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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 19, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 5pm — the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050, including a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works. grants of £5000 will be on offer to people in england and wales to replace their gas boilers with heat pumps as part of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the uk, but the green party call it misguided. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it's inefficient, it's leaky and it's a waste of money. with ministers investing £620 million in grants for electric vehicles and street charging points,
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we ask whether this will be enough for the uk to "go electric"? also in the next hour, an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. nhs england announces children aged 12—15 will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs, not just at school, as concern grows over a rise in cases. music. and a0 years after the first episode of bergerac, we'll be looking at some previously unseen photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey.
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the government has set out a road map for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050, which ministers claim will support nearly half a million jobs over the next few decades. it includes the aim that by 2035, the uk will be powered entirely by clean electricity. there is also £650 million to subsidise the cost of electric vehicles, and people in england and wales will be offered £5000 grants from next year to replace their gas boilers with low—carbon heat pumps as ministers wants to end the sale of gas boilers by 2035. this report from jon donnison. engineers in chesterfield this morning being trained how to install heat pumps.
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over the next few years, they can expect to be busy, with the government hoping gas burners can be phased out completely by 2035. heat pumps work by extracting warmth from the air, the ground or water. they're a bit like a fridge, operating in reverse, and are powered by electricity. if you want to reduce carbon emissions, it's probably one of the simplest and quickest ways to make a reduction in that. similar to an electric car. but in terms of running costs, even though they are more expensive to purchase, you can get immediate savings from having a heat pump installed. so, this is where the actual hardware is located. richard installed a heat pump in his house seven years ago. i can safely say it's been the best thing we ever did. i mean, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot, but it's very livable. and from next april, people will be able to apply for a £5000 grant to help them pay to replace an existing gas boiler
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with a heat pump. it's part of a £450 million package announced by the government. but that's only enough to cover a maximum of 90,000 pumps, while there are around 25 million gas boilers in uk homes. i it's like we're in a 1500 metre l race, but we're deciding to walk | the first lap and there is no wayi you can catch up in the next two laps because you set off so slowly. the government ought to be doing a lot more a lot more quickly, - even if the direction of travel is in the right direction. - and a £5000 grant still falls considerably short of the cost of installing more heat pumps, which can cause more than double that. for some consumers, it will play a strong incentive, halving the cost of installation for them, would be quite prohibitive, it's still a big jump for them to make. and then there's the issue of insulation. this thermal imaging camera can be used to show how badly insulated some of our homes remain.
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which some say is a big problem if we're converting to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it's inefficient, it's leaky and it's a waste of money, so absolutely alongside this heat pump strategy we should have had a comprehensive local authority—led, street by street insulation programme that many of us have been calling for for years. speaking alongside business leaders at the global investment summit in london today, and ahead of the upcoming un climate summit in glasgow, borisjohnson said the uk was leading the way on green issues. the market is going green, people i know that we have the technological solutions to these problems and they want to go green. i and they know we will be able one day to bring down the prices - of green technology, _ eds and heat pumps and solar panels, in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile -
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phones affordable. and the prime minister later announced a £400 million partnership with the microsoft co—founder bill gates to help make green technology more affordable. jon donnison, bbc news. 0ur energy and environment analyst roger harrabin has been following this. in the next few weeks, borisjohnson is going to be welcoming world leaders to glasgow to the world's most important climate summit this year. the government... the uk government has set very aggressive targets for cutting emissions, and it now needs to show how it's going to meet those targets. and today's fact document covers the entire economy and shows how carbon emissions are going to be cut from every point in the economy. now, of course, critics will say it doesn't go strongly enough, but i have to say that this looks to me like the most advanced plan from any major nation towards how we will actually get round to achieving the emissions
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cuts that have been so bravely promised. i'm joined now by david adams from the energy efficiency infrastructure group, a trade body that represents interests of companies in favour of creating a net—zero built environment. he's in northamptonshire. thanks for being with us. are these plans being announced today enough in your view?— in your view? well, the plans are art of in your view? well, the plans are part of the _ in your view? well, the plans are part of the solution, _ in your view? well, the plans are part of the solution, but - in your view? well, the plans are part of the solution, but i'm - in your view? well, the plans are l part of the solution, but i'm afraid with regard — part of the solution, but i'm afraid with regard to dwellings, it's a small— with regard to dwellings, it's a small part. 3,000 heat pumps over a year for— small part. 3,000 heat pumps over a year for four— small part. 3,000 heat pumps over a year for four years, small part. 3,000 heat pumps over a yearforfouryears, of small part. 3,000 heat pumps over a year for four years, of course that's— year for four years, of course that's welcome, but it certainly does _ that's welcome, but it certainly does not — that's welcome, but it certainly does not provide a long—term incentive _ does not provide a long—term incentive that the industry needs. and indeed in orderto incentive that the industry needs. and indeed in order to achieve our targets, _ and indeed in order to achieve our targets, we — and indeed in order to achieve our targets, we absolutely have, so as has been _ targets, we absolutely have, so as has been previously mentioned, to draw— has been previously mentioned, to draw the _ has been previously mentioned, to draw the necessary fabric improvements that need to go alongside heat pump delivery. in many— alongside heat pump delivery. in many cases, not all, but the vast
