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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 19, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at eight... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050, including a big push for renewable energy, electric vehicles and millions of trees to be planted. grants of £5,000 will be on offer to people in england and wales to replace their gas boilers with heat pumps, as part of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the uk. it will be able to one day bring down the prices of green technology — evs and heat pumps and solar panels — in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. there are some people who are quite privileged in that they can spend that money, and obviously, it's well worth it, but it'sjust not available for everyone. if i knew the outcome — - the ins and outs, the beginning, middle and end and the outcome
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of what exactly i came for- would actually stand for — i i would 100%, as long as it was beneficial to the i children of tomorrow. and at half past eight, we'll answer your questions about insulating your home and installing a heat pump. that's in �*your questions answered' also in the next hour — sexual abuse claims against the late labour peer lord janner. a damning report says children were let down by the police and state. the elder brother of the manchester arena bomber, salman abedi, leaves the uk after being ordered to appear at the inquiry into the attack. and coming up, the story of amal. a giant puppet of a nine—year—old girl from syria, highlighting the plight of young refugees.
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good evening and welcome to bbc news. in less than 30 years' time, the united kingdom should be a net—zero country — putting nothing into the atmosphere, which would make climate change worse. that is the target that the government has set out today. anything that does produce greenhouse gases, like industrial processes and aircraft, will be balanced by measures to absorb carbon dioxide, like planting more forests. the plans include £620m grants for electric cars and charging points. it comes ahead of the united nations cop26 climate conference in glasgow, which begins next month. with more, here's our science editor, david shukman. every aspect of life is going to have to change as we go zero—carbon. and now, after a long delay, the government is laying out its plans. and the key to it all is a belief that new green technologies will quickly become cheaper. the market is growing, is going green,
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and people know that we have the technological solutions to these problems, and they want to go green. and they know that we'll be able one day to bring down the prices of green technology, evs and heat pumps and solar panels, in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. there's money to support electric cars and charging points, and car—makers will be told to sell a set number of clean vehicles. hydrogen gets a push, especially for heavy industry. it is a clean fuel, depending on how the gas is produced. and there's backing for new nuclear power stations, including at this site in suffolk, but the details aren't settled and critics say that none of this goes far enough. there is still a chasm with this government between the rhetoric and the reality. my fear is this plan will not deliver the fair, prosperous transition
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we need equal to the scale of the emergency we face. it's very disappointing. we have a climate emergency, . and a lot of these actions are not going to see light of day for years. we need to be acting now, be far more ambitious. - amid all the arguments about tackling climate change, the goal is to reach net—zero, but what is that? well, like every country, the uk emits carbon dioxide, the gas that's driving up temperatures. it comes from heating our homes, getting around, generating power. it's meant to fall dramatically by 2050, but if we don't get down to literally zero, we'll have to compensate by pulling carbon dioxide out of the air. the easiest way to do that is planting trees, but on a far bigger scale than we do right now. with solar panels on the roofs and everything well insulated, this green business park in bristol is an example of
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lower—carbon living. cycling is made as easy as possible, so what do people make of the government plan to go green? i think that some people are quite privileged and they can spend that money and it's well worth it, but it isn't available for everyone, which is another huge issue. if i knew the outcome of the ins and outs and beginning and middle and end and what exactly i'm paying for, what it would stand for, i would 100% as long as it is beneficial to the children of tomorrow, i would make that sacrifice. an obvious measure is better insulation. many experts want this to be given a bigger push, and the government's independent climate adviser says more needs to be spelled—out. it is important to say. that we have a new plan for getting to net—zero, and it looks like it is- a more comprehensive one. but what we don't have, sadly, is all the detail on how it's- going to be delivered. the government was running out of time to announce its policies.
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hosting the cop26 climate summit in glasgow next month, it is in the global spotlight. so, promising action isn't enough. david shukman, bbc news. joining me now is bob ward, director of policy and communications at lse's grantham research institute on climate change and the environment. what do you make of what's been announced today, doesn't go far enough? it’s announced today, doesn't go far enou~h? �* , . announced today, doesn't go far enou~h? v . , announced today, doesn't go far enou~h? �*, . , enough? it's a very good contribution _ enough? it's a very good contribution and - enough? it's a very good contribution and it's - enough? it's a very good - contribution and it's brought together other announcements. i know for the first time, provided more detail about how we can get to that target of net zero x 2050. but there are still details. some of those details are not really for them to decide. in many cases, it depends on
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how the private sector response to these policies for things like the roll—out of electric vehicles. those depend on manufacturers and those who are going to be selling these products to the public to see how they respond. so those details need to be worked out, and until we see those details, i'm not sure this will be enough to get us to that target. if will be enough to get us to that taruet. , ., , , will be enough to get us to that taruet. ,, , , ., target. if you “ust rely on the rivate target. if you just rely on the private sector, _ target. if you just rely on the private sector, is _ target. if you just rely on the private sector, is there - target. if you just rely on the private sector, is there a - target. if you just rely on the private sector, is there a risk target. if you just rely on the - private sector, is there a risk that the costs are often customer, to the consumer, which can affect the poor are within society?— consumer, which can affect the poor are within society? what we do know about climate — are within society? what we do know about climate change _ are within society? what we do know about climate change is _ are within society? what we do know about climate change is it's - are within society? what we do know about climate change is it's far - about climate change is it's far more costly to do nothing. we're seeing the impacts all around the world, including in britain. what we know about many of these new technologies that we're bringing in, they also benefit consumers, and its
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electric vehicles which are much more reliable. there is an upfront cost, and the government hasn't really laid out how to help poor consumers with the cost of electric vehicles. but it does thinks what happened in a few years from now, after manufacturers has learned a more efficient way, it will become easierfor more efficient way, it will become easier for consumers more efficient way, it will become easierfor consumers on more efficient way, it will become easier for consumers on lower incomes to afford these. is easier for consumers on lower incomes to afford these. is there enou:h incomes to afford these. is there enough money — incomes to afford these. is there enough money going _ incomes to afford these. is there enough money going into - enough money going into infrastructure for electric cars to support people who want to shift? again, the infrastructure is not only going to be paid for by government. it announced a 620 million today to help people who want charging points at home and increase the infrastructure around the country. but again, this will depend on private companies, and what we will have to see is is this strategy clear enough that it
