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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 19, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050. ministers have described the measures as "simple and fair" and include plans for a big push towards electric vehicles. green is good. green is right. green works! homeowners in england and wales will get five thousand pounds to help them replace old gas boilers with low carbon alternatives — critics say the strategy lacks ambition to be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in it. it's inefficient, it's leaky, and it's a waste of money. we'll have the latest from westminster and from our environment a nalyst. also this lunchtime... an inquiry finds that child abuse allegations against the late
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labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated because of multiple failures by police and prosecutors. a devastating �*suspected' gas explosion in ayr destroys a house and leaves four people in hospital. the elder brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi leaves the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the inquiry into the attack and the man with kidneys weighing five stone — who's had life—changing surgery to remove them. and coming up on the bbc news channel, scotland are in action at the t20 world cup against papua new guinea as they aim to qualify for the super 12 stage.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the government has set out a road map for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050 which ministers claim will support nearly half a million jobs over the next few decades. the plans include millions of pounds to subsidise the cost of electric vehicles. the government also wants to end the sale of gas boilers by 2035. people in england and wales will be offered £5,000 grants from next year to replace their gas boilers with low carbon heat pumps. critics say it's not enough. boilers with low carbon heat pumps. here'sjon donnison. boilers with low carbon heat pumps. jamaat boilers with low carbon heat pumps. in chesterfielt being jamaat in chesterfield this morning being trained how to install heat pumps. being trained how to install heat um s. being trained how to install heat --ums. , ., , being trained how to install heat um s, , ., , , pumps. over the next few years, they can exect pumps. over the next few years, they can meet to — pumps. over the next few years, they can meet to be _ pumps. over the next few years, they can expect to be busy _ pumps. over the next few years, they can expect to be busy with _ pumps. over the next few years, they can expect to be busy with the - can expect to be busy with the government hoping gas burners can be phased out completely by 2035. heat pumps work by extracting wealth from
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the air, the ground or water. they are a bit like a fridge, operating in reverse and are powered by electricity. if in reverse and are powered by electricity-— in reverse and are powered by electrici . , ., ., ., . electricity. if you want to reduce carbon emissions _ electricity. if you want to reduce carbon emissions is _ electricity. if you want to reduce carbon emissions is probably - electricity. if you want to reduce | carbon emissions is probably one electricity. if you want to reduce . carbon emissions is probably one of the simplest and quickest ways to reduce that. similar to an electric car. but in terms of running costs, even though they are more expensive to purchase, you can get immediate savings from having them. this to purchase, you can get immediate savings from having them.— savings from having them. this is where the actual— savings from having them. this is where the actual hardware - savings from having them. this is where the actual hardware is - where the actual hardware is located~ _ where the actual hardware is located. . . ., where the actual hardware is located. . . , ., ., ., located. richard installed a heat . um . located. richard installed a heat -um- in located. richard installed a heat pump in his _ located. richard installed a heat pump in his house _ located. richard installed a heat pump in his house seven - located. richard installed a heat pump in his house seven years | located. richard installed a heat - pump in his house seven years ago. i can safely say it's the best thing we ever— can safely say it's the best thing we ever did, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling — at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot _ at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot but it is very livable. and from — boiling hot but it is very livable. and from next april people will be able to apply for a £5,000 grant to help them pay to replace an existing gas boiler with a heat pump. it is part of a £450,000,000 package announced by the government. but thatis announced by the government. but that is only enough to cover a maximum of 90,000 pumps. while there
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are around 25,000,000 gas boilers in uk homes. it’s are around 25,000,000 gas boilers in uk homes. �* , ~ ., are around 25,000,000 gas boilers in uk homes. 3 ~ ., ., , uk homes. it's like we are only 1,500 uk homes. it's like we are only 1500 metre — uk homes. it's like we are only 1,500 metre race _ uk homes. it's like we are only 1,500 metre race but _ uk homes. it's like we are only 1,500 metre race but are - uk homes. it's like we are only i 1,500 metre race but are deciding uk homes. it's like we are only - 1,500 metre race but are deciding to work the first lap and there is no way you can catch up in the next two laps because she set up so slowly. the government ought to be doing more quickly, even if the direction of travel isn't the right direction. a £5,000 grant still falls considerably short of the cost of installing more heat pumps which can cause more than double that. for some cause more than double that. igrr' some consumers it will play a strong consent of, having the cost of installation for them but for low households it would be quite negative, it's still a big jump for them to make. negative, it's still a big “ump for them to makefi negative, it's still a big “ump for them to make.