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majority — many cases, not all, but the vast majority. otherwise it's difficult to ensure — majority. otherwise it's difficult to ensure performance, questionable in terms _ to ensure performance, questionable in terms of— to ensure performance, questionable in terms of low running cost is certainiy— in terms of low running cost is certainly there is a much greater impact _ certainly there is a much greater impact on — certainly there is a much greater impact on the logical grid which will need — impact on the logical grid which will need more upgrading. what would ou like to will need more upgrading. what would you like to see? _ will need more upgrading. what would you like to see? what _ will need more upgrading. what would you like to see? what more _ will need more upgrading. what would you like to see? what more do - will need more upgrading. what would you like to see? what more do you - you like to see? what more do you want to hear from the government? welcome that we need scale and we need scope. so, one in 12 we polled 2,000 _ need scope. so, one in 12 we polled 2,000 people last week thought that government were doing enough. we need a _ government were doing enough. we need a lot— government were doing enough. we need a lot more. and we need to adopt— need a lot more. and we need to adopt a _ need a lot more. and we need to adopt a holistic and long—term retrofit — adopt a holistic and long—term retrofit driver. something that really — retrofit driver. something that really delivers verifiable reductions in housing emissions and the group _ reductions in housing emissions and the group here have proposed a green stamp _ the group here have proposed a green stamp duty— the group here have proposed a green stamp duty incentive. and this is to drive _ stamp duty incentive. and this is to drive that— stamp duty incentive. and this is to drive that demand over a very extended _ drive that demand over a very extended period, a 20 or 30 year period. _ extended period, a 20 or 30 year period. and — extended period, a 20 or 30 year period, and it allows energy efficiency and homes to be cheaper
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to buy _ efficiency and homes to be cheaper to buy and — efficiency and homes to be cheaper to buy and the poor performing ones are less _ to buy and the poor performing ones are less attractive to purchasers. but it _ are less attractive to purchasers. but it does — are less attractive to purchasers. but it does not impose costs on already— but it does not impose costs on already struggling families. emily potted _ already struggling families. emily polled this idea, only 5% strongly disagreed with the proposition. it's really— disagreed with the proposition. it's really important that government make _ really important that government make energy efficient homes cheaper to purchase. find make energy efficient homes cheaper to urchase. �* , , ., to purchase. and 'ust in terms of ener: to purchase. and just in terms of energy efficiency. _ to purchase. and just in terms of energy efficiency, one _ to purchase. and just in terms of energy efficiency, one side - to purchase. and just in terms of energy efficiency, one side of. to purchase. and just in terms of| energy efficiency, one side of the story is replacing gas boilers and so on to him about the other side is insulation. we heard that from the green party, saying there is no point in having new technology if you've got something like a leaking teapot. what more do we need to do on that? , ., . ., , teapot. what more do we need to do on that? , . . . , ., on that? so, is a package really. to aet on that? so, is a package really. to net the on that? so, is a package really. to get the best — on that? so, is a package really. to get the best out _ on that? so, is a package really. to get the best out of _ on that? so, is a package really. to get the best out of a _ on that? so, is a package really. to get the best out of a heat _ on that? so, is a package really. to get the best out of a heat pump - on that? so, is a package really. to| get the best out of a heat pump and frankly— get the best out of a heat pump and frankly to _ get the best out of a heat pump and frankly to drive our bills down and reduce _ frankly to drive our bills down and reduce the — frankly to drive our bills down and reduce the amount of work that is going to _ reduce the amount of work that is going to have to be done on the eiectricai— going to have to be done on the electrical grid, we need to insulate
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our homes — electrical grid, we need to insulate our homes more. and that's building on past _ our homes more. and that's building on past programmes that frankly have stalled _ on past programmes that frankly have stalled so _ on past programmes that frankly have stalled. so that's particularly owners — stalled. so that's particularly owners and occupiers which is 55% of dwellings. _ owners and occupiers which is 55% of dwellings, its wall insulation, draught — dwellings, its wall insulation, draught stripping, changing windows. in draught stripping, changing windows. in fact, _ draught stripping, changing windows. in fact, your— draught stripping, changing windows. in fact, your viewers will be familiar— in fact, your viewers will be familiar with the energy performance certificate _ familiar with the energy performance certificate. it's all those kind of measure — certificate. it's all those kind of measure. this is not newtek, this is 'ust measure. this is not newtek, this is just making — measure. this is not newtek, this is just making a — measure. this is not newtek, this is just making a mass uptake of these kind of— just making a mass uptake of these kind of measures starting now and running _ kind of measures starting now and running through for the next 20 years — running through for the next 20 ears, , ., ., ., running through for the next 20 ears, ,., ., ., ., " running through for the next 20 ears. ., ., ~ ., years. good to talk to you, david adams. years. good to talk to you, david adams many — years. good to talk to you, david adams. many thanks _ years. good to talk to you, david adams. many thanks indeed - years. good to talk to you, david adams. many thanks indeed forl years. good to talk to you, david - adams. many thanks indeed for your perspective. adams. many thanks indeed for your --ersective. ., ~ adams. many thanks indeed for your perspective-— the government has released the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. 43,738 new infections were recorded
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in the latest 24—hour period. there were another 223 deaths within 28 days of a positive test. nearly 49.5 million people have received the first dose of the vaccine, and more than 45 million people have received the second jab. 78.9% of the population aged 12 and over have been fully vaccinated. so, today's cases are slighly down on yesterday's figures. however, rates in the uk have been rising throughout this month. as this graph with data collected up to the 18th of october shows, the number of people newly testing positive for covid in the uk has been rising to around more than 40,000 every day. there have been about as many new cases over the past three months as there were between october and january last year. the uk now has one of the highest rates of covid infections in europe. as this data up until
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the 9th of october shows, there's a significant gap between the uk and other major european nations in terms of new daily cases per million people. so, where are we heading with coronavirus rates in the uk? let's speak with paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. whom we have talked to many times during this pandemic. just that last graph shoving the cable about many other european nations in terms of case numbers. there are reasons for that including a lot more testing as opposed to france and germany but how worried are you by that sort of graph, those sorts of figures? it’s graph, those sorts of figures? it's alwa s graph, those sorts of figures? it�*s always very difficult to compare figures between countries but we have seen is that although cases have seen is that although cases have been gradually moving up in the uk since early august, the last week or so, there has been a particular surge in infections. and not only in infections what we are now seeing hospitalisation data going up and people in respiratory care beds and