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convinces the private sector that it can invest with confidence? because that's the private sector that will get us through this in the end, and if they don't feel this is a clear enough strategy, we will be stuck. many thanks indeed. more than a fifth of the uk's green house gas emissions come from heating buildings, homes and offices. from next april, the government will be offering some households in england and wales a subsidy to help meet the cost of replacing gas fired boilers with low carbon heat pumps. so, what are they and how much do they cost? well, it will vary depending on the type and size of your home. they are costly — between £6,000 and £18,000 — but the government will give households £5,000 to bring the price down. £450m is being set aside for this scheme over the next three years, but that will only cover the installation of 90,000 pumps. up to 25 million homes are currently heated by gas boilers. here's our consumer affairs
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correspondent, colletta smith. it's time for the final checks on a newly—installed boiler. and like the vast majority of homes, this one runs on gas. james's company fit about 1,000 boilers a month across the country. all people want to do is turn the tap on and get hot water and turn the heating on and get heat. and it's a light box on the wall. thomas just forked out for a new home when he needed to replace the boiler. so even with an extra five grand from the government, there is no way he could have matched that with his own cash. you may want to make a greater decision, but you're limited by cost, i suppose. across the street, 91—year—old lottie made the same choice. she got a new gas cooler because it's cheapest. not everybody's got that. it costs over 2,000 l for this only last year. so, it's draining your bit of savings, you see. - heat pumps work by taking warmth from the ground or the air,
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squashing it, which makes it harder, and then pumping it round your house. margaret and john fitted an air—sourced pump to their home in anglesey, and she's delighted with the results. oh, my goodness, the difference it makes. actually fantastic. yes, it reduces our running costs, but it is costly to do it. it's good that the government is waving a little tiny green flag. it is not enough. for many people, a heat pump is an expense they cannot afford. it'sjust not going to be generous enough to help them do it. we're talking about households for whom investments and long—run returns on investments and their properties, it's just a foreign language. we all know that for the whole country to cut emissions, we will need to change our trains and our buses and even the cars we drive, but lots of people haven't clocked that to cut around a fifth of our emissions, that change will have to take place right here in the heart of every household. james thinks the effort
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of installing insulation and the radiators would put most people off. 0nce into the transformation that would have to go on and the people that would need to be done in an existing property, then it becomes, right, well, maybe not me, then. every home is different, so there's no easy solution but, despite this, extra money and the government still need homeowners to be willing and able to pay for the change. colletta smith, bbc news, in pontefract. we'll have a lot more on heat pumps and what you can do in your own homes to insulate and reduce your carbon footprint at half past eight, when we'll be putting viewers' questions to andrew shepherd, managing director at tophat, who build zero carbon homes and factories. and laura bishop, chair at the ground source heat pump association. the government has released the latest coronavirus figures for the uk.
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43,738 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period. there were another 223 deaths, within 28 days of a positive test. nearly 49 and a half million people have received the first dose of the vaccine and more than 45 people have received the second jab. 78.9% of the population aged 12 and over have been fully vaccinated. so today's figures for new cases are slightly down on yesterday's. however, infection rates in the uk have been rising throughout this month. as this graph with data collected up to 18th october shows, the number of people newly testing positive for covid in the uk has been rising to around more than 40,000 every day. there have been about as many new cases over the past three months as there were between october and january last year. the uk now has one of the highest rates of covid infections in europe. as this data up until 9th october
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shows, there's a significant gap between the uk and other major european nations in terms of new daily cases per million people. so where are we heading with coronavirus rates in the uk? i'm nowjoined by professor rowland kao, data scientist from the university of edinburgh. should people be worried about rising rates? figs should people be worried about rising rates?— should people be worried about rising rates? should people be worried about risin: rates? a ., ., ., rising rates? as we look forward to autumn and _ rising rates? as we look forward to autumn and winter, _ rising rates? as we look forward to autumn and winter, we _ rising rates? as we look forward to autumn and winter, we need - rising rates? as we look forward to autumn and winter, we need to - rising rates? as we look forward to autumn and winter, we need to be| autumn and winter, we need to be aware that if cases continue to rise, and hospitalizations and deaths inevitably also follow, albeit more slowly, we need to be where there could be some real issues to deal with.— issues to deal with. what in particular— issues to deal with. what in particular are _ issues to deal with. what in particular are you _ issues to deal with. what in | particular are you concerned issues to deal with. what in - particular are you concerned about in terms of how fast rates are rising? fist in terms of how fast rates are risin: ? �* ., ., , ., ., rising? at the moment, rates are not risin: ve rising? at the moment, rates are not rising very fast. _ rising? at the moment, rates are not rising very fast, and _ rising? at the moment, rates are not rising very fast, and that's _ rising? at the moment, rates are not rising very fast, and that's the -
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rising very fast, and that's the good news. what we don't know yet is whether they will increase. there are all sorts of things going on. the oncoming seasons changing may increase transmission. declining immunity will affect those rates. and other factors as well, including other or not other infections will infect rates as well.— other or not other infections will infect rates as well. how worried should we _ infect rates as well. how worried should we be _ infect rates as well. how worried should we be about _ infect rates as well. how worried should we be about the - infect rates as well. how worried should we be about the new- infect rates as well. how worried l should we be about the new delta variant? it's still small in numbers at the moment. i variant? it's still small in numbers at the moment.— at the moment. i think you're referring _ at the moment. i think you're referring to — at the moment. i think you're referring to the _ at the moment. i think you're referring to the subgroup - at the moment. i think you're referring to the subgroup of l at the moment. i think you're l referring to the subgroup of the delta variance which appears to be rising. it is an increasing proportion over the last few weeks and months of the total amount of infections in britain, and what that suggests is that for some reason we don't know what those reasons are.
