned the dprk's ballistic missile launch. these launches violate multiple un security council resolutions and our threat to the region. a call on the dprk to refrain from further provocations and engage in substantive dialogue and our commitment to the defence of the republic of korea and japan remains ironclad. these launches also underscore the urgent need for dialogue and diplomacy. our offer remains to meet anywhere, any time, without precondition. soo kim is a former cia analyst now with the rand corporation in washington. this is her assessment of the missile test. so this is north korea's fourth or fifth nuclear missile test in the past couple of months. technologies being developed.
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today is a missile with advanced manoeuvring capabilities. all of this is showing that from a strategic and defence perspective north korea's defence provocation and arsenal is developing quite diversely and from a geopolitical perspective this is a way for the regime to get the attention of the united states and south korea so we have to really examine what kind of diplomacy we are trying to aim for. the biden administration has maintained the position that we are going to be open to talks that when you read a statement carefully there are conditions such as, of course, keeping the sanctions in place and being of human rights issues so diplomacy is notjust something that can be unconditional but were going to need to get north korea to cooperate and also take steps to show that it is actually about dialogue and denuclearisation.
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the british government has set out a range of measures to transition to a greener economy, to try to reach its target of no net emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050. it comes less than two weeks before it hosts the un climate summit in glasgow. it hopes this "green industrial revolution" will create thousands ofjobs. but environmental groups say the plans lack ambition. more from our science editor david shukman. every aspect of life is going to have to change as we go zero carbon. and now, after a long delay, the government is laying out its plans. and the key to it all is a belief that new green technologies will quickly become cheaper. the market is going green. and people know that we have the technological solutions to these problems and they want to go green. and they know that we'll be able, one day, to bring down the prices of green technology, evs and heat pumps and solar panels, in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable.
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there's money to support electric cars and charging points, and car—makers will be told to sell a set number of clean vehicles. hydrogen gets a push, especially for heavy industry. it is a clean fuel, depending on how the gas is produced. and there's backing for new nuclear power stations, including at this site in suffolk, but the details aren't settled and critics say that none of this goes far enough. there is still a chasm with this government between the rhetoric and the reality. my fear is this plan will not deliver the fair, prosperous transition we need, equal to the scale of the emergency we face. it's very disappointing.
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we have a climate emergency and a lot of these actions are not going to see the light of day for years. we need to be acting now, be far more ambitious. amid all the arguments about tackling climate change, the goal is to reach net zero, but what is that? well, like every country, the uk emits carbon dioxide — the gas that's driving up temperatures. it comes from heating our homes, getting around, generating power. it's meant to fall dramatically by 2050, but if we don't get down to literally zero, we'll have to compensate by pulling carbon dioxide out of the air. it has been one month since the volcano
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on the spanish island of la palma first erupted. 7,000 people have been displaced and nearly 2000 buildings have been destroyed. the volcano is continuing to spew lava with no end in sight. 0ur correspondent dan johnson is there. it still has the capacity to attract and enthrall, but after a month it's become an overbearing backdrop to much of life here. an incredible spectacle with its own mundane chores. ryan does this once a week. "maybe it doesn't affect you directly," he says, "but a family member or someone you know." translation: i want it to end. it's not too worrying for me but it is for my family and in the meanwhile, we just have to live with it. this kind of strong mentality that they say, "it doesn't matter what comes, we go through it, and go forward."
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lucas isn't going forward. this is what happened to the house he lived in for 60 years. his wife cannot bear to watch. translation: | cannot put| into words, losing the house that should have been for my children and grandchildren. it's a miracle we have this flat because i know people are sleeping in cars and tents and caravans. there is no sign of this eruption easing at all, and in fact, if anything, the volcano only gets more active and it's actually grown over the weeks as the layers of lava have built up and hardened, but there is still fresh lava pouring down the hillside as well, destroying more farmland, homes and villages, and there are new fires breaking out all the time.
