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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 19, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. an end to new gas boilers within 15 years under the government's green energy plans for england and wales. the prime minister says, don't expect the green police to kick your door down. instead ministers want us to use a heat pumps like this and they're offering grants to help us buy them, but is it enough? a major explosion shakes a housing estate in ayr. two adults and two children are in hospital. after mps pay tribute to sir david amess, more discussions on what can be done to keep politicians safe. england are hit with a stadium ban by uefa.
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at least one match will be played behind closed doors after ticketless fans stormed the turnstiles at last summer's euros final. keeping history alive — we meet the man who's re—created a 100 metre stretch of first world war trenches. it isa it is a fairly cloudy and murky day ahead with many of us seeing some rain, but it will be unseasonably mild and where we see the sunshine in the south—east later, it could hit 21 degrees. i will have the details coming up. it's tuesday the 19th of october. the prime minister has said the government's plan to phase out gas boilers will not be enforced with green shirts armed with sandals and carrots. he wrote the comments in a newspaper article promoting the sale —— the end of sale of new gas
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boilers. ministers have announced cash incentives to encourage the switch to greener forms of home heating. £450 million will be spent on the boiler upgrade scheme, which will run for three years. but critics say the scheme is unambitious as the grants amount tojust 90,000 replaced boilers. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has more details on this. it came down there, into that corner. there is a secret lying under richard's garden. the heat for his home is absorbed by an underground network of pipes. it comes in through a ground source pump. so, this is where the actual hardware is located. richard swapped his gas guzzling system seven years ago, and he hasn't looked back. i can safely say it's been the best thing we ever did. i mean, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot, but it's very livable. and the economics of it are just fantastic. we paid 15,000 for the ground source and then 5000 for some solar thermal
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panels for the roof, which supply the hot water. to make a ground source pump work you need a massive garden, which is a pipe dream for most of us. the other type of heat pump works by compressing heat from the air. it's cheaper to install and smaller, but most homes will still need loads of insulation first. then we'll go through and see some of the equipment we've got set up. david spends his time researching heating efficiency and says although the money sounds like a lot, it won't go far. what we are being left with is a gamble on the future, that these things are going to be cheaper and that the industry are going to be more ready to install them, and, crucially, that people are going to want them. do you think this is going to be enough to convince people with gas boilers to make the switch? perhaps not yet. one of the problem is that they're going to face here is getting that connection with people and householders, to make sure the policy actually works and it's something people are happy to take on. because each home is different,
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getting 86% of households off gas is a monumental challenge. despite promises, this strategy will only begin to scratch the surface. coletta smith, bbc news, harrogate. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. good morning. serious ambition from the government but the prime minister's choice of a language is slightly unusual.— minister's choice of a language is sliahtl unusual. , ., slightly unusual. yes, good morning. it is classic boris _ slightly unusual. yes, good morning. it is classic boris johnson _ slightly unusual. yes, good morning. it is classic boris johnson flourish - it is classic borisjohnson flourish with the rhetoric and language this morning. here is the article he has written in the sun newspaper. as you mentioned in the headlines, the boiler police are not going to kick your door in with their sandal clad feet and sees at character point to your trusty old combi. —— sees at carrot point. we have a big summit coming up in glasgow, cop26, and a
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little bit, so it is how on earth to take people with you as a government when you have made a massive promises about getting to net zero carbon emissions by 2050. all sorts of ideas including changing how we heat our homes. how do you do it so it doesn't cost people of fortune and it isn't hugely inconvenient and it doesn't cripple the economy. boris johnson's it doesn't cripple the economy. borisjohnson�*s idea is that you can recharge the economy in a green way which will create lots of newjobs and help meet the targets. the essence of what he's trying to do in this article, and you will see it over and over again in the coming weeks of the gathering of world leaders in glasgow, is to ensure that this is not seen as some sort of elite project that the rich can afford but that all of us can be willing to sign up to because it is worth it for the planet and for our wallets. that is the argument going on here. . ~ wallets. that is the argument going on here. ., ~ ,, wallets. that is the argument going on here. . ~' ,, ,
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wallets. that is the argument going on here. ., ~ ,, , . , on here. thank you very much, chris. sor , we on here. thank you very much, chris. sorry. we just — on here. thank you very much, chris. sorry, we just have _ on here. thank you very much, chris. sorry, we just have to _ on here. thank you very much, chris. sorry, we just have to stare - on here. thank you very much, chris. sorry, we just have to stare at - on here. thank you very much, chris. sorry, we just have to stare at you i sorry, we just have to stare at you for a bit! we have got rid of you now. four people have been taken to hospital after an explosion at a house in ayr. the two adults and two children were injured in a blast which was heard and felt for miles around. katie hunter has more. emergency services were called to the kincaidston area of ayrjust after seven o'clock. the blast in gorse park appears to have destroyed one house and damaged others nearby. dozens of people were forced to leave their homes. they gathered in a nearby school and community centre. just outside my house there were sort of broken roof tiles. we walked up to where the houses have been blown away, and it wasjust, it was horrendous, it was like something from a movie set. it was just quite overwhelming. an air ambulance arrived at the scene a short time after the explosion along with several ambulances, fire engines and police cars.
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we have about 50 families who are in the centres, working the way through, we are dealing with them. the council's response has been excellent. the partners' response has been excellent. the police, the fire service are here on time, very, very quickly. and all the professionals have done a wonderfuljob here. and the community have rallied round, which is absolutely wonderful. a large area around the blast remained sealed off overnight. gas engineers have been working with the emergency services to make sure the area is safe. katie hunter, bbc news. four people have been taken to hospital after the daughters of two men who died following covid outbreaks in their care homes begin a legal case against the government today. the high court hearing will examine policies such as sending elderly and disabled patients back from hospitals without suitable plans for testing or isolation. the government says it specifically sought to safeguard care homes and their residents. jon donnison has this report.
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michael gibson was 88 when he died in a care home in april last year from suspected covid—19. his daughter cathy was only able to say goodbye to him through a window. the family is now part of a landmark legal challenge that will argue the government's failure to protect thousands of care home residents during the first wave of the pandemic was unlawful. at the same time that we'd all been told to stay at home, to not see anybody, to keep ourselves safe, the most vulnerable in society who were just in a larger home were left notjust unprotected but put at risk. the case will likely focus on the policy of clearing space in nhs hospitals, by discharging some patients into care homes initially without them being tested for coronavirus. at the time, the government defended its action. so, right from the start, we've tried to throw a protective ring around our care homes.