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something to watch but not yet something that needs to be directly concerned about. what something that needs to be directly concerned about.— concerned about. what about the com arina concerned about. what about the comparing incidents _ concerned about. what about the comparing incidents with - concerned about. what about the | comparing incidents with europe? concerned about. what about the i comparing incidents with europe? is that because we vaccinated earlier? there are a number of factors. both are likely to have an impact. britain had one of the earliest most successful vaccination campaigns. unfortunately, the data suggests that as we knew would happen,. that's starting to become a factor. more importantly now for transmission are younger people who are unvaccinated.— are unvaccinated. thank you very much indeed. _
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it's been a very comfortable night for manchester city as they swept aside bruges in the champions league. joao cancelo got citys first of the evening after a great through ball from phil foden. city were 2—nil up before the break thanks to a riyad mahrez penalty. kyle walker added another before 19—year—old cole palmer scored the fourth just two minutes after coming onto the pitch. bruges did pull one back, but mahrez got his second of the night ot make it 5—1 to city. and liverpool have made a fantastic start against atletico in madrid — a mohammed salah effot was flicked in offjames milner, and naby keita just added a second. so around 15 minutes played in the spanish capital — liverpool 2—0 up. celtic picked up their first points in the europa league this season by beating ferencvaros 2—0. the game was held much earlier than usual due to policing pressures. celtic also required their fans to have covid
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passports to enter the stadium, and carried out random spot checks. 0n the pitch, it took almost an hour before the deadlock was broken at celtic park with portuguese midfielderjota setting up japan forward kyogo. david turnbull forced balint vecsei into an own goal for celtic�*s second goal, with ten minutes left. the win leaves celtic third in group g. 68% of premier league players are now fully vaccinated against covid—19, with 81 % having had one jab. there has been a large increase in the uptake of the vaccine in the last month after mounting pressure. i think they've got responsibilities to themselves. to their families into their friends. we don't want any more games cancelled, we don't want any squads that are short that can't fulfil fixtures because half of them got covid. we can avoid that now. you can choose the time to get
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vaccinated, you can't choose the time when you're going to have that chance encounter with covid, and if you're a professional sports person, it could knock up something very big in your sporting life. to cricket now, and scotland are closing in on qualification for the super 12s stage of the men's t20 world cup. they beat papua new guinea by 17 runs, to make it two wins from two in their qualifiers, after their opening day victory over bangladesh. joe wilson has this report. having excelled by beating bangladesh on the weekend, scotland had a different challenge in the desert of oman. proud opponents. ritchie barrington, 13 years of scotland international hit three sixes. and it seemed feasible. when barrington was up first 17, they lost energy, good total but they were relieved it wasn't more. they attacked with the bat
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and did not work. whose hand grab that catch, ritchie barrington. scotland took five quick wickets but then they played a defiant ending. it kept things on the edge. and to his fury, they deflected the ball for the wicket. the end, 140 it all out and scotland's record, 100%. joe wilson, bbc news. if scotland beat 0man on thursday, they'll go through as group winners. that's because bangladesh beat the tournament co—hosts this evening. they set 0man a total of 154 and went on to win by 26 runs. and after naming his squad for the upcoming autumn internationals yesterday, eddiejones is already having to make some changes. jones left out several big names, including saracens hookerjamie george, who has now been recalled to the squad after luke cowan—dickie picked up an ankle injury playing for exeter chiefs at the weekend. joe marchant replaces anthony watson who ruptured his acl. jones said he is using this period as a stepping stone for the rugby world cup
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in two years time. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. gavin, thanks very much. a court has heard that a man acted "recklessly and dangerously" when he organised a flight carrying the argentine footballer emiliano sala. prosecutors at cardiff crown court said david henderson enlisted a pilot who was neither qualified nor competent. sala and the pilot david ibbotson died in the crash injanuary 2019. mr henderson denies endangering the safety of an aircraft. he has previously admitted a charge of attempting to discharge a passenger without valid permission or authorisation. police investigating the killing of sir david amess have been gathering cctv from shops and businesses near the home of his alleged killer. cctv footage from a convenience store in north london shows a man believed to be the main suspect in the case walking towards gospel 0ak 0verground station. 25—year—old ali harbi ali is being held under
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the terrorism act and officers have until friday to question him. nhs england has announced that children aged 12 to 15 will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — not just at school. this follows concern over the recent increase in cases in schools and colleges. it's hoped they'll be a large up—take over vaccines during the half—term holidays. while in scotland, the national clinical director said the government was "on track" to get everyone boosted six months after their second dose. while in wales, 10,000 pupils missed school last week for covid reasons. geoff barton is the general secretary of the association of school and college leavers. he joins us live from bury st edmunds in suffolk. thanks forjoining us. what do you make of this movement to get childrenjabbed in general hubs? i childrenjabbed in general hubs? i think it's probably a good move. when we had the decision that we would vaccinate 12 to 15—year—olds
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with their consent, we were told it would be completed by the end of october. i know from talking to had teachers today that that isn't going to happen because they don't have teams lined up to come into mid—november. so, this is about catching up on time. heaven only knows, but if it means those young people who haven't had the chance of vaccination yet can go to a hub next week, that will be a good way of reassuring them that the promise can move a step closer.— move a step closer. which parts of the country — move a step closer. which parts of the country are _ move a step closer. which parts of the country are most _ move a step closer. which parts of the country are most badly - move a step closer. which parts of the country are most badly of - move a step closer. which parts of the country are most badly of the l the country are most badly of the affected? i the country are most badly of the affected? ~ �* , , ., ., , affected? i think it's been a fairly mixed picture. _ affected? i think it's been a fairly mixed picture. i— affected? i think it's been a fairly mixed picture. ithink— affected? i think it's been a fairly mixed picture. i think areas - affected? i think it's been a fairly mixed picture. i think areas of. mixed picture. i think areas of disadvantage have particularly found problems in the take—up. i think one
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of the universal issues is more whether the rhetoric of what school leaders should have expected from the immunisation team has been matched by what they were able to do in person. what i mean as a secondary school which was expecting a team yesterday got an email the night before saying they change plans. that appears to be happening irrespective of where you are, and you've also got examples of the teams and driving without sufficient vaccines. having to leave early. we really have to sort this out because it's notjust about really have to sort this out because it's not just about vaccination, it's not just about vaccination, it's about public confidence and those young people who are feeling so anxious about trying to get back to normality of learning howling to been told that the vaccination as part of that. been told that the vaccination as part of that-— been told that the vaccination as art of that. ., . ., ,,., , part of that. how much have lessons been disruptive? _
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part of that. how much have lessons been disruptive? as _ part of that. how much have lessons been disruptive? as you _ part of that. how much have lessons been disruptive? as you know, - been disruptive? as you know, the latest figures _ been disruptive? as you know, the latest figures are _ been disruptive? as you know, the latest figures are out _ been disruptive? as you know, the latest figures are out today. - been disruptive? as you know, the latest figures are out today. we've i latest figures are out today. we've seen an increase in young people with covid, so we still have something like 2009000 young people out. but the issue isn'tjust people who do get covid. — 2009000. i spoke to a head teacher who said she had 20 members of staff out. and she's getting to a point where she's having to talk to the public health about whether she has to send year groups. that's why there needs to be an urgency from the government. there needs to be a clear campaign about why vaccination matters. and there needs to be a much stronger in a line and why this campaign happens, spooking so many young people. frankly needs to stop. in the government can help by creating
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exclusion zones of.— exclusion zones of. many thanks for our exclusion zones of. many thanks for your time- — and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the broadcaster and psychotherapist lucy beresford, and sam lister, deputy political editor at the daily express. four people — among them two children — are in hospital after an explosion at a house in ayr. last night's blast, which affected several properties, could be heard for miles. residents were evacuated from part of the kincaidston area. police scotland said inquiries were continuing into the cause. the cabinet minister michael gove had to be escorted by police in westminster this afternoon after anti—lockdown demontrators attempted to surround him in the street. footage shared on social media showed the communities secretary being encircled by police officers after protesters approached him and began shouting. the met police said there had been no arrests following the incident, but will review the footage. 0ur political correspondent,
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iain watson, joins us now. in the light of the events in the last few days and all the concerns about safety, this footage look quite alarming.— quite alarming. that's right. it does look _ quite alarming. that's right. it does look alarming _ quite alarming. that's right. it does look alarming because i does look alarming because conservatives are... and we heard also from mps about threats they may have received. some of them death threats. some of the people broke away, surrounded michael gove and through paper at his head, but goodness knows what it could've been. police say they intervened immediately and escorted him safely to a government building. downing street describe the behaviour as a boring and said abusing cannot be
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tolerating — — abhorrence. as you are saying, there have been no arrest made, but police are reviewing footage to see if any offensives have occurred. but i think it feels raw at the moment given scotland has been on potential threat. in the speed at which michael gove was accosted. there are arena police. the question remains on mps' safety. the home office is reviewing and i'm told they will report to the recommendations before this week. iain report to the recommendations before this week. . . ., report to the recommendations before thisweek. . . ., ., ,, report to the recommendations before this week. . . ., . ~' , ., and finally, the queen may be 95 years old, but she has turned down
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the 0ldie of the year award — saying you are only as old as you feel. here are some pictures of her majesty with borisjohnson meeting delegates at a windsor castle reception as part of the global investment summit. looking very unloaded and maybe not at all 95. well, in a letter to the 0ldie written by her assistant private secretary, it says the queen sends her warmest best wishes but does not believe she meets the relevant criteria to be able to accept the award. the prize went instead to the french actress leslie caron, who is 90. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schaffernaker. the ever youthful! well, it's been a very strange day for many of us. blustery winds, but feeling quite warm, too. temperatures got up to 21 degrees in east anglia and the south east. still hovering around 17 at midnight tonight. and there's some rain on the way, too. in fact, some of that rain could be quite heavy this evening and overnight in east anglia and the south east. clear spells in the north means that the temperatures will dip away, perhaps to single figures in northern ireland and parts of scotland.