�* negative, it's still a big “ump for them to make. �* , , , them to make. then there's the issue of insulation- — them to make. then there's the issue of insulation. this _ them to make. then there's the issue of insulation. this thermal— them to make. then there's the issue of insulation. this thermal imaging i of insulation. this thermal imaging camera can be used to show how badly insulated some of our homes remain. which some say is a big problem if we are converting to heat pumps. to we are converting to heat pumps. trr be honest, having heat pumps in a home that is poorly insulated is like buying a teapot with cracks in
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it. it is an efficient, it is leaky and a waste of money so perhaps looking alongside this heat pump strategy we should have had a comprehensive local authority led street by street insulation programme that many of us have been calling for four years.— calling for four years. speaking alonuside calling for four years. speaking alongside business _ calling for four years. speaking alongside business leaders - calling for four years. speaking alongside business leaders at l calling for four years. speaking i alongside business leaders at the global investment summit in london today, the upcoming uk them un climate summit in glasgow, the prime minister said the uk was leading the way on green issues. the minister said the uk was leading the way on green issues.— way on green issues. the market is auoin way on green issues. the market is going green. _ way on green issues. the market is going green. peeple _ way on green issues. the market is going green, people know- way on green issues. the market is going green, people know that - way on green issues. the market is going green, people know that we | going green, people know that we have the technological solutions to these problems and they want to go green and they know that will be able one day to bring down the prices of green technology, heat pumps and solar panels in a way that me so rapidly made microwaves and mobile phones affordable. the prime minister later— mobile phones affordable. the prime minister later announced _ mobile phones affordable. the prime minister later announced a _ minister later announced a £400,000,000 partnership with the microsoft co—founder bill gates to help make green technology more affordable. jon donnison, bbc news.
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let's speak to our energy and environment analyst roger harrabin. in the house of commons in the last few minutes, the government has set out more details about its strategy for fighting climate change? out more details about its strategy forfighting climate change? in out more details about its strategy for fighting climate change? in the for fighting climate change? in the next few weeks, _ for fighting climate change? in the next few weeks, boris _ for fighting climate change? in the next few weeks, boris johnson - for fighting climate change? in the next few weeks, boris johnson is l next few weeks, borisjohnson is going to be next few weeks, boris johnson is going to be welcoming world leaders to glasgow to the well �*s most important climate summit this year. the government, the uk government has set a very aggressive targets for cutting emissions and it meant needs to show how it is going to meet those targets and the document today covers the entire economy and it shows how carbon emissions are going to be cut from every point in the economy. of course, critics will say it does not grow strongly enough, but i have to say that this looks to me like the most advanced planning for many major nation towards how we will actually get around to achieving the emissions cuts that are being so bravely promised. roger, thank you. 0ur political correspondent
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chris mason is at westminster. chris, all of this just ahead of the crucial cop26 summit on climate change, which britain is hosting? good afternoon. it absolutely is. politically and diplomatically it matters for the government and boris johnson. hosting that summit, world leaders heading to glasgow for the skagit shindig, trying to nail down global promises as far as cutting emissions are concerned. in this document here, published in the last 30 minutes, as we heard from roger, a sense of how you turn those big promises into reality. crucially, how you take people with you, how the government tempts people to change behaviour and change behaviour pretty quickly. and what is striking when you look at some of the language being used is how the government attempts to do that. they talk about the net zero strategy,,
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taking the slogan about building back better and adding a slash of green paint to it and the other mission of the government, talking about wanting to level up and help out communities that feel they have been left behind, the prime minister saying in the foreword to this document that going green is turning a mission into the greatest opportunity ofjobs and prosperity for our country since the industrial revolution so the pitches this could work economically as well as environmentally. the hope of course is that lots of people are willing to change behaviour with the kind of incentives the government is providing the potential for huge cost for the taxpayer, households, as well as the accompanying pfaff of changing our livelihoods pretty quickly. chris, thank you. an inquiry has found that "multiple failures" by police, prosecutors and council officials meant that child abuse allegations against the late labour peer lord janner were not properly investigated. lord janner died in 2015,
