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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 19, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works! homeowners in england and wales will get 5,000 pounds to help replace old gas boilers with low carbon alternatives — critics say the strategy lacks ambition. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it's inefficient, it's leaky, and it's a waste of money. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors.
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the health secretary announces children aged 12 to 15 in england will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — not just at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. the elder brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi leaves the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the inquiry into the attack. and a0 years after the first episode of bergerac, we'll be looking at some previously unseen photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey.
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a warm welcome to bbc news. the government has set out a road map for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 which ministers claim will support nearly halfi million jobs over the next few decades. it includes the aim that by 2035 the uk will be powered entirely by clean electricity. there is also £650m to subsidise the cost of electric vehicles. and people in england and wales will be offered 5,000 pound grants from next year to replace their gas boilers with low cabon heat pumps, boilers with low carbon heat pumps, as ministers want to end the sale of gas boilers by 2035. this report from jon donnison. engineers in chesterfield this morning being trained how to install heat pumps. over the next few years, they can expect to be busy with the government hoping gas burners can be phased out completely by 2035. heat pumps work by extracting warmth from the air, the ground or water. they are a bit like a fridge, operating in reverse
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and are powered by electricity. if you want to reduce carbon emissions it's probably one of the simplest and quickest ways to reduce that. similar to an electric car. but in terms of running costs, even though they are more expensive to purchase, you can get immediate savings from having them. this is where the actual hardware is located. richard installed a heat pump in his house seven years ago. i can safely say it's the best thing we ever did, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot but it is very livable. and from next april people will be able to apply for a £5,000 grant to help them pay to replace an existing gas boiler with a heat pump. it is part of a £450,000,000 package announced by the government. but that is only enough to cover a maximum of 90,000 pumps. while there are around 25,000,000 gas boilers in uk homes.
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it's like we are in a 1,500 metre race but are deciding to walk the first lap and there is no way you can catch up in the next two laps because you set off so slowly. the government ought to be doing a lot more a lot more quickly, even if the direction of travel is in the right direction. a £5,000 grant still falls considerably short of the cost of installing more heat pumps which can cause more than double that. for some consumers it will play a strong incentive, having the cost of installation for them but for low households it would be quite prohibitive, it's still a big jump for them to make. then there's the issue of insulation. this thermal imaging camera can be used to show how badly insulated some of our homes remain. which some say is a big problem if we are converting to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it.
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it is inefficient, it is leaky and a waste of money so perhaps alongside this heat pump strategy we should have had a comprehensive local authority led, street by street insulation programme that many of us have been calling for for years. speaking alongside business leaders at the global investment summit in london today, and ahead of the upcoming un climate summit in glasgow, the prime minister said the uk was leading the way on green issues. the market is going green, people know that we have the technological solutions to these problems and they want to go green and they know we will be able one day to bring down the prices of green technology, eds and heat pumps and solar panels in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. the prime minister later announced a £400,000,000 partnership with the microsoft co—founder bill gates to help make green technology more affordable. jon donnison, bbc news.
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let's talk about some of the other enhancements that were included in that net zero strategy. we can now speak to sir ed davey, leader of the liberal democrats and former energy and climate secretary. welcome to bbc news. what did you make first of all of what you heard today about the strategy. it covers many different areas but what are the standouts for you? it is many different areas but what are the standouts for you?— the standouts for you? it is very disappointing- _ the standouts for you? it is very disappointing. we _ the standouts for you? it is very disappointing. we have - the standouts for you? it is very disappointing. we have a - the standouts for you? it is very | disappointing. we have a climate emergency and a lot of these actions are not going to see the light of day for years. we need to be acting now and be far more ambitious. 0ne now and be far more ambitious. one of the big omissions was a real action in the city of london. in london, huge amounts of money, hundreds of billions of pounds are raised from the fossil fuel industry, notjust in the uk but across the world. the liberal democrats believe we should be taking action on that, so we switch the huge amount of private sector investment from dirty fossil fuels
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into green technology and renewables. we could do that, but this government strategy doesn't put anything forward that are serious about that. i anything forward that are serious about that. ~ . anything forward that are serious about that-— anything forward that are serious about that. ~ . ., , , about that. i think what many people watchin: about that. i think what many people watching this — about that. i think what many people watching this might _ about that. i think what many people watching this might feel _ about that. i think what many people watching this might feel as _ about that. i think what many people watching this might feel as they - about that. i think what many people watching this might feel as they are l watching this might feel as they are being asked to make pretty significant changes and investments in their own homes, and get some of the biggest polluters are other countries and also big business. i countries and also big business. i agree with that. that is why the liberal democrats think we need to hold these powerful city firms, investors and powerful fossil fuel companies to account. we can do that, we can change the law in the way that the financial industry works in the city of london. we can make sure that these big businesses and these big muscle fuel companies have to switch and that means we can influence notjust investment in the uk, incredibly important though that is, but we can do that around the world. we need to define what in the uk, but we are only 2% of global greenhouse emissions. —— we need to
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do far more in the uk. the other 98% is around the world, should be showing leadership in the way money is raised and spent. and because the city of london do so much business for the global economy, we have a tool that we could pull on the governmentjust isn't pulling it. i think that is because they are not prepared to stand up to vested interest in the city. you prepared to stand up to vested interest in the city.— prepared to stand up to vested interest in the city. you can say we show leadership _ interest in the city. you can say we show leadership here, _ interest in the city. you can say we show leadership here, but - interest in the city. you can say we show leadership here, but the - show leadership here, but the reality is this is an international problem and it needs international coordination to tackle it. if what you are proposing is to stop businesses in the city of london trading with fossil intensive businesses, they willjust go elsewhere, won't they? hat elsewhere, won't they? not necessarily _ elsewhere, won't they? not necessarily at _ elsewhere, won't they? not necessarily at all. _ elsewhere, won't they? iirrt necessarily at all. what we can do is make london and the uk the leading centre for finance for the green economy of the future. we could beat the net zero financial centre of the world, and that would attract huge amounts of business to
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replace that dirty business, and actually we could show leadership so new york and tokyo and other big financial centres would follow our lead. that is why i would like to see that at cop26 in glasgow, was vitally important climate change talks. when i went there, leading the uk delegation, we push from the policies and we touch from a strong base because under liberal democrat policies we quadrupled the renewable electricity in the uk, we made britain the world leader in offshore wind. we showed how we would get the cost down. i really regret to say the conservatives have not really taking on the liberal democrat leader. we have seen very little happened. even in the announcement today, it is pretty disappointing. if you judge it on its impact on climate, its impact on heating bills, on its impact on energy security, so we don't have to import
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so much fossil fuel, security, so we don't have to import so much fossilfuel, to replace that with green technology, this announcement fails on those accounts. i would like to see something far more radical. and whether it is insulative people's homes, which is vital, far more money on that, whether it is investing for the future, hydrogen, hype action storage, the government because my proposal is very timid when we need to have some really bold and imaginative ideas. that is one of the reasons why the liberal democrats believe that if you went to the city of london and reformed that, you could get huge amounts of money, not from the taxpayer but from the private sector to really sort these problems out. that is what we did with offshore wind and renewables, and i think we need to do that with heating and transport and aviation and so on. i do that with heating and transport and aviation and so on.— and aviation and so on. i want to talk about _ and aviation and so on. i want to talk about insulation _ and aviation and so on. i want to talk about insulation because - and aviation and so on. i want to talk about insulation because we and aviation and so on. i want to - talk about insulation because we are going to come onto that heat pump issue any moment. your energy secretary back in 2012, 2013 when the green deal was launched, part of
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the green deal was launched, part of the coalition government. that spectacularly failed to deliver results. that i assume would prove how difficult it is to effect change. how difficult it is to effect chan . e. ~ how difficult it is to effect chance. ~ ., how difficult it is to effect chance. ., ., , change. we also have the energy com an change. we also have the energy company obligation, _ change. we also have the energy company obligation, this - change. we also have the energy company obligation, this was - change. we also have the energy company obligation, this was a l company obligation, this was a regulation on the big energy utility companies forcing them to spend money on insulating people's homes and we inserted over1 million homes. before the liberal democrats, the labour party did quite a lot of good work on insulating homes. the problem started in 2015, i regret to say again the conservatives have really failed miserably and it is one of the reasons why this winter there will be millions more people spending more money on their heating bills because of the gas price rise than we need to have been. if the conservatives follow what the liberal democrats did and the labour party did, people's heating bills would be much less this winter. it is good to talk to you. thank you for being with us. let's look in more details
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at the government's plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035. from next april households in england and wales will be offered grants of five—thousand—pounds to install air source heat pumps, or other green heating. 450—million pounds will be spent on the boiler upgrade scheme, which will run for three years. around 20% of uk emissions are from heating buildings, according to official figures, so there is pressure on the heat and buildings strategy to deliver effective reductions. but as the grants amount to just 90—thousand replaced i'm joined by nigel donohue, chief executive of the insulation assurance authority. nice to see you. thanks for being with us. what do you make festival of these plans. described as unambitious and lacking in detail, and quite simply they may not even be enough engineers to install them.
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what you make of the announcement? i think i'm going to start with the point that we have got a policy and it is long—awaited and it is reassuring we have got something that will help us have this type of conversation about what comes next, and about the ambition. 90,000 heat pumps into a three years is far short of the government's target of 600,000, but a short of the government's target of 600,000, buta number of short of the government's target of 600,000, but a number of guests have said already it is a wasted effort if we don't focus on the need to insulate our properties. right now we are in slitting less properties than we have in five years. unless we focus on that end, and having quickly reviewed it, since it has been published, there is little evidence there that we are taking it seriously and when you think about the skills needed, mobilise the workforce and funding that is associated with that if we are going
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to get the benefits of having a low carbon heat system. i to get the benefits of having a low carbon heat system.— to get the benefits of having a low carbon heat system. i was looking at a re ort carbon heat system. i was looking at a report that — carbon heat system. i was looking at a report that describes _ carbon heat system. i was looking at a report that describes the _ carbon heat system. i was looking at a report that describes the uk's - a report that describes the uk's homes are some of the oldest and sleekest housing stock in western europe. as you alluded to there, without insulation the idea of installing heat pumps is pointless. homes need to be better integrated first. . ., ., ., ., ., first. yeah, without a shadow of a doubt. first. yeah, without a shadow of a doubt- we — first. yeah, without a shadow of a doubt. we have _ first. yeah, without a shadow of a doubt. we have got _ first. yeah, without a shadow of a doubt. we have got to _ first. yeah, without a shadow of a doubt. we have got to recognise, | doubt. we have got to recognise, someone said it is like... the challenge we have got here is the journey is not a quickjourney. if you want to try and get to the point where you tackle net zero, you have got to invest now in training initiatives, apprenticeships. you have got to provide a sustainable funding within the insulation sector that encourages people to invest and committed to this marketplace. to be
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honest with you, it has got to transcend government policy. it is not good enough to have conversations about how government can do this, this has got to be cross parliamentary, it has got to transcend government manifestos. this is about a policy plan government that helps to tackle the very real crisis. we government that helps to tackle the very real crisis.— very real crisis. we were sticking to ed davey. _ very real crisis. we were sticking to ed davey, the _ very real crisis. we were sticking to ed davey, the problem - very real crisis. we were sticking to ed davey, the problem is- very real crisis. we were stickingj to ed davey, the problem is they have been so many previous schemes, be those they green deal, the green homes grant that people are a little bit wary of seeing that money is being offered. accessing that money and getting into homes proves to be the most difficult part of the process. the most difficult part of the rocess. . , , ., process. yeah, there is 4 billion investment _ process. yeah, there is 4 billion investment over _ process. yeah, there is 4 billion investment over the _ process. yeah, there is 4 billion investment over the next - process. yeah, there is 4 billion investment over the next four . process. yeah, there is 4 billion - investment over the next four years investment over the next four years in the new equal support scheme that looks at the whole house approach. but there is wider initiatives as well. the public have got to commit, and the government has got a commitment, but the only way they
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public is going to commit if we have grant funding, stamp duty initiatives, looking at the vat situation with energy efficiency. we need to find the incentives. make energy efficiency very much a priority, so publicise it far greater, make it a priority because a lot of homeowners don't want to set out to do their own thing, they just need the right advice and guidance to do the right thing. —— don't want to set out to do the wrong thing. it don't want to set out to do the wrong thing-— don't want to set out to do the wron: thin. , ., ., ,., wrong thing. it is good to have your thou . ht. wrong thing. it is good to have your thought. thanks. _ a police officer from greater manchester police has been charged with child sexual abuse offences. lee cunliffe, 40, a detective constable, has been charged with 11 offences. the officer, based in the salford
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district, is charged with two counts of attempting to arrange or facilitate a child sexual abuse offence, one count of possession of an indecent photograph of a child, three counts of making an indecent photographs of a child, two counts of misconduct in public office and two counts of perverting the course of publicjustice. he is bailed to appear before manchester magistrates�* court on october 26. a police officer in greater manchester police charged with child sexual abuse offences. we will bring you more on that as we get it here this afternoon. the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers in by 2035, grants of 5000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps.
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an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. an inquiry has found that �*multiple failures' by police, prosecutors and council officials meant that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015, facing criminal charges spanning three decades and relating to nine people who had been in children's homes. he always denied any wrongdoing. 0ur correspondent sean coughlan is outside the headquarters of the child sexual abuse inquiry in central london. good afternoon. just bring us up—to—date with the background of this case. up-to-date with the background of this case. , , . , . this case. this is a highly critical re ort this case. this is a highly critical report into _ this case. this is a highly critical report into how _ this case. this is a highly critical report into how claims _ this case. this is a highly critical report into how claims against i this case. this is a highly critical i report into how claims against lord janner were investigated and it says police and local authorities seem to
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be reluctant to pursue claims and it talks of inexcusable failures to act on key witness statements. it also raises question about whether the high status of lord janner is a prominent public figure could have been a deterrent to the police were looking further. it is important to say this wasn't an enquiry into whether these claims were true. he died before claims against him were fully heard in quite. his relatives have always said he was an innocent man being falsely accused. what we do know from this report is that those who did bring forward claims perhaps were not treated with the full dignity and respect they might have hoped for and the report concludes the complainants were failed. , , . , ., failed. give us a little bit more detail, failed. give us a little bit more detail. as _ failed. give us a little bit more detail, as we _ failed. give us a little bit more detail, as we have _ failed. give us a little bit more detail, as we have said - failed. give us a little bit more detail, as we have said this - failed. give us a little bit more detail, as we have said this is| detail, as we have said this is dating back many, many years and lord janner died in 2015. the case now continues. he
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lord janner died in 2015. the case now continues.— now continues. he is dead and so those proceedings _ now continues. he is dead and so those proceedings have - now continues. he is dead and so those proceedings have finished. | now continues. he is dead and so - those proceedings have finished. the family have contested his innocence throughout. this is an unusual enquiry in the sense it wasn't into establishing whether these allegations were true, it was about trying to find out how the allegations were handled. i think the key point they would make in this is how are the voices of witnesses when people did come
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forward, how are they handled with respect, people who brought forward testimony. and when this was brought against a prominent and powerful figure, and the report looks at how there is a pattern of powerful people not being investigated.— powerful people not being investigated. powerful people not being investiuated. , ., ., ,, investigated. 0k, it is good to talk to ou. investigated. ok, it is good to talk to from thank— investigated. 0k, it is good to talk to you. thank you _ investigated. 0k, it is good to talk to you. thank you so _ investigated. 0k, it is good to talk to you. thank you so much. - as we've been hearing a public inquiry has found "multiple failures" by police, prosecutors and council officials meant child abuse allegations against the late labour peer, lord janner, were not properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015, facing criminal charges relating to nine former residents of children s homes in leicester. the secretary to the child sexual abuse inquiry, john 0'brien explained what the report had found. 0peration magnolia and the other operation were failed investigations. that operation were failed investigations. operation were failed investi . ations. �* ., operation were failed investirations. �* ., ., operation were failed investirations. ., ., investigations. at the heart of both of those, it — investigations. at the heart of both of those, it was _ investigations. at the heart of both of those, it was because _ investigations. at the heart of both of those, it was because it - investigations. at the heart of both of those, it was because it was - of those, it was because it was deemed that these children because they were children in care were not taken seriously and be critical witnesses. i think that is very concerning a very sad, bearing in mind operation magnolia 2000, operation darkness 2006 is recent history, it is not 50 or 60 years ago. it would never be acceptable. we are talking about investigations that failed to properly pursue multiple allegations of child sexual abuse on the basis that they were children in care and wouldn't be taken seriously. mas children in care and wouldn't be taken seriously.— children in care and wouldn't be taken seriously. was it more likely they wouldn't _ taken seriously. was it more likely they wouldn't be _ taken seriously. was it more likely they wouldn't be taken _ taken seriously. was it more likely they wouldn't be taken seriously . they wouldn't be taken seriously because lord janner was an mp and a
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big name in the local area? it is difficult enough _ big name in the local area? it is difficult enough on _ big name in the localarea? it 3 difficult enough on the evidence we sell whether that is the case or not, but at the end of this, there were 33 complainants who were let down because the police simply didn't do thejob down because the police simply didn't do the job and following up the evidence. we had two statements that were not forwarded to the crown prosecution service and they said that would have altered the outcome of the decision at the time potentially if they had seen them. in operation darkness we had a senior investigative officer who didn't seem interested in pursuing this, due to sheer disinterest linked not been seen as credible. we can speculate on the reasons but at heart of this, 33 complainants let down simply because there was not a proper investigation and proper follow—up of the evidence, and for the cps a significant delay in looking at the files or afforded on both cases.