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but the nights across wales and much of england will still be very, very mild. now, tomorrow, it's going to be a changeable day. we have sunny spells in the forecast, but also bursts of heavy rain. and, in fact, thunderstorms possible across areas of england and wales during the course of the morning and into the afternoon. another very mild day for many of us tomorrow, but come thursday, it's all change. the winds will swing direction. they'll be coming in from the north, a cold wind, a strong wind, and those temperatures are set to tumble thursday. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the government has set out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. grants of five thousand pounds willl be given to help households switch to heat pumps — as ministersplans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035.
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an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. nhs england announces children aged 12 to 15 will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — notjust at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. a public inquiry has found multiple failures by police, prosecutors and council officials resulted in child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner not being properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015, facing criminal charges relating to nine people who had been in children s homes — that spanned back 3 decades. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. greville — later lord — janner, mp for leicester, well—known, a keen magician, a man who was repeatedly accused
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of sexually abusing children. you thought it was black and white, didn't you? you haven't a clue, have you? i haven't a clue! one of the first was mark, who, in 1991, told police lord janner had assaulted him as a child. it was like being embarrassed, feeling dirty, and it's something you wanted to keep private. the scars, you can't get rid of, you know, knowing that if it had gone to court, you would have had yourjustice. there were two key moments which prevented that, according to the report. in 2,000, police didn't pass the statements of mark and another man to prosecutors. that was "serious and inexcusable", the inquiry found. in 2006, a prosecutor decided not to push ahead with the investigation, a decision which was "unsound and strategically flawed". this is very recent history. it's not 50, 60 years ago. it would never be acceptable, but we're talking about
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investigations that failed to properly pursue multiple allegations of child sexual abuse, on the basis that they were children in care and wouldn't be taken seriously. lord janner wasn't arrested, he remained an mp, and he wasn't charged for nearly a decade — by which point, he was too ill to stand trial. he died shortly afterwards. justice wasn't done. not for the accusers or the accused. no trial, and alleged victims abandoned attempts to sue in the civil courts. lord janner and his family had no opportunity to mount a defence. his son daniel said the report... but leicestershire police directed its response at the alleged victims. i'd like to start off with an apology to the victims involved in this case and also to commend their bravery, their bravery for coming forward.
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and we should've secured the charges against lord janner far earlier than we did. lord janner always denied the allegations, but because attempts to get to the bottom of them were "shut down", in this inquiry�*s words, the truth can never now be established beyond doubt. tom symonds, bbc news, at the child abuse inquiry. a former soldier, who was on trial in belfast over a fatal shooting during the troubles, has died after contracting covid. dennis hutchings — who was 80 — had been charged with the attempted murder ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 1974. his lawyers had tried to have the case against him thrown out because of his poor health. the elder brother of the manchester arena suicide bomber has left the uk ahead of an appearance at a public inquiry he had been ordered to attend. 28 year old ismail abedi has always refused to answer questions from the inquiry into the attack, which killed 22 people in 2017. 0ur north of england correspondent
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judith moritz has more. ismail, bbc news, can i ask you a few questions, ismail? this is the last sighting of ismail abedi, when i tracked him down in manchester a year ago. why won't you help the inquiry, ismail? why won't you speak to the inquiry? he wasn't prepared to answer my question then answer my questions then, and he also refused to co—operate with the public inquiry into the arena bombing. the bomber�*s brother has been ordered to appear at court this week, but that now seems highly unlikely. we understand that he is not currently in the country and there is no indication as to when he will return. ismail abedi clearly has important evidence to give to the inquiry and we urge him today, sir, to make contact with the inquiry legal team — either directly or through his own legal representatives. as he surely must understand, if he does not do so, the public may infer that he has something to hide
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and so, sir, may you. ismail abedi was arrested on the day after the attack in 2017. he was found to possess extremist propaganda, but was released without charge. last year, greater manchester police said they were still investigating ismail abedi and were going to make further attempts to speak to him. but the bbc understands that a few weeks ago, he left the uk, on a flight to the middle east. and some of the families bereaved by the arena bombing have told us they're furious that he's been able to go abroad. a friend of salman abedi's, ahmed taghdi, has been ordered to appear too, but has also refused to comply with the court so far. unfortunately, he attempted to leave the country yesterday and, as a result, was arrested, so we have a high degree of confidence that he will attend the hearing on thursday. a convicted terrorist who is alleged to have radicalised abedi, abdalraouf abdallah, has also been ordered
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to appear at the inquiry. tomorrow, it's expected that he will be brought to court from prison to face questions. judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. now on bbc news, your questions answered. the government has set out its long awaited strategy to help emissions ljy awaited strategy to help emissions by 2030. grants from up to £5,000 to install low carbon heat pumps to replace gas boilers would you be able to take up the offer of a heat pump? to answer your questions on all things heat pump and household related — with me is andrew shepherd, managing director at tophat, who build zero carbon homes and factories and also, i'm joined by laura bishop, chair at the ground source heat pump association. thank you both so much for your time tonight. we've got lots and lots of
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questions here. andrew if i canjust start off with one who says who can claim this grant? 0nly people on low income or all households with gas boilers? is there sort of a maintenance tester anyone have a? well so far the answer is currently unclear. what we do know is that they will be available from april 2022. there's a period of time where i'm sure will start to see more detail around the grant. what government have said is the funding support will be targeted to those who need it most. will be talking about in terms of total grants are talking about is a maximum of 90,000 homes benefit from the grant. which homes benefit from the grant. which is a lona homes benefit from the grant. which is a long way — homes benefit from the grant. which is a long way short _ homes benefit from the grant. which is a long way short of _ homes benefit from the grant. which is a long way short of the _ homes benefit from the grant. which is a long way short of the total- is a long way short of the total needed. , i: :: :: :: :: :: is a long way short of the total needed. , i: i: i: i: i: i: ., , , needed. there is 13,000,000 houses were talking — needed. there is 13,000,000 houses were talking about _ needed. there is 13,000,000 houses were talking about .3 _ needed. there is 13,000,000 houses were talking about .3 of _ needed. there is 13,000,000 houses were talking about .3 of the _ needed. there is 13,000,000 houses were talking about .3 of the total- were talking about .3 of the total housing population. were also keen to understand is the ground source