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that view will now be challenged at the high court. during the first three months of the pandemic, more than 111,000 people in care homes in england and wales died from coronavirus. the outcome of this case could affect thousands of families. jon donnison, bbc news. the department for health and social care have told us: "we worked tirelessly to protect the public from the threat to life and health posed by the pandemic and specifically sought to safeguard care homes and their residents, providing billions of pounds to support the sector, free ppe, additional testing and priority vaccinations." we will take a more detailed look at that story later in the programme. a former british army soldier, who was standing trial over a fatal shooting during northern ireland's troubles, has died. dennis hutchings had denied attempting to murder john pat cunningham in county tyrone in 197a. the trial was adjourned last week after the 80—year—old, from cornwall, fell ill. he later tested positive for covid
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and died in a belfast hospital. donald trump has filed a case against the congressional committee which is investigating the attack by his supporters on the capitol building in january. the lawsuit is an effort to keep records from his presidency secret. he claims the material is covered by executive privilege, which protects the confidentiality of some white house documents. the rapper ka nye the rapper kanye west has formally changed his name. he is now called ye. he made the application to a los angeles court in august and he has just been given the green light. the 44—year—old has long used the nickname ye and it was the title of an album he released in 2018. ye! i wonder what carroll makes of all of
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this? ., ., �* ., ., ., this? you haven't made a change to our this? you haven't made a change to your name — this? you haven't made a change to your name this _ this? you haven't made a change to your name this morning? _ no, iam no, i am still carol, that will be topical soon! no, i am still carol, that will be topicalsoon! it no, i am still carol, that will be topical soon! it is a mild start to the day, if you haven't stepped outside, it is double figures. in london it is 17 degrees. to date will be cloudy for many, it will be murky, rain around and fog mixed in with the rain. we have the dregs of some rain which will clear the south—east and then heavier rain coming in across northern ireland, wales, south—west england and it will push into northern england and scotland. some could prove to be said to be in nature, breezy as well but it should brighten up in the southeastern corner. we will see some temperatures up to 21 degrees. despite the cloud, it is still going to be mild for the time of year
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wherever you are. normally it is 12 to 15 degrees north to south as an average. through the evening and overnight to get the rain into the south—east corner followed by showers across the south—west. gusty winds in the english channel and further showers in the north—west which could be heavy and thundery. it will be a mild night, our overnight lows more reminiscent of our afternoon maximum temperatures at this stage in october. we say goodbye to the rain tomorrow, then a lot of showers crossing england and wales, in between bright skies and sunshine. more showers coming into the south—west, more rain coming in across the far north—west. this is a weather front, across the far north—west. this is a weatherfront, not across the far north—west. this is a weather front, not so across the far north—west. this is a weatherfront, not so much across the far north—west. this is a weather front, not so much on wednesday were into thursday, that sinks south and will bring much colder air with.— sinks south and will bring much colder air with. you are right about the name change, _ colder air with. you are right about the name change, if _ colder air with. you are right about the name change, if you _ colder air with. you are right about the name change, if you change i
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colder air with. you are right about l the name change, if you change your name, carol's carols, that is an institution. sally's carols doesn't sound right. we institution. sally's carols doesn't sound right-— sound right. we can always have matt's maps- — sound right. we can always have matt's maps- i — sound right. we can always have matt's maps. i would _ sound right. we can always have matt's maps. i would suggest i sound right. we can always have i matt's maps. i would suggest that sound right. we can always have - matt's maps. i would suggest that to the boss! not — matt's maps. i would suggest that to the boss! not sure _ matt's maps. i would suggest that to the boss! not sure that _ matt's maps. i would suggest that to the boss! not sure that will- matt's maps. i would suggest that to the boss! not sure that will go - matt's maps. i would suggest that to the boss! not sure that will go down| the boss! not sure that will go down well! appreciate your time. we often talk about the amazing things achieved by our nhs doctors. well, this next story is truly extraordinary. it's about a man, warren higgs, whose diseased kidneys weighed a total of five and a half stone. they've now been removed in a record—breaking operation by a team from oxford university hospitals. 0ur health correspondent katherine da costa reports on the difference it has made to warren's life. it's crushing my lungs, so i struggle to breathe. this was warren higgs injune. every major organ was
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under intense strain. it's crushing my stomach, so i can't eat a solid meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease more than 20 years ago. it's caused a series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six to 12 months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side of the spine. warren's kidneys were covered in cysts, full of fluid, and took up his whole abdomen. he'd had enough. and wanted the organs removed. the operation itself is dangerous, it's a 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it, i've got to do it because it's not a life, living on the sofa. surgeons discovered warren's kidneys weighed 35 kilograms, that's nearly five and a half stone. making it a highly complex operation. i've never seen anything
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as big as this. this i think would be the reported heaviest kidneys that have been removed anywhere in the world. when everything is distorted and not in the right place, you run the risk of damaging other organs. you run the risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took that risk, and from struggling to breathe to building back his strength. this is him three months after surgery. how are you feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe, i can eat little bits, definitely a lot better. i get a lot out of here. it's not only a health thing, it's a mental thing as well. this was a big part of my old life. warren is still learning to adjust, having lost 45 kilos almost overnight, losing his balance can still be a problem. it's weird for me to get around, the fact that i can hold this, i can feel it's 5k. but the fact that i had 45 kilos in front of me,
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it's hard for me to grasp. step—by—step, warren is determined to get his life back on track. how was that? hard. that must be my record. he dependent on dialysis three times a week, but he's hoping to be added but he's hoping to be added to the transplant waiting list by the end of the year. it would mean everything. if i had a kidney, i would just be able to do anything, do all my sports. yes, i will have to take more tablets but i'm free to get on with my life. that will be so amazing for me. really would. incredible story there from catherine. 16 minutes past six. let's take a look at some of today's papers. the metro leads with a call from mps to end "online hatred", as they gathered yesterday to remember theirfriend and colleague sir david amess. 0ne mp has called for "david's law", which would seek to end online
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anonymity for social media users. the telegraph criticises the government's plan to provide £5,000 vouchers towards the cost of replacing gas boilers with heat pumps, pointing out that the money allocated will cover just 90,000 homes. it quotes a government source saying the scheme is designed to "kick—start" demand. the guardian's front page carries a warning from the government that the next few months are set to be challenging, as uk coronavirus cases reach close to 50,000 in a single day — the highest level since mid—july. and the daily star laments a new shortage in the uk supply chain. "now we've run out of nigels" is the headline, in reference to the fact that not a single new baby was named nigel in the last year. there is a picture of nigel havens! we're also running perilously low on gordons, carols and jonathans. i have got a bit more detail on that. do you know, there are more
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children called lucifer last year than nigel. children called lucifer last year than nigel-— than nigel. who is calling their baby lucifer? _ than nigel. who is calling their baby lucifer? probably - than nigel. who is calling their i baby lucifer? probably someone than nigel. who is calling their - baby lucifer? probably someone who is unaware of — baby lucifer? probably someone who is unaware of the _ baby lucifer? probably someone who is unaware of the historical— is unaware of the historical significance! apparently there are no satans which is good news. that is not kind- — no satans which is good news. that is not kind. top _ no satans which is good news. that is not kind. top of _ no satans which is good news. trust is not kind. top of the list... if anyone has got school—age children, you will know these. 0liver anyone has got school—age children, you will know these. oliver is the number—1 boys name. 0livia is the girls, followed by amelia, there are eight of them in our kids class. ava, mia, ivey, lily, isabella, sophia. 0liver, george, arthur, noah, mohammed, archie and jack. i know several of them. ida noah, mohammed, archie and jack. i know several of them.— know several of them. no nigels. what were _ know several of them. no nigels. what were your _ know several of them. no nigels. what were your parents _ know several of them. no nigels. what were your parents going - know several of them. no nigels. what were your parents going to l know several of them. no nigels. i what were your parents going to call you before sally?— what were your parents going to call you before sally? timothy. obviously didn't no to you before sally? timothy. obviously didn't go to plan _ you before sally? timothy. obviously didn't go to plan. they _ you before sally? timothy. obviously didn't go to plan. they were - didn't go to plan. they were expecting a boy. i'm from lots of
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boysin expecting a boy. i'm from lots of boys in the family, very rare to have a girl. i boys in the family, very rare to have a girl-— have a girl. i was going to be geraint. have a girl. i was going to be geraint- my _ have a girl. i was going to be geraint. my mother - have a girl. i was going to be geraint. my mother said - have a girl. i was going to be geraint. my mother said that have a girl. i was going to be i geraint. my mother said that to have a girl. i was going to be - geraint. my mother said that to my midway, and —— my mother said to the midwife, and she mispronounced it! this is lovely, don't we love gorgeous story about puppies. seven of these labrador puppies, they have been rescued, they were abandoned at the side of a country path. all labradors can be found by a cyclist who spotted one of them, a little puppy who spotted one of them, a little puupy he who spotted one of them, a little puppy he was shivering and scared behind some bushes, then they investigated and they found six more red and golden labradors which can
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cost up to £4000 each. they are all rescued now and they are very happy. the cost of dogs!— the cost of dogs! don't start me on that! i the cost of dogs! don't start me on that! iwon't- _ the cost of dogs! don't start me on that! iwon't. how— the cost of dogs! don't start me on that! iwon't. how long _ the cost of dogs! don't start me on that! i won't. how long have - the cost of dogs! don't start me on that! i won't. how long have we - the cost of dogs! don't start me on i that! i won't. how long have we got? someone shout _ that! i won't. how long have we got? someone shout at _ that! i won't. how long have we got? someone shout at me. _ that! i won't. how long have we got? someone shout at me. a _ that! i won't. how long have we got? someone shout at me. a minute. - someone shout at me. a minute. forgive the headline, are you a dipper or a squirter? britain is a nation of ketchup lovers but we are divided, do you spread it or do you have collap? eight out of ten are adamant that it is a dollop. two smother their meal. i'm interested in what you do with your source. do you mix up sources on the same place? mayonnaise next to ketchup? no, i love mayonnaise but i would not have catch up on the same plate. i'm very happy with the belgians for
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introducing me to mayonnaise and chips. more than half thought it was bad manners to squirt it all over the meal. do you have a dip in someone else's? bad the meal. do you have a dip in someone else's? 1, . , , , someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people — someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people do _ someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people do that? _ someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people do that? 5096 _ someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people do that? 5096 said - someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people do that? 5096 said it - someone else's? bad manners, surely. some people do that? 5096 said it wasl some people do that? 5096 said it was bad. four some people do that? 5096 said it was bad- four in — some people do that? 5096 said it was bad. four in ten _ some people do that? 5096 said it was bad. four in ten frown _ some people do that? 5096 said it was bad. four in ten frown on _ some people do that? 5096 said it was bad. four in ten frown on mixing - some people do that? 5096 said it was bad. four in ten frown on mixing up i bad. four in ten frown on mixing up their sources, bad. four in ten frown on mixing up theirsources, ketchup bad. four in ten frown on mixing up their sources, ketchup is the king of the condiments, number one followed by mannose, barbecue sauce. we do have burger with mixed up sauces? ., . we do have burger with mixed up sauces? . . , ., ., , sauces? catch up on the bottom bun and a man is— sauces? catch up on the bottom bun and a man is on _ sauces? catch up on the bottom bun and a man is on the _ sauces? catch up on the bottom bun and a man is on the top _ sauces? catch up on the bottom bun and a man is on the top one. - sauces? catch up on the bottom bun and a man is on the top one. and i and a man is on the top one. and ma be and a man is on the top one. and maybe -- — and a man is on the top one. and maybe -- catch _ and a man is on the top one. and maybe -- catch up _ and a man is on the top one. and maybe -- catch up on _ and a man is on the top one. and maybe —— catch up on the bottom bun, mayonnaise. numberfour, chilli mayonnaise. number four, chilli sauce, mayonnaise. numberfour, chilli sauce, then salsa, brown sauce, salad cream is at seven. it is back! guacamole. _ salad cream is at seven. it is back! guacamole, then _ salad cream is at seven. it is back! guacamole, then soy _ salad cream is at seven. it is back!