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the elder brother of the manchester arena suicide bomber has left the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the public inquiry into the attack. ismail abedi has always refused to answer questions from the inquiry in case he incriminates himself. 0ur north of england correspondent judith moritz brings us up to date. the manchester arena enquiry has just begun its phase of examining why salman abedi carried out his attack and how he was radicalised, and as part of that it wants to speak to his family, friends and associates. well, in the wake of the bombing, salman abedi's elder brother ismail was one of those who was arrested. he was found to possess extremist propaganda, but he was never charged with any offence. he and the parents have refused to co—operate with the enquiry. bbc news tracked ismail abedi down last year. we found him living in manchester. and at the time, greater manchester police said their investigation was continuing and they were still seeking to speak to him. and we were expecting ismail abedi to come and give evidence here at court this week,
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but this morning, we were told that he has left the country. it is not known when he will return and if he doesn't appear to give evidence, having been issued with a court order, by the way, to compel him to do so, if he doesn't appear, the public may infer from that that he had something to hide. some of the bereaved families have told us today they are extremely angry that ismail abedi has been able to go abroad. there is another witness who is also going to be compelled to appear here this week, a friend of salman abedi's, a childhood friend. he was found trying to leave the country last night. he was arrested, he is now in custody, we were told. he will be brought here to give evidence later this week. a leading government scientific adviser says the covid booster programme must be accelarated. covid cases in the uk are at their highest level for almost three months. professor neil ferguson says immunity is waning.
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0ur health correspondentjim reed is here, and neil ferguson says having been a world leader in vaccinations, we're now falling behind. yes, and niall ferguson is important because he and his team in imperial couege because he and his team in imperial college where one of the most influential groups of people at convincing the government back then and ministers to go ahead with that first lockdown. he has been talking in the media this morning about this third booster doses. this is the deal is for people of 50 years or over that should top up their immunity this winter. there has been some criticism that hasn't been ruled out according to some people as fast as it could have been. there is a good reason why people are concerned at the moment and we can show you this on some of these charts. we will start by looking at cases across the uk at the moment and you can see on the right—hand side of this graph we are going to look at, the cases have been rising. that is the average, 114,000. almost
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tipped over 50,000 yesterday, it will be worth watching what goes on today. that is the uk as a whole, in scotland it has been flat, rising elsewhere. there are a number of different reasons why there case numbers have been going up, we are mixing more, it is getting colder, more people are inside, eating and drinking inside, that is going to increase infection rate, but the highest rates at the moment are in secondary school aged children and in the last couple of hours or so there has been an important other quite subtle change in policy in england here. before today you had to... almost every child being vaccinated was vaccinated in school itself and there had been criticism about the paper that will out, just 15% of that age group in england had been vaccinated against nearly 50% in scotland. what they are going to do now is allow children to book in the same way as adults, is to go online and book at a vaccination centre in a normal way. it is going to take a while to roll this out, it
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will not happen straightaway, you have to wait for a letter to as the end of the week but that is an important change in england. they have been doing that for a while, since the beginning in scotland. find since the beginning in scotland. and what everyone is keeping a close eye on is that link between infection rates and hospitalisations. what do we know about that given what you are telling us about the infection rate? . , , are telling us about the infection rate? ., , , ., , are telling us about the infection rate? , ., , ., are telling us about the infection rate? .,, , ., , ., , are telling us about the infection rate? , ., , ., ,, rate? cases have been going up but this is the interesting _ rate? cases have been going up but this is the interesting thing. - rate? cases have been going up but this is the interesting thing. every l this is the interesting thing. every flip this around to look at the number of patients in hospital across the whole of the uk, we haven't seen that big rice and that is because the vaccine is basically doing itsjob at is because the vaccine is basically doing its job at stopping severe illness in particular. 0ver doing its job at stopping severe illness in particular. over the last couple of weeks there have been in england and wales in particular signs that emissions to hospital have been starting to rise, but from a pretty low base. 750 across the uk emissions into hospital, up from 550. nevertheless, that is exactly why you are hearing these calls from niall ferguson and others to get that this campaign accelerated and to get more people to sign up to protect the most vulnerable, the
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elderly, as we head into that winter period. elderly, as we head into that winter eriod. . , , elderly, as we head into that winter eriod. ., , , ., ~' period. really interesting. thank ou for period. really interesting. thank you for bringing _ period. really interesting. thank you for bringing us _ period. really interesting. thank you for bringing us up-to-date . period. really interesting. thank| you for bringing us up-to-date on you for bringing us up—to—date on those changes within the last couple of hours. four people have been taken to hospital after an explosion at a house in ayr. the two adults and two children were injured in a blast which was heard — and felt — for miles around. police scotland said one terraced house had been entirely destroyed and those on either side were damaged. the cause is under investigation. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello, cloudy weather for most of us today, some rain in the air as well but it is warm air with some thinning of the cloud in the east anglia and south—east. temperatures will reach 21 degrees. even elsewhere with cloud and rain around, temperatures 17 or 18 degrees late afternoon and early into evening. most of the rain is across england and wales, was south—east. clearer skies following,
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some showers, sundry ones in the south—west of england and wales. mouthing another night with southern parts of the uk. cooler weather north with clear skies and some sunshine on the way for wednesday. we have these clusters of thundery downpours moving eastwards and northwards across england and wales. wetter weather for northern england in the afternoon. either side of that, some sunshine and rain in the north—west and we have got this rain threatening the south—west of england later. i'll stay on wednesday, just not quite as mild as today and things will change more significantly to the rest of the week. it will be feeling much colder thanks to a northerly wind. this is bbc news the headlines.
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the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers in by 2035 — grants of £5,000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. the health secretary announces children aged 12 to 15 in england will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — not just at school — as concern grows over a rise in covid cases. the elder brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi leaves the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the inquiry into the attack. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. scotland have made it two wins from two, as they beat papua new guinea by 17
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runs in their t20 world cup group qualifier in oman. they beat bangladesh by 6 wickets in their first match — and richie berrington top scored for the scots today with 70. matthew cross provided 45 runs and they eventually finished on 165 for 9. papua new guinea were hoping to recover from their thrashing by 0man. and they did make scotland work for it. norman vanua scored 47 runs, including two sixes, but scotland'sjosh davey impressed — he got four wickets. both teams are aiming to reach the super 12 stage later this week. an injury worry for england before their t20 cricket world cup has even begun for them. liam livingstone dropping this catch towards the end of their warm up game with india, before clutching his finger in pain and leaving the field. he's viewed as a key part of england's hopes of winning the world cup. rishabh pant hit a six to win the match by seven wickets with an over to spare. england's opener is against defending champions west indies on saturday. celtic take on ferencevaros in the europa league
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at the unusual time of half past three this afternoon. the early kick—off is due to policing pressures over the forthcoming cop26 climate conference soon to take place in glasgow. it's also the first event in scotland where fans will have to have proof that they are double—vaccinated against coronavirus as random spot checks will be in place. celtic�*s manager — speaking to the press yesterday — knows they must win today to keep alive their hopes of making the knock—out stages. obviously the other two sides in the group have won their two opening games. you kind of know if you want to bridge the gap we have got to win our games we've got remain, particularly the two games we have at home. we know the significant of tomorrow's game in the context of us wanting to progress. no shying away from that, we need a win tomorrow. manchester city midfielder kevin de bruyne says he's happy with the club's achievements in his six years there so far —
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but he hopes to help them lift the champions league before his time is up. they're third in their group, and they take on second—placed bruges this evening, with de bruyne back in his native belgium for a club fixture for the first time since he left genk for chelsea in 2012. i'm excited to go back home. obviously it's been the first time to play at home except the national team since i left, about ten years ago or something. it's a long time. but obviously, i think people will always set the standard higher and higherand i think because of what we have done in england for the last five or six years, people expect us to win the champions league and that is what we want to do. and players who haven't been vaccinatd against covid—19 are unlikely to be allowed to compete at the australian open in january. yesterday, reigning men's champion and world no 1 novak djokovic declined to reveal his vaccination status
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again, and said he was unsure if he would defend his title in melbourne. the leader of the state of victoria said it would be strict with players, as it battles a resurgence of covid—19 cases. the vaccine doesn't care what your tennis ranking is or how many grand slams you have won, sorry, the virus doesn't care. it is completely irrelevant. you need to be vaccinated, to keep yourself safe and others. i don't think in unvaccinated tennis player is going to get a visa to come into this country and if they did get a visa they would probably have to quarantine for a couple of weeks and i don't know that will, when other players don't have to, i don't think that will be a relevant issue. that's all the sport for now. studio: thanks for joining studio: thanks forjoining us. the european union is sending emergency coronavirus aid to romania which according to one estimate is recording one
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of the highest number of covid deaths per million people in the world. the government has said today that daily infections and deaths have hit a record high. its intensive care units are full and some patients are being transferred for treatment into neighbouring hungary. mark lobel reports. inside romania's overwhelmed intensive care units. a country in a covid critical condition. 0utside some hospitals, medical staff make space. romania's vaccination campaign chief says the eastern european country is experiencing the same scenario italy's lombardy region suffered last year. patients pile up in this hospital corridor waiting for treatment. volunteers are stepping up. translation: i don't know whether i will resist - the fourth wave entirely, whether i will have the energy to do it. this wave is terrible, the most severe one. things are so full here, romania is now transferring some of its covid—19 patients
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to neighbouring hungary. translation: we notice a daily average of approximately - 15,000 infected people. we have a daily average unfortunately of 300 deaths. one major reason for all this, romania has the second lowest vaccination rate in the eu. translation: some 90%| of the hospitalised patients are not vaccinated. translation: i'm not vaccinated, i was afraid of the vaccine. - i'll see after i get better. i want to get vaccinated. eu countries have started sending covid—19 drugs and equipment to treat patients here. but with around two—thirds of the country unvaccinated, and a fortnight of rising cases, some already warn of a fifth wave of the pandemic hitting romania even before this fourth one is under control. mark lobel, bbc news.
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a former soldier, who was on trial in belfast over a fatal shooting during the troubles, has died after contracting covid. dennis hutchings — who was 80 — had been charged with the attempted murder ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 197a. his lawyers had tried to have the case against him thrown out because of his poor health. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page gave us this update. the prosecution of dennis hutchings has been a high—profile and controversial case here. given the ongoing debate over how killings from the troubles should be investigated. dennis hutchings was 80 years old, he was from cornwall, former member of the lifeguards regiment, and he was charged with attempted murder over the killing ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 197a. john pat cunningham was 27, he had learning difficulties, and he was shot in the back as he was running away from an army patrol. mr hutchings had been on trial
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in belfast crown court for the last couple of weeks, he had been suffering from chronic kidney disease and heart failure. yesterday the trial was adjourned because the court heard that dennis hutchings had tested positive for covid—19, and he died in a hospital here in belfast yesterday afternoon. unionist politicians have said that he shouldn't have been prosecuted in the first place, for example, the leader of the democratic unionist party, sirjeffrey donaldson, has said serious questions must be answered. but the public prosecution service have said that prosecuting mr hutchings was in the public interest and that there was new evidence available to the court. john pat cunningham's family have said that in due course they will set out their response to the issues around the prosecution of dennis hutchings but they want to respectfully remind, they say, the public of the facts of the case which were not contested during the trial.
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so, a deeply personal story but also one that will play into the politics of legacy issues in northern ireland. the government currently has plans to scrap all prosecutions, all civil court cases, related to the conflict, and those plans are opposed by many victims�* groups and all the main political parties in devolved government at stormont. chris page, there, in belfast. australia�*s vaccination rollout has been picking up. in new south wales more than 80% of adults are now fully vaccinated and victoria will hit that target soon ? a triggerfor allowing international borders to open. but elsewhere ? especially in remote and regional areas, its a different story. and in a land so vast? getting needles in arms can be logistically tricky. now one of the country s oldest get those numbers up. simon atkinson reports from north queensland.
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you don�*t get many visitors at this airstrip. but for years the royal flying doctor service has brought medical care here and now there�*s an extra bit of cargo on board. ravenswood has two pubs but the nearest doctor is 100 kilometres away. so this is how locals are getting vaccinated against covid. this is convenient and it saves all the travel. this is convenient and it saves all the travel-— the travel. instead of “oining the cueue, the travel. instead of “oining the queue out * the travel. instead of “oining the queue, out here _ the travel. instead of “oining the queue, out here we _ the travel. instead of joining the queue, out here we are - the travel. instead of joining the queue, out here we are getting l queue, out here we are getting almost — queue, out here we are getting almost exclusive access. it is queue, out here we are getting almost exclusive access.- almost exclusive access. it is a matter of— almost exclusive access. it is a matter of having _ almost exclusive access. it is a matter of having to _ almost exclusive access. it is a matter of having to have - almost exclusive access. it is a matter of having to have it - almost exclusive access. it is a matter of having to have it so i j matter of having to have it so i thought now is the time. this town has never had _ thought now is the time. this town has never had a _ thought now is the time. this town has never had a case _ thought now is the time. this town has never had a case of _ thought now is the time. this town has never had a case of covid - thought now is the time. this town has never had a case of covid and l has never had a case of covid and for many here there has been no real urgency to get vaccinated but with australia planning to open up soon, there is a warning, even people in remote locations like this cannot be complacent. iqruie remote locations like this cannot be complacent-— remote locations like this cannot be comlacent. ., ~ , ., ., complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and — complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and we _ complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and we have _ complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and we have got _ complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and we have got to _ complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and we have got to open - complacent. we cannot keep covid out for ever and we have got to open up i for ever and we have got to open up and i think if we are vaccinated we
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will be largely all right. it will have implications for fine doctors for these remote areas because there will be cases of covid ? flying doctors. we will need to fly out in full ppe which are not really looking forward to, to be honest. clinics like this have given more than 50,000 jabs across remote australia, including in several indigenous communities. vaccination rates amongst aboriginal and islanders are far lower than in the country as a whole, but the flying doctors say they are bucking that trend. ., , . ., , trend. people in the communities know the service _ trend. people in the communities know the service and _ trend. people in the communities know the service and they - trend. people in the communities know the service and they trust . trend. people in the communities i know the service and they trust the doctors and nurses so if that doctor says to them, it is in your best interests to have this vaccine, they are going, 0k, interests to have this vaccine, they are going, ok, i will have it. interests to have this vaccine, they are going, ok, iwill have it.- are going, ok, iwill have it. some employers — are going, ok, iwill have it. some employers in _ are going, ok, iwill have it. some employers in rural— are going, ok, iwill have it. some employers in rural australia, - employers in rural australia, especially the mining sector, are now making vaccination compulsory,
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and workers must decide job or word—1—macro. at this gold mine it remains voluntary for now. hoping that the fly in clinic will make the process so easy but it is hard to say no. simon atkinson, bbc news, north queensland. some breaking news. an allerdale councillor has been sent to prison for 18 weeks after threatening a cumbrian mp. 37—year—old peter little, from grasmere terrace in maryport, appeared at workington magistrates court today after pleading guilty, at an earlier hearing, to sending an offensive message. an email he�*d sent to allerdale�*s chief executive had included a threat to both him and to markjenkinson, the conservative mp for workington.
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an allerdale councillor has been sent to prison for 18 weeks after threatening a cumbrian mp. a man — thought to have had the heaviest kidneys on record weighing more than 5 stone — has had surgery to remove them. warren higgs from windsor in berkshire suffers from poly—cystic kidney disease. the condition causes fluid—filled cysts to grow in the kidneys. it affects around one in 1000 people and there�*s no cure. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa has been following warren�*s story. it�*s crushing my lungs, so i struggle to breathe. he gasps. this was warren higgs injune. every major organ was under intense strain. it�*s crushing my stomach, so i can�*t eat a solid meal.
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he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease more than 20 years ago. it�*s caused a series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six to 12 months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side of the spine. warren�*s kidneys were covered in cysts, full of fluid, and took up his whole abdomen. he�*d had enough. and he wanted the organs removed. the operation itself is dangerous, it�*s a 50—50 chance. but i�*ve got to take it, i�*ve got to do it because it�*s not a life, living on the sofa. surgeons discovered warren�*s kidneys weighed 35 kilograms, that�*s nearly five—and—a—half stone, making it a highly complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. this i think would be the reported heaviest kidneys that have been removed anywhere in the world.