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heat pumps are not appropriate for every single house. we've got millions of houses in the uk that are under insulated or have no insulation whatsoever. they are absolutely the place to start targeting money. there he pumps won't work in those houses that need insulation in the first place was up we should say that he pumps themselves can cost up to £18,000. laura, question who says he pumps do seem to be quite large for there pumps small enough to fit into flats? , , , , pumps small enough to fit into flats? , , ,, ., flats? yes. he pumps come in all different shapes _ flats? yes. he pumps come in all different shapes and _ flats? yes. he pumps come in all different shapes and sizes. - flats? yes. he pumps come in all different shapes and sizes. from | different shapes and sizes. from very small— different shapes and sizes. from very small to a three kw he pumps up to mulli- _ very small to a three kw he pumps up to multi— megawatt commercial industrial— to multi— megawatt commercial industrial heat pumps. there are certainly— industrial heat pumps. there are certainly heat pumps on the market that are _ certainly heat pumps on the market that are small enough to fit into small_ that are small enough to fit into small flats. they are shoe box unit which _ small flats. they are shoe box unit which are — small flats. they are shoe box unit which are very small indeed. and they are — which are very small indeed. and they are regularly going into social housing, _ they are regularly going into social housing, high—rise flats no problem over the _ housing, high—rise flats no problem over the last few years was up one
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of the _ over the last few years was up one of the things that we do have to consider— of the things that we do have to consider is _ of the things that we do have to consider is the fact that there needs— consider is the fact that there needs to _ consider is the fact that there needs to be a domestic hot water cylinder~ — needs to be a domestic hot water cylinder. you can't generate domestic— cylinder. you can't generate domestic hot water instantaneously off a heat— domestic hot water instantaneously off a heat pump. actually it is sometimes the cylinder that is the biggest _ sometimes the cylinder that is the biggest problem rather than the pump itself is _ biggest problem rather than the pump itself is up _ biggest problem rather than the pump itself is up to the bigger he pumps you might — itself is up to the bigger he pumps you might see for small houses actually— you might see for small houses actually contain the cylinders themselves. they look bigger than they actually are. so that's one of they actually are. so that's one of the things— they actually are. so that's one of the things to consider when you're looking _ the things to consider when you're looking at— the things to consider when you're looking at space. do the things to consider when you're looking at space.— looking at space. do you have to chance looking at space. do you have to change other— looking at space. do you have to change other aspects _ looking at space. do you have to change other aspects of - looking at space. do you have to change other aspects of your - looking at space. do you have to - change other aspects of your house, and how disruptive is it? it change other aspects of your house, and how disruptive is it?— and how disruptive is it? it very much depends _ and how disruptive is it? it very much depends on _ and how disruptive is it? it very much depends on the _ and how disruptive is it? it very much depends on the house. i and how disruptive is it? it very| much depends on the house. as anders 'ust much depends on the house. as anders just said. _ much depends on the house. as anders just said. not _ much depends on the house. as anders just said, not every house is suitable _ just said, not every house is suitable for a heat pump but many are. suitable for a heat pump but many are we _ suitable for a heat pump but many are. we spent a lot of time dispelling myths around people believing that they have to have indoor— believing that they have to have indoor heating in the house or how their— indoor heating in the house or how their radiators or pipes ripped out in the _ their radiators or pipes ripped out in the house pulled to bids to have a heat _ in the house pulled to bids to have a heat pump and it simply not true.
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from _ a heat pump and it simply not true. from actual— a heat pump and it simply not true. from actual experience and our members — from actual experience and our members experience you are mainly heat pump— members experience you are mainly heat pump installers what we find is that you _ heat pump installers what we find is that you might need to replace two or three _ that you might need to replace two or three radiators. that you might need to replace two orthree radiators. it that you might need to replace two or three radiators. it certainly not a given— or three radiators. it certainly not a given that — or three radiators. it certainly not a given that you have to room replace — a given that you have to room replace every radiator but a good engineer— replace every radiator but a good engineer and replace every radiator but a good engineerand a good replace every radiator but a good engineer and a good installer coming to your— engineer and a good installer coming to your house will assess the existing _ to your house will assess the existing and be able to advise on what _ existing and be able to advise on what radiators need to be replaced if what radiators need to be replaced it any _ what radiators need to be replaced if an . ., �*, what radiators need to be replaced if an . . �* , ., , , if any. ok, that's really helpful. eduar, a if any. ok, that's really helpful. edgar, a question, _ if any. ok, that's really helpful. edgar, a question, why - if any. ok, that's really helpful. edgar, a question, why does . if any. ok, that's really helpful. | edgar, a question, why does the government keep mentioning he pumps as a substitute for replacing gas boilers goes back to what about using direct replacement electric boilers which are hundred % efficient?— boilers which are hundred % efficient? , , ., ., , , ., �* efficient? the issue of gas you're burnin: efficient? the issue of gas you're burning something. _ efficient? the issue of gas you're burning something. in _ efficient? the issue of gas you're burning something. in the - efficient? the issue of gas you're burning something. in the world | efficient? the issue of gas you're i burning something. in the world we live in today but sickly warming houses with coal, and with gas and all of those very instantly and create carbon dioxide what were looking to do is read to start. 0ur homes contribute to a large amount
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of carbon sleep not carbon dioxide. 0ne of carbon sleep not carbon dioxide. one of the main options in one of the best options and what we use is obviously heat pumps. the heat pumps are incredibly efficient. we talk about efficiency and how much energy is produced. electric power boiler obviously benefits from using 100% of the energy but air source heat pumps are even more efficient than that. they create four times more energy and heat energy than they actually produce electricity. so they are incredibly efficient. even more efficient than electric boilers. that's one of the main reason the government is looking to drive the use of air heat pumps. we've touched on this, how can people in upper level flats in cities install a heat punch when there is no outer space?- cities install a heat punch when there is no outer space? that's a really good _ there is no outer space? that's a really good question. _ there is no outer space? that's a really good question. two - there is no outer space? that's a i really good question. two answers there is no outer space? that's a - really good question. two answers to that, if— really good question. two answers to that, if you _ really good question. two answers to that, if you are living in social
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housing, _ that, if you are living in social housing, high—rise blocks or even at low level— housing, high—rise blocks or even at low level communal blocks of flats there _ low level communal blocks of flats there are — low level communal blocks of flats there are solutions for shared ground — there are solutions for shared ground loops which are happening now and happening in the last couple years _ and happening in the last couple years. where we see shared system, shared _ years. where we see shared system, shared a _ years. where we see shared system, shared a ground collector which is collecting — shared a ground collector which is collecting the energy out of the ground — collecting the energy out of the ground and then each person in each flat has— ground and then each person in each flat has their own small ground source — flat has their own small ground source heat pump and then using to extract— source heat pump and then using to extract heat out of the ground. that's — extract heat out of the ground. that's fairly straightforward and social _ that's fairly straightforward and social housing where you got maybe one housing association that owns an entire block — one housing association that owns an entire block. because they can look after everything from the boreholes to the _ after everything from the boreholes to the heat pumps and basically they are almost— to the heat pumps and basically they are almost telling the tenants that this is— are almost telling the tenants that this is what you're going to have. if this is what you're going to have. if you _ this is what you're going to have. if you are — this is what you're going to have. if you are a — this is what you're going to have. if you are a private homeowner with a flat _ if you are a private homeowner with a flat that _ if you are a private homeowner with a flat that slightly more difficult because — a flat that slightly more difficult because you have to encourage either your leasehold owner or your neighbours to come on board with you