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also the deaths have started to rise, were asked they have been pretty flat for most of the last two or three months. find pretty flat for most of the last two or three months.— pretty flat for most of the last two or three months. and your colleague professor neil _ or three months. and your colleague professor neil ferguson _ or three months. and your colleague professor neil ferguson was - or three months. and your colleague professor neil ferguson was signed l professor neil ferguson was signed this morning he is worried that the vaccine roll—out, although it was very good clearly in this country in the beginning, it's starting to wane now and we really do need the boosterjabs. it is that how you see equipment yeah, actually and i think particularly the most vulnerable population. we particularly the most vulnerable population-— particularly the most vulnerable --oulation. ~ . ., population. we have heard in the last few days _ population. we have heard in the last few days about _ population. we have heard in the last few days about even - population. we have heard in the last few days about even those . population. we have heard in the i last few days about even those that should have been having an additional primary booster weeks ago, people who have got leukaemia or are suffering from severe immune deficiencies are not actually coming forward or not being offered the vaccines anywhere near as effectively as we would want. and indeed also in the other age groups,
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we are very much behind the roll—out rate that we saw in the first and second dose. is rate that we saw in the first and second dose.— rate that we saw in the first and second dose. , ., , , ., ., second dose. is there a sense or do ou wor second dose. is there a sense or do you worry there _ second dose. is there a sense or do you worry there is _ second dose. is there a sense or do you worry there is a _ second dose. is there a sense or do you worry there is a sense - second dose. is there a sense or do you worry there is a sense of - you worry there is a sense of complacency now in this country frankly? people kind of think it's all over and that we have fewer restrictions as you were seeing in other countries. you restrictions as you were seeing in other countries.— restrictions as you were seeing in other countries. you are right and i think that's — other countries. you are right and i think that's one _ other countries. you are right and i think that's one of _ other countries. you are right and i think that's one of the _ other countries. you are right and i think that's one of the reasons - other countries. you are right and i think that's one of the reasons whyj think that's one of the reasons why people are not coming forward as quickly as for their booster vaccines as would have been and as we saw earlier on in the outbreak. in many ways, we are in a much better position than we were earlier on in the year. hospitalisation rates are far down on what they were in january. rates are far down on what they were injanuary. deaths are fard deny what they were. but they are not as low as it would like. and it's certainly the booster vaccines particularly for the older sections of society, people who are more vulnerable because of other health issues, really need to be coming forward for their booster vaccines
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to make sure that they don't catch potentially lethal or severe covid—19. and of course as well within that is the importance of the influenza vaccine because if you get flu and covid—19 at the same time, and only is it a bigger bird for the health service but actually for individuals who get the infection at the same time, that can double your risk were more than double your risk of dying. so it is important as well as covena ntee of dying. so it is important as well as covenantee and the people come forward for their flu jabs as well. with that in mind and that one with the double whammy of getting the flu and covid—19 in the same time, how worried are you about the winter and with of the nhs can cope this winter whether you think there might be a need for more restrictions? it up whether you think there might be a need for more restrictions?- need for more restrictions? it up is also many — need for more restrictions? it up is also many things. _ need for more restrictions? it up is also many things. it _ need for more restrictions? it up is also many things. it is _ need for more restrictions? it up is also many things. it is so - need for more restrictions? it up is also many things. it is so difficult l also many things. it is so difficult to predict what's going to be happening even after the next week orso happening even after the next week or so at the moment. there is a lot of things going on. and only have we been seeing clear evidence that the
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first course of vaccine is beginning, the headedness is beginning, the headedness is beginning to wear off, but we are also have heard of the last two days about this new variant, which is a sub variant of the delta variant. and that may actually be more infectious is able are suggesting it may be about ten to 15% more infectious so not as big a jump as delta was over alpha or alpha was over the previous variant but certainly a risk of causing more rapid spread. and we will have to keep a very careful eye on what's going to go on over the next few weeks to make sure this is not actually and ultimately running away from us. ., , ., from us. professor paul hunter, alwa s from us. professor paul hunter, always good _ from us. professor paul hunter, always good to _ from us. professor paul hunter, always good to talk _ from us. professor paul hunter, always good to talk to _ from us. professor paul hunter, always good to talk to you. - from us. professor paul hunter, | always good to talk to you. thank you so much from the university of east anglia, thank you. it is 5:16pm and you're watching bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news — the government has set out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050, including a big push towards electric vehicles. grants of £5000 will be given to help households switch to heat pumps as ninisters plan to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. let's get more on that story. an inquiry has found that "multiple failures" by police, prosecutors and council officials meant that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015 facing criminal charges spanning three decades and relating to nine people who had been in children's homes. he always denied any wrongdoing. earlier, i spoke to our home affairs correspondent tom symonds,
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who brought us the latest on the case. well, ben, that death, lord janner�*s death in 2015 meant there was no justice for people who made allegations against him, a number which was reached at 33 by the time he died. and also no justice for him because he had no opportunity in court to defend himself. by the time charges were levelled against him, he was suffering from dementia. and this inquiry wasn't to find out whether he is guilty of child abuse, but why those investigations never led to prosecutions earlier. and it found really that generally the people who made the allegations had been in care homes and were not believed or taken seriously because they were not really trusted in what they were saying. there was also something of a culture of deference towards the leicester mp. and more specifically, the inquiry found that in 2000, there was a key moment.