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facing criminal charges spanning three decades and relating to nine people who had been in children's homes. he always denied any involvement. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds is in central london. bring us up to date. that death of lord janner _ bring us up to date. that death of lord janner in _ bring us up to date. that death of lord janner in 2015 _ bring us up to date. that death of lord janner in 2015 meant - bring us up to date. that death of lord janner in 2015 meant there i bring us up to date. that death of i lord janner in 2015 meant there was no justice for people who made allegations against him. a number which reached 33 by the time he died. also nojustice for him because he had no opportunity in court to defend himself. by the time charges were levelled against him he was suffering from dementia. this inquiry was not to find out whether he is guilty of child abuse but whether those investigations never led to prosecutions earlier. it found really that generally, the people who made the allegations had beenin people who made the allegations had been in care homes and were not believed or taken seriously because they were not really interested in
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what they were saying. there was also something of a culture of deference towards the leicester mp. more specifically, the inquiry found in 2,000, there was a key moment, a police officerfailed to in 2,000, there was a key moment, a police officer failed to pass two early statements alleging abuse by lord janner to prosecutors, the inquiry says that was serious and inexcusable. in 2006, prosecutors decided not to continue investigations, gave advice to the police to that effect, the inquiry said that was unsound and strategically flawed. and that the complainant, the people who made the allegations were failed by these investigations. the family of lord janner and stressed today this inquiry report has no suggestion of his guilt and that he remains to his dying day, someone who denied he was involved in child abuse. they say he was a victim of institutional failings because he was not able to have his day in court either. tom, thank you.
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two children and two adults are in hospital after a suspected gas explosion destroyed a house in ayr last night. police say four homes were caught up in the blast which was heard several miles away, and neighbouring properties have been evacuated. 0ur scotland correspondent jamie mcivor is at the scene. joe, it is a scene of some devastation today.- joe, it is a scene of some devastation today. joe, it is a scene of some devastation toda . ., , . devastation today. that is correct, or through — devastation today. that is correct, or through the _ devastation today. that is correct, or through the morning _ devastation today. that is correct, or through the morning residents l or through the morning residents have been gathering here and sharing their shock at the explosion last night. many have been telling me how they felt the impact of the blast inside their own home for perhaps ornaments rattles or they felt some of the rubble falling and crashing around. in the past hour, the police confirmed all four of the injured from the same family. a couple and their two children and they are all in hospital in glasgow.
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0ne home destroyed, and debris holder because this acquired housing estate. the explosion so loud it was heard miles away. neighbours rushing to see what had happened. there heard miles away. neighbours rushing to see what had happened.— to see what had happened. there was a kid with his — to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg _ to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg trapped. _ to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg trapped. two - to see what had happened. there was a kid with his leg trapped. two guys i a kid with his leg trapped. two guys trying _ a kid with his leg trapped. two guys trying to help the kid. i helped a little _ trying to help the kid. i helped a little bit — trying to help the kid. i helped a little bit as well, to steady him a little _ little bit as well, to steady him a little bit — little bit as well, to steady him a little bit. another guy ran in. a little _ little bit. another guy ran in. a little bit — little bit. another guy ran in. a little bit closer. you could see there — little bit closer. you could see there is — little bit closer. you could see there is a _ little bit closer. you could see there is a crack in the house. the blast there is a crack in the house. tue blast happened there is a crack in the house. tte blast happened at there is a crack in the house. "ttj: blast happened at 7pm there is a crack in the house. ttj: blast happened at 7pm last there is a crack in the house. t“tj: blast happened at 7pm last night, two adults and two children taken to hospital, eye witnesses describing flames shooting into the air. aha, flames shooting into the air. a family affair four flames shooting into the air. a family affairfourtaken flames shooting into the air. a family affair four taken to hospital, 33 —year—old woman, 16 wear-old — hospital, 33 —year—old woman, 16 —year—old boy in glasgow royal infirmary, — —year—old boy in glasgow royal infirmary, a 37 —year—old man in the queen— infirmary, a 37 —year—old man in the queen elizabeth university hospital. an —year—old boy in the royal hospital— an —year—old boy in the royal hospital for sick children. this morning. _ hospital for sick children. this morning, supplies _ hospital for sick children. “tt 3 morning, supplies were delivered to help those who had to leave their home, 90 spent the night of messengers, the local council says some may not be able to go back to