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when everything is distorted and not in the right place, you run the risk of damaging other organs. you run the risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took that risk, and from struggling to breathe... ..to building back his strength. this is him three months after surgery. how are you feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe, i can eat little bits, definitely a lot better. how was that? hard. i smashed my record. he�*s dependent on dialysis three times a week, but he�*s hoping to be added to the transplant waiting list by the end of the year. it would mean everything. if i had a kidney, i would just be able to do anything, do all my sports. yes, i will have to take more tablets, but i�*m free to get on with my life. that would be so amazing for me. really would.
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that report from our health correspondent katharine da costa. the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers in by 2035 — grants of £5,000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. let�*s have a look at some of these stories making headlines across the uk.
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people in the forest of dean are being asked if they want their area to be officially designated a unesco biosphere reserve. there are more than 700 of these around the world — they�*re described as learning places for sustainable development — and could provide lots of local green solutions to global challenges. tracey miller explains. there is no denying that the forest of dean is a beautiful place. now there are plans to give this ancient woodland protection and international recognition. it has got bats, birds, wildlife. it is a major carbon store and that is very valuable in these days when we need to take carbon out of the air, lock it up in timberand wood, and reduce our effect on the climate. there are seven other unesco biosphere reserves in the uk. north devon is one of them, but what would the forest of dean gain by becoming one? i think it sets our stall out as to what kind of economy we envisage for the forest of dean
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in the future and obviously that is a balanced economy that considers the needs of the environment and society as a wider area. there is a survey, and we really want people to give us their opinion and positive or negative, we just want to hear from the population. "what do you think? do you want this to happen?" local businesses are very much part of the biosphere plan. the forest is actually quite a good example of small—scale local businesses that are run by local people and supported by local people. we welcome tourism to add to that, but we don't want that to become the predominant focus of the area. the concern is that increased tourism might result in higher house prices, an economic study has been done into the reserves and they found that for every pound invested it could return £4 for the local economy. like this business making wood —based products from the forest instead of imports. but the environmental gains, they say, are vital
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for the future of the forest. and to really grasp the opportunities that we can protect and look after the biodiversity, not only now but for future generations. blackpool has the lowest life expectancy in the country. poor housing conditions play a part. now the council is doing up derelict guest houses, and renting them to those in need. kelly foran has more. there are plenty of reasons, more than 18 million visit here every year. the big one, the illuminations, the tower, butjust a few streets away from the promenade we find ourselves right in the middle of one of the most deprived areas in the entire country. buildings like this one are an all too common sight. this hotel does
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not look like it has been up to much recently. this was once a hotel and for a short time had multiple people living here. this for a short time had multiple people livin: here. , , ., , ., living here. this is how we start, reall . living here. this is how we start, really. definitely _ living here. this is how we start, really. definitely not _ living here. this is how we start, really. definitely not livable. - living here. this is how we start, j really. definitely not livable. the council's own _ really. definitely not livable. the council's own a _ really. definitely not livable. the council's own a rental— really. definitely not livable. the council's own a rental business i really. definitely not livable. the i council's own a rental business are council�*s own a rental business are renovating places like this to improve poor housing, one of the reasons that has been linked to blackpool having the lowest life expectancy in the country. aha, blackpool having the lowest life expectancy in the country. a decent home gives — expectancy in the country. a decent home gives them _ expectancy in the country. a decent home gives them an _ expectancy in the country. a decent home gives them an opportunity . expectancy in the country. a decent home gives them an opportunity to | home gives them an opportunity to find a job and raise a family but if they are moving from one poor quality accommodation to another, bouncing from one lab onto another, that doesn�*t help the resort or the customers. ? from one landlord to another. , , ., ., , another. residents are often stuck in a benefits _ another. residents are often stuck in a benefits trap _ another. residents are often stuck in a benefits trap which _ another. residents are often stuck in a benefits trap which results - another. residents are often stuck in a benefits trap which results in i in a benefits trap which results in more problems like drugs, alcohol, homelessness, and there is no quick fix. finding somewhere decent to rent on a budget is tough. angela is one of the first people to move into this multi—million pound development, owned by the council. there are a lot of drug addicts and
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alcoholics and i would get woken up early, i wanted my children to experience something better. iquqi’iiiii experience something better. will these attempts to improve the town were? 0nly these attempts to improve the town were? only time will tell. ? work? a former reading and aldershot footballer has spoken of how a gambling addiction, took him to the brink of ending his life. scott davies lost over £300,000 before seeking help for the condition that put an end to his promising career as a professional. the 33 year old now visits clubs to educate others about the dangers of gambling. lewis coombes reports. scott davies was a promising young footballer, used to celebrating wins. but after the adulation of a crowd quietened, it was the financial losses off the field that he battled in silence.
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people didn�*t know what i was up to, i was living a secret life. it is the easiest addiction to hide, i was professional at that. it was similar to scoring a goal, the euphoric feeling, the buzz, the sweaty palms, the increased heartbeat, i was getting that 50 or 60 times a day from betting on dog racing, horse racing, football matches, whatever it might be. in total, scott lost over £300,000, but perhaps even more costly was the impact on the people he loved and his own mental health. i carried on going to the bookmakers, i looked at the door one day and i saw my mum crying her eyes out, saying you have to stop gambling, you will end up dead or you will break up mine and your dad�*s marriage. my dad said to me i am sick of her googling in the middle of the night, "how can i help somebody with a gambling problem?" i thought to myself, my parents hate me, my career is over,
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i don�*t even like myself, i did something out of the ordinary, i started cutting myself, i got scared, i went to my parents�* house. i said to my mum, "i think i am having a breakdown." she said, "thank goodness you have admitted it." after 26 days in rehab at the sporting chance clinic in liphook, it�*s now been six years since scott last placed a bet. alongside rebuilding his own life, he now visits football clubs to educate players about the dangers of gambling. the best medicine i have ever been given is the ability to talk. i�*ll never get back the way in which i treated people and i think i know i am not a bad person, for me to treat people how i did does not sit right with me. if i can give back and help others, that is a good thing. subtitles, signing and audio description are not likely to return
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to channel 4 television until mid—november, almost two months after a major fault. the outage, which has already lasted more than three weeks, has angered deaf, hard of hearing and visually impaired viewers. around 500 people have complained to broadcasting regulator 0fcom. time for a bit of tv nostalgia now — and if you�*re over a certain age, this tune will almost certainly give you that unmistakeable sunday night feeling. music: theme from bergerac that is, of course, the theme to the bbc one detective drama bergerac, which was first broadcast 40 years ago. the bbc archive is marking the occasion by releasing a stash of photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey. richard latto has been looking back. it was in 1981 that a new tv series broughtjersey to television screens across the world.
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there�*s a host of programmes coming soon. 15 million viewers regularly tuned in in britain alone giving a massive boost to tourism. set on the beautiful island ofjersey, there is bergerac, a new detective series starring john nettles. you're an obsessional man. yeah — the bbc first came and said, can we use the old courthouse? we weren�*t sort of rubbing our hands and saying, "oh, this is going to be great", because it might have been a failure, for all we knew. we didn�*t know what it was about. i reckon it's put business up by 50%. everywhere you go now, there's bergerac bars, . bergerac restaurants. bergerac t—shirts, even bergerac aftershave, i believe. _ i haven't seen any money from that. the more we can do, i in a way, for the island, the more they will help us to make our programme.| it was compulsive viewing when it was on air. and i thinkjersey was a character in itself. it was this unique place where not a lot of people knew a lot about it, so that gave the writers carte blanche to
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create what they wanted. the series also made a household name out of its lead star. the actorjohn nettles, who plays bbc tv detective john bergerac, is in hospital in jersey with a suspected broken hip. mr nettles fell off a bicycle. and also, it's turned _ you into a sex symbol, hasn't it? yes, this is amazing. yes, yes. i can count my success with women on the fingers of one hand. well, i think i'm a bit old to have sex symbols, but i like him! - oh, i think is marvellous. now, 40 years on since the start of the series, the bbc archive has revealed unseen images from its photo library. we�*ve got a lot of images that have never been seen. we have only recently been able to have the technology to be able to scan images properly and to be able to distribute them in the way that we would like to.
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and now, to celebrate the 40th anniversary, they�*re remastering a classic episode for islanders to see in high definition very soon. it�*s fantastic that you guys are digitising it and giving it that treatment, because i think that gives people the opportunity to really see and appreciate quite how fantastic that show really was. and brian is confident his production company will see a new series of bergerac on our screens soon. there is so much work going on behind the scenes that unfortunately we can�*t talk about, but it�*s very much, watch this space. i think what's important really is that the crime is fictional and the scenery is for real. richard latto, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. it�*s another cloudy day today for most of us, some rain in the air as well. and that�*s because the air has travelled over 1500 miles to get to the uk all the way from the tropics, but with that long sea track you pick up all that moisture.
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but it�*s warm air that�*s heading our way so with some sunshine potentially for the south—east of england and east anglia, temperatures reaching 21 degrees. elsewhere, where we have more cloud, some outbreaks of rain or showers, it�*s still 17 or 18 degrees. that�*s the picture late afternoon, early evening and the wetter weather is going to move across england and wales towards the south—east overnight. some clearer skies developing elsewhere, a few showers knocking about, some heavy, thundery ones in the south—west of england and south wales later on. a warm start to wednesday across the southern half of the uk, a little cooler perhaps as you head further north where we do have some sunshine. that rain clears to the south—east of england and then these heavy, potentially thundery downpours move northwards and eastwards across england and wales. wetter weather sitting in northern england in the afternoon. either side of that we should see some sunshine coming through, there is rain in the far south—west later and the north—west of scotland. temperatures not quite as high as today, but still a mild one across many parts of england and wales. but as we head into the end of the week through thursday and friday, it�*s going to feel very different, it�*s going to feel much colder. that�*s because our wind is coming
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from a different location. we�*ve got some heavy rain on wednesday night across southern parts of the uk and then we�*ve got this cold front moving down from the north as well. but behind that, the wind direction changes and we are picking up air more from the arctic or polar regions, that will make it feel much colder. it�*s going to be a windy day on thursday, the rain first thing along the east coast, south coast will move away but then plenty of sunshine, showers more towards the north—west and a little bit wintry over the hills. there�*ll be some strong and gusty north to north—westerly winds possibly gales along eastern coasts where we have spring tides as well. and it will feel cold — eight, nine degrees in northern scotland to a higher 13 in southern parts of england and wales, so quite a change from what we�*ve got at the moment. that chillier air still in place overnight and then we get this ridge of high pressure building in from the atlantic on friday. fewer showers, probably a fair bit of cloud coming into western areas, this is where we will see the bulk of the showers. the winds won�*t be quite as strong on friday and the sunnier skies will be towards the eastern side
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of the uk. but we�*ve still got temperatures of 11 to 14 degrees, quite a bit cooler than today. this is bbc news. the headlines... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works! plans to end the sale of new gas boilers in by 2035, grants of 5000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it�*s inefficient, it�*s leaky, and it�*s a waste of money. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. the health secretary announces children aged 12 to 15 in england
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will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — not just at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. the elder brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi leaves the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the inquiry into the attack. and 40 years after the first episode of bergerac, we�*ll be looking at some previously unseen photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey.
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the government has set out a road map for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 which ministers claim will support nearly half a million jobs over the next few decades. it includes the aim that by 2035 the uk will be powered entirely by clean electricity. there is also £650m to subsidise the cost of electric vehicles(viz gfx)and people in england and wales will be of electric vehicles. and people in england and wales will be offered five thousand pound grants from next year to replace their gas boilers with low carbon heat pumps, as ministers wants to end the sale of gas boilers by 2035. this report from jon donnison. engineers in chesterfield this morning being trained how to install heat pumps. over the next few years, they can expect to be busy with the government hoping gas burners can be phased out completely by 2035. heat pumps work by extracting warmth from the air, the ground or water.
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they are a bit like a fridge, operating in reverse and are powered by electricity. if you want to reduce carbon emissions it�*s probably one of the simplest and quickest ways to reduce that. similar to an electric car. but in terms of running costs, even though they are more expensive to purchase, you can get immediate savings from having them. this is where the actual hardware is located. richard installed a heat pump in his house seven years ago. i can safely say it's the best thing we ever did, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot but it is very livable. and from next april people will be able to apply for a £5,000 grant to help them pay to replace an existing gas boiler with a heat pump. it is part of a £450,000,000 package announced by the government. but that is only enough to cover a maximum of 90,000 pumps. while there are around 25,000,000 gas boilers in uk homes.
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it�*s like we are in a 1,500 metre race but are deciding to walk the first lap and there is no way you can catch up in the next two laps because you set off so slowly. the government ought to be doing a lot more a lot more quickly, even if the direction of travel is in the right direction. a £5,000 grant still falls considerably short of the cost of installing more heat pumps which can cause more than double that. for some consumers it will play a strong incentive, having the cost of installation for them but for low households it would be quite prohibitive, it�*s still a big jump for them to make. then there�*s the issue of insulation. this thermal imaging camera can be used to show how badly insulated some of our homes remain. which some say is a big problem if we are converting to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it is inefficient, it is leaky
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and a waste of money so perhaps alongside this heat pump strategy we should have had a comprehensive local authority led, street by street insulation programme that many of us have been calling for for years. speaking alongside business leaders at the global investment summit in london today, and ahead of the upcoming un climate summit in glasgow, borisjohnson said the uk was leading the way on green issues. the market is going green, people know that we have the technological solutions to these problems and they want to go green and they know we will be able one day to bring down the prices of green technology, eds and heat pumps and solar panels in a way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. the prime minister later announced a £400,000,000 partnership with the microsoft co—founder bill gates to help make green technology more affordable. jon donnison, bbc news.
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how significant are those announcements? 0ur energy and environment analyst roger harrabin has been following this. in the next few weeks boris johnson is in the next few weeks borisjohnson is going to be welcoming world leaders to glasgow to the world�*s most important climate summit this year. the government has set very aggressive targets for cutting emissions, and it now needs to show how it is going to meet those targets and today�*s document covers the entire economy and shows how carbon emissions are going to be cut from every point in the economy. critics will say it doesn�*t go strongly enough but i have to say this looks to me like the most advanced plan from any major nation to its how we will actually get around to achieving the emissions cuts that have been so bravely promised. i�*m joined by aliza ayaz, an international climate activist and un goodwill ambassador.
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it is good to have you with us. thank you forjoining us this afternoon. i wonder what you make of those announcements by the government this afternoon about how significant they could be in helping achieve that target of net to zero x 2035. ., ~ , ., achieve that target of net to zero x 2035. . ~ , ., ., ., 2035. thank you for having me. i think the uk _ 2035. thank you for having me. i think the uk is _ 2035. thank you for having me. i think the uk is on _ 2035. thank you for having me. i think the uk is on track- 2035. thank you for having me. i think the uk is on track to - 2035. thank you for having me. i think the uk is on track to hitting its target by 2050. i think there is a lot of scepticism around it but borisjohnson spoke about the changes that are needed and as a climate activist i am happy to hear he has spoken about resource and energy efficiency. we are also looking at societal changes and choices that will lead to a lower demand for carbon intensive activities. we also want to think about extensive electrification for transport and heating. this�*ll be supported by a major expansion of renewable and other low carbon power generation. 0ne
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renewable and other low carbon power generation. one aspect i wished we do talk upon at the cop26 is hydrogen economy to service demands because this is crucial to achieve net zero targets. especially for the energy dense applications in the long—distance... finally what is spoken about carbon capture storage is a good green light for us because it is vital for the whole of the government to tackle this any well—managed transition. i am well-managed transition. i am interested _ well-managed transition. i am interested in _ well-managed transition. i am interested in your _ well—managed transition. i am interested in your international perspective here because quite clearly this is an international problem, one that will involve international coordination. i wonder where in the world is doing this well and what perhaps the uk could learn from other countries. i well and what perhaps the uk could learn from other countries.- learn from other countries. i think one area the _ learn from other countries. i think one area the uk _ learn from other countries. i think one area the uk could _ learn from other countries. i think one area the uk could jump - learn from other countries. i think one area the uk could jump on . learn from other countries. i think one area the uk could jump on is| learn from other countries. i think. one area the uk could jump on is in terms of the wind energy supply. it has been a world leader in offshore
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wind but the increase is achievable because at the moment energy companies are worried at the price they are paying for energy is dropping rapidly and this squeezes their venues and could limit investment which means we might not be able to go ahead with investment plans to achieve net zero. they will also be much more need of energy storage were times when the wind is not low and we are looking at middle eastern countries, looking to these technologies. they have been quite successful. if they can do it, there is no reason the uk should not be able tojump on is no reason the uk should not be able to jump on the same bandwagon. do these proposals go far enough? criticism from many cautious they are not ambitious enough or realistic. i wonder what else you would like to see included in these proposals. i would like to see included in these ro osals. ~ ., ., would like to see included in these --roosals. ~ . . proposals. i think what i am hoping for is with the _ proposals. i think what i am hoping for is with the different _ proposals. i think what i am hoping for is with the different climate - for is with the different climate solutions to be fit for —— to put forth in a more collaborative way.