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police officers failed to pass two early statements alleging abuse by lord janner to prosecutors. the inquiry says that was "serious and inexcusable". and then in 2006, a prosecutor decided not to continue investigations, gave advice to the police to that effect. the inquiry said that that was "unsound and strategically flawed". and that the complainants, the people who made the allegations, "were failed" by these investigations. now, the family of lord janner stressed today that this inquiry report has no suggestion of any evidence of his guilt and that he remained to his dying day somebody who denied he was involved in child abuse. and they, too, say that he was a victim of institutional failings because he wasn't able to have his day in court either. the elder brother of the manchester arena suicide bomber has left the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the public inquiry into the attack. ismail abedi has always refused to answer questions from the inquiry in case he incriminates himself. 0ur north of england correspondent
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judith moritz brings us up to date. the manchester arena inquiry has just begun its phase of examining why salman abedi carried out his attack and how he was radicalised, and as part of that, it wants to speak to his family, friends and associates. well, in the wake of the bombing, salman abedi's elder brother, ismail, was one of those who was arrested. he was found to possess extremist propaganda, but he was never charged with any offence. now, he and the abedis' parents have refused to co—operate with the inquiry. bbc news tracked ismail abedi down last year. we found him living in manchester. and at the time, greater manchester police said their investigation was continuing and they were still seeking to speak to him. and we were expecting ismail abedi to come and give evidence here at court this week, but this morning, we were told that he has left the country. it's not known when he will return,
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and if he doesn't appear to give evidence, having been issued with a court order, by the way, to compel him to do so, if he doesn't appear, the public may infer from that that he had something to hide. and some of the bereaved families have told us families have told us today they're extremely angry that ismail abedi has been able to go abroad. there's another witness who's also going to be compelled to appear here this week, a friend of salman abedi's, a childhood friend. he was found trying to leave the country last night. he was arrested, he's now in custody, we're told. he'll be brought here to give evidence later this week. police investigating the killing of sir david amess have been gathering cctv material from shops and businesses near the home of his alleged killer. footage from a convenience store in highgate road, north london, obtained by the bbc, shows a man believed to be the main suspect in the case walking down gordon house road in the direction gospel 0ak 0verg round station.
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25—year—old ali harbi ali is being held under the terrorism act, and officers have until friday to question him. a former soldier who was on trial in belfast over a fatal shooting during the troubles has died after contracting covid. dennis hutchings, who was 80, had been charged with the attempted murder ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 1974. his lawyers had tried to have the case against him thrown out because of his poor health. mps suspended of bullying or sexual harassment can now face a recall petition after a change in parliamentary rules. the move could lead to a by—election. it follows a controversy over the backbench mp rob roberts. he was suspended from parliament for six weeks in may for sexual misconduct. a loophole meant he didn't face a petition that could trigger a by—election. but the rule changes will not apply retrospectively to rob roberts,
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something labour argued should be the case. video footage has emerged to show levelling up and housing secretary, michael gove, being accosted on the street by anti—vaccine protesters. downing street has condemned the treatment. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now. this is particularly alarming in the wake of the heightened concern over the safety of mps._ the safety of mps. absolutely. followin: the safety of mps. absolutely. following the _ the safety of mps. absolutely. following the death _ the safety of mps. absolutely. following the death of- the safety of mps. absolutely. following the death of sir- the safety of mps. absolutely. l following the death of sir david amess there is far more concern and worry about the safety of mps in the general toxic culture of abuse many of them said they are receiving from those who disagree with them. today we had at least an example of the kind of pressure that mps are put under. michael gove is walking in the street not very far from where i am now actually, around westminster
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and a series of government departments and he was surrounded by antilock down protesters, some of whom were shouting abuse at him. and very quickly the police moved in and formed a cordon around him and try to escort him safely towards ability. but an object like a piece of paper was thrown at him and appeared to hit him up. downing street have been pretty swift in condemning what happened. they said the met police are investigating this incident but they are also saying they expect the police to take this seriously and they denounced the behaviour of the protesters as a bore it. a spokesman said that threatening and abusive language cannot be tolerated. what dentistry would not do is discuss a particular specific security arrangements around cabinet ministers, but it did confirm the home of his review of mps security following the murder of sir david amess is expected this week so we
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will have more recommendations on the protection of mps later this week. the police themselves are commented on the incident as well. they say that no arrests were made, no injuries took place when they are reviewing footage to find out if any offences have been committed and they did say that a group of people acted in a hostile manner towards the levelling up secretary michael gove but as i say the context of the moment if people are incredibly concerned and very sensitive about the treatment mps receiving we are the treatment mps receiving we are the tributes to sir david amess earlier this week. as well as some of the other threats and sometimes even death threats to other mps have been exposed to by the police are saying that they moved in very quickly to ensure the safety of the secretary of state and also to minimise disruption to londoners and to disrupt any criminal activity. all right, thank you very much.