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their homes for several days. investigations are continuing to try and establish the cause of the explosion. police and fire and rescue are carrying out a joint investigation. scottish gas networks engineers have also been at the site but there is no confirmation yet that whether or not this was a gas explosion. still, ithink that whether or not this was a gas explosion. still, i think the point here today is one of shock, there is that sense of so much about lying around, so much debris on the ground here, that while people's thoughts are with the injured, it could still have been so much worse. jamie, thank you. the elder brother of the manchester arena suicide bomber has left the uk after being ordered to appear this week at the public inquiry into the attack. ismail abedi has always refused to answer questions from the inquiry in case he incriminates himself. 0ur correspondentjudith moritz is in manchester. judith, bring us up to date.
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the manchester arena inquiry has just begun its phase of examining by salman abedi carried out his attack and how he was radicalised and is part of that, it wants to speak to his family, friends and associates. in the wake of the bombing, his elder brother ismail abedi was one of those who was arrested, found to possess extremist propaganda but he was never charged with any offence. he and fellow �*s parents refused to co—operate the inquiry. bbc news tracked down ismail abedi last year, we found him living in manchester and at the time greater manchester police said the investigation was continuing and they were still seeking to speak to him. we were expecting ismail abedi to come and give evidence here at court this week. this morning, we were told that he has left the country, it is not known when he will return. and if he does not appear to give
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evidence, having been issued with a court order by the way to compel him to do so, if he does not appear, the public may inferfrom to do so, if he does not appear, the public may infer from that that he has something to hide. some of the bereaved families have told us today that they are extremely angry that ismail abedi has been able to go abroad. there is another witness who is also going to be compelled to appear here this week, a friend of selma abedi, ahmed taghdi, a childhood friend who was found trying to be the country last night, he was arrested, now in custody. he will be brought here to give evidence later this week. judith, thank you. government plans that could see mps face by—elections if they are suspended for sexual harassment or bullying are being debated in the commons this afternoon. it follows a controversy over the backbench mp rob roberts. he was suspended from parliament for six weeks in may for sexual misconduct. a loophole meant he didn't face a petition that could trigger a by—election. labour says the measures should also
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apply retrospectively. a former soldier who was on trial in belfast over a fatal shooting during the troubles has died after contracting covid. dennis hutchings, who was 80, had been charged with the attempted murder ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 197a. his lawyers had tried to have the case against him thrown out because of his poor health. let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page in belfast. and prosecutors have been defending the decision to bring charges against dennis hutchings? yes, that's right, ben. the prosecution of dennis hutchings has been a high—profile and controversial case here. dennis hutchings was 80 years old, he was from cornwall, former member of the lifeguards regiment, and he was charged with attempted murder over
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the killing ofjohn pat cunningham in county tyrone in 197a. john pat cunningham was 2a, he had learning difficulties and he was shot in the back as he was running away from an army patrol. mr hutchings had been on trial in belfast high court for the last couple of weeks, he had been suffering from chronic kidney disease and heart failure and yesterday the trial was adjourned because the court heard that dennis hutchings had tested positive for covid—19, and he died in a hospital here in belfast yesterday afternoon. unionist politicians have said that he should not have been prosecuted in the first place, for example, the leader of the democratic unionist party, sirjeffrey donaldson, has said serious questions must be answered. but the public prosecution service have said that prosecuting miss to hutchings was in the public interest and that there was new evidence available to the court. john pat cunningham's family have
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said that in due course they will set out their response to the issues around the prosecution of dennis hutchings but they want to respectfully remind, they say, the public of the facts of the case which were not contested during the trial. so, a deeply personal story but also one that will play into the politics of legacy issues in northern ireland. the government currently has plans to scrap all prosecutions, all civil court cases, related to the conflict, and those plans are opposed by many victims' groups and all the main political parties in devolved government at stormont. , ., j ., , stormont. chris page, in belfast, thank you- _ police investigating the killing of sir david amess have been gathering cctv from shops and businesses near the home of his alleged killer. cctv footage from a convenience store in highgate road, north london, obtained by the bbc, shows a man believed to be the main suspect in the case walking down gordon house road, in the direction gospel 0ak 0verground station.