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there are amazing survival stories. these dogs have been fed by drone for four weeks and now there's an attempt to use one to rescue them. but there is little hope for the home is still in the way of the lava. a historic moment that many of his victims have waited forfor decades. the former dictator in the dock older, slimmer. and as he sat down, obedient enough. dawn, and as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on a plane outside, it lights up a biblicalfamine now in the 20th century. the depressing conclusion, in argentina today it is actually cheaper
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to paper your walls with money. we've had controversies - in the past with great britain, but as good friends we have always found a good - and lasting solution. a report recommending that steve bannon, a key ally of donald trump, be held in contempt, is approved by us lawmakers investigating january's riot on capitol hill. north korea releases images of the ballistic missile launched from a submarine — as the white house warns against further �*provocations'.
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every week at this time we take a look climate change 7 bringing you stories with big implications for our planet s future. this week, we focus on geoengineering — using technology to try to undo or repair the damage to our climate — on a massive scale. some scientists say that even with drastic cuts in co2 emissions — preventing catastrophic climate change may be impossible without action to cool our planet right now. projects could include, carbon capture — capturing c02 from the air or from industrial emissions. 0cean fertilisation — adding iron to oceans to boost the growth of c02—consuming plankton. solar reflection blocking sunlight by seeding the upper atmosphere with reflective particles — or sending giant mirrors into space.
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cloud brightening spraying salt from oceans into the air — creating whiter clouds that reflect more heat. and land management covering deserts, ice sheets and rooftops with reflective material, or genetically—modifying lighter crops that absorb less heat. but 7 are these massive projects realistic? and might they have unforeseen 7 potentially disastrous consequences7 joining me now is gernot wagner, the founding executive director of harvard s solar geoengineering research programme. he teaches climate economics at new york university and is the author of geoengineering: the gamble . some of those ideas, putting dustin some of those ideas, putting dust in the atmosphere to reflect light back out, they sent pretty far—fetched. they sound nuts, yes. and that is a pretty good reaction to have.
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there is and not the sort things you want to be using to tackle climate change. they are certainly not go to minor defence. they're not the first thing you think about. we had to cut c02 thing you think about. we had to cut co2 emissions. better steps one to ten. and maybe then we'll to be thinking about what else. then we'll to be thinking about what else-— then we'll to be thinking about what else. ., ., , ,, ., ., what else. you got steps one to ten to do but — what else. you got steps one to ten to do but that _ what else. you got steps one to ten to do but that may - what else. you got steps one to ten to do but that may not - what else. you got steps one to ten to do but that may not be i ten to do but that may not be enough. it may not be fast enough. it may not be fast enough. you might actually have to take some of the slightly more wacky idea seriously. just to be clear. _ more wacky idea seriously. just to be clear, steps _ more wacky idea seriously. just to be clear, steps 11—15 are to climate change. we have to do that too. and on top of that there may be these other technologies out there. and to be clear there are very
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different things talking about. carbon removal, setting c02 out of thin air, is often called geoenigineering but frankly, the fire main pad it is expensive litigation. there are cheaper ways of cutting c02 cheaper ways of cutting co2 emissions and we had to do that but maybe in addition to get to net zero emissions overall, we may also want to taking in co2 out of the atmosphere and then on top of all of that comes geo— engineering, solar geoenigineering. i'd make this idea putting particles up in space on mirrors to reflect the sunlight back out and keep the planet cool air, could that work? it does. it did. volcanoes happen basically doing this forever. so when one
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erupts in the philippines in 1991, i992 erupts in the philippines in 1991, 1992 ironically at the time of the very first earth summit in 180 heads of state came to be to talk about how to achieve a sustainable future for the planet, global average temperatures are around half a degree centigrade than they would have been without this volcanic eruption. a year later, dot—mac volcanic eruption. a year later, dot-mac— volcanic eruption. a year later, dot-ma. , ., ., , ., , later, dot-mac you are probably auoin to later, dot-mac you are probably going to go _ later, dot-mac you are probably going to go on _ later, dot-mac you are probably going to go on to _ later, dot-mac you are probably going to go on to say _ later, dot-mac you are probably going to go on to say this - later, dot-mac you are probably going to go on to say this but i going to go on to say this but i'm guessing there is some downside to doing a project like this artificially. downside to doing a pro'ect like this artificially.�* like this artificially. there are some _ like this artificially. there are some downsides - like this artificially. there are some downsides and| like this artificially. there i are some downsides and to like this artificially. there - are some downsides and to be clear this was a massive volcano with a massive impact and that impact did not last, thankfully, in many ways. temperatures have been rising ever since and unfortunately,