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two children and two adults are in hospital after a suspected gas explosion destroyed a house in ayr last night. police say four homes were caught up in the blast which was heard several miles away and neighbouring properties have been evacuated. 0ur scotland correspondent jamie mcivor is at the scene, and, jamie mcivor is at the scene. 0ne home destroyed, three more badly damaged and debris hurled across this quiet housing estate. the explosion was so loud, it was heard miles away. neighbours rushed out to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg trapped. there was two guys trying to help the kid. ijust helped a wee bit, as well, to steady him a wee bit. then another guy ran in. a wee bit closer, you could see there's a crack in the house. the blast happened at 7pm last night. two adults and two children
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were taken to hospital. eyewitnesses described flames shooting into the air. a family of four were taken to hospital. a 43—year—old woman and 16—year—old boy are in glasgow royal infirmary. a 47—year—old male in the queen elizabeth university hospital. and an 11—year—old boy in the royal hospital for sick children. this morning, supplies were delivered to help those who had to leave their home. 90 spent the night in rest centres. the local council says some may not be able to go back to their homes for several days. tesco has opened its first supermarket in the uk without any checkouts. cameras and weight sensors will work out which items customers have picked up from the store in central london, then bill them through the company's app. the new format follows similar stores opened in london by amazon. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. what is that, a lovely sunset? a st
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sunrise in what is that, a lovely sunset? st sunrise in portsmouth. i don't know how they would work that with weather forecasters. they could do without us. do you know what chris? today was a chilly a really bizarre day. strong winds, outbreaks of rain and sunshine but at the same time really warmer with the richer is up to 21 celsius across east anglia and the southeast and at 6pm still not far off 20 across the south. 0n the southeast and at 6pm still not far off 20 across the south. on top of that wind and rain still crossing the country during the course of the night. not going to be raining everywhere and if at the cross of northern areas is going to turn clear with the winds and a bit of nip in the air at 8 or nine degrees. but broadly speaking it is still a very mild not and another very mild day on the way to come tomorrow. it's not going to be quite as warm, not 21 as we got today but the high teens certainly but also a changeable date, a mixed bag,
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blustery winds, sunny spells and a chance of heavy showers or even a thunderstorm most anywhere across parts of wales and england. also the north of scotland with some right in the forecast there. thursday is going to be a very different day. northerly winds, chilly and eight certainly noticeable difference. southern half of the country during the course of wednesday. really gusty conditions as well. some
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the government has set out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. grants of five thousand pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps — as ministersplans to end the sale as ministers plan to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. nhs england announces children aged
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12 to 15 will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — notjust at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sarah mulkerins. i think the guy responsible he is to themselves, to their families themselves, to theirfamilies into theirfriends. but don't themselves, to theirfamilies into their friends. but don't want any more games cancelled, we don't want any more squats that cannot fulfil
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fixtures because half of them have got covid—19. we can avoid that now. and you can choose the time to get vaccinated, you cannot choose the time when you're going to have that chance encounter with covid—19. and if you are a professional sports person, it could really ruin your sporting life. celtic picked up their first points in the europa league this season by beating ference—varos 2—0. the game was held much earlier than usual due to policing pressures. celtic also required their fans to have covid passports to enter the stadium and carried out random spot checks. it took almost an hour before the deadlock was broken at celtic park with portuguese midfielderjota setting upjapan forward kyogo. david turnbull secured the victory over the hungarians with less than ten minutes to go. the win leaves celtic third in group g. scotland have taken a big step towards reaching the super 12s stage of the men's t20 world cup.
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they beat papua new guinea by 17 runs. the scots finished their 20 overs on 165—9 with richie berrington hitting 70, matt cross added 45 runs. papua new guinea were 148 all out — josh davey taking 4 wickets. scotland have now won their first two games. they could secure their spot this evening if 0man beat bangladesh — that match is underway. bangladesh have set 0man a taget of 154 runs after their 20 overs. 0man are 24 for 1. england captain eoin morgan says he would consider dropping himself, if his poorform with the bat continues. morgan has only scored 82 runs in seven t—20 innings for england this year. they play a final warm—up game against new zealand on thursday, before their world cup campaign starts against west indies on saturday.
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i'm not going to stand in the way of a team winning the world cup and being short on runs, my captain has been pretty good. and we have been in being the nature of cricket and where i am, or to take high—risk options and have come to terms with that and it's just something that you deal with and it's the nature of the job so, you deal with and it's the nature of thejob so, i'm going to continue to take those risks and if the team dictates that they need them, if they don't, i won't. after naming his squad for the upcoming autumn internationals yesterday, eddiejones is already having to make some changes. jones left out several big names, including saracens hookerjamie george — who has now been recalled to the squad after luke cowan—dickie picked up an ankle injury playing for exeter chiefs at the weekend. bath winger anthony watson will also miss out — he ruptured his acl. jones told the bbc rugby
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union weekly podcast, he is using this period as a stepping stone for the rugby world cup in two years time. we ta ke we take another step to being the world cup winning side and so, you've got a young squad but a good squad, we want to play really good performances. almost the perfect ladder. each game we get a little bit better and obviously, the result is are going to win. in each game we get a little bit better and people go away from the ground thinking, i want to see this side play again. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. a plane crash in texas is 21 people on board and we're curing that they
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all escaped apart from one person with minor injuries and that is the aftermath of that plane crash and it was an executive jet, one report of minor injury no fatalities at all, despite the wreckage that you can see, flames and smoke coming out of that wreckage and there was an emergency responses you can see getting under way. this was mid—morning local time in the wake of that plane crash. the department sink it happened on cardiff roads very close to the houston executive airport in the southeast corner of the county in texas. only one minor injuries so it was very lucky escape for those passengers.