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for example, the suggestions of hydrogen capture, it is currently operating with the department of business energy strategy over the private sector. we need to this change is accessible and affordable as soon as possible. the uk already has reduced emissions, 48% from what was and this reduction reflects the impact of covid has been significant and what we hope in the future when the impact of covid will go back to what the normal state was. ii the impact of covid will go back to what the normal state was. if anyone is watchin: what the normal state was. if anyone is watching this, _ what the normal state was. if anyone is watching this, they _ what the normal state was. if anyone is watching this, they will _ what the normal state was. if anyone is watching this, they will seem - is watching this, they will seem lots of proposals to change the everyday life, beat the heat pumps and gas boilers, using less cars, taking the public transport. they look around the world and say china is pumping out coal powered fire stations at a rate of knots. why would i do make a difference? what would i do make a difference? what
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would your message be to them? it is hard to would your message be to them? it 3 hard to understand why one person could make a difference but i think it is a torque of micro effect. we are talking about hundreds of hundreds of individual coming together in a community, the fact the plastic to produce, the amount of clothes they are buying, the carbon emissions and how frequently are driving the car and how much we damaged it was unclear. consequently, what has been happening in the world is that the large chunk of carbon emissions have been produced by developed nations and it goes on to affect undeveloped nations which have been struggling with heat droughts. it hasn�*t come close to home and hit us in the united kingdom, and i hope it is not seen. we need to realise the individual effects are just as important as industry level. thank ou for important as industry level. thank you forjoining _ important as industry level. thank you forjoining us. _ an inquiry has found that �*multiple failures�* by police,
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prosecutors and council officials meant that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015, facing criminal charges spanning three decades and relating to nine people who had been in children�*s homes. he always denied any wrongdoing. earlier i spoke to our home affairs correspondent tom symonds,
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that death of lord janner in 2015 meant there was no justice for people who made allegations against him. a number which reached 33 by the time he died. also no justice for him because he had no opportunity in court to defend himself. by the time charges were levelled against him he was suffering from dementia. this inquiry was not to find out whether he is guilty of child abuse but why those investigations never led to prosecutions earlier. it found really that generally, the people who made the allegations had been in care homes and were not believed or taken seriously because they were not really trusted in what they were saying. there was also something of a culture of deference towards the leicester mp. more specifically, the inquiry found in 2000, there was a key moment, a police officer failed to pass two early statements alleging abuse by lord janner to prosecutors, the inquiry says that was serious and inexcusable. in 2006, prosecutors decided not to continue investigations, gave advice to the police to that effect, the inquiry said that was unsound and strategically flawed. and that the complainants, the people who made the allegations were failed by these investigations. the family of lord janner stressed today this inquiry report has no
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suggestion of his guilt and that he remains to his dying day, someone who denied he was involved in child abuse. they, too, say he was a victim of institutional failings because he was not able to have his day in court either. the secretary to the child sexual abuse inquiry, john 0�*brien explains more about what the report found. 0peration magnolia and operation dauntless were failed investigations. at the heart of both of those, it was because it was deemed that these children because they were children in care were not taken seriously and be critical witnesses. —— credible witnesses. i think that is very concerning and very sad, bearing in mind operation magnolia 2000, operation dauntless 2006 is recent history, it is not 50 or 60 years ago. it would never be acceptable. we are talking about investigations that failed to properly pursue multiple allegations of child sexual abuse on the basis that they were children in care and wouldn�*t be taken seriously. was it more likely they wouldn�*t be taken seriously because lord janner
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was an mp and a big name in the local area? it is difficult to know from the evidence we saw whether that is the case or not, but at the end of this, there were 33 complainants who were let down because the police simply didn�*t do theirjob in following up the evidence. we had two statements that were not forwarded to the crown prosecution service and they said that would have altered the outcome of the decision at the time potentially if they had seen them. in operation dauntless we had a senior investigative officer who didn�*t seem interested in pursuing this, due to sheer disinterest linked to not being seen as credible. we can speculate on the reasons but at the heart of this, 33 complainants let down simply because there was not a proper investigation and proper follow—up of the evidence, and for the cps a significant delay in looking at the files on both cases.
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in the last hour assistant chief constable david sandall of leicestershire police reacted to the findings. i would like to start off with an apology to the victims involved in this case and also to commend their bravery, their bravery for coming forward and we should have secured the charges against lord janner far earlier than we did. we have supported the enquiry throughout. we will now analyse the reports details very carefully. we will positively and proactively review the findings in line with the force policies and reforms today. furthermore we will work with partners mentioned in the report to find any improvements. the enquiry and the report notes that the investigation resulted in 22 charges being brought against the former member of parliament. following his death in december 2015, those charges were discontinued. we believe operation
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enamel demonstrated more than six years ago a clear commitment and determination to pursue allegations of current or historic abuse against children. the commitment continues today. reports of abuse are taken extremely seriously by leicestershire police. the force has a dedicated child abuse investigation unit, preventing and tackling sexual offences, child sexual abuse and criminal exploitation, they are all key priorities for us. we review and improve our work continuously whenever and wherever we can. again, i would like to acknowledge the bravery and candour of the complainants who have continued on this long and challenging enquiry, which will have cause significant anxiety and suffering. with them in mind, leicestershire police will study the reports findings scrupulously and examine any findings and actions for improvement. the headlines on bbc news...
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the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers in by 2035 — grants of 5000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. the elder brother of the manchester arena suicide bomber has left the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the public inquiry into the attack. ismail abedi has always refused to answer questions from the inquiry in case he incriminates himself. 0ur north of england correspondent judith moritz brings us up to date. the manchester arena enquiry has just begun its phase of examining why salman abedi carried out his attack and how
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he was radicalised, and as part of that it wants to speak to his family, friends and associates. well, in the wake of the bombing, salman abedi�*s elder brother ismail was one of those who was arrested. he was found to possess extremist propaganda, but he was never charged with any offence. he and the parents have refused to co—operate with the enquiry. bbc news tracked ismail abedi down last year. we found him living in manchester. and at the time, greater manchester police said their investigation was continuing and they were still seeking to speak to him. and we were expecting ismail abedi to come and give evidence here at court this week, but this morning, we were told that he has left the country. it is not known when he will return and if he doesn�*t appear to give evidence, having been issued with a court order, by the way, to compel him to do so, if he doesn�*t appear, the public may infer from that that he had something to hide.
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some of the bereaved families have told us today they are extremely angry that ismail abedi has been able to go abroad. there is another witness who is also going to be compelled to appear here this week, a friend of salman abedi�*s, a childhood friend. he was found trying to leave the country last night. he was arrested, he is now in custody, we were told. he will be brought here to give evidence later this week. from half—term, 12 to 15—year—olds in england will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs, rather than at school. the health secretary sajid javid says the move is part of a plan to speed up vaccinations in england. meanwhile, a leading expert warns that with rising cases and the waning effect of vaccines, it is "critical" the uk accelerates its booster vaccination rollout. covid cases in the uk are currently at their highest level for almost three months. joining us now is the virologist professor lawrence young, professor of molecular oncology
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at warwick medical school, at the university of warwick. good to have you with us this afternoon. i wonderfirst good to have you with us this afternoon. i wonder first of all, the highest level of infection is for three months. how concerned should we be because as yet, there isn�*t a corresponding link to hospitalisations? isn't a corresponding link to hospitalisations?— isn't a corresponding link to hospitalisations? no, but we are seeinq hospitalisations? no, but we are seeing very _ hospitalisations? no, but we are seeing very high _ hospitalisations? no, but we are seeing very high levels _ hospitalisations? no, but we are seeing very high levels of- seeing very high levels of infection. these do end up with more people being in hospital, an extra burden on the nhs and we are entering a difficult time of the year when we know the nhs is going to be under more stress and strain, because of covid along with other respiratory infections. we are at a bit of a tipping point. talk respiratory infections. we are at a bit of a tipping point.— bit of a tipping point. talk to me about that _ bit of a tipping point. talk to me about that time _ bit of a tipping point. talk to me about that time of _ bit of a tipping point. talk to me about that time of year - bit of a tipping point. talk to me about that time of year because | bit of a tipping point. talk to me - about that time of year because one might say the weather has been on our side lately. it has meant we have been able to be outside a little more. talk to me about the importance and risks associated with the cooler weather. we
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importance and risks associated with the cooler weather.— the cooler weather. we know that eo - le the cooler weather. we know that people spend _ the cooler weather. we know that people spend more _ the cooler weather. we know that people spend more time - the cooler weather. we know that people spend more time indoorsi the cooler weather. we know that | people spend more time indoors in the cooler weather and white mixing invoice in a poorly ventilated spaces will contribute to increased levels of infection —— more mixing indoors in poorly ventilated spaces. the mixing is being fuelled by school—age children who are spreading the virus amongst themselves and to other folk. alongside other infections like flu and seasonal respiratory infections, this could all become a bit of a perfect storm actually and it is why we do really need to motor on with not only boost nations but also vaccinating 12 to 15—year—olds. professor niall ferguson suggested we were once the world leaders in vaccinations and we are now folded scratching following behind. —— professor neil ferguson. talk about the importance of being able to vaccinate younger people, notjust in—school but national vaccination centres. in-school but national vaccination centres. ., , ., centres. one of the things that has im acted centres. one of the things that has
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impacted the _ centres. one of the things that has impacted the logistics _ centres. one of the things that has impacted the logistics of _ centres. one of the things that has impacted the logistics of rolling - impacted the logistics of rolling out vaccination in that age group is that up until now, these have been restricted to the school vaccination programme and it is quite clear that vaccinating in schools hasn�*t worked as efficiently as would like. also we have been very slow to do this so we have been very slow to do this so we delayed and they gathered about vaccinating this age group, where other countries in western europe were soldiering on ahead. they have vaccinated more than 70 or 80% of the youngsters. we are behind the curve on that what is important now as we get that vaccine rolls out, not only to protect those youngsters from disease themselves, not only to protect them from spreading the infection, but also to protect their education. 0ne infection, but also to protect their education. one of the big things we have all been concerned about, obviously, is the impact of these education restrictions and problems that have meant that youngsters haven�*t been able to go to school and that has really affected their world being in mental health, so we really do need to get on and get
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vaccinations out to those youngsters and using vaccination centres as well as the school vaccine programme will significantly improve the efficiency of that roll—out. the efficiency of that roll-out. the government — efficiency of that roll-out. the government was _ efficiency of that roll—out. the government was quite clear about the possible options with plan a and plan b, and plan b would reintroduce mask wearing indoors, urging people to work from home once again. requesting more people take up the vaccination. when you look at the current figures, do you think that plan b is now inevitable? i current figures, do you think that plan b is now inevitable?- current figures, do you think that plan b is now inevitable? i think we are starinq plan b is now inevitable? i think we are staring into _ plan b is now inevitable? i think we are staring into the _ plan b is now inevitable? i think we are staring into the jaws _ plan b is now inevitable? ! think we are staring into the jaws of- plan b is now inevitable? i think we are staring into the jaws of plan - plan b is now inevitable? i think we are staring into the jaws of plan b l are staring into the jaws of plan b now. with less mask wearing, more mixing and waning immunity, there are very light scattering high levels of infection. the biggest fear of all is as the inverse continues to spread unchecked, it will continue to mutate. —— as the virus continues to spread. we cannot afford another variant that will impact transmission and the immunity
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that we get from vaccination. i think it is likely that some additional restrictions will have to come back in unless people start to behave differently and start to realise that we cannotjust rely on vaccination. it realise that we cannot 'ust rely on ccinaiuna— realise that we cannot 'ust rely on vaccination— realise that we cannot 'ust rely on vaccinationfi realise that we cannot 'ust rely on vaccination. it is good to have your thou t hts vaccination. it is good to have your thoughts this _ vaccination. it is good to have your thoughts this afternoon. _ vaccination. it is good to have your thoughts this afternoon. we - vaccination. it is good to have your thoughts this afternoon. we are i thoughts this afternoon. we are grateful for your time, thoughts this afternoon. we are gratefulfor your time, thank you. a former soldier, who was on trial in belfast over a fatal shooting during the troubles, has died after contracting covid. dennis hutchings — who was 80 — had been charged with the attempted murder ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 1974. his lawyers had tried to have the case against him thrown out because of his poor health. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page gave us this update. the prosecution of dennis hutchings has been a high—profile and controversial case here. given the ongoing debate over how killings from the troubles should be investigated. dennis hutchings was 80 years old,
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he was from cornwall, former member of the lifeguards regiment, and he was charged with attempted murder over the killing ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 1974. john pat cunningham was 27, he had learning difficulties, and he was shot in the back as he was running away from an army patrol. mr hutchings had been on trial in belfast crown court for the last couple of weeks, he had been suffering from chronic kidney disease and heart failure. yesterday the trial was adjourned because the court heard that dennis hutchings had tested positive for covid—19, and he died in a hospital here in belfast yesterday afternoon. unionist politicians have said that he shouldn�*t have been prosecuted in the first place, for example, the leader of the democratic unionist party, sirjeffrey donaldson, has said serious questions must be answered. but the public prosecution service have said that prosecuting
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mr hutchings was in the public interest and that there was new evidence available to the court. john pat cunningham�*s family have said that in due course they will set out their response to the issues around the prosecution of dennis hutchings but they want to respectfully remind, they say, the public of the facts of the case which were not contested during the trial. so, a deeply personal story but also one that will play into the politics of legacy issues in northern ireland. the government currently has plans to scrap all prosecutions, all civil court cases, related to the conflict, and those plans are opposed by many victims�* groups and all the main political parties in devolved government at stormont. chris page, there, in belfast. police investigating the killing of sir david amess have been gathering cctv from shops and businesses near the home of his alleged killer. cctv footage from a convenience store in highgate road, north london, obtained by the bbc, shows a man believed to be the main suspect in the case walking down
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gordon house road, in the direction gospel 0ak 0verground station. 25—year—old ali harbi ali is being held under the terrorism act and officers have until friday to question him. tesco has opened its first supermarket in the uk without any checkouts. cameras and weight sensors will work out which items customers have picked up from the store in central london, then bill them through the company�*s app. the new format follows similar stores opened in london by amazon. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren. hello, cloudy weather for most of us today, some rain in the air as well but it is warm air with some thinning of the cloud in the east anglia and south—east. temperatures will reach 21 degrees. even elsewhere with cloud and rain around, temperatures 17 or 18 degrees late afternoon and early into evening.
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most of the rain is across england and wales, that will slide to the south—east. clearer skies following, some showers, thundery ones in the south—west of england and wales. milder night in southern parts of the uk. cooler weather north with clear skies and some sunshine on the way for wednesday. we have these clusters of thundery downpours moving eastwards and northwards across england and wales. wetter weather for northern england in the afternoon. either side of that, some sunshine and rain in the north—west and we have got this rain threatening the south—west of england later. a mild day on wednesday, just not quite as mild as today and things will change more significantly through the rest of the week. it will be feeling much colder thanks to a northerly wind. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good.
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green is right. green works! plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035 — grants of £5,000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it�*s inefficient, it�*s leaky, and it�*s a waste of money. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. the health secretary announces children aged 12 to 15 in england will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — notjust at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. the elder brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi leaves the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the inquiry into the attack.
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40 years after the first episode of bergerac, we�*ll be looking at some previously unseen photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. scotland have made it two wins from two, as they beat papua new guinea by 17 runs in their t20 world cup group qualifier in oman. they beat bangladesh by 6 wickets in their first match — and richie berrington top scored for the scots today with 70. matthew cross provided 45 runs and they eventually finished on 165 for 9. papua new guinea were hoping to recover from their thrashing by 0man. and they did make scotland work for it. norman vanua scored 47 runs, including two sixes, but scotland�*sjosh davey impressed as he took four wickets. both teams are aiming to reach
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the super 12 stage later this week. and bangladesh are taking on 0man at the moment. bangaldesh are batting first — they are currently 25—2. celtic have just kicked off against ferencevaros in the europa league — the game being held much earlier than usual due to policing pressures over the forthcoming cop26 climate conference soon to take place in glasgow. it�*s also the first event in scotland where fans will have to have proof that they are double—vaccinated against coronavirus as random spot checks will be in place. celtic must win today to keep alive their hopes of making the knock—out stages. just two minutes played. we will kee- ou just two minutes played. we will keep you updated. _ in the champions league, liverpool are in madrid where they�*re taking on atletico later. jurgen klopp�*s team have scored three or more goals away from home in every match so far this season. they last faced atletico just before the coronavirus pandemic suspended
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football in march 2020. last season diego simeone�*s side won la liga and klopp knows they�*ll be hungry for more success. we did not forget how bad we were there. i�*m pretty sure atletico did not forget how good we were at home. so, there is a way to cause them problems, but you have do play a top—class game and you have to be incredibly brave. if you don�*t do that, they eat you. and that is what we should avoid. saracens hookerjamie george has been called up to the england squad for the upcoming autumn internationals, with luke cowan—dickie withdrawing with an ankle injury. england head coach eddiejones named his squad yesterday — leaving out several big names including george, to bring in some new faces. speaking to the bbc rugby union weekly podcast, jones said he is using the fixtures against tonga, australia and south africa as a stepping stone for the rugby world cup in two years time.