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to have _ neighbours to come on board with you to have that— neighbours to come on board with you to have that kind of shared ground loop system. if that's not feasible and it— loop system. if that's not feasible and it is quite difficult if you are privately— and it is quite difficult if you are privately owning a flat your option then privately owning a flat your option than is— privately owning a flat your option than is to — privately owning a flat your option then is to have an air source heat uumo _ then is to have an air source heat pump. that— then is to have an air source heat pump. that then comes down to whether— pump. that then comes down to whether you've got space outdoors. it whether you've got space outdoors. it can _ whether you've got space outdoors. it can be _ whether you've got space outdoors. it can be mounted on the wall and they don't— it can be mounted on the wall and they don't have to sit on the floor on the _ they don't have to sit on the floor on the balcony. so those are your options _ on the balcony. so those are your options there. shared ground loop systems— options there. shared ground loop systems very easily to do in social housing, — systems very easily to do in social housing, not so easy and private housing — housing, not so easy and private housing but air source is still in option— housing but air source is still in option if— housing but air source is still in option if you live in a flat. we will try to _ option if you live in a flat. we will try to get _ option if you live in a flat. - will try to get through more questions. we got so many here. you can use that he pam to replace the warm air boiler? that can use that he pam to replace the warm air boiler?— can use that he pam to replace the warm air boiler? at heat pump can be wet or dry- — warm air boiler? at heat pump can be wet or dry- it — warm air boiler? at heat pump can be wet or dry- it can _ warm air boiler? at heat pump can be wet or dry. it can either be _ warm air boiler? at heat pump can be wet or dry. it can either be used - warm air boiler? at heat pump can be wet or dry. it can either be used to i wet or dry. it can either be used to heat air. the downside ofjust using a dry heat pump is that you don't have a second system to heat hot water. we would always use a wet system that creates hot water that you use for your bath in your shower
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as well as for your heat.— as well as for your heat. laura, how ureen will as well as for your heat. laura, how green will the _ as well as for your heat. laura, how green will the transition _ as well as for your heat. laura, how green will the transition be - as well as for your heat. laura, how green will the transition be if - as well as for your heat. laura, how green will the transition be if we - green will the transition be if we import heat pumps rather than manufacture our own? another good ruestion. manufacture our own? another good question- at — manufacture our own? another good question. at the _ manufacture our own? another good question. at the moment _ manufacture our own? another good question. at the moment because i question. at the moment because there _ question. at the moment because there hasn't been the big g—man that we want _ there hasn't been the big g—man that we want to— there hasn't been the big g—man that we want to see in the uk for he pumps — we want to see in the uk for he pumps. we_ we want to see in the uk for he pumps. we tend to import all of our heat pumps — pumps. we tend to import all of our heat pumps or most of our repayments are from _ heat pumps or most of our repayments are from asia _ heat pumps or most of our repayments are from asia and from europe. what we are _ are from asia and from europe. what we are seeing now because of the surge _ we are seeing now because of the surge to— we are seeing now because of the surge to get he pumps roll—out and heat pump — surge to get he pumps roll—out and heat pump industry in the uk people they are _ heat pump industry in the uk people they are looking to move their heat source _ they are looking to move their heat source manufacturing to the uk to a factory there. we got companies who have been_ factory there. we got companies who have been making their own heat pumps _ have been making their own heat pumps for— have been making their own heat pumps for many years and i can only see that _ pumps for many years and i can only see that improving as we go forward with this _ see that improving as we go forward with this strategy and we have more he pumps _ with this strategy and we have more he pumps roll—out for that right now yes, we _ he pumps roll—out for that right now yes, we having to import them but i see looking — yes, we having to import them but i see looking into the future that is
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going _ see looking into the future that is going to — see looking into the future that is going to change and organising more more _ going to change and organising more more people building he pumps in the uk. �* ., , ., ., uk. andrew, who can help monitor the ma'or uk. andrew, who can help monitor the major polluters — uk. andrew, who can help monitor the major polluters on _ uk. andrew, who can help monitor the major polluters on greenhouse - uk. andrew, who can help monitor the major polluters on greenhouse gas - major polluters on greenhouse gas emissions? for major polluters on greenhouse gas emissions? ., ~ �* , emissions? for me i think it's really important _ emissions? for me i think it's really important we _ emissions? for me i think it's really important we start - emissions? for me i think it's really important we start at i emissions? for me i think it's. really important we start at the source of the problem or source areas. focusing on the key producers and productions of cot particularly within the uk. so looking at things like carbon, obviously from concrete and cement huge production seven or 8% of the total uk carbon dioxide issueis 8% of the total uk carbon dioxide issue is from concrete. starting to look at new intelligent materials, better products that really help to reduce. advocates really important we start to focus on how actually thatis we start to focus on how actually that is sourced and through the manufacturing process will stop laura, a nice problem, we fought a ten kw heat pump this year for our swimming pool and it works really well you do it like using two kw of
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electricity but it doesn't work if the air temperature is low. but of course we — the air temperature is low. but of course we don't _ the air temperature is low. but of course we don't want _ the air temperature is low. but of course we don't want to - the air temperature is low. but of course we don't want to swim - the air temperature is low. but of| course we don't want to swim and the air temperature is low. but of- course we don't want to swim and my question is how well, what a heat pump work in midwinter and freezing conditions? clearly they won't make much heat pump work in midwinter and freezing conditions?