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guacamole, then soy sauce. - salad cream is at seven. it is back! guacamole, then soy sauce. i - salad cream is at seven. it is back! i guacamole, then soy sauce. i would not say that — guacamole, then soy sauce. i would not say that guacamole _ guacamole, then soy sauce. i would not say that guacamole was - guacamole, then soy sauce. i would not say that guacamole was a - guacamole, then soy sauce. i would | not say that guacamole was a sauce. it's definitely a dip. aha, not say that guacamole was a sauce. it's definitely a dip.— it's definitely a dip. a number ten, brinuain it's definitely a dip. a number ten, bringing up — it's definitely a dip. a number ten, bringing up the _ it's definitely a dip. a number ten, bringing up the rear, _ it's definitely a dip. a number ten, bringing up the rear, a _ it's definitely a dip. a number ten, bringing up the rear, a good - bringing up the rear, a good old—fashioned mustard. that bringing up the rear, a good old-fashioned mustard. that is low for mustard- _ old-fashioned mustard. that is low for mustard. i _ old-fashioned mustard. that is low for mustard. i love _ old-fashioned mustard. that is low for mustard. i love mustard - old-fashioned mustard. that is low for mustard. i love mustard with i old-fashioned mustard. that is low for mustard. i love mustard with al for mustard. i love mustard with a aood for mustard. i love mustard with a good sausage- _ for mustard. i love mustard with a good sausage. that _ for mustard. i love mustard with a good sausage. that grainy - for mustard. i love mustard with a good sausage. that grainy stuff, i good sausage. that grainy stuff, none of that! pare good sausage. that grainy stuff, none of that!— good sausage. that grainy stuff, none of that! �* ., , , ., ., none of that! are you a dipper or a su uirter? none of that! are you a dipper or a squirter? generally _ none of that! are you a dipper or a squirter? generally a _ none of that! are you a dipper or a squirter? generally a dipper- none of that! are you a dipper or a j squirter? generally a dipper rather than a squirter. _ squirter? generally a dipper rather than a squirter. glad _ squirter? generally a dipper rather than a squirter. glad we _ squirter? generally a dipper rather than a squirter. glad we cleared i than a squirter. glad we cleared that up. time for a bit of tv nostalgia now and if you're over a certain age, this tune will almost certainly give you that unmistakeable sunday night feeling. bergerac theme plays. i think my mother still watches this! , ., i think my mother still watches this! i. ~' i think my mother still watches this! ~ , i think my mother still watches this! ., ., this! do you think people at home will recognise _ this! do you think people at home will recognise it _ this! do you think people at home will recognise it and _ this! do you think people at home will recognise it and not _ this! do you think people at home will recognise it and not know- this! do you think people at home | will recognise it and not know what it is? , ., it is? keep it going, iwill give ou a
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it is? keep it going, iwill give you a clue. — it is? keep it going, iwill give you a clue, detective - it is? keep it going, iwill give you a clue, detective series, i it is? keep it going, i will give. you a clue, detective series, up it is? keep it going, i will give - you a clue, detective series, up to 40 years ago it was on? that is, of course, the theme to the bbc one detective drama bergerac, which was first broadcast 40 years ago. the bbc archive is marking the occasion by releasing a stash of photographs which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey. richard latto has been looking back. it was in 1981 that a new tv series broughtjersey to television screens across the world. there's a host of programmes coming soon. 15 million viewers regularly tuned in in britain alone giving a massive boost to tourism. set on the beautiful island ofjersey, there is bergerac, a new detective series starring john nettles. you're an obsessional man. yeah — the bbc first came and said, can we use the old courthouse? we weren't sort of rubbing our hands and saying, "oh, this is going to be great", because it might have been a failure, for all we knew. we didn't know what it was about. i reckon it's put business up by 50%. everywhere you go now, there's bergerac bars, i bergerac restaurants.
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bergerac t—shirts, even bergerac aftershave, i believe. _ i haven't seen any money from that. the more we can do, i in a way, for the island, the more they will help us to make our programmel it was compulsive viewing when it was on air. and i thinkjersey was a character in itself. it was this unique place where not a lot of people knew a lot about it, so that gave the writers a carte blanche to create what they wanted. the series also made a household name out of its main star. the actorjohn nettles, who plays bbc tv detective john bergerac, is in hospital in jersey with a suspected broken hip. mr nettles fell off a bicycle. and also, its turned you into a sex symbol, hasn't it? yes, this is amazing. yes, yes. i can count my success with women on the fingers of one hand. well, i think i'm a bit old to have sex symbols, but i like him! - oh, i think is marvellous. now, 40 years on since the start of the series, the bbc archive has revealed unseen images from its photo library. we've got a lot of images that have never been seen.
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we have only recently been able to have the technology to be able to scan images properly and to be able to distribute them in the way that we would like to. and now, to celebrate the 40th anniversary, they're remastering a classic episode for islanders to see in high definition very soon. it's fantastic that you guys are digitising it and giving it that treatment, because i think that gives people the opportunity to really see and appreciate quite how fantastic that you really was. fantastic that show really was. and brian is confident his production company will see a new series of bergerac on our screens soon. there is so much work going on behind the scenes that unfortunately we can't talk about, but it's very much, watch this space. i think what's important really is that the crime is fictional and the scenery is for real.
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richard latto, bbc news. my my favourite story of the morning. i think quite a few people are excited about the potential return of bergerac. wait till i ring my mother! mother, bergerac is back, she will be over the moon! still to come on today's show. covid cases are rising and the booster vaccine programme is not being rolled out fast enough. that's the verdict of some experts — we'll get a view at ten past seven from our regular epidimiologist, dr mike tildesley. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. hundreds of afghan families who've recently settled in the capital, are leaving their temporary accomodation and declaring themselves homeless.
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london has uncovered refugees are telling councils they don't want to stay in hotels, with some asking to be housed closer to their families here. we need the home office to communicate with afghan refugees about what the processes and gives them clarity, as well as clarity to local councils about how this process is actually going to work. the home office says it's working closely with local authorities to ensure everyone temporarily in hotels has access to essential provision, healthcare, education and universal credit. in just under a week's time, the ultra low emission zone expands to cover the area within north and south circulars. its meant to encourage drivers to switch to cleaner cars, but there are concerns there aren't places to charge them. transport for london says the capital could need 66,000 electric vehicle charging points by 2030. at the moment there are 7,000.