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we ta ke we take another step to being a world cup winning side. we have got a young squad but a good squad and we want to play three really good performances. tonga, australia, south africa, almost the perfect ladder. each game, we get a bit better. the result is we want to win, that is the obvious, but each game we get a bit better and people go away from the ground thinking, i want to see this england side play again. and players who haven�*t been vaccinatd against covid—19 are unlikely to be allowed to compete at the australian open in january. yesterday, reigning men�*s champion and world no 1 novak djokovic declined to reveal his vaccination status again, and said he was unsure if he would defend his title in melbourne. the leader of the state of victoria said it would be strict with players, as it battles a resurgence of covid—19 cases.
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that could affect a lot of players on the tour. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. the man in charge of the united states�* nuclear forces says the world has to act "very carefully", because the relationship between the us, china and russia is something that has never been faced before. admiral chas richard made the comments in an interview with the bbc�*s defence correspondent jonathan beale. jonathan beale is here now. especially timely with north korea firing a missile into the waters of japan. ile firing a missile into the waters of ja tan. ., . ., japan. he did not confirm the details of _ japan. he did not confirm the details of that _ japan. he did not confirm the details of that but _ japan. he did not confirm the details of that but it - japan. he did not confirm the details of that but it has - japan. he did not confirm the| details of that but it has been reported that north korea fired a ballistic missile possibly from a submarine, that is not certain. admiral richard said it underlined the need for deterrence and the us has 28,000 troops in south korea. it covers south korea with its nuclear umbrella of which admiral richard is in charge and they often have a show
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of force with strategic bombers going into the region and they have us carrier groups in the region as well. the biggest concern for us command at the moment is china, which is a potential adversary, and notjust north korea launching weapons, there are reports that china has fired a hypersonic missile, long—range missile, that came out yesterday, and the us officially still not confirming or denying it. that was the case with admiral richard, he did not confirm or deny, but the big issue is the pace and modernisation of china and their strategic forces and this is what he said.— what he said. china's strategic break-out _ what he said. china's strategic break-out in _ what he said. china's strategic break-out in terms _ what he said. china's strategic break-out in terms of- what he said. china's strategic break-out in terms of their . break—out in terms of their strategic— break—out in terms of their strategic and nuclear capabilities are breathtaking, i'm not sure that is the _ are breathtaking, i'm not sure that is the right— are breathtaking, i'm not sure that is the right word, but unprecedented in their_ is the right word, but unprecedented in their history and close to world history _ in their history and close to world history. expansion in their capabilities in that area, so i think— capabilities in that area, so i think you _ capabilities in that area, so i think you then have to look at that
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in the _ think you then have to look at that in the context of the broad expansion of their military capabilities in terms of how that changes— capabilities in terms of how that changes what we need for our collective _ changes what we need for our collective defence. in particular, and this— collective defence. in particular, and this is— collective defence. in particular, and this is true for china and russia, _ and this is true for china and russia, you have to look at what they— russia, you have to look at what they do. — russia, you have to look at what they do, not what they say. it is not 'ust they do, not what they say. it is notjust china. _ they do, not what they say. it is notjust china. russia _ they do, not what they say. it 3 not just china. russia also a they do, not what they say. it 3 notjust china. russia also a big player in this sphere.— notjust china. russia also a big player in this sphere. russia also developing _ player in this sphere. russia also developing hypersonic _ player in this sphere. russia also developing hypersonic missiles i player in this sphere. russia also i developing hypersonic missiles and the reason why this is because yes, they have missile defence shield is to take out ballistic missiles but they are an unknown trajectory, hypersonic missiles can alter course and they are much harder to defend against so the us is concerned about this development. both china and russia developing hypersonic missiles, and the us is also developing hypersonic missiles, but it gives you a sense of the instability that we now have. in the past, in the cold war, it was america dealing with russia, there were some arms—control treaties that
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stopped them spending too much on nuclear arms and weapons and they both had a stockpile of about 4000 nuclear warheads each. but now there�*s the added equation of china. those two, make life difficult, said apple richard, in terms of making sure of deterrence. �*? apple richard, in terms of making sure of deterrence.— sure of deterrence. ? admiral richard. for _ sure of deterrence. ? admiral richard. for the _ sure of deterrence. ? admiral richard. for the first - sure of deterrence. ? admiral richard. for the first time - sure of deterrence. ? admiral richard. for the first time we | sure of deterrence. ? admiral- richard. for the first time we face two peer— richard. for the first time we face two peer nuclear competitors at the same _ two peer nuclear competitors at the same time — two peer nuclear competitors at the same time who have to be deterred differently. we have never faced this situation before. it calls on all of— this situation before. it calls on all of us, — this situation before. it calls on all of us, this takes you back almost — all of us, this takes you back almost to— all of us, this takes you back almost to the basic theoretical level. — almost to the basic theoretical level, that most theories of deterrence do not account for a three _ deterrence do not account for a three party dynamic like that. it is incumbent — three party dynamic like that. it is incumbent on everyone to thing our way through this very carefully. that _ way through this very carefully. that is— way through this very carefully. that is the _ way through this very carefully. that is the us. it is russia and china. where does the uk fit in? whereas the us has a pivot to the indo pacific, they are focusing on the threat from china, in our
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strategic defence review in the uk, it was a tilt towards the indo pacific, so it is important and it has become more important because of the rising power of china. we have had recently the royal navy aircraft carrier in the south china sea, a frigate going through and making sure of the freedom of navigation and making a point, essentially. the other thing is the agreement between the us and the uk, agreeing to help australia build nuclear power, nuclear powered submarines which is not welcomed by china but it is seen as a response to china even though officially they did not say that. you get a sense that there is growing concern about china around the world and how they operate within what they called the rules —based system, the fear that china is operating outside that, how do you contain that, that is a concern for notjust you contain that, that is a concern for not just the you contain that, that is a concern for notjust the us its allies.
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jonathan, really interesting stuff, thanks forjoining us. an increasingly bitter row between the european union and poland — has come to a head in strasbourg. european commission head ursula von de leyen said she wouldn�*t allow warsaw to put european values at risk. the polish prime minister then accused the eu of blackmail. brussels has long said reforms introduced by poland�*s right—wing government undermine the independence ofjudges and the courts. the row escalated this month when the polish constitutional tribunal in effect rejected the core principle that eu law has primacy over national legislation. the polish justice minister has accused the eu of aiming to become one, centrally managed body, undermining national sovereignty. 0ur europe correspondent jessica parker has this report. a political showdown in strasbourg, a polish prime minister defiant, an eu leader being urged to act, saying she�*ll defend the values of democracy,
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freedom and human rights. this is what all 27 member states have signed up to as part of this union, as sovereign countries and free people. honourable members, we cannot and will not allow our common values to be put at risk. possible actions include a legal challenge, or withholding funds. but poland�*s prime minister, mateusz morawiecki, showed little sign of backing down. translation: i reject the language i of threats and the fait accompli. i i will not have politicians blackmail poland. blackmail must not be a method of contact with member states. polls suggest the majority of polish people support being in the eu, and there have been protests after the country�*s top court rejected the primacy of eu law in certain areas. some see it as an alarming development, calling the country�*s
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judicial independence further into question. 0thers argue it�*s a fair assertion of national rights in the face of eu overreach. the commission here is under pressure to act, but it is high—stakes — take strong action against poland, does it risk pushing the country further away? take a more conciliatory approach, does the commission look weak and risk undermining the bloc�*s entire legal basis? this isn�*t the only area where the polish ruling party is at odds with the european union, but it is an escalation. this place�*s unity is being tested. jessica parker, bbc news. two children and two adults are in hospital after a suspected gas explosion destroyed a house in ayr last night. police say four homes were caught up in the blast which was heard several miles away, and neighbouring properties have been evacuated. 0ur scotland correspondent jamie mcivor reports.
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0ne home destroyed, three more badly damaged and debris hurled across this quiet housing estate. the explosion was so loud it was heard miles away. neighbours rushed out to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg trapped. two guys trying to help the kid. i helped a wee bit, as well, to steady him a wee bit. another guy ran in. a wee bit closer. you could see there is a crack in the house. the blast happened at 7pm last night, two adults and two children were taken to hospital, eye witnesses described flames shooting into the air. a family of four were taken to hospital, a 43—year—old woman and 16—year—old boy are in glasgow royal infirmary, a 37—year—old male in the queen elizabeth university hospital. an 11—year—old boy in the royal hospital for sick children. this morning, supplies were delivered to help those who had to leave their home, 90 spent the night in rest centres.
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the local council says some may not be able to go back to their homes for several days. new zealand has reported the highest daily total of covid cases since the pandemic began. 94 new cases were recorded on tuesday — almost all of them in the country�*s largest city, auckland. experts are warning that sustained high numbers could quickly push the health system to the limit. shaimaa khalil has the details. new zealand�*s prime minister, jacinda ardern, blamed this spike on people not following lockdown rules. she said that while the situation was incredibly hard, the country was not powerless. now, remember, for any other nation, 94 cases of covid—19 in one day is not a big number. but in new zealand�*s context, a country that has isolated itself from the world since the beginning of the pandemic, has gone months and months with zero covid, this is notjust a record number, it is a very worrying development,
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especially that those case numbers are likely to rise in the coming days and weeks, because health authorities have not yet been able to link at least half of those new cases with existing infections. the main concern, really, around this outbreak growing is the pressure on the health resources, things like isolation, like testing. we�*ve already heard experts say that the contract tracing capacity is reaching its limits. new zealand has been battling with a delta strain outbreak that has centred mainly in its largest city of auckland, and since the beginning of the pandemic, they�*ve gone for the elimination policy — they�*ve gone for zero covid, any outbreak has been tightly controlled with very strict lockdowns wherever it happened. and they have been quite successful so far, but with the delta strain, this has proven nearly impossible, so the government conceded that the way to go is to ramp up vaccination numbers. as it stands, around 66% of eligible population have been fully vaccinated.
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the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers in by 2035 — grants of £5,000 will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. a man thought to have had the heaviest kidneys on record weighing more than five stone — has had surgery to remove them. warren higgs from windsor in berkshire suffers from poly—cystic kidney disease. the condition causes fluid—filled cysts to grow in the kidneys. it affects around one in 1,000
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people and there�*s no cure. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa has been following warren�*s story. it�*s crushing my lungs, so i struggle to breathe. he gasps this was warren higgs injune. every major organ was under intense strain. it�*s crushing my stomach, so i can�*t eat a solid meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease more than 20 years ago. it�*s caused a series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six to 12 months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side of the spine. warren�*s kidneys were covered in cysts, full of fluid, and took up his whole abdomen. he�*d had enough. and he wanted the organs removed. the operation itself is dangerous, it�*s a 50—50 chance. but i�*ve got to take it, i�*ve got to do it because it�*s not
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a life, living on the sofa. surgeons discovered warren�*s kidneys weighed 35 kilograms, that�*s nearly five—and—a—half stone, making it a highly complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. this i think would be the reported heaviest kidneys that have been removed anywhere in the world. when everything is distorted and not in the right place, you run the risk of damaging other organs. you run the risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took that risk, and from struggling to breathe... ..to building back his strength. this is him three months after surgery. how are you feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe, i can eat little bits, definitely a lot better. how was that? hard. i smashed my record. he�*s dependent on dialysis three times a week, but he�*s hoping to be added
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to the transplant waiting list by the end of the year. it would mean everything. if i had a kidney, i would just be able to do anything, do all my sports. yes, i will have to take more tablets, but i�*m free to get on with my life. that would be so amazing for me. really would. that report from our health correspondent katharine da costa. subtitles, signing and audio description are not likely to return to channel 4 television until mid—november, almost two months after a major fault. the outage, which has already lasted more than three weeks, has angered deaf, hard of hearing and visually impaired viewers. around 500 people have complained to broadcasting regulator 0fcom. 400 koalas are to be vaccinated against chlamydia, as part of a trial that researchers say could play a significant role in the long term survival of one of australia�*s most beloved native species.
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sophia tran—thomson has this report. the australian koala foundation estimates there are less than 100,000 koalas left in the wild, and chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease, affects up to half the population. the disease, which can be spread from mothers to their newborns, can cause debilitating conjunctivitis, blindness, bladder infections and at times infertility. although chlamydia can sometimes be treated with antibiotics, researchers say preventing the spread of the disease is preferable to treating it. the animals will come in, go through their normal treatment processes, and just before the day they are ready to be released back into the wild, i will give them a vaccine and microchip and afterwards see how well it went. scientist call the vaccine a game changer. even if it can be 50—70% effective, it doesn�*t have to be 100% effective.
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no vaccines are. that should make a big difference to the other half of the population. following australia�*s devastating bushfires in 2019, which are thought to have killed more than 60,000 koalas, protecting the native marsupials from disease is more crucial than ever. time for a bit of tv nostalgia now — and if you�*re over a certain age, this tune will almost certainly give you that unmistakeable sunday night feeling. music: theme from bergerac i�*m just old enough! that is, of course, the theme to the bbc one detective drama bergerac, which was first broadcast 40 years ago. the bbc archive is marking the occasion by releasing a stash of photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey. richard latto has been looking back.
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it was in 1981 that a new tv series broughtjersey to television screens across the world. there�*s a host of programmes coming soon. 15 million viewers regularly tuned in in britain alone giving a massive boost to tourism. set on the beautiful island ofjersey, there is bergerac, a new detective series starring john nettles. you're an obsessional man. yeah — the bbc first came and said, can we use the old courthouse? we weren�*t sort of rubbing our hands and saying, "oh, this is going to be great", because it might have been a failure, for all we knew. we didn�*t know what it was about. i reckon it's put business up by 50%. everywhere you go now, there's bergerac bars, i bergerac restaurants. bergerac t—shirts, even bergerac aftershave, i believe. _ i haven't seen any money from that. the more we can do, i in a way, for the island, the more they will help us to make our programme.| it was compulsive viewing when it was on air. and i thinkjersey was a character in itself. it was this unique place where not a lot of people knew a lot about it, so that
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gave the writers carte blanche to create what they wanted. the series also made a household name out of its lead star. the actorjohn nettles, who plays bbc tv detective john bergerac, is in hospital in jersey with a suspected broken hip. mr nettles fell off a bicycle. and also, it's turned _ you into a sex symbol, hasn't it? yes, this is amazing. yes, yes. i can count my success with women on the fingers of one hand. well, i think i'm a bit old to have sex symbols, but i like him! - oh, i think is marvellous. now, 40 years on since the start of the series, the bbc archive has revealed unseen images from its photo library. we�*ve got a lot of images that have never been seen. we have only recently been able to have the technology to be able to scan images properly and to be able to distribute them in the way that we would like to.