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25—year—old ali harbi ali is being held under the terrorism act and officers have until friday to question him. our top story this lunchtime... the government sets out its plans for cutting carbon emissions to zero by 2050, which include plans for a big push towards electric vehicles. and coming up — keeping history alive, we meet the man who has recreated a 100 metre stretch of first world war trenches in kent. coming of first world war trenches in kent. up on the bbc manchester coming up on the bbc news channel... manchester city take on bruges in the champions league. they are third in their group after losing to paris saint—germain last time out. a man thought to have had
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the heaviest kidneys on record, weighing more than five stone, has had surgery to remove them. warren higgs from windsor in berkshire suffers from polycystic kidney disease. the condition causes fluid—filled cysts to grow in the kidneys. it affects around one in 1,000 people and there's no cure. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa has been following warren's story. it's crushing my lungs, so i struggle to breathe. he gasps. this was warren higgs injune. every major organ was under intense strain. it's crushing my stomach, so i can't eat a solid meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease more than 20 years ago. it's caused a series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six to 12 months. you can see here a normal set of
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kidneys on either side of the spine. warren's kidneys were covered in cysts, full of fluid, and took up his whole abdomen. he'd had enough. and he wanted the organs removed. the operation itself is dangerous, it's a 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it, i've got to do it because it's not a life, living on the sofa. surgeons discovered warren's kidneys weighed 35 kilograms, that's nearly five—and—a—half stone, making it a highly complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. this i think would be the reported heaviest kidneys that have been removed anywhere in the world. when everything is distorted and not in the right place, you run the risk of damaging other organs. you run the risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took that risk, and from struggling to breathe... ..to building back his strength. this is him three months after surgery. how are you feeling?
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a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe, i can eat little bits, definitely a lot better. how was that? hard. i smashed my record. he's dependent on dialysis three times a week, but he's hoping to be added to the transplant waiting list by the end of the year. it would mean everything. if i had a kidney, i would just be able to do anything, do all my sports. yes, i will have to take more tablets, but i'm free to get on with my life. that would be so amazing for me. really would. that report from our health correspondent, katharine da costa. meanwhile, the european union is sending emergency coronavirus aid to romania, which according to one estimate is recording one of the highest number of covid deaths per million people in the world. its intensive care units are full and some patients
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are being transferred for treatment into neighbouring hungary. mark lobel reports. inside romania's overwhelmed intensive care units. a country in a covid critical condition. 0utside some hospitals, medical staff make space. romania's vaccination campaign chief says the eastern european country is experiencing the same scenario italy's lombardy region suffered last year. patients pile up in this hospital corridor waiting for treatment. volunteers are stepping up. translation: i don't know whether i will resist - the fourth wave entirely, whether i will have the energy to do it. this wave is terrible, the most severe one. things are so full here, romania is now transferring some of its covid—19 patients to neighbouring hungary. translation: we notice a daily average of approximately - 15,000 infected people. we have a daily average
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unfortunately of 300 deaths. one major reason for all this, romania has the second lowest vaccination rate in the eu. translation: some 90%| of the hospitalised patients are not vaccinated. translation: i'm not vaccinated, i was afraid of the vaccine. - i'll see after i get better. i want to get vaccinated. eu countries have started sending covid—19 drugs and equipment to treat patients here. but with around two—thirds of the country unvaccinated, and a fortnight of rising cases, some already warn of a fifth wave of the pandemic hitting romania even before this fourth one is under control. mark lobel, bbc news. a leading government scientific adviser says the covid booster in the uk programme must be accelarated.