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a football coach from west london is to find out whether he is going to spend 25 years in a dubai jail, after four bottles of illegal vape liquid were found in his car. the court of appeal is due to review the evidence in the case of billy hood. the 24 year—old who was arrested in january, after moving to the country. he says he was forced to sign a confession in arabic, despite not speaking the language. now the travel. now let's get the weather. hello, good morning. it has been a very mild night and temperatures have not dropped below the mid—teens in celsius, the sort of temperatures we would normally expect to see by day at this time of the year. a mild start, a very mixed picture. there could be some dribs and drabs of rain around fora could be some dribs and drabs of rain around for a time this morning
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and it is quite grey. lots of low cloud. quite a murky morning. the wind is brisk, and it is dragging the mild air ourway. wind is brisk, and it is dragging the mild air our way. some strong winds at times but it should brighten up through the late morning and into the afternoon. we will even see some sunshine around. temperatures could rise to perhaps 20 or 21 celsius, well above the average for this time of the year. there will be more rain as we head into this evening. this band of rain is set to push its way eastwards. it will be heavy for a time. a mild night to follow. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius as we head into wednesday morning. 0n mid—teens in celsius as we head into wednesday morning. on wednesday we are expecting sherry outbreaks of rain. some of it likely to be heavy for a time. brighter spells in the afternoon. it stays windy. more rain for southern areas as we had through wednesday night. by thursday, a big drop in temperature. in north—westerly wind, but also some sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. coming up on the programme this morning... england's footballers will be playing behind closed doors because of fan violence at the euros final. we'll speak to the former fa boss mark palios about that decision. we'll meet the man who has dug a system of defensive trenches in kent. and how do you fancy exploring distant galaxies from the comfort of your own home? astronomers in belfast are seeking volunteers. they'll be telling us more after nine. before that, we give you some details on our top story, those £5,000 government subsidies for
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homeowners in england and wales to swap their boilers for heat pumps. nina is at a healing centre. is this the start of a new dawn for home heating? well, it could be, but! heating? well, it could be, but i will tell you what, they have been making heat pumps here for 40 years, which is making me feel way behind the curve. let me explain. this is what a heat pump might look like if you choose to install one at your home. it would sit outside. it is not on at the moment. it was earlier but it's not that noisy. picture your fridge where the fan socks out of the heat generated from your food and pumps it out of the bag. a similar fan is it out of the bag. a similarfan is used it out of the bag. a similar fan is used to soak heat from the air, turns that. it is basically used to create energy that ends up in a boiler like that, which will look more familiar to you than the heat pump. let's remind ourselves why this is happening. you will be hearing a lot more about this carbon neutral target we have for 2050.
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that means reducing the amount of carbon that we generate and offsetting all that's left. but our homes standardly way of that. at the moment about a 15% of our carbon emissions from domestic households, which is where heat pumps come in. not only are they better because they guzzle a lot less gas, well, no gas at all, but also, there are three times more energy efficient than gas boilers. where is the catch? there is always one. they are expensive. at the moment around £10,000 to install. there is also a concern around the shortage of engineers. at the moment, are there enough we can make that transition from installing gas boilers to heat pumps? also, electricity is pricey at the moment because it is heavily taxed. would you see much of an improvement for your bill? let's talk to bill, who works here, and is also part of the heat pump association and has been for 60 years. who knew such a thing
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existed? we have been hearing about the air pumps. there is also the option of a ground pump. how does that work? �* ., . ., option of a ground pump. how does thatwork? �* ., . ., , ., that work? brown sauce works similar to the air source, _ that work? brown sauce works similar to the air source, taking _ that work? brown sauce works similar to the air source, taking a _ that work? brown sauce works similar to the air source, taking a latent - to the air source, taking a latent heat out of the ground and using the energy to produce heat. i am thinking. _ energy to produce heat. i am thinking, and _ energy to produce heat. i am thinking, and this _ energy to produce heat. i am thinking, and this is - energy to produce heat. i am thinking, and this is probably a basic question, where i live in salford it is not that warm. does it matter the air in the ground doesn't feel warm? ., ., matter the air in the ground doesn't feel warm?— matter the air in the ground doesn't feelwarm? ., ., , ,, ., ~ feelwarm? no, heat pumps work in all conditions. _ feelwarm? no, heat pumps work in all conditions. they _ feelwarm? no, heat pumps work in all conditions. they are _ feelwarm? no, heat pumps work in all conditions. they are designed i feelwarm? no, heat pumps work in all conditions. they are designed to | all conditions. they are designed to know the conditions down to —25, so really suitable for our climate. it sounds brilliant once you have had them installed. do you share the concerns about engineers? are there enough to go around?— concerns about engineers? are there enough to go around? yeah, that is a challenae, enough to go around? yeah, that is a challenge. but _ enough to go around? yeah, that is a challenge, but we _ enough to go around? yeah, that is a challenge, but we have _ enough to go around? yeah, that is a challenge, but we have already i enough to go around? yeah, that is a challenge, but we have already got i challenge, but we have already got 120,000 skilled plumbing and heating engineers installing over 1.7 million heating systems today. it's about obscuring those engineers to
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be able to install heat pumps in our homes. the heat pump association has recently launched a training course to up skill engineers to be able to install heat pumps in homes. presumably at the moment of the fact costis presumably at the moment of the fact cost is so prohibitive, the more people take this on, it is basically economics that the price comes down but that could take some time? yes. but that could take some time? yes, the moment — but that could take some time? yes, the moment a _ but that could take some time? yes, the moment a heat _ but that could take some time? yes the moment a heat pump does but that could take some time? 123 the moment a heat pump does cost more than a gas boiler, but if you haven't got gas and you put it in for dent, you will see savings today. —— and you put a heat pump in. the government is offering a £5,000 grant for the additional upfront cost. £5,000 grant for the additional upfront cost-— upfront cost. sven is over from sweden. give _ upfront cost. sven is over from sweden. give us— upfront cost. sven is over from sweden. give us a _ upfront cost. sven is over from sweden. give us a quick - upfront cost. sven is over from sweden. give us a quick nod. i upfront cost. sven is over from i sweden. give us a quick nod. the heat pumps we have got here, they are as common as gas boilers in sweden? yeah. and neil, one of the
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engineers, already has a heat pump. he has had one since 2015. is it true your bills have gone down? fiur true your bills have gone down? our bills did true your bills have gone down? 0ur bills did come down. we had an old inefficient _ bills did come down. we had an old inefficient gas boiler and inefficient gas boiler and inefficient water tank. with the heat _ inefficient water tank. with the heat pump our bills did go down. and easier to heat pump our bills did go down. easier to use. heat pump our bills did go down. fific easier to use. in heat pump our bills did go down. elic easier to use. in terms of your energy consistency, sometimes you whack on a radiator and you have to open a window, is it better? we find it much more _ open a window, is it better? we find it much more consistent _ open a window, is it better? we find it much more consistent and - it much more consistent and comfortable. we operate the system at lower_ comfortable. we operate the system at lower temperatures. that is good for all— at lower temperatures. that is good for all systems. we find it much more _ for all systems. we find it much more consistent and comfortable. it more consistent and comfortable. [i is 'ust more consistent and comfortable. it isjust whether or not more consistent and comfortable. it is just whether or not that £5,000 carrot will be enough. friends of the earth saying it's not. speaking of carrots, you probably heard this morning the prime minister saying that the boiler police want kick your door in and sees your combi boiler. some people will be questioning today whether that language belittles the importance of that a transition to heat pumps. but
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also, the messaging. you won't have to necessarily do this within the next 15 years. so is it enough to make people do it? labour says it doesn't go far enough. the government target is for 600,000 of these to be installed every year by 2028, but if the money they are putting in will only fund around 90,000. yes, it is a step in the right direction, say environmentalists, but nowhere near enough. thank you, nina. chris mason was talking about the language boris johnson had used, carrot wielding. we will speak to somebody at half past seven about that this morning. john is here. good morning. this is the aftermath of the euros? what we saw unfold in the summer ahead of the final between england and italy at wembley. it was awful. it was a sorry end to a great tournament for england. but it was the incident which unfolded at the end of the match, tailgating, breach