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the man in charge of the united states' nuclearforces says the world has to act "very carefully", because the relationship between the us, china and russia is something that has never been faced before. admiral chas richard made the comments in an interview with the bbc�*s defence correspondent jonathan beale. jonathan beale is here now. jonathan, this was a wide—ranging interview. what did admiral richard say about the reports today — that north korea fired a missile into the sea of japan? i asked him about that in he would not go into details but it underlined the need for deterrence in the region and they have 20,000 troops in south korea and it protects south korea with its nuclear umbrella. i think the big worry he has his china and if you talk any us military commander, they talk any us military commander, they talk any us military commander, they talk a lot about china and this comesjust talk a lot about china and this comes just after talk a lot about china and this comesjust after a talk a lot about china and this comes just after a day when there was a report that china had used a long—range hypersonic missile. he would not confirm or deny that china
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had in fact used to hypersonic missile and in fact, china has denied it but a lot of experts believe they did use a hypersonic missile and this is of concern because with the us is seeing is the modernisation of china's long—range, strategic weapons and he said it was breathtaking, china's modernisation programme. and their nuclear capabilities are breathtaking and i made sure breathtaking and i made sure breathtaking is the right word. unprecedented in road history, expansion of the capabilities in that area — expansion of the capabilities in that area and i'm thinking you have to look— that area and i'm thinking you have to look at— that area and i'm thinking you have to look at it — that area and i'm thinking you have to look at it in the context of the broader— to look at it in the context of the broader expansion of their military capabilities in terms of how that changes— capabilities in terms of how that changes what we need for our collective _ changes what we need for our collective defence. in particular, this is— collective defence. in particular, this is true — collective defence. in particular, this is true for china and russia, you have — this is true for china and russia, you have to— this is true for china and russia, you have to look at what they do, not what — you have to look at what they do, not what they say.—
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you have to look at what they do, not what they say. talking about the breathtaking — not what they say. talking about the breathtaking modernisation - not what they say. talking about the breathtaking modernisation of- not what they say. talking about the breathtaking modernisation of the i breathtaking modernisation of the chinese military. in the threat from russia, as well as china. you chinese military. in the threat from russia, as well as china.— russia, as well as china. you have both of these _ russia, as well as china. you have both of these countries _ russia, as well as china. you have i both of these countries modernising the strategic forces in the nuclear capabilities essentially in both of these countries and the us are developing these hypersonic missiles that the us has its legacy weapons from the cold war is essentially nuclear weapons which wants to modernise but its season china and russia, then developing hypersonic missiles and the us is invested a lot in missile defence but is about ballistic missiles that they can track and it's much more difficult to track and defend against hypersonic missiles. so they're in this new era, not a cold war era were arm —controlled treaties, that is not the case so much of china, of having to worry about these two adversaries at the same time for the
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first time in — adversaries at the same time for the first time in our— adversaries at the same time for the first time in our collective _ first time in our collective histories, we face to peer nuclear competitors at the same time we have to be deterred differently. we have never _ to be deterred differently. we have never faced the situation before it because _ never faced the situation before it because in— never faced the situation before it because in all of us and it takes us back— because in all of us and it takes us back almost— because in all of us and it takes us back almost back to the theoretical level that _ back almost back to the theoretical level that most theories of deterrence don't account for three party— deterrence don't account for three party dynamic like that. and it is incumbent — party dynamic like that. and it is incumbent on all of us to think our way through this very carefully. he sa s way through this very carefully. hrs. says all way through this very carefully. says all of us way through this very carefully. he: says all of us but where does the uk fit into this. the three big powers, where do we fit in? haste fit into this. the three big powers, where do we fit in?— fit into this. the three big powers, where do we fit in? we have seen a shift in uk — where do we fit in? we have seen a shift in uk foreign _ where do we fit in? we have seen a shift in uk foreign policy _ where do we fit in? we have seen a shift in uk foreign policy with - shift in uk foreign policy with a talk about a pivot to the indo pacific region and there's been a tilt as far as the foreign policy is concerned and we have seen them being deployed to the south china sea and we have seen a royal navy frigate go to the street to ensure
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freedom of navigation and so, the uk is playing a part in that and also the super image which is essentially the super image which is essentially the us the uk agreeing to help australia build, develop its own nuclear power, not nuclear armed submarines. i would say the other thing to acknowledge is in the defence review, the uk took an unusual step in and out produce group to lift the cap on the number of warheads that are holds from to 260. so, realise that the threat of nuclear arms race is a concern the defence systems of the country are a concern and devote a credible deterrent in the view of the uk government, they have got to increase their posture too. defence correspondent. _
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an increasingly bitter row between the european union and poland — has come to a head in strasbourg. european commission head ursula von de leyen said she wouldn't allow warsaw to put european values at risk. the polish prime minister then accused the e—u of blackmail. brussels has long said reforms introduced by poland's right—wing government undermine the independence ofjudges and the courts. the row escalated this month when the polish constitutional tribunal in effect rejected the core principle that eu law has primacy over national legislation. the polish justice minister has accused the e—u of aiming to become one, centrally managed body, undermining national sovereignty. 0ur europe correspondent jessica parker has this report. a political showdown in strasbourg, a polish prime minister defiant, an eu leader being urged to act, saying she'll defend the values of democracy, freedom and human rights. this is what all 27 member states have signed up to as part of this union, as sovereign countries
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and free people. honourable members, we cannot and will not allow our common values to be put at risk. possible actions include a legal challenge, or withholding funds. but poland's prime minister, mateusz morawiecki, showed little sign of backing down. translation: i reject the language i of threats and the fait accompli. i i will not have politicians blackmail poland. blackmail must not be a method of contact with member states. polls suggest the majority of polish people support being in the eu, and there have been protests after the country's top court rejected the primacy of eu law in certain areas. some see it as an alarming development, calling the country's judicial independence further into question. others argue it's a fair assertion of national rights in the face of eu overreach.