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that said, do we think we know that said, do we think we know that adding small reflective particles into the lower stratosphere of death per atmosphere would the planet? yes because of volcanoes. and atmosphere would the planet? yes because of volcanoes. and i favoured you — yes because of volcanoes. and i favoured you had _ yes because of volcanoes. and i favoured you had to _ yes because of volcanoes. and i favoured you had to leave - yes because of volcanoes. and i favoured you had to leave it - favoured you had to leave it there. i have so many questions i still want to ask. it's a fascinating but i am afraid are out of time so we will have to read the debit i'm sure we'll see how things develop and how much progress as neighbourly mailer that you bear, and if any of these ideas become a little more necessary. thank you very much. little more necessary. thank you very much-— thank you. just two weeks now until world leaders gather for a crucial climate summit in glasgow. it s called cop26 and the focus will be on the world s biggest polluters to offer even greater commitments to limit global warming.
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four territories are responsible for more than half of the world s emissions. china, the united states, india — and europe. put together, the eu and the uk produce more than 7% of c02. in the latest in his series of climate profiles, my colleague ros atkins looks at what the european union is doing to keep its climate promises. we know where they want to go and what we need to do to get there. �* ,., ,, there. and some progress has been made- — there. and some progress has been made. from _ there. and some progress has been made. from 1995 - there. and some progress has been made. from 1995 and i there. and some progress has i been made. from 1995 and 2020 been made. from 1995 and 2020 be either reduced emissions by a quarter, beating its own targets. aim is to reach 55% of 1990 levels by 2030 and aims to get to 40% of its energy from renewables by the same point. the strategy to get there includes carrots and sticks. say emeka to accept and change
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business models and the behaviour of investors to finance green investments and penalise those who don't make this move. wide by the eu is clear on the scale of the nothing be presented today is going to be easy. it is going to be bloody hard. that's one way heat of the climate plan is emissions trading. here is the president of the european commission commission again. you make the principle is simple. the emission of c02 must have a price. a price on c02 that incentivises consumer, producers and innovators to choose the clean technologies. and emissions trading industry came emit a certain amount of c02 with the allowance cut overtime as the main tool to wean the eu industry of the dirtiest fuels. first and foremost as coal. polling get 70% of its energy from coal.
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the government is investing to change this but instead binds them using coal is 20119. change this but instead binds them using coal is 2019. then there is germany. it produces more coal emissions than any other eu country and you look at the top ten entities that produce emissions in the eu six of them are german coal power stations. this does look likely to change. the party is in talks to form in a coalition in germany have agreed to end coal ijy germany have agreed to end coal by 2030. translation: it will be the biggest industrial modernisation project germany has undertaken in more than 100 years. it will greatly benefit our economy. for other eu members there remain practical concerns about shift to clean energy. this is the outgoing czech prime minister. translation: the czech republic is a very industrial country. a specific country. we don't have the sea, we don't have many renewable resources. and while
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member states grapple with finding clean energy sources the european union is tightening its transport policies. tighter emission limits for cars are coming and that will effectively end new petrol and diesel sales by 2035 and for air travel there will be any tax on jet fuel. france has gone even further, passing a law banning domestic fights with a jet samejourney a law banning domestic fights with a jet same journey could be made by train. that is one example and in many others european still fly. to use policies to change habits, well, people need to be persuaded. as the president wellness. in 2018 the protests in france were triggered by a rise in green taxes on petrol and the president drew this conclusion. if you to happen we have to help middle classes and poor people to make this change with us. and i am sure about that now. some are worried