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of the turnstiles, security could not keep them back. fans targeting particular points around the stadium where they felt they would get easier access. where they felt they would get easieraccess. uefa where they felt they would get easier access. uefa are issuing this punishment which is going to be a two match stadium ban. 0ne punishment which is going to be a two match stadium ban. one of those will be suspended. it was certainly an embarrassing moment, it's fair to say, for the fa, a sorry end to an impressive performance by england at the euros. the fallout could have huge implications on a possible bid to host the world cup. this gives you a sense of what played out ahead of the final. fans attempting to break into the stadium ahead of the final injuly. uefa said the punishment was for a lack of order and discipline inside and around the stadium , and has also fined the football association £85,000. the punishment means england will play the opening home game of their 2022—23 nations league campaign without fans. this has been really, really serious. it could have resulted in
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fatality, it could have resulted in serious injury. there may well have been a situation where emergency services could not have gone into wembley if they needed to. no one should underestimate the impact of what went wrong on that particular day, which is why i really urge and hope that both the police and the fa will change this culture of defensiveness and denial, and actually have a transparent and honest conversation about how to fix things for the future. arsenal legend patrick vieira was given an incredibly warm reception on his return to the club, as manager of crystal palace. the former captain was a three—time premier league title winner with arsenal, and part of the invincibles, who went through the 2003—04 campaign unbeaten. you wonder how popular he would have been had his team won this one? 0dsonne edouard put them ahead only for alexander lacazette to equalise late on. when you spend nine years in a football club like that, and i was part of a generation who did well for the football club. so it's a
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reception that mean a lot to me, but i'm not surprised by the arsenal fans. , :, , i'm not surprised by the arsenal fans. , . , ., , i'm not surprised by the arsenal fans. , ., , ., , ., fans. there is an in'ury worry for encland fans. there is an in'ury worry for england before i fans. there is an injury worry for england before the _ fans. there is an injury worry for england before the 2020 - fans. there is an injury worry for england before the 2020 world i fans. there is an injury worry for i england before the 2020 world cup. liam livingstone is viewed as a key part of england's attempt to win the world cup. moeen ali made a prognosis on his injury. yeah, ithink yeah, i think it's fine. i have a sit down now myself but he seems to be fine. hopefully it's just a bit of bruising and it's not too bad. 0bviously of bruising and it's not too bad. obviously it was a bit of a scare at the time but he said it was fine, so hopefully it's really good. he's a brilliant player. he's been playing really well over the last couple of years. so, yeah, hopefully he can carry that form into the world cup. i feel like it is going to be a
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carry that form into the world cup. ifeel like it is going to be a big stage for him. ireland's curtis campher provided a cricketing rarity at the twenty20 world cup. he took four wickets in four balls against the netherlands, becoming only the third bowler to achieve that feat in t20's. ireland won by seven wickets as they look to qualify for the super 12 stage. eddiejones has once again left out some big names of his england squad ahead of rugby's autumn internationals the vunipola brothers billy and mako have both been omitted, as have their former lions teammates george ford and jamie george, but uncapped raffi quirke and tommy freeman are in the 34—man squad. england face tonga, australia and world champions south africa in november. it's not a popularity contest, is it? you have to make those big calls. eddiejones is clearly calls. eddie jones is clearly the calls. eddiejones is clearly the man to do it. that is one of the role is all about. he gets paid a lot of money. thank you, john.
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it was a rare day of unity in parliament yesterday, as the house convened to pay tribute to the murdered mp sir david amess. many of those tributes focused on sir david's primary goal during his 38 years as an mp, which was representing his constituents, first in basildon and, more recently, in southend west. 0ur reporter ben bolous is there now. good morning. really emotional yesterday. i know there's been an outpouring of affection for the mp there in leigh—on—sea? yeah, a very, very sombre day indeed, — yeah, a very, very sombre day indeed, in _ yeah, a very, very sombre day indeed, in different ways, really. here _ indeed, in different ways, really. here in _ indeed, in different ways, really. here in leigh—on—sea we saw the very personal. _ here in leigh—on—sea we saw the very personal. the — here in leigh—on—sea we saw the very personal, the private grief of a family— personal, the private grief of a family who have lost a much loved husband _ family who have lost a much loved husband and father. sir david's widow— husband and father. sir david's widow came here to read some of the tributes— widow came here to read some of the tributes and _ widow came here to read some of the tributes and messages left by people outside _ tributes and messages left by people outside the church where he was stabbed — outside the church where he was stabbed to death on friday. tributes which _ stabbed to death on friday. tributes which the _ stabbed to death on friday. tributes which the family have said have given— which the family have said have given them so much strength as they try to _ given them so much strength as they
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try to understand why such an awful thing _ try to understand why such an awful thing happened. meanwhile, in westminster we saw the very public -rief westminster we saw the very public grief among sir david's colleagues in the _ grief among sir david's colleagues in the house of commons, paying tribute _ in the house of commons, paying tribute to— in the house of commons, paying tribute to his contribution to parliament, to democracy, in almost 40 years— parliament, to democracy, in almost 40 years serving as an mp. many of them— 40 years serving as an mp. many of them remembering him notjust as a colleague _ them remembering him notjust as a colleague but also as a friend. they also remarked how sir david was killed _ also remarked how sir david was killed carrying out one of the most important — killed carrying out one of the most important democratic duties, that of meeting _ important democratic duties, that of meeting his constituents, the people he represented. and something we don't _ he represented. and something we don't often see, or hear, and that normally— don't often see, or hear, and that normally loud and raucous chamber, tributes— normally loud and raucous chamber, tributes began with silence. his constituency has lost a much respected and loved member of parliament. this house has lost a remarkable and valued parliamentarian. and every member of this house has lost a friend.
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sir david was one of the most dedicated, but also the most affable of mps _ dedicated, but also the most affable of mps. he looked beyond party differences to work with so many of us on _ differences to work with so many of us on a _ differences to work with so many of us on a multitude of issues of common— us on a multitude of issues of common concern, and that's why there are tears— common concern, and that's why there are tears on— common concern, and that's why there are tears on all sides of the house this afternoon. a are tears on all sides of the house this afternoon.— this afternoon. a roller-coaster of deep trauma _ this afternoon. a roller-coaster of deep trauma no — this afternoon. a roller-coaster of deep trauma no one _ this afternoon. a roller-coaster of deep trauma no one should i this afternoon. a roller-coaster of deep trauma no one should have i this afternoon. a roller-coaster of. deep trauma no one should have to experience — deep trauma no one should have to experience i— deep trauma no one should have to experience i also _ deep trauma no one should have to experience. i also know— deep trauma no one should have to experience. i also know that - deep trauma no one should have to| experience. i also know that david's family— experience. i also know that david's family will— experience. i also know that david's family will still— experience. i also know that david's family will still be _ experience. i also know that david's family will still be in _ experience. i also know that david's family will still be in utter— experience. i also know that david's family will still be in utter shock, i family will still be in utter shock, as i family will still be in utter shock, as i know— family will still be in utter shock, as i know many— family will still be in utter shock, as i know many of— family will still be in utter shock, as i know many of you _ family will still be in utter shock, as i know many of you are. - family will still be in utter shock, as i know many of you are. but. family will still be in utter shock, as i know many of you are. but ii as i know many of you are. but i hope _ as i know many of you are. but i hope at — as i know many of you are. but i hope at some _ as i know many of you are. but i hope at some point _ as i know many of you are. but i hope at some point they - as i know many of you are. but i hope at some point they are i as i know many of you are. but ii hope at some point they are able as i know many of you are. but i- hope at some point they are able to hear at _ hope at some point they are able to hear at least — hope at some point they are able to hear at least some _ hope at some point they are able to hear at least some of— hope at some point they are able to hear at least some of the _ hope at some point they are able to hear at least some of the beautiful, j hear at least some of the beautiful, and very— hear at least some of the beautiful, and very funny— hear at least some of the beautiful, and very funny tributes _ hear at least some of the beautiful, and very funny tributes that - hear at least some of the beautiful, and very funny tributes that are i and very funny tributes that are being _ and very funny tributes that are being paid _ and very funny tributes that are being paid to— and very funny tributes that are being paid to him _ and very funny tributes that are being paid to him today. - and very funny tributes that are being paid to him today. and i and very funny tributes that are i being paid to him today. and that that will— being paid to him today. and that that will provide _ being paid to him today. and that that will provide a _ being paid to him today. and that that will provide a morsel - being paid to him today. and that that will provide a morsel of i that will provide a morsel of comfort— that will provide a morsel of comfort amidst _ that will provide a morsel of comfort amidst their- that will provide a morsel of comfort amidst their pain. l comfort amidst their pain. david _ comfort amidst their pain. david was _ comfort amidst their pain. david was a _ comfort amidst their pain. david was a man - comfort amidst their pain. david was a man of- comfort amidst their pain. david was a man of faith i comfort amidst their pain. i david was a man of faith and convictions. faith in his religion and convictions in his politics. he was above — and convictions in his politics. he was above and beyond everything else