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the commission here is under pressure to act, but it is high—stakes — take strong action against poland, does it risk pushing the country further away? take a more conciliatory approach, does the commission look weak and risk undermining the bloc�*s entire legal basis? this isn't the only area where the polish ruling party is at odds with the european union, but it is an escalation. this place's unity is being tested. jessica parker, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. the government has set out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. grants of five thousand pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps — as ministersplans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035. an inquiry finds that child abuse
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allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. another big push towards electric vehicles is being made in the uk government's latest strategy to make the great shift to a virtually zero—carbon economy. ministers are investing £620m in grants for electric vehicles and street charging points. and car makers will be mandated to sell a proportion of clean vehicles each year. an extra £350m is promised to help the automotive supply chain move to electric. ceo of co—charger, a platform that allows people with home ev chargers to share them with neighbours. he's in exeter. the thing this is a great leap forward? i the thing this is a great leap forward? ~ , , ., forward? i think this is a continuation _ forward? i think this is a continuation over- forward? i think this is a - continuation over something that forward? i think this is a _ continuation over something that is been going well up to now. an extension of another comprehensive
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plan that generally was going very well and so, plan that generally was going very welland so, i'm plan that generally was going very well and so, i'm pleased to see that acceleration in place.— acceleration in place. what do you mean? some _ acceleration in place. what do you mean? some people _ acceleration in place. what do you mean? some people expect: - acceleration in place. what do you | mean? some people expect: some people said is not nearly enough vehicles in this country, enough charging points? i vehicles in this country, enough charging points?— charging points? i think we are startin: charging points? i think we are starting to _ charging points? i think we are starting to realise _ charging points? i think we are starting to realise that - charging points? i think we are starting to realise that the - starting to realise that the progress on public charging has actually been a lot better than given credit for in the past years so since this was really grabbed by the scruff of the neck, the reliability and availability reports later this year going to mandate reliability and availability in public charging. this also this recognition now that actually preps public charging isn't the only thing we need to be focused on. i think there is a realisation that it's more like a mobile phone, it's not electric fuel pumps that we need, it's based charging and workplace charging and making sure people can charge while they are at home.
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that's all you run an electric car, it's a very different operation, much better one in this growing understanding that will make for better decision—making and introducing other things like charge point sharing which is going to be vital in making sure everyone can get into an electric car even if they can't have a charger at home. it's a different mentality ofjust thinking of going to fill up my car with petrol or diesel. brute thinking of going to fill up my car with petrol or diesel.— with petrol or diesel. we had a slick committee _ with petrol or diesel. we had a slick committee and _ with petrol or diesel. we had a slick committee and we - with petrol or diesel. we had a slick committee and we could l with petrol or diesel. we had a i slick committee and we could see with petrol or diesel. we had a - slick committee and we could see the polarisation and the reactions of the set charging needs to be as easy as fuelling a normal car and a lot of people who aren't experienced with this nodded. why would you wanted to be that bad? running in ev is much better, you don't stop at a fuel station on your way somewhere to stand in a puddle of oil in squared flammable stuff in your car because it's a good way of doing things. it's much like a mobile phone break in church wherever there's an electron so while you're doing something else, i think that is starting to dawn now and people,
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actually, there is starting to dawn now and people, actually, there's this huge patchwork of solutions with community charging and kerb—side charging it's great to see more money going in that enable people to make the switch in the first place, rather than the obsession with just the things you use less frequently.— obsession with just the things you use less frequently. when people get an electric vehicle, _ use less frequently. when people get an electric vehicle, how _ use less frequently. when people get an electric vehicle, how far _ use less frequently. when people get an electric vehicle, how far is - use less frequently. when people get an electric vehicle, how far is it - an electric vehicle, how far is it going to take me? is it reliable if i wanted going to decentlyjourney, also as of worries when they are thinking about making the leap to electric. i thinking about making the leap to electric. ~ , ., , , ., electric. i think the people start to realise is _ electric. i think the people start to realise is if _ electric. i think the people start to realise is if i _ electric. i think the people start to realise is if i had _ electric. i think the people start to realise is if i had a _ electric. i think the people start| to realise is if i had a magic fuel pump in home that took my car when i was asleep, how often stop at a service station, the answer is not very often. but when i first got my electric car six years ago, it was a bit of an adventure going on a long trip and finding the right charger available and working wasn't always
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easy. that is an outdated viewpoint in things are improving really quickly and things like the task force and the association coming together actually improved and making things improve incredibly quick. we did some research on the one thing people need to look at is of people who have tried both electric and conventional cars, 99% stick with the electric. and i chose a lot of the concerns that people have while completely understandable, probably are not born out of fact.— born out of fact. thank you very much indeed. _ the european union is sending emergency coronavirus aid to romania which according to one estimate is recording one of the highest number of covid deaths per million people in the world. its intensive care units are full and some patients
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are being transferred for treatment into neighbouring hungary. mark lobel reports. inside romania's overwhelmed intensive care units. a country in a covid critical condition. 0utside some hospitals, medical staff make space. romania's vaccination campaign chief says the eastern european country is experiencing the same scenario italy's lombardy region suffered last year. patients pile up in this hospital corridor waiting for treatment. volunteers are stepping up. translation: i don't know whether i will resist - the fourth wave entirely, whether i will have the energy to do it. this wave is terrible, the most severe one. things are so full here, romania is now transferring some of its covid—19 patients to neighbouring hungary. translation: we notice a daily average of approximately - 15,000 infected people. we have a daily average
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unfortunately of 300 deaths. one major reason for all this, romania has the second lowest vaccination rate in the eu. translation: some 90%| of the hospitalised patients are not vaccinated. translation: i'm not vaccinated, i was afraid of the vaccine. - i'll see after i get better. i want to get vaccinated. eu countries have started sending covid—19 drugs and equipment to treat patients here. but with around two—thirds of the country unvaccinated, and a fortnight of rising cases, some already warn of a fifth wave of the pandemic hitting romania even before this fourth one is under control. mark lobel, bbc news. (pres)a man — thought to have had the heaviest kidneys on record new zealand has reported the highest daily total of covid cases since the pandemic began. 94 new cases were recorded on tuesday — almost all of them in the country's largest city, auckland. experts are warning that sustained high numbers could quickly push the health system to the limit.