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and now, to celebrate the 40th anniversary, they�*re remastering a classic episode for islanders to see in high definition very soon. it�*s fantastic that you guys are digitising it and giving it that treatment, because i think that gives people the opportunity to really see and appreciate quite how fantastic that show really was. and brian is confident his production company will see a new series of bergerac on our screens soon. there is so much work going on behind the scenes that unfortunately we can�*t talk about, but it�*s very much, watch this space. i think what's important really is that the crime is fictional and the scenery is for real. richard latto, bbc news. in the wake ofjames bond�*s return to the big screen, the hollywood sci—fi epic dune joins 007 in the campaign to entice people back to cinemas, after the pandemic. the star—studded remake of david lynch�*s 1980�*s cult hit goes on wide
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theatrical release this week. timothee chalamet leads the cast, in this version from canadian director denis villeneuve — who has urged audiences not to dilute their experience by watching it at home. london�*s leicester square played host to a special red carpet event. thomas magill was on hand to speak to some of the film�*s stars. the crowds are back in leicester square and despite the rain, it is doing what it does best, hosting a gala screening of a pretty epic movie, and the screams you heard, they were all for the star—studded cast and we have got two of the main stars. sorry about the weather. this is lovel . stars. sorry about the weather. this is lovely- it — stars. sorry about the weather. this is lovely- it is _ stars. sorry about the weather. this is lovely. it is the _ stars. sorry about the weather. this is lovely. it is the ambience. - stars. sorry about the weather. this is lovely. it is the ambience. the . is lovely. it is the ambience. the london vibe _ is lovely. it is the ambience. the london vibe and _ is lovely. it is the ambience. the
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london vibe and spirit. _ is lovely. it is the ambience. the london vibe and spirit. this - is lovely. it is the ambience. the london vibe and spirit. this is i is lovely. it is the ambience. the i london vibe and spirit. this is what london vibe and spirit. this is what london is always _ london vibe and spirit. this is what london is always light? _ london vibe and spirit. this is what london is always light? exactly. i london vibe and spirit. this is what | london is always light? exactly. you have s-ent london is always light? exactly. you have spent the _ london is always light? exactly. you have spent the last _ london is always light? exactly. you have spent the last six _ london is always light? exactly. you have spent the last six months i london is always light? exactly. you| have spent the last six months here. not quite. maybe a couple of months and i not quite. maybe a couple of months and i got _ not quite. maybe a couple of months and i got good friends here, i love it here _ and i got good friends here, i love it here i'm — and i got good friends here, i love it here. i'm from new york so it doesn't — it here. i'm from new york so it doesn't feel— it here. i'm from new york so it doesn't feel that different. i asked sharon if she _ doesn't feel that different. i asked sharon if she gave _ doesn't feel that different. i asked sharon if she gave you _ doesn't feel that different. i asked sharon if she gave you any - doesn't feel that different. i asked sharon if she gave you any tips i doesn't feel that different. i asked sharon if she gave you any tips as| sharon if she gave you any tips as to where to go. has she taken you to east london? ida. to where to go. has she taken you to east london?— east london? no, i'm not staying there. it east london? no, i'm not staying there- it is _ east london? no, i'm not staying there. it is the _ east london? no, i'm not staying there. it is the place, _ east london? no, i'm not staying there. it is the place, baby. i east london? no, i'm not staying there. it is the place, baby. we i east london? no, i'm not staying i there. it is the place, baby. we can take ou there. it is the place, baby. we can take you to — there. it is the place, baby. we can take you to some _ there. it is the place, baby. we can take you to some delicacies - there. it is the place, baby. we can take you to some delicacies and i there. it is the place, baby. we can take you to some delicacies and a i take you to some delicacies and a whole _ take you to some delicacies and a whole lot— take you to some delicacies and a whole lot of— take you to some delicacies and a whole lot of clubs, _ take you to some delicacies and a whole lot of clubs, we _ take you to some delicacies and a whole lot of clubs, we will - take you to some delicacies and a whole lot of clubs, we will party, i take you to some delicacies and a | whole lot of clubs, we will party, i promise — whole lot of clubs, we will party, i promise i— whole lot of clubs, we will party, i tromise. ., ., whole lot of clubs, we will party, i tromise. . ., , ., whole lot of clubs, we will party, i tromise. . . , ., ., promise. i have a feeling you are ttoin to promise. i have a feeling you are going to see _ promise. i have a feeling you are going to see us _ promise. i have a feeling you are going to see us out _ promise. i have a feeling you are going to see us out and - promise. i have a feeling you are going to see us out and about. i promise. i have a feeling you are i going to see us out and about. have a treat going to see us out and about. have a great night- _ going to see us out and about. have a great night. see _ going to see us out and about. have a great night. see the _ going to see us out and about. have a great night. see the movie - going to see us out and about. have a great night. see the movie on i going to see us out and about. have| a great night. see the movie on your screens. a great night. see the movie on your screens- yes. _ a great night. see the movie on your screens. yes, on _ a great night. see the movie on your screens. yes, on imax, _ a great night. see the movie on your screens. yes, on imax, not - a great night. see the movie on your screens. yes, on imax, not on i a great night. see the movie on your screens. yes, on imax, not on the i screens. yes, on imax, not on the tv! now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren.
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hello there. it�*s another cloudy day today for most of us, some rain in the air as well. and that�*s because the air has travelled over 1500 miles to get to the uk all the way from the tropics, but with that long sea track you pick up all that moisture. but it�*s warm air that�*s heading our way so with some sunshine potentially for the south—east of england and east anglia, temperatures reaching 21 degrees. elsewhere, where we have more cloud, some outbreaks of rain or showers, it�*s still 17 or 18 degrees. that�*s the picture late afternoon, early evening and the wetter weather is going to move across england and wales towards the south—east overnight. some clearer skies developing elsewhere, a few showers knocking about, some heavy, thundery ones in the south—west of england and south wales later on. a warm start to wednesday across the southern half of the uk, a little cooler perhaps as you head further north where we do have some sunshine. that rain clears to the south—east of england and then these heavy, potentially thundery downpours move northwards and eastwards across england and wales. wetter weather sitting in northern england in the afternoon.
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either side of that we should see some sunshine coming through, there is rain in the far south—west later and the north—west of scotland. temperatures not quite as high as today, but still a mild one across many parts of england and wales. but as we head into the end of the week through thursday and friday, it�*s going to feel very different, it�*s going to feel much colder. that�*s because our wind is coming from a different location. we�*ve got some heavy rain on wednesday night across southern parts of the uk and then we�*ve got this cold front moving down from the north as well. but behind that, the wind direction changes and we are picking up air more from the arctic or polar regions, that will make it feel much colder. it�*s going to be a windy day on thursday, the rain first thing along the east coast, south coast will move away but then plenty of sunshine, showers more towards the north—west and a little bit wintry over the hills. there�*ll be some strong and gusty north to north—westerly winds possibly gales along eastern coasts where we have spring tides as well. and it will feel cold — eight, nine degrees in northern scotland to a higher 13 in southern parts of england and wales, so quite a change from what we�*ve got at the moment. that chillier air still in place overnight and then we get this ridge of high pressure building
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in from the atlantic on friday. fewer showers, probably a fair bit of cloud coming into western areas, this is where we will see the bulk of the showers. the winds won�*t be quite as strong on friday and the sunnier skies will be towards the eastern side of the uk. but we�*ve still got temperatures of 11 to 14 degrees, quite a bit cooler than today.
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this is bbc news. i�*m ben thompson. the headlines... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works! plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035, grants of 5000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. to help households to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it�*s inefficient, it�*s leaky, and it�*s a waste of money. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. the health secretary announces children aged 12 to 15 in england
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will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — not just at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. channel 4 says its subtitles, signing and audio description are unlikely to return until mid—november, almost two months after a catastrophic fault. hunting for planets from the comfort of the sofa — a project enlists the help of the public to identify new stars by looking at five years�* worth of footage captured by telescopes. this the government has set out a road map for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 which ministers claim will support
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nearly half one million jobs over the next few decades. it includes the aim that by 2035 the uk will be powered entirely by clean electricity. there is also £650m to subsidise the cost of electric vehicles. and people in england and wales will be offered 5,000 pound grants from next year to replace their gas boilers with low carbon heat pumps, as ministers wants to end the sale of gas boilers by 2035. this report from jon donnison. engineers in chesterfield this morning being trained how to install heat pumps. over the next few years, they can expect to be busy with the government hoping gas boilers can be phased out completely by 2035. heat pumps work by extracting warmth from the air, the ground or water. they are a bit like a fridge, operating in reverse and are powered by electricity. if you want to reduce carbon
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emissions it�*s probably one of the simplest and quickest ways to reduce that. similar to an electric car. but in terms of running costs, even though they are more expensive to purchase, you can get immediate savings from having them. this is where the actual hardware is located. richard installed a heat pump in his house seven years ago. i can safely say it's the best thing we ever did, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot but it is very livable. and from next april people will be able to apply for a £5,000 grant to help them pay to replace an existing gas boiler with a heat pump. it is part of a £450 million package announced by the government. but that is only enough to cover a maximum of 90,000 pumps. while there are around 25 million gas boilers in uk homes. it�*s like we are in a 1,500 metre race but are deciding to walk the first lap and there is no way
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we can catch up in the next two laps because we set off so slowly. the government ought to be doing a lot more a lot more quickly, even if the direction of travel is in the right direction. a £5,000 grant still falls considerably short of the cost of installing more heat pumps which can cause more than double that. for some consumers it will play a strong incentive, halving the cost of installation for them but for low households it would be quite prohibitive, it�*s still a big jump for them to make. then there�*s the issue of insulation. this thermal imaging camera can be used to show how badly insulated some of our homes remain. which some say is a big problem if we are converting to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it is inefficient, it is leaky and a waste of money so absolutely alongside this heat pump strategy we should have had a comprehensive local authority led,
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street by street insulation programme that many of us have been calling for for years. speaking alongside business leaders at the global investment summit in london today, and ahead of the upcoming un climate summit in glasgow, borisjohnson said the uk was leading the way on green issues. the market is going green, people know that we have the technological solutions to these problems and they want to go green and they know we will be able one day to bring down the prices of green technology, evs and heat pumps and solar panels in the way that we so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. the prime minister later announced a £400 million partnership with the microsoft co—founder bill gates to help make green technology more affordable. jon donnison, bbc news.
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how significant are those proposals? 0ur energy and environment analyst roger harrabin has been following this. in the next few weeks boris johnson is going to be welcoming world leaders to glasgow to the world�*s most important climate summit this year. the government has set very aggressive targets for cutting emissions, and it now needs to show how it is going to meet those targets and today�*s document covers the entire economy and shows how carbon emissions are going to be cut from every point in the economy. critics will say it doesn�*t go strongly enough but i have to say this looks to me like the most advanced plan from any major nation towards how we will actually get around to achieving the emissions cuts that have been so bravely promised. i�*m joined now by mike thompson, chief economist at the climate change committee, an independent body which advises the uk government on emissions targets. it is good to have you with us. we
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are hearing today, these proposals for reaching that 2015 deadline. what do you make of the announcement and are they enough? iqrqihat what do you make of the announcement and are they enough?— and are they enough? what we have tot toda and are they enough? what we have got today is — and are they enough? what we have got today is a _ and are they enough? what we have got today is a plan — and are they enough? what we have got today is a plan that _ and are they enough? what we have got today is a plan that matters i got today is a plan that matters because we didn�*t have a plan before. the uk has very ambitious climate targets but we didn�*t quite know how the government intended to meet them and after today we do know that. it is not the end, we don�*t have everything, every single policy mapped out, but we now have a much clearer sense of how the government is going to get from here to zero in 2050, and crucially how it will meet its targets for 2025, 2030, 2035. this is not about a distant plan. it moves the goalposts forward from 2050 to 2035, and there is quite a clear offer at the centre of it. the government is saying we will sort out the electricity sector, we will make sure that by 2035, every electron flowing through the wires is a zero carbon, all the
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electricity coming, you can be confident it is genuinely low carbon. you can go out and buy electric cars, eventually you can fit heat pumps to heat your home with electricity and know that in doing that, you will genuinely be cutting your emissions. put doing that, you will genuinely be cutting your emissions.— cutting your emissions. put this into a bit of _ cutting your emissions. put this into a bit of context _ cutting your emissions. put this into a bit of context in - cutting your emissions. put this into a bit of context in terms i cutting your emissions. put this into a bit of context in terms of| into a bit of context in terms of how significant an announcement it is internationally. we know this needs to be an internationaljoined up needs to be an internationaljoined up effort. it is an international problem. where do we figure in terms of taking a lead on climate change? the uk is hosting the climate talks that are coming up in glasgow in a couple of weeks and those are crucial for getting the planet on course to tackling global warming properly. we have said the uk should be coming to those talks is a genuine climate leader. we have a track record already of cutting emissions rapidly, we have done that already while growing our economy. we have got some of the most ambitious targets in the world and now we have also said how we�*re going to deliver on those targets. i think is your correspondent has
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said, that is pretty unique in that combination of all of those things is unusual when we look internationally. no one else has bill mapped this out in as much detail as we have now in the uk. it is notjob done, there is an awful of work to be done to implement these plans, to get the policy is in, to get the investments to follow, but as a statement to take to take to the world, this is a really powerful one. {ltiq to take to the world, this is a really powerful one.- to take to the world, this is a really powerful one. ok, a statement of what lid like _ really powerful one. ok, a statement of what lid like to _ really powerful one. ok, a statement of what lid like to achieve _ really powerful one. ok, a statement of what lid like to achieve and - really powerful one. ok, a statement of what lid like to achieve and then i of what lid like to achieve and then the devil is always is in the detail. —— what we would like to achieve. let�*s talk about some of the detail on heat pumps, moving away from gas boilers that are polluting two words heat pump technology. already a lot of criticism that without insulation the pointless, we don�*t have enough installers to get the sp heat pumps and hoses that need it and the government are offering grants of £5,000 and it is simply not enough because it only covers about 90,000
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of them. ~ ., because it only covers about 90,000 of them. . . ., ., ., ._ because it only covers about 90,000 of them. . . ., ., ., , ., of them. what we have got today is a statement of — of them. what we have got today is a statement of intent _ of them. what we have got today is a statement of intent again _ of them. what we have got today is a statement of intent again from i of them. what we have got today is a statement of intent again from the i statement of intent again from the government, this is about saying for the first time, really, we haven�*t had this from a uk government before, that the future is going to before, that the future is going to be primarily electric. we will keep hydrogen in play as an option but we are looking really at shifting our gas boilers, our oil boilers, all across to electricity. that is a big statement and we have not managed to get that before. we have got a list of policy ideas and at the moment some of them really are just idea stage, and they will need to go beyond that and we will need to do the consultations, we need to do the industry engagement, we need to make sure we have something really works for people. but i think we have now got a very clear direction, actually, and we have got alongside that a framework as to how it can be delivered. absolutely, 90,000 heat pumps in the next three years is not enough to get us where we need to get to, but some of those ideas to drive delivery through market—based mechanisms, putting obligations on
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by the manufacturer�*s and households, on words, those kind of things could be a way, if the detail is right, it could be a way to rescale things up. == is right, it could be a way to rescale things up.— is right, it could be a way to rescale things up. -- on landlords. you are broadly _ rescale things up. -- on landlords. you are broadly receptive - rescale things up. -- on landlords. you are broadly receptive and i you are broadly receptive and encouraged by what you have heard but where else would you have liked to see in these announcements. iqrqihat to see in these announcements. what would make — to see in these announcements. what would make a — to see in these announcements. what would make a big _ to see in these announcements. wisgt would make a big difference? it is early days. the climate committee will take time to scrutinise them properly, we will do that as quick as we possibly can, but at the moment i think the initial reaction is to say this is a big step forward to have a genuine plan and the next thing is to say how do we go from plant to implementation and onto delivery? it plant to implementation and onto delive ? , , delivery? it is good bit happy with us this afternoon. _ delivery? it is good bit happy with us this afternoon. thank - delivery? it is good bit happy with us this afternoon. thank very i delivery? it is good bit happy with i us this afternoon. thank very much. let�*s bring you the latest figures that we have as far as covid infections and deaths are concerned. we are told 43,738 new cases are reported of the last 24 hours. that
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is actually down from the 49,156 that were announced yesterday. latest cases coming at 43,738, but there has been a significant increase in deaths. 0n there has been a significant increase in deaths. on monday that figure is usually much lower because of delays in reporting the data at the start of the week. there were 223 further deaths announced over the last 24—hour is. that is a rise from 45 on monday. those are the latest official uk figures we have as far as coronavirus cases and deaths are concerned. an inquiry has found that �*multiple failures�* by police, prosecutors and council officials meant that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015, facing criminal charges spanning three decades and relating to nine people who had been in children�*s homes. he always denied any wrongdoing.
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earlier i spoke to our home affairs correspondent tom symonds, who brought us the latest on the case. that death of lord janner in 2015 meant there was no justice for people who made allegations against him. a number which reached 33 by the time he died. also no justice for him because he had no opportunity in court to defend himself. by the time charges were levelled against him he was suffering from dementia. this inquiry was not to find out whether he is guilty of child abuse but why those investigations never led to prosecutions earlier. it found really that generally, the people who made the allegations had been in care homes and were not believed or taken seriously because they were not really trusted in what they were saying. there was also something of a culture of deference towards the leicester mp. more specifically, the inquiry found in 2000, there was a key moment, a police officer failed to pass two
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early statements alleging abuse by lord janner to prosecutors, the inquiry says that was serious and inexcusable. in 2006, prosecutors decided not to continue investigations, gave advice to the police to that effect, the inquiry said that was unsound and strategically flawed. and that the complainants, the people who made the allegations were failed by these investigations. the family of lord janner stressed today this inquiry report has no suggestion of his guilt and that he remains to his dying day, someone who denied he was involved in child abuse. they, too, say he was a victim of institutional failings because he was not able to have his day in court either. the secretary to the child sexual abuse inquiry, john 0�*brien gave a more detailed explanation of what the report found. 0peration magnolia and operation dauntless were failed investigations.