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a family— was above and beyond everything else a family man, and a very funny man. he'd_ a family man, and a very funny man. he'd often— a family man, and a very funny man. he'd often break all the rules, cutting — he'd often break all the rules, cutting through pomp and ceremony and connecting with people. i and connecting with people. i am — and connecting with people. i am happy to announce that her majesty has agreed that southend will be accorded the city status it so clearly deserves. idols? will be accorded the city status it so clearly deserves.— so clearly deserves. now that awardin: so clearly deserves. now that awarding of— so clearly deserves. now that awarding of city _ so clearly deserves. now that awarding of city status - so clearly deserves. now that awarding of city status is i so clearly deserves. now that awarding of city status is a i so clearly deserves. now that i awarding of city status is a very rare _ awarding of city status is a very rare honour indeed. and no one knew that more _ rare honour indeed. and no one knew that more than sir david amess himself — that more than sir david amess himself it _ that more than sir david amess himself. it is something he had long campaigned for, for southend, raising — campaigned for, for southend, raising a — campaigned for, for southend, raising a just a few days before he died in _ raising a just a few days before he died in a _ raising a just a few days before he died in a radio interview. it brings with it _ died in a radio interview. it brings with it presently is as well as potential— with it presently is as well as potential economic benefits and has been welcomed by people here as well as the _ been welcomed by people here as well as the local— been welcomed by people here as well as the local council. it as the local council. it is _ as the local council. it is lovely to see our community being recognised this way, even if it is in such sad circumstances. and
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having spoken to some of sir david's close colleagues, having read the statement made by his family over the weekend, i think it's clear that those who knew sir david best are absolutely clear this is something he would have really wanted and, you know, i think it is a little ray of light in really dark times. in terms of the investigation, police — in terms of the investigation, police are _ in terms of the investigation, police are continuing to question ali harbi — police are continuing to question ali harbi ali, who is the suspect in the case, — ali harbi ali, who is the suspect in the case, at — ali harbi ali, who is the suspect in the case, at a london police station _ the case, at a london police station in _ the case, at a london police station. in terms of whether constituency surgeries should go ahead _ constituency surgeries should go ahead like the one that was happening here on friday, downing street— happening here on friday, downing street said this tragic killing, this event, could not be allowed to -et this event, could not be allowed to get in _ this event, could not be allowed to get in the — this event, could not be allowed to get in the way of democracy. then— get in the way of democracy.
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then michael, thank you very much indeed. that ben toolis reporting. shall we find out what is happening with the weather? carol has all the news for us for today and the next few days. good morning. few days. good morninu. ., good morning. good morning. if you haven't yet — good morning. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped _ good morning. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped outside - good morning. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped outside it - good morning. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped outside it is i good morning. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped outside it is a i haven't yet stepped outside it is a mild start. these are the kind of temperatures that will meet you currently. in london it is 18 degrees at the moment. in cardiff, 17. but for many parts of the uk we are looking at 15 degrees. to give you an idea of the average maximum daytime temperature, not the minimum, it would be about 12 degrees in the north of scotland. and 15 in the south—east of baghdad. we certainly would not expect to see 15 degrees in the north of scotland at this time of day. it is going to continue to be mild throughout the day across the board. it is also going to be cloudy and wet for many of us. a lot of mark as well. you can see why. we have got various weather fronts crossing us. can see why. we have got various weatherfronts crossing us. the isobars telling us it is going to be breezy. there will be rain followed
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by showers. some of the rain will continue to be heavy as it pushes northwards and eastwards. by nine o'clock this morning if you are stepping out a wee bit later, you can expect some rain across scotland, a lot of cloud, murky and misty conditions. for northern ireland, you will still have the rain but it will eventually clear. it will push through wales, northern england and a lot of cloud across southern england. this morning's wrote rain in the south—east starting slowly to pull away. —— this morning's rain. behind that it would brighten up. the sun will come out. it should return to northern ireland as well. you can see from any parts of england and wales we will hang on to the cloud and the rain, some of it heavy, potentially the rumble of thunder as well. temperatures today 13 and lowered to 20 in london. locally we could see 21. through this evening and overnight of the brain does eventually push over towards the south—east. again, some of that could be heavy. gusty winds through the english channel and areas adjacent to it. more showers in the
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south—west. some of those could be heavy and thundery. showers in the north—west of scotland as well. but in between, something drier. and it's going to be another mild night. tomorrow this rain clears the south—east. the showers continue to push in. they could be heavy and thundery through the day across parts of england and wales. then there is a drier, brighter interlude with some sunshine. 0n the other side of those showers, a drier, brighter interlude, with sunshine in scotland. temperatures down a touch on today but still pretty mild. we have a weather front coming into the north—west. this is salient. it is a cool cold front and it will be sinking southwards. it will do that overnight wednesday to thursday, eventually clearing away. what it is doing is allowing this colder to come in. we have more of a north—westerly wind. we are likely to see some gales along the coastline as well. especially the north sea coastline. with a full moon on wednesday night we could well have some overtopping,
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especially along the east coast. temperatures will be quite a shock to the system. add in the wind chill as well, we're looking at six to 12 but it will feel colder. carol, we have some news to share with you. you know we were talking about babies names and how the name nigel has gone completely? less than three. dan has been doing a bit of investigating. he has got something to share with you. i'm afraid, carol, that carol has also disappeared from the list. there were fewer than three last year. did you know that? carols are dying out! do you know what? itjust means those that are left are special. i said exactly that to sally. 0nce i said exactly that to sally. once you have the top carol, you don't need any others. i have been doing my research. there is a list of famous carols. you are in the top three. carol vorderman is below you. carol smillie is up
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there. carole king is top of the charts. you are the number one carol with no e in the world. 0h, damn, you make me laugh. you are my favourite breakfast presenter called dan. 0k. called dan. ok. i'm going to leave it there. that hurt a lot. thank you, carol. that hurt a lot. thank ou, carol. ., ., m] that hurt a lot. thank ou, carol. ., ., m thank you, carol. top carol. got to rotect thank you, carol. top carol. got to protect carol- _ thank you, carol. top carol. got to protect carol. ten _ thank you, carol. top carol. got to protect carol. ten minutes - thank you, carol. top carol. got to protect carol. ten minutes to i thank you, carol. top carol. got to i protect carol. ten minutes to seven. a field trip to learn about the grim realities of the first world war would traditionally involve a journey to the former battlefields of belgium or northern france. now, however, you can stay a bit closer to home — maidstone, in kent, to be precise. 0ur reporter fiona lamdin is there, in a trench, to tell us more. it's over 100 metres long and two metres deep. it is a world war i replica based on the trenches near
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ypres, built100 replica based on the trenches near ypres, built 100 years later in a forest in kent. and it is europe's only accurate outdoor replica, according to its designer, who is a military historian. his grandfather john fought in the first world war. he was a private soldier between 1916 and 1919. wounded twice, gassed twice. i mean, if he died in the great war, i am not here. stand twice. i mean, if he died in the great war, i am not here. and it's not his first- _ great war, i am not here. and it's not his first. he _ great war, i am not here. and it's not his first. he built _ great war, i am not here. and it's not his first. he built four - not his first. he built four trenches, including this one in his garden. as well as historian, he is also a hollywood film adviser, working with steven spielberg. here he is in 2011, blowing the whistle in war horse. the best exchange i ever had with steven spielberg is actually he gave me instructions to an actor to say fix bayonets and it all went horribly wrong. nobody knew what to do. i was able to say to him, you need to give a warning, fix bayonets, then it will work. and it