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shaimaa khalil has the details. blamed this on people not following lockdown rules and said that while the situation was incredibly hard, the situation was incredibly hard, the country was not powerless. remember, for any other nation, 94 cases of covid—19 and one day is not a big number but new zealand's context, a country that is isolated itself from the road from the king of the pandemic is gone months and months with zero covid—19. notjust a record number, but is very worrying development, especially of those case numbers are likely to rise in the coming days and weeks because health authorities have not yet been able to link at least half of those new cases with existing infections. the main concern around this outbreak is the pressure on the health resources and things like isolation, testing be very hurt
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experts say that the contact trace and capacity is reaching its limit in new zealand has been battling with the delta strain outbreak that his men in the bed and some larger city of oakland and they have gone for the elimination policy. zero covid—19, any outbreak wherever it is happened. and they've been quite successful so far but with the delta strain, this is proving nearly impossible and so, the government conceded that the way to go was to mmp conceded that the way to go was to ramp up vaccination numbers. as it stands, route 66% of the eligible population have been fully vaccinated. time for a bit of tv nostalgia now — and if you're over a certain age, this tune will almost certainly give you that unmistakeable sunday night feeling. that is, of course, the theme to the bbc one
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detective drama bergerac, which was first broadcast 40 years ago. the bbc archive is marking the occasion by releasing a stash of photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey. richard latto has been looking back. it was in 1981 that a new tv series broughtjersey to television screens across the world. there's a host of programmes coming soon. 15 million viewers regularly tuned in in britain alone giving a massive boost to tourism. set on the beautiful island ofjersey, there is bergerac, a new detective series starring john nettles. you're an obsessional man. yeah. the bbc first came and said, can we use the old courthouse? we weren't sort of rubbing our hands and saying, "oh, this is going to be great", because it might have been a failure, for all we knew. we didn't know what it was about. i reckon it's put business up by 50%.
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everywhere you go now, there's bergerac bars, i bergerac restaurants. bergerac t—shirts, even bergerac aftershave, i believe. _ i haven't seen any money from that. the more we can do, i in a way, for the island, the more they will help us to make our programmel it was compulsive viewing when it was on air. and i thinkjersey was a character in itself. it was this unique place where not a lot of people knew a lot about it, so that gave the writers carte blanche to create what they wanted. the series also made a household name out of its lead star. the actorjohn nettles, who plays bbc tv detectivejohn bergerac, is in hospital injersey with a suspected broken hip. mr nettles fell off a bicycle. and also, it's turned _ you into a sex symbol, hasn't it? yes, this is amazing. yes, yes. i can count my success with women on the fingers of one hand. well, i think i'm a bit old to have sex symbols, but i like him! - oh, i think is marvellous. now, 40 years on since the start of the series, the bbc archive has revealed unseen images from its photo library. we've got a lot of images that
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have never been seen. we have only recently been able to have the technology to be able to scan images properly and to be able to distribute them in the way that we would like to. and now, to celebrate the 40th anniversary, they're remastering a classic episode for islanders to see in high definition very soon. it's fantastic that you guys are digitising it and giving it that treatment, because i think that gives people the opportunity to really see and appreciate quite how fantastic that show really was. and brian is confident his production company will see a new series of bergerac on our screens soon. there is so much work going on behind the scenes that unfortunately we can't talk about, but it's very much, watch this space. i think what's important really is that the crime is fictional and the scenery is for real.
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richard latto, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. well, it's been a bizarre day of weather for many of us today. really blowy out there, but at the same time, quite warm in the sunshine. in fact, temperatures got up to 21 degrees in east anglia and the south east. and another mild day on the way tomorrow. not quite so mild, but warm enough certainly for the time of the year. here's the reason — a current of tropical air you can see spreading into the uk all the way from the southern climes, and if we track that air, the origins are here in the caribbean. you can see caracas there in south america, the leeward and the windward islands, so this air has made a journey northwards of thousands of miles. it's obviously cooled off, but it's retained some of that
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warmth and the energy in the form of the strong winds and also some heavy showers that will be also continuing across the uk over the next 24 hours or so. so, a mild start across england and wales once again, and then we're watching out for these clusters of rain, these thunderstorms that could sweep across the southern half of the country during the course of wednesday. and really gusty conditions as well, but there'll be some sunshine, too. i think overall a very changeable pattern, changeable picture on the way for wednesday. and then it's all change for the second half of the week, certainly the end of the week. wednesday and thursday, it's going to feel quite a bit colder. the wind is going to change direction. in fact, low pressure will be sitting on top of us. if you track the isobars, these lines coming from the north, that's where the wind will be coming from. so, rathertropicalair coming in from the south and the south—west, we've got colder north atlantic air, even some wintry showers
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across the hills of scotland. and on top of that, we've got gusty winds, high tides along the north sea coasts. gust of wind in some areas could approach 40—50 mph. this is colder airfrom the north. it's going to feel very, very different on thursday. look at the temperatures. maybe eight degrees in aberdeen, 12 in birmingham, 13 in london. quite a drop, and it's that wind that's particularly going to make it feel chilly, i think, on thursday. and then thursday into friday, high pressure nudges into the uk. high pressure means that the weather will settle down. it'll push the stronger winds out into the north sea, so this is where that cold wind will be. here, winds will be lighter across the bulk of the uk. there'll some sunny spells, and i think it'll feel a little less cold and bright on friday. bye— bye.
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at six — the government's ambitious new plans to make the uk carbon—neutral by 2050. to balance out any greenhouse gases released, a big push for electric cars, renewable energy, and milllions of trees to be planted. push for electric cars, renewable energy, and millions of trees to be planted. going green at home — government help in england and wales to replace gas boilers in thousands of homes, with heat pumps. we'll be able, one day, to bring down the prices of green technology, evs and heat pumps and solar panels, in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. we'll be asking if the government can achieve its green goals by 2050 and what the price will be. also tonight.
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a damning report says children who claimed they'd been sexually

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