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about the pace and the cost of climate policies and others wary they are not enough. the campaign group greenpeace argues this whole package is based on a target that is too low. celebrating these policies is that a high jumper claiming is that a highjumper claiming a is that a high jumper claiming a medalfor running under the bar. semi—members are trying to move the bar up. the lid wants to be carbon neutral by 2035. sweden by 2045. bear in mind the eu target overall is 2050. just like the uk. if that is in the long term light now that the long term light now that the blue line here shows is almost on track for its 2030 target and as it pursues this watchword comes up a lot? at the end of the day, people and most varied this is going to be fair. fairness is a crucial point. fairness within societies and fairness between member states. societies and fairness between memberstates. fairness societies and fairness between member states. fairness is crucial and we see that in every country. is there a risk
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that a sense of unfairness becomes a reason not to act? fundamentally the eu will be judged by the speed and scale of its emission cuts. still very balmy out there for some of us for a late october night. 15—16 celsius, and wednesday promises to be another mild day. quite breezy and lots of showers in the forecast, too. 0ur tropical air arrived a couple of days ago, it's still with us, it was very warm yesterday in the south—southeast, 21 celsius — we won't quite get that today, but i want to show you the origins of this current of air, so this is the north atlantic and it's all very warm air across the atlantic, and here we have the caribbean. so this is where the air has
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come from — it's obviously cooled, but it's still pretty balmy over this part of europe. now this is what it looks like early in the morning — there is some rain around, a wet start to the day in east anglia and the southeast, lots of heavy showers approaching cornwall, devon, parts of wales, too. in fact, these are heavy, thundery showers — and through the morning and into the afternoon, they could bring gusts of wind, as well, but some sunny spells, so quite a changeable day for england and wales. but for northern ireland and most of scotland, it should be dry and bright — but notice in the northwest highlands here, some wet weather come the afternoon. so i say mild again, 18 celsius expected in the southeast and east anglia. now into the week, or thursday onwards, it'll turn quite a bit colder — in fact, a reversal in the wind direction is expected wednesday into thursday. in fact, around this area of low pressure, the winds will start to come in from the north. now right now at this moment, the winds are coming in from the south or southwest. on thursday, they're coming in almost from the north — this is arctic air, in fact, some of the showers across scotland could be wintry, the winds will be strong anyway particularly along the north sea coast,
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touching gale force. i mean, gusts inland will be around 40 mph or so, so it'll feel relatively cold compared to what we've got right now. and these are the temperatures, the high temperatures on thursday —11—13 in the south, single figures in the north, and once again, wintry showers are possible across the mountains of scotland. now thursday night into friday, the wind dies down as the low pressure pulls away, and in fact a high pressure develops across the uk briefly in what we call a ridge of high pressure. there'll be some sunshine around, as well, but it won't feel quite so cold on friday because the winds will be lighter, still only around 13 celsius. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: the select committee investigating january's attack on the united states' capitol has unanimously approved a report which recommends that a former aide to president trump be held in contempt of congress. steve bannon has refused to appear before the panel. mr trump urged former aides to reject the panel's requests. north korea has confirmed it test—fired a new submarine—launched ballistic missile, for the first time in two years. we've received these images, which we are unable to independently verify. earlier the south korean military reported that one missile had landed in waters off the coast of japan. the british government has set out a range of measures to transition to a greener
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economy, to try to reach its target of no net emissions of greenhouse gases by the year 2050. it comes less than two weeks before it hosts the un climate summit in glasgow. now on bbc news it's time for panorama. tonight on panorama, how social media can be toxic for women. you will be threatened physically, sexually as well as verbally. from reality tv stars to politicians, women are getting more and more online hate. i got words thrown at me, those kind of words which a man definitely wouldn't have had. people just expect you to accept the fact that you're going to get abuse because you put yourself out there and it shouldn't be like that at all. we investigate the social media platforms accused of spreading the hate.
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so they are driving up their bottom line by keeping

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