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at the heart of both of those, it was because it was deemed that these children because they were children in care would not be taken seriously and be credible witnesses. i think that is very concerning and very sad, bearing in mind operation magnolia 2000, operation dauntless 2006 is recent history, it is not 50 or 60 years ago. it would never be acceptable. we are talking about investigations that failed to properly pursue multiple allegations of child sexual abuse on the basis that they were children in care and wouldn�*t be taken seriously. was it more likely they wouldn�*t be taken seriously because lord janner was an mp and a big name in the local area? it is difficult to know from the evidence we saw whether that is the case or not, but at the end of this, there were 33 complainants who were let down because the police simply didn�*t do theirjob in following up the evidence. we had two statements
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that were not forwarded to the crown prosecution service and they said that would have altered the outcome of the decision at the time potentially if they had seen them. in 0peration dauntless we had a senior investigative officer who didn�*t seem interested in pursuing this, due to sheer disinterest linked to not being seen as credible. we can speculate on the reasons but at the heart of this, 33 complainants let down simply because there was not a proper investigation and proper follow—up of the evidence, and for the cps a significant delay in looking at the files on both cases. the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035 — grants of 5000 pounds will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. an inquiry finds that child abuse
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allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. from half—term, 12 to 15—year—olds in england will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs, rather than at school. the health secretary sajid javid says the move is part of a plan to speed up vaccinations in england. meanwhile, a leading expert warns that with rising cases and the waning effect of vaccines, it is "critical" the uk accelerates its booster vaccination rollout. covid cases in the uk are currently at their highest level for almost three months. we�*rejoined by professor adam finn, a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation and professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol. welcome to bbc news. we were just
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updating our appearance on the latest figures we had today, 42,730 cases, 223 deaths. i wonder if you put that into a little bit of context for us and what you make of where we are on this journey as far as infections are concerned. i where we are on this journey as far as infections are concerned.- as infections are concerned. i think we all do need _ as infections are concerned. i think we all do need to _ as infections are concerned. i think we all do need to be _ as infections are concerned. i think we all do need to be concerned i as infections are concerned. i think| we all do need to be concerned that the figures are slowly but surely going up, they are not going up in the kind of rapid rise way that we saw last year, but they are never the less steadily creeping up. and although the vaccine programme will do much to reduce the extent to which those cases are translated into hospitalisations and deaths, because the vaccines are very good at preventing that, never the less, we do need to bear in mind that the vaccine programme by itself will not keep this virus under control and stop it circulating. i keep this virus under control and stop it circulating.— stop it circulating. i am sorry to interrupt. _ stop it circulating. i am sorry to interrupt. i— stop it circulating. i am sorry to interrupt, i want _ stop it circulating. i am sorry to interrupt, i want to _ stop it circulating. i am sorry to interrupt, i want to come i stop it circulating. i am sorry to interrupt, i want to come ontoi stop it circulating. i am sorry to i interrupt, i want to come onto the 12 to 15—year—old group in a second as far as the vaccination is
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concerned, but i wonder first of all, given quite what we are seen, and the government was very clear, there is a plan a and plan b as far as infections start rising, reintroducing mask wearing indoors, encouraging more working from home once again. how far away from the army, do you think? i once again. how far away from the army, do you think?— army, do you think? i think those thints army, do you think? i think those things are — army, do you think? i think those things are actually _ army, do you think? i think those things are actually things - army, do you think? i think those things are actually things that i i things are actually things that i would encourage people to do it now. not necessarily by making it compulsory butjust by providing the information to people that if they do wear masks indoors, when they are in contact with other people, whether that is at work or in the shops are socially, if they do use the lateral flow tests twice a week to see if they have got the infection, those are all things people can do which will reduce the transmission of infection without interfering with normal lives, not lead to more restrictions. there are many things we could be doing if he
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just encouraged each other to do it and i am worried people have stopped bothering. and i am worried people have stopped botherint. �* , and i am worried people have stopped botherint. �*, .., and i am worried people have stopped botherint. �*, ., ., ., bothering. let's come onto that ounter bothering. let's come onto that younger cohort _ bothering. let's come onto that younger cohort of _ bothering. let's come onto that l younger cohort of schoolchildren here. we are told they will be able to get vaccinations at the national centres, notjust in school and we are looking at new figures that were released that suggests a 20.8% of children between the age of 12 and 17 have had their vaccine, that is one of the areas of concern. yeah, i think what — one of the areas of concern. yeah, i think what we _ one of the areas of concern. yeah, i think what we have _ one of the areas of concern. yeah, i think what we have learned - one of the areas of concern. yeah, i think what we have learned from i think what we have learned from colleagues in scotland who actually implemented this way of doing things already, and have got much higher coverage, is that this is a good idea. mostly for adolescent children, we discover based immunisation but that is usually a rolling programme that is going on right the way through the year, the meningitis, the cervical cancer vaccine and this is a much more immediate campaign. i think giving additional options for parents to take their kids to get immunised and
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notjust waiting for the team to arrive in school is a really good idea. ~ ., , ., arrive in school is a really good idea. . . , ., , idea. we are seeing a different ticture idea. we are seeing a different picture of _ idea. we are seeing a different picture of an — idea. we are seeing a different picture of an app _ idea. we are seeing a different picture of an app around i idea. we are seeing a different picture of an app around the i idea. we are seeing a different i picture of an app around the world. we were reporting earlier on infections in new zealand and australia, we have seen problems in russia and parts of romania, seeing record heights there as well. everyone is out of step at the moment and i wonder what we might learn from what other countries are doing that we could probably be thinking about doing once again right here. i thinking about doing once again ritht here. ., , thinking about doing once again ritht here. ,, , ., , right here. i think it is really well worth _ right here. i think it is really well worth comparing i right here. i think it is really i well worth comparing ourselves right here. i think it is really - well worth comparing ourselves with other similar countries, and certainly if you compare us with our neighbours in france at the moment, there is a lot different. i was in france last month and you have to show your vaccine passport to go and get a coffee in a caf, show your vaccine passport to go and get a coffee in a caf , everybody going to the supermarket, everybody is wearing a mask. they really are taking this seriously in a way that we appear not to be any more. i think it is worth learning from
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other people and seeing how things are going elsewhere. i do other people and seeing how things are going elsewhere.— are going elsewhere. i do agree. it is tood to are going elsewhere. i do agree. it is good to have _ are going elsewhere. i do agree. it is good to have your— are going elsewhere. i do agree. it is good to have your thoughts. i are going elsewhere. i do agree. it i is good to have your thoughts. thank you for being with us this afternoon. the elder brother of the manchester arena suicide bomber has left the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the public inquiry into the attack. ismail abedi has always refused to answer questions from the inquiry in case he incriminates himself. 0ur north of england correspondent judith moritz brings us up to date. the manchester arena enquiry has just begun its phase of examining why salman abedi carried out his attack and how he was radicalised, and as part of that it wants to speak to his family, friends and associates. well, in the wake of the bombing, salman abedi�*s elder brother ismail was one of those who was arrested. he was found to possess extremist propaganda, but he was never charged with any offence. he and the parents have refused to co—operate with the enquiry. bbc news tracked ismail abedi down last year.
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we found him living in manchester. and at the time, greater manchester police said their investigation was continuing and they were still seeking to speak to him. and we were expecting ismail abedi to come and give evidence here at court this week, but this morning, we were told that he has left the country. it is not known when he will return and if he doesn�*t appear to give evidence, having been issued with a court order, by the way, to compel him to do so, if he doesn�*t appear, the public may infer from that that he had something to hide. some of the bereaved families have told us today they are extremely angry that ismail abedi has been able to go abroad. there is another witness who is also going to be compelled to appear here this week, a friend of salman abedi�*s, a childhood friend. he was found trying to leave the country last night. he was arrested, he is now in custody, we were told. he will be brought here to give
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evidence later this week. police investigating the killing of sir david amess have been gathering cctv from shops and businesses near the home of his alleged killer. cctv footage from a convenience store in highgate road, north london, obtained by the bbc, shows a man believed to be the main suspect in the case walking down gordon house road, in the direction gospel 0ak 0verground station. 25—year—old ali harbi ali is being held under the terrorism act and officers have until friday to question him. two children and two adults are in hospital after a suspected gas explosion destroyed a house in ayr last night. police say four homes were caught up in the blast which was heard several miles away, and neighbouring properties have been evacuated. 0ur scotland correspondentjamie mcivor is at the scene....and jamie 0ne home destroyed, three more badly damaged and debris hurled across this quiet housing estate. the explosion was so loud
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it was heard miles away. neighbours rushed out to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg trapped. two guys trying to help the kid. i helped a wee bit, as well, to steady him a wee bit. another guy ran in. a wee bit closer. you could see there is a crack in the house. the blast happened at 7pm last night, two adults and two children were taken to hospital, eye witnesses described flames shooting into the air. a family of four were taken to hospital, a 43—year—old woman and 16—year—old boy are in glasgow royal infirmary, a 37—year—old male in the queen elizabeth university hospital. "47. an 11—year—old boy in the royal hospital for sick children. this morning, supplies were delivered to help those who had to leave their home, 90 spent the night in rest centres. the local council says some may not be able to go back to their homes for several days.
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mps suspended of bullying or sexual harassment can now face a recall petition after a change in parliamentary rules — the move could lead to a by election. it follows a controversy over the backbench mp rob roberts. he was suspended from parliament for six weeks in may for sexual misconduct. a loophole meant he didn�*t face a petition that could trigger a by—election. but the rule changes will not apply retrospectively to rob roberts — something labour argued should be the case. 0ur political correspondent ione wells joins us now. just explain for us the significance of this change. this just explain for us the significance of this change.— of this change. this is certainly a very significant _ of this change. this is certainly a very significant rule _ of this change. this is certainly a very significant rule change i of this change. this is certainly a | very significant rule change many people are asking why wasn't this the case sooner? why was it that mps who were suspended for sexual harassment and bullying couldn't face every competition, a chance for the constituency to have a say in whether or not they want them to
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remain an mp, the mps could face a recall petition for offences like misusing parliamentary expenses. the whole reason behind this was a parliamentary quite the case recall petitions, they transfer constituents to have a say and can only be triggered by parliamentary committees, subcommittees made up of other mp5. recently a new independent panel was set up specifically tojudge independent panel was set up specifically to judge cases against mps that involved bullying or sexual harassment, and appointed a panel must keep those cases independent from mps themselves. an unintended consequence of keeping that independence meant that in cases like the case of robert roberts, we have had suspended for six weeks for sexual harassment by this independent panel, but he couldn't face a recall petition and still won't due to the fact these new changes will not be applied retrospectively to cases that have
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already been judged.— retrospectively to cases that have already been judged. already been 'udged. labour argues that this already been judged. labour argues that this should _ already been judged. labour argues that this should apply _ that this should apply retrospectively.- that this should apply retrospectively. that this should apply retrosectivel . . , , retrospectively. that is right, they have argued _ retrospectively. that is right, they have argued this _ retrospectively. that is right, they have argued this bill _ retrospectively. that is right, they have argued this bill changers - have argued this bill changers should apply retrospectively to the only currently sitting mp who this really applies to witches robert roberts. the reason is the government has argued it wouldn't be fair to apply retrospective rule changes, essentially allowing someone to be published in the past —— punished for something in the past. when the rules then are different from the rules now. there are questions raised from mps concerned about the precedent that would set for the independence of the panel is political rule changes could affect past decisions made by this independent panel. that is move by labour to try and make this apply retrospectively to rob robinson himself —— roberts himself wasn't backed in the end. but any future harassment could potentially mean
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mps can face a recall petition in the future. tesco has opened its first supermarket in the uk without any checkouts. cameras and weight sensors will work out which items customers have picked up from the store in central london, then bill them through the company's app. the new format follows similar stores opened in london by amazon. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. good afternoon. it has been 21 degrees today across parts of northwick and essex. that is ahead of— parts of northwick and essex. that is ahead of the _ parts of northwick and essex. that is ahead of the rain. we did have a bit sunshine to give that temperature based but it has been mad everywhere. turning drier across scotland, we have been developing across wales in western england and that will work its way eastwards towards east anglia and the south—east of the night, one that moves through the skies were clear and we will have some showers dotted
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about. we will get some heavy thundery ones arriving to as wales and a south—west later on. another mild night across the southern half of the uk but cooler further north. we will have clear skies and sunshine tomorrow. that rain close to the south—east. thundery showers break out, push northwards through the day after detroit's northern england in the afternoon. either side we will have some sunshine and rain in the north—west, more rain coming into the far south—west later on. in an day, not as mild as today, highest temperatures will beat with east anglia and the south—east. all of us to serve the ever ready, we will feel cooler with the wind when coming down the north. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push
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towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works! plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035, grants of £5,000 will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it's inefficient, it's leaky, and it's a waste of money. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. the health secretary announces children aged 12 to 15 in england will be able to get vaccinated at national hubs — notjust at school — as concern grows over a rise in cases. channel [i says its subtitles, signing and audio description are unlikely to return until mid—november, almost two months after a catastrophic fault. hunting for planets from the the comfort of the sofa — a project enlists the help
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of the public to identify new stars by looking at five years' worth of footage captured by telescopes. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. from the bbc sport centre. 68% of all premier league players are now fully vaccinated against covid—19, with 81% having had at least one jab. there has been a large increase in uptake of the vaccine — at the end of september there were only seven clubs where more than 50% of players had been fully vaccinated. our sports editor dan roan has been speaking to deputy chief medical officer, professorjonathan van—tam. i think they have got responsibilities to themselves, to their families and friends, but we don't want any more games cancelled. we don't want any more squads that
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are short and can't fulfil fixtures because half of them have got covid and we can avoid that now. you can choose the time when you get vaccinated, you can't choose the time when you are going to have that chance encounter with covid, and if you are a professional sports person, you know, it could lead to something very big in terms of spoiling something in your sporting life. celtic are in action against ferencevaros in the europa league — the game being held much earlier than usual due to policing pressures. it is still goalless at celtic park. in the champions league, liverpool are in madrid where they're taking on atletico later. jurgen klopp's team have scored three or more goals away from home in every match so far this season. they last faced atletico just before the coronavirus pandemic suspended football in march 2020.
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last season diego simeone�*s side won la liga and klopp knows they'll be hungry for more success. we did not forget how bad we were there. i'm pretty sure atletico did not forget how good we were at home. so, there is a way to cause them problems, but you have do play a top—class game and you have to be incredibly brave. if you don't do that, they eat you. and that is what we should avoid. scotland have made it two wins from two, as they beat papua new guinea by 17 runs in their t20 world cup group qualifier in oman. they beat bangladesh by 6 wickets in their first match — and richie berrington top scored for the scots today with 70. matthew cross provided 45 runs and they eventually finished on 165 for 9.