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did. he said, it's not rocket science, is it? and i said, no, it isn't, mr spielberg, but you have to follow the drill book, otherwise it won't work. 50 follow the drill book, otherwise it won't work-— follow the drill book, otherwise it won'twork. ' . , won't work. so effectively you were in charre won't work. so effectively you were in charge of— won't work. so effectively you were in charge of spielberg _ won't work. so effectively you were in charge of spielberg at _ won't work. so effectively you were in charge of spielberg at that i in charge of spielberg at that moment? i in charge of spielberg at that moment? :, , in charge of spielberg at that moment?— in charge of spielberg at that moment? . , _, ., ,, ., moment? i was, come to think of it. he wouldn't — moment? i was, come to think of it. he wouldn't like _ moment? i was, come to think of it. he wouldn't like that _ moment? i was, come to think of it. he wouldn't like that very _ moment? i was, come to think of it. he wouldn't like that very much. i he wouldn't like that very much. there we are. now it is schools and the army who learn about the reality of war. the trenches full of 11—year—old boys rehearsing their school play. it 11-year-old boys rehearsing their school play-— 11-year-old boys rehearsing their school -la . , ., , ., school play. it shows how gruesome and di it school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has _ school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been _ school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been for _ school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been for them i school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been for them and i and dirty it has been for them and how strong — and dirty it has been for them and how strong they must have been to carry— how strong they must have been to carry on. _ how strong they must have been to carry on, even in difficult times without— carry on, even in difficult times without their families. it carry on, even in difficult times without their families.- carry on, even in difficult times without their families. it has been reall cool without their families. it has been really cool and _ without their families. it has been really cool and helpful— without their families. it has been really cool and helpful to - without their families. it has been really cool and helpful to feel- without their families. it has been | really cool and helpful to feel what the soldiers — really cool and helpful to feel what the soldiers have _ really cool and helpful to feel what the soldiers have felt, _ really cool and helpful to feel what the soldiers have felt, because i the soldiers have felt, because we've — the soldiers have felt, because we've got— the soldiers have felt, because we've got the _ the soldiers have felt, because we've got the exact _ the soldiers have felt, because we've got the exact conditionsl the soldiers have felt, because i we've got the exact conditions and it's been— we've got the exact conditions and it's been really— we've got the exact conditions and it's been really fun _ we've got the exact conditions and it's been really fun and _ we've got the exact conditions and it's been really fun and it - we've got the exact conditions and it's been really fun and it will- it's been really fun and it will really— it's been really fun and it will really help— it's been really fun and it will really help to _ it's been really fun and it will really help to feel— it's been really fun and it will really help to feel the - it's been really fun and it will. really help to feel the emotions they were — really help to feel the emotions they were going _ really help to feel the emotions they were going through - really help to feel the emotions they were going through when. really help to feel the emotions i they were going through when inside and the _ they were going through when inside and the pressure _ they were going through when inside and the pressure they— they were going through when inside and the pressure they were - they were going through when inside and the pressure they were under. itj and the pressure they were under. it is muddy— and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and — and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it— and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it is— and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it is cold _ and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it is cold and _ and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it is cold and it - and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it is cold and it is - is muddy and it is cold and it is grim _ is muddy and it is cold and it is grim. just— is muddy and it is cold and it is grim. just walking _ is muddy and it is cold and it is grim. just walking around, i is muddy and it is cold and it is grim. just walking around, likei is muddy and it is cold and it is - grim. just walking around, like the periscopes — grim. just walking around, like the periscopes and _ grim. just walking around, like the periscopes and everything - grim. just walking around, like the periscopes and everything just - grim. just walking around, like the|
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periscopes and everything just fair, it's quite _ periscopes and everything just fair, it's quite hard — periscopes and everything just fair, it's quite hard just _ periscopes and everything just fair, it's quite hard just to _ periscopes and everything just fair, it's quite hard just to imagine - it's quite hard just to imagine being — it's quite hard just to imagine being in— it's quite hard just to imagine being in their— it's quite hard just to imagine being in their with _ it's quite hard just to imagine being in their with the - it's quite hard just to imagine being in their with the threati it's quite hard just to imagine i being in their with the threat of being _ being in their with the threat of being shot _ being in their with the threat of being shot at _ being in their with the threat of being shot at any _ being in their with the threat of being shot at any moment. - being in their with the threat of| being shot at any moment. you being in their with the threat of- being shot at any moment. you would have to _ being shot at any moment. you would have to be _ being shot at any moment. you would have to be careful— being shot at any moment. you would have to be careful to _ being shot at any moment. you would have to be careful to keep— being shot at any moment. you would have to be careful to keep your- being shot at any moment. you would have to be careful to keep your head i have to be careful to keep your head down _ have to be careful to keep your head down and _ have to be careful to keep your head down and not — have to be careful to keep your head down and not be _ have to be careful to keep your head down and not be shot. _ have to be careful to keep your head down and not be shot. that- have to be careful to keep your head down and not be shot. that sort- have to be careful to keep your head down and not be shot. that sort of. down and not be shot. that sort of thing _ down and not be shot. that sort of thin. , ,., . , down and not be shot. that sort of thin. , . , ., ., thing. these pouches were to hold the ammunition. _ thing. these pouches were to hold the ammunition. each _ thing. these pouches were to hold the ammunition. each soldier - thing. these pouches were to hold | the ammunition. each soldier could carry— the ammunition. each soldier could carry up— the ammunition. each soldier could carry up to — the ammunition. each soldier could carry up to £150 of ammunition. they also learn about _ carry up to £150 of ammunition. they also learn about food _ carry up to £150 of ammunition. tie: also learn about food rationing carry up to £150 of ammunition. tte: also learn about food rationing and ammunition. just also learn about food rationing and ammunition-— ammunition. just being cold and terri in: ammunition. just being cold and terrifying straightaway _ ammunition. just being cold and terrifying straightaway from - ammunition. just being cold and terrifying straightaway from the | terrifying straightaway from the beginning. the food wasn't great. you would — beginning. the food wasn't great. you would have to make it last. you -ot you would have to make it last. you got tens _ you would have to make it last. you got tens of— you would have to make it last. you got tens of beef but i wouldn't eat all of— got tens of beef but i wouldn't eat all of that— got tens of beef but i wouldn't eat all of that at one time. i'd make it last as _ all of that at one time. i'd make it last as long — all of that at one time. i'd make it last as long as possible. they would be rats _ last as long as possible. they would be rats you — last as long as possible. they would be rats. you would have friends dying — be rats. you would have friends dying the _ be rats. you would have friends dying. the weather would be horrendous. the weather is horrendous. the weather is horrendous in a war zone. 20 metres behind the front _ horrendous in a war zone. 20 metres behind the front line _ horrendous in a war zone. 20 metres behind the front line this _ horrendous in a war zone. 20 metres behind the front line this was - horrendous in a war zone. 20 metres behind the front line this was the - behind the front line this was the officers's dugout. deep underground. this is where they slept, where they played cards, this was the hub. the meals came in here, the ammunition, and this is how they contacted each
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other up and down the lines. everything came through here. and above ground they have got ambitious plans, hoping to build a german trench the other side of no man's land. fiona landon is still in their trench. good morning. actually, it is pouring. _ good morning. actually, it is pouring, so i am not in the trench. i'm pouring, so i am not in the trench. injust— pouring, so i am not in the trench. i'mjust behind pouring, so i am not in the trench. i'm just behind it. pouring, so i am not in the trench. i'mjust behind it. i'm underground. let me— i'mjust behind it. i'm underground. let me take— i'mjust behind it. i'm underground. let me take you back 100 years. let's _ let me take you back 100 years. let's come — let me take you back 100 years. let's come and meet mark. mark, give me a sense _ let's come and meet mark. mark, give me a sense of— let's come and meet mark. mark, give me a sense of what sort of night of the men _ me a sense of what sort of night of the men would have had in here? we had a the men would have had in here? had a pretty the men would have had in here? we had a pretty tough night last night. we were _ had a pretty tough night last night. we were gassed~ _ had a pretty tough night last night. we were gassed. we _ had a pretty tough night last night. we were gassed. we went - had a pretty tough night last night. we were gassed. we went out - had a pretty tough night last night. we were gassed. we went out on i we were gassed. we went out on patrol. — we were gassed. we went out on patrol. we _ we were gassed. we went out on patrol. we did — we were gassed. we went out on patrol. we did some _ we were gassed. we went out on patrol. we did some wiring. - we were gassed. we went out on patrol. we did some wiring. the. we were gassed. we went out on - patrol. we did some wiring. the guys are now— patrol. we did some wiring. the guys are now sleeping _ patrol. we did some wiring. the guys are now sleeping. eating, _ patrol. we did some wiring. the guys are now sleeping. eating, that- patrol. we did some wiring. the guys are now sleeping. eating, that sort. are now sleeping. eating, that sort of stuff _ are now sleeping. eating, that sort of stuff. , . . ~ are now sleeping. eating, that sort of stuff. , , . ~ ., . of stuff. just talk me through what ou miaht of stuff. just talk me through what you might have — of stuff. just talk me through what you might have for— of stuff. just talk me through what you might have for breakfast? - of stuff. just talk me through what i you might have for breakfast? sure. we have some _ you might have for breakfast? sure. we have some corby. _ you might have for breakfast? sure. we have some corby. we _ you might have for breakfast? sure. we have some corby. we have - you might have for breakfast? sure. we have some corby. we have got the tea and _ we have some corby. we have got the tea and sugar— we have some corby. we have got the tea and sugar in— we have some corby. we have got the tea and sugar in there. _ we have some corby. we have got the tea and sugar in there. —— _ we have some corby. we have got the tea and sugar in there. —— corned - tea and sugar in there. —— corned beef _ tea and sugar in there. —— corned beef these — tea and sugar in there. —— corned