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programme in the uk must be accelarated. covid cases in the uk are at their highest level for almost three months. professor neil ferguson says immunity is waning. 0ur health correspondentjim reed is here, and neil ferguson says that having been a world leader in vaccinations, we're now falling behind. that's right. professor ferguson was part of the team whose data was very influential in convincing ministers to go ahead with the first lockdown last year. he has been speaking this morning about these third poster jabs for the over—50s, saying they need to be accelerated, and there is a good reason for that. if we look at this chart of daily cases across the uk, you can see on the right—hand side it has been rising across the uk, except really in scotland, a number of reasons for that, more mixing, particularly inside, we are still seeing the highest rates of infection in secondary school age children. and in england, there has been some criticism about the speed of the vaccine roll—out for that school age group. in the last hour or so, we
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have been told that rather than just giving jabs in school, children in england will soon be able to sign up as normal through the same online booking portal as adults, which is what some people had been calling for. that is already the case in scotland, and in the last couple of hours, they've issued new guidance for mask wearing as well for pupils in scotland, saying they should continue to wear masks in school in scotland for the time being. so, that's cases. if we look at hospitalisations, the number of admissions, you can see it is still relatively flat, and that's because the vaccine has continued to do its job. most hospitalisations are in the over—70s, which is why urc and that call from professor ferguson and others today saying we need to get ahead with the poster campaign for that group. jim reed, thank you. tesco has opened its first supermarket in the uk without any checkouts. cameras and weight sensors will work out which items customers have
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picked up from the store in central london, then bill them through the company's app. the new format follows similar stores opened in london by amazon. a field trip to learn about the grim realities of the first world war would traditionally involve a journey to the former battlefields of belgium or northern france. now, you can stay a bit closer to home thanks to a new history project in kent. fiona lamdin reports. it's over 100 metres long and two metres deep. it's a world war i replica, based on the trenches near ypres, built 100 years later in a forest in kent. and it's europe's only accurate outdoor replica, according to its designer, andy robertshaw, who's a military historian. his grandfatherjohn fought in the first world war. he was a private soldier between 1916 and 1919. wounded twice, gassed twice.
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i mean, if he died in the great war, i'm not here. and it's not his first. he built four trenches, including this one in his garden. on your ladders, boy! on your ladders, boys! as well as a historian, he's also a hollywood film adviser, working with steven spielberg. whistle blows. pipes play. here he is in 2011, blowing the whistle in war horse. whistle blows. now, it's for schools and the army to learn about the realities of war. and today, the trench is full of 11—year—old boys rehearsing their school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been for them and it shows how strong they must have been to carry on, even in difficult times without their families. these pouches were to hold the ammunition. i each soldier could carry up to 150 rounds of ammunition. _ they also learn about food rationing and ammunition. just being cold and . terrifying straightaway from the start you're here.
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and the food wasn't great. you'd have to make it last. you've got tins of bully beef but i wouldn't eat| all that at one time. i'd make it last- as long as possible. 20 metres behind the front line, this was the officers' dugout deep underground. this was where they slept, where they played cards, this was the hub. the meals came in here, the ammunition, and this is how they contacted each other up and down the lines. everything came through here. and above ground, they've got ambitious plans, hoping to build a german trench the other side of no—man's land. scotland s cricketers are back in action at the t20 world cup in oman today. after an excellent win against bangladesh at a victory today against papua new guinea would put them in a strong position to qualify
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for the main tournament. batting first, they made 165 runs with richie berrington top scoring with 70. a short time ago, in reply, papua new guinea were 46 for 5. a 900—year—old sword that's thought to have belonged to a crusader knight has been found by an amateur diver off the coast of israel. though it was covered in marine life, the metre—long weapon was distinctive enough to be noticed as the sands shifted. officials say the sword will be put on display after it's been cleaned and restored. time for a look at the weather. here's darren bett. hello. a lot of cloud heading our way today, and a bit of rain in the airas way today, and a bit of rain in the air as well, that's because the air has travelled over 1500 miles to get to the uk, coming all the way from the tropics, picking up all that moisture on the way, but bringing some warmth. where we are getting some warmth. where we are getting some sunshine across parts of the
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south—east, temperatures are more

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