— freezing conditions? clearly they will make much _ freezing conditions? clearly they will make much he _ freezing conditions? clearly they will make much he content - freezing conditions? clearly they will make much he content in . freezing conditions? clearly they| will make much he content in the air. will make much he content in the air~ this— will make much he content in the air~ this is— will make much he content in the air. this is the difference between air. this is the difference between air source — air. this is the difference between air source and ground source where ground _ air source and ground source where ground source is not affected by low air temperatures in ground source is not affected by low airtemperatures in the ground source is not affected by low air temperatures in the winter, it's stable _ air temperatures in the winter, it's stable all— air temperatures in the winter, it's stable all year round. if you do have _ stable all year round. if you do have an — stable all year round. if you do have an air— stable all year round. if you do have an air source heat pump it is something — have an air source heat pump it is something that you must be aware of. when _ something that you must be aware of. when the _ something that you must be aware of. when the temperature is cold outside your cop _ when the temperature is cold outside your cop or— when the temperature is cold outside your cop oryour when the temperature is cold outside your cop or your efficiency will drop— your cop or your efficiency will drop because the heat pumps tent to work that— drop because the heat pumps tent to work that much harder to raise to the cold — work that much harder to raise to the cold air— work that much harder to raise to the cold air to the warm air inside the cold air to the warm air inside the house — the cold air to the warm air inside the house. the important thing to look at _ the house. the important thing to look at is — the house. the important thing to look at is your seasonal efficiently eight _ look at is your seasonal efficiently eight efficiency not just your instantaneous efficiency that's happening on the coldest day of the year~ _ happening on the coldest day of the year. those cold days may only be very few _ year. those cold days may only be very few of — year. those cold days may only be very few of the year but the spring and the _ very few of the year but the spring and the autumn of your heat pump, yourair— and the autumn of your heat pump, your air source heat pump will be working _ your air source heat pump will be working a — your air source heat pump will be working a lot more efficiently. as a port to _ working a lot more efficiently. as a port to look— working a lot more efficiently. as a port to look at the seasonal efficiency for that with an air
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source — efficiency for that with an air source there's no getting away from that there _ source there's no getting away from that there efficiency reduces in cold weather. it that there efficiency reduces in cold weather.— cold weather. it does still heat our cold weather. it does still heat your prose _ cold weather. it does still heat your prose like _ cold weather. it does still heat your prose like that _ cold weather. it does still heat your prose like that house - cold weather. it does still heat - your prose like that house properly? absolutely. andrew, a question from carol who says how do you get the financial help, do they come around to check that our home is insulated enough? to check that our home is insulated enou~h? �* ., , to check that our home is insulated enou~h? �* . , , to check that our home is insulated enou~h? . , , ., , enough? again this is really unclear. if— enough? again this is really unclear. if you _ enough? again this is really unclear. if you were - enough? again this is really unclear. if you were to - enough? again this is really i unclear. if you were to engage enough? again this is really - unclear. if you were to engage with one of the engineers would likely come around the house and give you some early advice on how to install them at the best processes do you need to change radiators. it shouldn't be too difficult to switch from the traditional gas boiler to electrical heat pump. what we imagine is that they will probably start to look at installers that will come to your house, give you that recommendation and the payment will be made through that process. it's what they've done in the past with things like the insulation and the two the past.—
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the two the past. wind and solar ower the two the past. wind and solar power generation, _ the two the past. wind and solar power generation, is _ the two the past. wind and solar power generation, is it - the two the past. wind and solar| power generation, is it consistent or based on what other alternatives do we have for coal and gas powered power stations? tram do we have for coal and gas powered power stations?— power stations? two things. obviously — power stations? two things. obviously we _ power stations? two things. obviously we still _ power stations? two things. obviously we still have - power stations? two things. i obviously we still have nuclear power — obviously we still have nuclear power in — obviously we still have nuclear power in the uk as we were talking eariier— power in the uk as we were talking earlier today how nuclear power 17% and we _ earlier today how nuclear power 17% and we may— earlier today how nuclear power 17% and we may start to see more of the smaller— and we may start to see more of the smaller nuclear reactors coming online — smaller nuclear reactors coming online 0f— smaller nuclear reactors coming online. of course they have their own issues— online. of course they have their own issues but we do have that as an option _ own issues but we do have that as an option one — own issues but we do have that as an option. one of the things that brilliant — option. one of the things that brilliant about he pumps particularly around sources the ability— particularly around sources the ability to— particularly around sources the ability to store energy in the ground _ ability to store energy in the ground. the ability to use a heat pump— ground. the ability to use a heat pump to — ground. the ability to use a heat pump to switch on when there is too much _ pump to switch on when there is too much electricity on the grid, too much _ much electricity on the grid, too much wind, _ much electricity on the grid, too much wind, too much solar it's like switching _ much wind, too much solar it's like switching on — much wind, too much solar it's like switching on your solar vehicle and absorbed _ switching on your solar vehicle and absorbed that electrical power and conversely when there's not an apparently great if you got thermal storage _ apparently great if you got thermal storage and/or battery storage you can actually allow your heat pump to off without _
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can actually allow your heat pump to off without damaging the thermal comfort _ off without damaging the thermal comfort of the building. this going to be _ comfort of the building. this going to be a _ comfort of the building. this going to be a few— comfort of the building. this going to be a few different ways of managing that and thermal storage and electric heating systems is going — and electric heating systems is going to — and electric heating systems is going to be very interesting and important way to balance the national— important way to balance the national grid.— important way to balance the national rid. ., ,, , ., national grid. ok. thank you both very much — national grid. ok. thank you both very much for— national grid. ok. thank you both very much for raising _ national grid. ok. thank you both very much for raising through - national grid. ok. thank you both very much for raising through all. very much for raising through all those questions was a very good to talk to you. thank you. and then we are getting reports of disruption taking place at manchester airport this evening. we had a statement we had a a "controlled evacuation" istaking place after a suspicious package was reported at terminaltwo of britain's manchester airport, "following a report of a suspicious package in terminal two,a controlled evacuation is taking place as per standardprocedure," all flights
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all flights will take from terminal one untilfor all flights will take from terminal one until for directions. more all flights will take from terminal one untilfor directions. more on that as soon as we can it to you. channel 4 says subtitles, signing and audio description are unlikely to return to tv until mid—november. it's because of a fault at a broadcast centre which happened last month. well, we can speak now to charlie swinbourne, who is the editor of the limping chicken, which is a deaf news website. he joins us live from ilkley in west yorkshire. are you surprised that channel for is still having trouble reinstating its subtitles and other services? i think it's a really big surprise for deaf people because the idea that subtitles would disappear from one of our main tv channels, itjust so hard for people to believe. i think when it first happened the subtitles just disappeared and deaf people just disappeared and deaf people just were wondering what's going on for a few days. and the idea that