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papua new guinea were hoping to recover from their thrashing by oman. and they did make scotland work for it. norman vanua scored 47 runs, including two sixes, but scotland'sjosh davey impressed as he took four wickets. both teams are aiming to reach the super 12 stage later this week. in the days second game, bangladesh are taking on oman. bangaldesh are batting first. they are currently 120—4. saracens hookerjamie george has been called up to the england squad for the autumn internationals, after luke cowan—dickie withdrew with an ankle injury. anthony watson also looks set to miss the upcoming matches. head coach eddiejones named his squad yesterday — leaving out several big names to bring in some new faces. speaking to the bbc rugby union weekly podcast, he said he is using the fixtures against tonga, australia and south africa as a stepping stone for the rugby world cup in two years time. we take another step
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to being a world cup winning side. we've got a young squad but a good squad and we want to play three really good performances. tonga, australia, south africa, it's almost the perfect ladder. each game, we get a bit better. the result is, we want to win, that is the obvious, but each game we get a bit better and people go away from the ground thinking, "i want to see this england side play again." that's all the sport for now. channel four says subtitles, signing and audio description are unlikely to return to tv until mid november. it's because of a fault at a broadcast centre which happened last month. the outage has angered deaf, hard of hearing and visually impaired viewers. i'm joined now by roger wicks, who's associate director of insight and policy at the royal national institute for deaf people. thanks forjoining us. talk to me
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about the significance of this because unless you rely on these services many people will think, what is the fuss all about? why is it such a lifeline? fine what is the fuss all about? why is it such a lifeline?— it such a lifeline? one in five --eole it such a lifeline? one in five peeple are — it such a lifeline? one in five people are deaf— it such a lifeline? one in five people are deaf or _ it such a lifeline? one in five people are deaf or have - it such a lifeline? one in five i people are deaf or have hearing it such a lifeline? one in five - people are deaf or have hearing loss and regularly use subtitles to access television programmes, the shows we all access, and if this had been an incident where the sound had gone from a programme, this would not have been left to go on so long. it has been over three weeks now on channel [i and that frankly is not good enough. channel 4 and that frankly is not good enough-— channel 4 and that frankly is not aood enou:h. , . ' . good enough. explain the difference and white they _ good enough. explain the difference and white they are _ good enough. explain the difference and white they are so _ good enough. explain the difference and white they are so useful? - good enough. explain the difference and white they are so useful? this l and white they are so useful? this is notjust involved subtitles but also signing and audio description, crucially. also signing and audio description, cruciall . . , crucially. that is right. it provides _ crucially. that is right. it provides equality - crucially. that is right. it provides equality of - crucially. that is right. it l provides equality of access crucially. that is right. it - provides equality of access to people with hearing loss, deafness and other conditions so they can enjoy the same films and programmes
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as the rest of us and it means when we have conversations about what is on the news, ourfavourite we have conversations about what is on the news, our favourite drama, everyone can join on the news, our favourite drama, everyone canjoin in and have on the news, our favourite drama, everyone can join in and have those rich conversations that are so important socially, so it is about access but also equality. what important socially, so it is about access but also equality. what have we been told _ access but also equality. what have we been told about _ access but also equality. what have we been told about why _ access but also equality. what have we been told about why this - access but also equality. what have we been told about why this is - we been told about why this is taking so long to fix? the problem was quite a while ago now but we are told it will take even longer to get right. it told it will take even longer to get riuht. , . ., , told it will take even longer to get riuht. , , ., right. it is complex. there was an incident and _ right. it is complex. there was an incident and some _ right. it is complex. there was an incident and some damage - right. it is complex. there was an incident and some damage at - right. it is complex. there was an incident and some damage at the | incident and some damage at the company that provides subtitles to other broadcasters, to the bbc as well, but the back—up system did not work at channel 4, and that is complicated technical stuff but the systems at channel [i were not robust enough and we are asking them, will this happen again, what can they make ? what can they do to make sure this doesn't happen again? this is
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not acceptable and we really hope channel [i take this more seriously. we have met them, we met them today and last week, and we are reassured that they understand the issue and they are beginning to communicate with viewers now. they have put bsl videos on and they are beginning to let viewers know where they can get subtitles although it is a long way to go until mid november and we need to go until mid november and we need to do is to change and quicken up. the company that provides them it says they cannot run the risk of something going wrong and it needs to be installed slowly to make sure the channels do not come off air and prevent something like this happening again. they have said they will try their utmost to speed up the process but what is your message to them today? thea; the process but what is your message to them today?— to them today? they have let down a lot of people. — to them today? they have let down a lot of people. the — to them today? they have let down a lot of people, the broadcasters - lot of people, the broadcasters have, and they have, and of course mistakes will happen, but there needs to be a back—up and a remedy. this is the 25th day since this happened and mid—november is along way away. at least we understand out
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that channel [i understands the needs of their viewers and the population and they understand the issue now and they understand the issue now and they understand the issue now and they are beginning to update people and alert people to which of their programmes do now have subtitles. most don't but more and more are but we need this to quicken up more are but we need this to quicken up as we move to next month. absolutely. roger, thanks for joining us. associate director at the royal national institute for deaf people, thank you. an increasingly bitter row between the european union and poland — has come to a head in strasbourg. european commission head ursula von de leyen said she wouldn't allow warsaw to put european values at risk. the polish prime minister then accused the eu of blackmail. brussels has long said reforms introduced by poland's right—wing government undermine the independence ofjudges and the courts. the row escalated this month when the polish constitutional tribunal in effect rejected the core principle that eu
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law has primacy over national legislation. the polish justice minister has accused the eu of aiming to become one, centrally managed body, undermining national sovereignty. our europe correspondent jessica parker has this report. a political showdown in strasbourg, a polish prime minister defiant, an eu leader being urged to act, saying she'll defend the values of democracy, freedom and human rights. this is what all 27 member states have signed up to as part of this union, as sovereign countries and free people. honourable members, we cannot and will not allow our common values to be put at risk. possible actions include a legal challenge, or withholding funds. but poland's prime minister, mateusz morawiecki, showed little sign of backing down.
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translation: i reject the language . of threats and the fait accompli. i i will not have politicians blackmail poland. blackmail must not be a method of contact with member states. polls suggest the majority of polish people support being in the eu, and there have been protests after the country's top court rejected the primacy of eu law in certain areas. some see it as an alarming development, calling the country's judicial independence further into question. others argue it's a fair assertion of national rights in the face of eu overreach. the commission here is under pressure to act, but it is high—stakes — take strong action against poland, does it risk pushing the country further away? take a more conciliatory approach, does the commission look weak and risk undermining the bloc�*s entire legal basis? this isn't the only area where the polish ruling party is at odds with the european union, but it is an escalation. this place's unity is being tested.
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jessica parker, bbc news. the european union is sending emergency coronavirus aid to romania which according to one estimate is recording one of the highest number of covid deaths per million people in the world. the government has said today that daily infections and deaths have hit a record high. its intensive care units are full and some patients are being transferred for treatment into neighbouring hungary. mark lobel reports. inside romania's overwhelmed intensive care units. a country in a covid critical condition. outside some hospitals, medical staff make space. romania's vaccination campaign chief says the eastern european country is experiencing the same scenario italy's lombardy region suffered last year. patients pile up in this hospital corridor waiting for treatment. volunteers are stepping up.
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translation: i don't know whether i will resist - the fourth wave entirely, whether i will have the energy to do it. this wave is terrible, the most severe one. things are so full here, romania is now transferring some of its covid—19 patients to neighbouring hungary. translation: we notice a daily average of approximately - 15,000 infected people. we have a daily average unfortunately of 300 deaths. one major reason for all this, romania has the second lowest vaccination rate in the eu. translation: some 90%| of the hospitalised patients are not vaccinated. translation: i'm not vaccinated, i was afraid of the vaccine. - i'll see after i get better. i want to get vaccinated. eu countries have started sending covid—19 drugs and equipment to treat patients here. but with around two—thirds of the country unvaccinated,
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and a fortnight of rising cases, some already warn of a fifth wave of the pandemic hitting romania even before this fourth one is under control. mark lobel, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 — including a big push towards electric vehicles. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035 — grants of £5,000 will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. an online citizen project is calling on the public to help search for extrasolar planets
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by examining five years worth of digital footage showing some of the brightest stars in the sky. the footage was captured on robotic telescopes by 12 planet hunters next—generation transit search. the telescopes will focus on discovering neptune—sized and smaller planets, with diameters between two and eight times that of earth. i'm joined by dr meg schwamb, an astronomer at queen's university belfast and the project leader. good to see you. there's a lot in the introduction that we need to explain and you other person to do it. tell us about the project and what you are hoping people will be able to help you achieve. we what you are hoping people will be able to help you achieve.— able to help you achieve. we are askin: able to help you achieve. we are asking people — able to help you achieve. we are asking people to _ able to help you achieve. we are asking people to go _ able to help you achieve. we are asking people to go to _ able to help you achieve. we are asking people to go to our- able to help you achieve. we are i asking people to go to our website and we are asking you to help sift through the from these telescopes, and it so computers have looked and analysed the data looking for the big dips in starlight that we think
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might be because of a planet transiting in front of its parent, so we are asking for people to look and help characterise whether this might be because of planets or other things that might mimic the signal from planets. it is things that might mimic the signal from planets-— from planets. it is almost looking for the absence _ from planets. it is almost looking for the absence of _ from planets. it is almost looking for the absence of something, . from planets. it is almost looking for the absence of something, so | for the absence of something, so where it has gone dark, that is the giveaway? where it has gone dark, that is the aiveawa ? , ., , where it has gone dark, that is the aiveawa ? , . , ., giveaway? yes, we are seeing that liuht giveaway? yes, we are seeing that li . ht di giveaway? yes, we are seeing that light dip into _ giveaway? yes, we are seeing that light dip into a _ giveaway? yes, we are seeing that light dip into a u-shaped _ giveaway? yes, we are seeing that light dip into a u-shaped dip, - giveaway? yes, we are seeing that light dip into a u-shaped dip, that| light dip into a u—shaped dip, that is characteristic of a planet, as it passesin is characteristic of a planet, as it passes in front of its star, so the computers have been searching through all of this data, coming up with these candidates, that might mean other false positives, with these candidates, that might mean otherfalse positives, other things which can give similar shapes, and so the team at the next generation is looking to the data with this small group of people but when you have lots of people looking at it you can actually outweigh expert opinions, and we think there
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might be something that could be missed in the initial small review, it depends how much cover you have had and how much sleep you have had the night before, so we have lots of people looking at it and we are hoping we might find some hidden gems which may not have been revealed the first time they look at the data. , ., , ., ., the data. five years worth of diuital the data. five years worth of digital footage _ the data. five years worth of digital footage and _ the data. five years worth of digital footage and what - the data. five years worth of digital footage and what has| digital footage and what has happened is a computer has been through all of this and then flagged up through all of this and then flagged up the bits that might be of interest and that is where you need the humans to get involved? exactly, askin: the humans to get involved? exactly, asking people — the humans to get involved? exactly, asking people to _ the humans to get involved? exactly, asking people to take _ the humans to get involved? exactly, asking people to take a _ the humans to get involved? exactly, asking people to take a look, - asking people to take a took, another set of bibles, small number of people, and so we want to know if there is something missing. by having everyone look to the data, we think there might be some missing worlds and that is the exciting part, you can go to the website and dive right in. part, you can go to the website and dive right in-— dive right in. missing worlds that we don't know— dive right in. missing worlds that we don't know about. _ dive right in. missing worlds that we don't know about. what - dive right in. missing worlds that we don't know about. what are l dive right in. missing worlds that i we don't know about. what are you hoping to find? what is the potential outcome of this? if someone is successful. fingers
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crossed we _ someone is successful. fingers crossed we will _ someone is successful. fingers crossed we will find _ someone is successful. fingers crossed we will find a - someone is successful. fingers crossed we will find a new - someone is successful. fingers i crossed we will find a new planet someone is successful. fingers - crossed we will find a new planet we did not know about before but even if we don't, we will be able to understand the completeness from the survey which tells us about the numbers and statistics for planets in our galaxy, so what are the typical server systems in our galaxy? is our solar system typical? we will find out how it fits in either way but fingers crossed we can find a couple of gems, it may be buried treasure in terms of finding a new planet that we did not know about before.— a new planet that we did not know about before. x' .,, i. about before. good luck. i hope your e es are about before. good luck. i hope your eyes are up — about before. good luck. i hope your eyes are up to _ about before. good luck. i hope your eyes are up to it- _ about before. good luck. i hope your eyes are up to it. thank _ about before. good luck. i hope your eyes are up to it. thank you - about before. good luck. i hope your eyes are up to it. thank you for- eyes are up to it. thank you for explaining all of that. really interesting. a man thought to have had the heaviest kidneys on record weighing more than five stone — has had surgery to remove them. warren higgs from windsor in berkshire suffers from polycystic kidney disease. the condition causes fluid—filled
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cysts to grow in the kidneys. it affects around one in 1000 people and there's no cure. our health correspondent katharine da costa has been following warren's story. it's crushing my lungs, so i struggle to breathe. he gasps this was warren higgs injune. every major organ was under intense strain. it's crushing my stomach, so i can't eat a solid meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease more than 20 years ago. it's caused a series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six to 12 months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side of the spine. warren's kidneys were covered in cysts, full of fluid, and took up his whole abdomen. he'd had enough. and he wanted the organs removed.
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the operation itself is dangerous, it's a 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it, i've got to do it because it's not a life, living on the sofa. surgeons discovered warren's kidneys weighed 35 kilograms, that's nearly five—and—a—half stone, making it a highly complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. this i think would be the reported heaviest kidneys that have been removed anywhere in the world. when everything is distorted and not in the right place, you run the risk of damaging other organs. you run the risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took that risk, and from struggling to breathe... ..to building back his strength. this is him three months after surgery. how are you feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe, i can eat little bits, definitely a lot better.
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how was that? hard. i smashed my record. he's dependent on dialysis three times a week, but he's hoping to be added to the transplant waiting list by the end of the year. it would mean everything. if i had a kidney, i would just be able to do anything, do all my sports. yes, i will have to take more tablets, but i'm free to get on with my life. that would be so amazing for me. really would. that report from our health correspondent katharine da costa. a field trip to learn about the grim realities of the first world war would traditionally involve a journey to the former battlefields of belgium or northern france. now you can stay a bit closer to home — thanks to a new history project in kent. fiona lamdin reports. it's over 100 metres long and two metres deep. it's a world war i replica,
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based on the trenches near ypres, built 100 years later in a forest in kent. and it's europe's only accurate outdoor replica, according to its designer, andy robertshaw, who's a military historian. his grandfatherjohn fought in the first world war. he was a private soldier between 1916 and 1919. wounded twice, gassed twice. i mean, if he died in the great war, i'm not here. and it's not his first. he built four trenches, including this one in his garden. on your ladders, boys! as well as a historian, he's also a hollywood film adviser, working with steven spielberg. whistle blows pipes play here he is in 2011, blowing the whistle in war horse. whistle blows now, it's for schools and the army to learn about the realities of war. and today, the trench is full of 11—year—old boys rehearsing their school play.
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it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been for them and it shows how strong they must have been to carry on, even in difficult times without their families. these pouches were to hold the ammunition. i each soldier could carry up to 150 rounds of ammunition. _ they also learn about food rationing and ammunition. just being cold and . terrifying straightaway from the start you're here. and the food wasn't great. you'd have to make it last. you've got tins of bully beef but i wouldn't eat| all that at one time. i'd make it last- as long as possible. 20 metres behind the front line, this was the officers' dugout deep underground. this was where they slept, where they played cards, this was the hub. the meals came in here, the ammunition, and this is how they contacted each other up and down the lines. everything came through here. and above ground, they've got ambitious plans, hoping to build a german trench the other side of no—man's land.
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400 koalas are to be vaccinated against chlamydia, as part of a trial that researchers say could play a significant role in the long term survival of one of australia's most beloved native species. sophia tran—thomson has this report. the australian koala foundation estimates there are less than 100,000 koalas left in the wild, and chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease, affects up to half the population. the disease, which can be spread from mothers to their newborns, can cause debilitating conjunctivitis, blindness, bladder infections and at times infertility. although chlamydia can sometimes be treated with antibiotics, researchers say preventing the spread of the disease is preferable to treating it. the animals will come in, go through their normal treatment processes, and just before the day
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they are ready to be released back into the wild, they will get a vaccine and microchip and afterwards we'll see how well it went. scientist call the vaccine a game changer. even if it can be 50—70% effective, it doesn't have to be 100% effective. no vaccines are 100%. that should make a big difference to the other half of the population. following australia's devastating bushfires in 2019, which are thought to have killed more than 60,000 koalas, protecting the native marsupials from disease is more crucial than ever. a 900—year—old sword that's thought to have belonged to a crusader knight has been found by an amateur diver off the coast of israel. though it was covered in marine life, the metre—long weapon was distinctive enough to be noticed as the sands shifted. officials say the sword will be put on display after it's been cleaned and restored.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello, good afternoon. 21 degrees in parts of essex and norfolk helped by sunshine but mainly because the winds have travelled over 1500 miles from the tropics to reach the uk and that is tropical maritime air. it has brought cloud and rain in places and turned a bit drier over many central and southern parts of scotland. this rain is developing across wales and western parts of england and that rain is going to move its way east overnight tonight, may be a few heavy bursts, but skies were clear after that, a couple of showers dotted about an heavy thundery ones arriving in the south—west and parts of wales late in the night. still quite mild across more southern parts of the uk but further north it will be a bit cooler. while we have these heavy thundery downpours
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running north and east over england and wales come up with sunshine following behind, still a couple of scattered showers especially in the south—west and rain arriving in the north of scotland. still quite mild tomorrow, the highest temperatures will be in east anglia and the south—east. by the time we get to thursday, continuing into friday, it will feel quite a bit colder, the wind direction is set to change, and before that happens, windy weather swings overnight across wednesday night and a cold front moves south, not much rain on it but after that moves down, the wind direction changes and we start to draw down airfrom changes and we start to draw down air from the arctic and the polar regions and it will feel a lot colder. the overnight rain clears away from the south and south—east and then sunshine to come on thursday, scattered showers in the north—west, a touch wintry over at higher parts of northern scotland, and it would be a windy day on thursday, gales around some north sea coasts combined with some high spring tides, and these other
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temperatures, 8—9 in northern scotland and 13 in southern parts of england and wales. quite in the wind. the cold air in place as we move into friday and we have the week ridge of high pressure building from the west and that will probably increase the cloud western areas. we hang onto a lot of dry and bright weather with some sunshine, and not as windy on friday. you won't feel as windy on friday. you won't feel as cold on friday but temperatures around 11—14 ? it won't. that is a bit cooler today than what we had yesterday.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 5pm — the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050, including a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works. grants of £5000 will be on offer to people in england and wales to replace their gas boilers with heat pumps as part of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the uk, but the green party call it misguided. to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it's inefficient, it's leaky and it's a waste of money. with ministers investing £620 million in grants for electric vehicles and street charging points, we ask whether this will be enough

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