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now a few weeks later and it's still not fixed and then today we find out that it's maybe another four weeks left to get it mended. the idea that you can access channels i think it's really surprising in this day and age wejust can't really surprising in this day and age we just can't imagine that this could happen. 50 age we just can't imagine that this could happen-— could happen. so a big practical difference to _ could happen. so a big practical difference to the _ could happen. so a big practical difference to the deaf _ could happen. so a big practical. difference to the deaf community obviously. difference to the deaf community obviousl . ~ ~ ., ., obviously. well, i think for deaf --eole i obviously. well, i think for deaf people i think _ obviously. well, i think for deaf people i think what _ obviously. well, i think for deaf people i think what it _ obviously. well, i think for deaf people i think what it feels - obviously. well, i think for deaf people i think what it feels like| obviously. well, i think for deaf i people i think what it feels like is a lot of areas of our lives being cut off we are being excluded. because it's already difficult for us to go to the theatre and now you've got cheryl force programmes goggle box, the really popular programmes we kind of watch. just worth remembering that there's quite a lot of people live in a house with other hearing people so you've got deaf people who are actually at home and the rest of the family are watching and they can't watch. you have to imagine how that feels to be
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isolated and to be left out. what have to imagine how that feels to be isolated and to be left out.— isolated and to be left out. what do ou think isolated and to be left out. what do you think about _ isolated and to be left out. what do you think about what _ isolated and to be left out. what do you think about what channel- isolated and to be left out. what do you think about what channel 4 - isolated and to be left out. what do l you think about what channel 4 about why they struggled to restore their services? we why they struggled to restore their services? ~ . ., why they struggled to restore their services? ~ .. , ., , why they struggled to restore their services? . .. , ., , ., services? we can understand they are ”rovidin services? we can understand they are providing the — services? we can understand they are providing the subtitles _ services? we can understand they are providing the subtitles and _ services? we can understand they are providing the subtitles and the - providing the subtitles and the audio description they are called redbeemedia. they had listed as their offices. what's difficult to understand we do know they have a massive technical problems fixing it but it's so hard to understand why there was an off—site backup that worked, why there wasn't a plan b, a contingency, i think they're really big questions to be asked of channel 4 and redbeemedia. big questions to be asked of channel 4and redbeemedia. i big questions to be asked of channel 4 and redbeemedia. i think the other thing that's been difficult for deaf people at this time is the lack of communication. we haven't had a lot of explanation we had those subtle statements going out and times to get their policies, took a while for all come to get involved and even the deaf charities are quite a wild to really get involved. now we do have an idea, we got nbc is making
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statements but it has just felt like it disappeared and there wasn't a lot said about it. it was almost like that's ok, whiles now it finally feels like it's hitting the news and people are thinking about it and talking about it and realising what a massive effect it's having. realising what a massive effect it's havinu. ., realising what a massive effect it's havinu. . ., ~ realising what a massive effect it's havinu. . ., ,, i. , realising what a massive effect it's havinu. ., ., ~' ,, , . having. charlie thank you very much indeed. this is amal — a giant puppet of a nine year old girl from syria — made by the creators of the stage play — war horse. and she just arrived in the uk after trekking across europe. she started her long walk in turkey injuly and has covered thouands of miles to highlight the plight of young refugees. our arts correspondent david silitto has been to see her in folkestone. little amal, a 3.5—metre—tall puppet refugee, and... ..this is the beginning of the final leg of what has an 8,000—kilometre journey. there have been many
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stops across europe. it takes you back when you see the physical reaction that we're getting, but also she's amazingly evocative. so, she's doing herjob. she has provoked strong feelings. in rome, the pope came out to meet her, but not everywhere has been quite so welcoming. especially at one stop in greece. people were stoning a puppet arriving? people were stoning a puppet arriving, which is nothing we expected, and feeling very strongly about it as well, shouting at her with everything they had. and here on the kent coast, which sees regular migrant arrivals along the shore, there is considerable local debate. this man is a ukip councillor, and he wasn't going to be meeting little amal. the event that's taking
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place in folkestone today is all about raising awareness, about being welcoming to refugees. you would rather folkestone was less welcoming? personally, yes. but i would welcome them if they came over here with a passport or equivalent documentation. but by folkestone harbour, the crowds were out. this refugee was getting a hero's welcome. these interactions are about empathy and trying to be curious about somebody you don't know. and welcoming somebody that you don't know. she may only be a puppet, but she's already proved she's a provocative and powerful piece of theatre. david sillito, bbc news, folkestone. i'm back at about 1030 with a look at the papers for tomorrow. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schaffernaker. well, it's been a bizarre day
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of weather for many of us today. really blowy out there, but at the same time, quite warm in the sunshine. in fact, temperatures got up to 21 degrees in east anglia and the south east. and another mild day on the way tomorrow. not quite so mild, but warm enough certainly for the time of the year. here's the reason — a current of tropical air you can see spreading into the uk all the way from the southern climes, and if we track that air, the origins are here in the caribbean. you can see caracas there in south america, the leeward and the windward islands, so this air has made a journey northwards of thousands of miles. it's obviously cooled off, but it's retained some of that warmth and the energy in the form of the strong winds and also some heavy showers that will be also continuing across the uk over the next 24 hours or so. so, a mild start across england and wales once again, and then we're watching out for these clusters of rain, these thunderstorms that could sweep across the southern half of the country during the course of wednesday. and really gusty conditions as well, but there'll be some sunshine, too.
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i think overall a very changeable pattern, changeable picture on the way for wednesday. and then it's all change for the second half of the week, certainly the end of the week. wednesday and thursday, it's going to feel quite a bit colder. the wind is going to change direction. in fact, low pressure will be sitting on top of us. if you track the isobars, these lines coming from the north, that's where the wind will be coming from. so, rathertropicalair coming in from the south and the south—west, we've got colder north atlantic air, even some wintry showers across the hills of scotland. and on top of that, we've got gusty winds, high tides along the north sea coasts. gust of wind in some areas could approach 40—50 mph. this is colder airfrom the north. it's going to feel very, very different on thursday. look at the temperatures. maybe eight degrees in aberdeen, 12 in birmingham, 13 in london. quite a drop, and it's that wind that's particularly going to make it feel chilly, i think, on thursday. and then thursday into friday, high pressure nudges into the uk. high pressure means that the weather will settle down. it'll push the stronger winds
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out into the north sea, so this is where that cold wind will be. here, winds will be lighter across the bulk of the uk. there'll some sunny spells, and i think it'll feel a little less cold and bright on friday. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. britain leads by example. ahead of the un's pivotal climate change conference in glasgow, the government sets out a bold plan for a zero—carbon society. it's a giant step forward, but is it enough? borisjohnson says the government will deploy billions to change the british economy. green is good. green is right. green works. poland's prime minister accuses the european commission of blackmail in a bitter row with ursula von der leyen over the supremacy of eu law. in haiti, the gang that kidnapped a group of american missionaries has demanded a $17 million ransom for their return. and a month on from the first volcanic eruption in la palma, the lava is still flowing.

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