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beef. these are _ tea and sugar in there. —— corned beef. these are the _ tea and sugar in there. —— corned beef. these are the biscuits - tea and sugar in there. —— corned| beef. these are the biscuits which will break— beef. these are the biscuits which will break your— beef. these are the biscuits which will break your teeth _ beef. these are the biscuits which will break your teeth if _ beef. these are the biscuits which will break your teeth if you - beef. these are the biscuits which will break your teeth if you bite i will break your teeth if you bite into them _ will break your teeth if you bite into them so— will break your teeth if you bite into them. so the _ will break your teeth if you bite into them. so the troops - will break your teeth if you bite i into them. so the troops usually soaked — into them. so the troops usually soaked them _ into them. so the troops usually soaked them in _ into them. so the troops usually soaked them in water— into them. so the troops usually soaked them in water and - into them. so the troops usuallyj soaked them in water and added into them. so the troops usually - soaked them in water and added them to food _ soaked them in water and added them to food they— soaked them in water and added them to food they are _ soaked them in water and added them to food. they are pretty— soaked them in water and added them to food. they are pretty tough. - soaked them in water and added them to food. they are pretty tough. they. to food. they are pretty tough. they look very tough- _ to food. they are pretty tough. they look very tough. this _ to food. they are pretty tough. look very tough. this is the officers's _ look very tough. this is the officers's table. they might have been _ officers's table. they might have been playing cards. behind us, the maps _ been playing cards. behind us, the maps and — been playing cards. behind us, the maps and other signalling... we have not a maps and other signalling... we have got a trench — maps and other signalling... we have got a trench map _ maps and other signalling... we have got a trench map showing _ maps and other signalling... we have got a trench map showing the - maps and other signalling... we have | got a trench map showing the german positions _ got a trench map showing the german positions in _ got a trench map showing the german positions in red. — got a trench map showing the german positions in red, the _ got a trench map showing the german positions in red, the british— got a trench map showing the german positions in red, the british trench - positions in red, the british trench maps _ positions in red, the british trench maps wereh't _ positions in red, the british trench maps weren't shown _ positions in red, the british trench maps weren't shown for _ positions in red, the british trench maps weren't shown for secretive i maps weren't shown for secretive reasons — maps weren't shown for secretive reasons we _ maps weren't shown for secretive reasons. we have _ maps weren't shown for secretive reasons. we have the _ maps weren't shown for secretive reasons. we have the aerial- maps weren't shown for secretive | reasons. we have the aerial shots maps weren't shown for secretive i reasons. we have the aerial shots of the trenches — reasons. we have the aerial shots of the trenches. we _ reasons. we have the aerial shots of the trenches. we have _ reasons. we have the aerial shots of the trenches. we have got— reasons. we have the aerial shots ofj the trenches. we have got signallers where _ the trenches. we have got signallers where they— the trenches. we have got signallers where they used _ the trenches. we have got signallers where they used to _ the trenches. we have got signallers where they used to sit _ the trenches. we have got signallers where they used to sit and _ the trenches. we have got signallers where they used to sit and take - the trenches. we have got signallers where they used to sit and take the. where they used to sit and take the messages — where they used to sit and take the messages to— where they used to sit and take the messages to and _ where they used to sit and take the messages to and from _ where they used to sit and take the messages to and from the - where they used to sit and take the| messages to and from the trenches. let's come _ messages to and from the trenches. let's come to — messages to and from the trenches. let's come to the _ messages to and from the trenches. let's come to the present _ messages to and from the trenches. let's come to the present day, - messages to and from the trenches. let's come to the present day, fasti let's come to the present day, fast forward _ let's come to the present day, fast forward 100 years. tell us the point of this? _ forward 100 years. tell us the point of this? it— forward 100 years. tell us the point ofthis? it is— forward 100 years. tell us the point of this? it is so lifelike and realistic, _ of this? it is so lifelike and realistic, but who is it for? this is primarily _ realistic, but who is it for? this is primarily for _ realistic, but who is it for? this is primarily for school - realistic, but who is it for? this is primarily for school groups and army— is primarily for school groups and army recruits. _ is primarily for school groups and army recruits, also _ is primarily for school groups and army recruits, also filming - army recruits, also filming companies _ army recruits, also filming companies as— army recruits, also filming companies as well. - army recruits, also filming companies as well. for. army recruits, also filming companies as well. for the army, what is it to _ companies as well. for the army, what is it to do, _ companies as well. for the army, what is it to do, to _ companies as well. for the army, what is it to do, to give _ companies as well. for the army, what is it to do, to give them - companies as well. for the army, what is it to do, to give them a i what is it to do, to give them a sense — what is it to do, to give them a sense of— what is it to do, to give them a sense of what it was like four people — sense of what it was like four people before them?- sense of what it was like four --eole before them? , . , , people before them? yes, absolutely. it is art of
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people before them? yes, absolutely. it is part of their _ people before them? yes, absolutely. it is part of their training _ it is part of their training programme, _ it is part of their training programme, called - it is part of their training programme, called of. it is part of their trainingi programme, called of the it is part of their training - programme, called of the realities of war _ programme, called of the realities of war we — programme, called of the realities of war. we have _ programme, called of the realities of war. we have troops _ programme, called of the realities of war. we have troops coming - programme, called of the realities. of war. we have troops coming down. we also _ of war. we have troops coming down. we also have — of war. we have troops coming down. we also have a — of war. we have troops coming down. we also have a school— of war. we have troops coming down. we also have a school groups - of war. we have troops coming down. we also have a school groups booked| we also have a school groups booked in. we also have a school groups booked in dis _ we also have a school groups booked in. r . we also have a school groups booked in. r , we also have a school groups booked in. . , ., ., in. as we saw. throughout the mornin: in. as we saw. throughout the morning we — in. as we saw. throughout the morning we will— in. as we saw. throughout the morning we will not _ in. as we saw. throughout the morning we will notjust - in. as we saw. throughout the morning we will notjust be . in. as we saw. throughout the . morning we will notjust be hiding in here, _ morning we will notjust be hiding in here, we — morning we will notjust be hiding in here, we will be in the trenches, all morning — in here, we will be in the trenches, all morning. thankfully, no rats, but lots — all morning. thankfully, no rats, but lots of— all morning. thankfully, no rats, but lots of mod. stay tuned to breakfast. you will see is in the trenches— breakfast. you will see is in the trenches with some of the men. thank ou. so trenches with some of the men. thank you. so authentic. _ trenches with some of the men. thank you. so authentic. imagine _ trenches with some of the men. thank you. so authentic. imagine going - you. so authentic. imagine going there on a _ you. so authentic. imagine going there on a school— you. so authentic. imagine going there on a school field _ you. so authentic. imagine going there on a school field trip? - you. so authentic. imagine going there on a school field trip? it. there on a school field trip? it would be amazing.— would be amazing. quite claustrophobic _ would be amazing. quite claustrophobic though. l time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. hundreds of afghan families who've recently settled in the capital, are leaving their temporary accomodation and declaring themselves homeless.
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london has uncovered refugees are telling councils they don't want to stay in hotels, with some asking to be housed closer to their families here. harrow, which is dealing with nearly a dozen cases like this. says the government's resettlement scheme isn't clear. we need the home office to communicate with afghan refugees about what the process is and give some clarity, as well as clarity to local councils about how this process is actually going to work. the home office says it's working closely with local authorities to ensure everyone temporarily in hotels has access to essential provision, healthcare, education and universal credit. a football coach from west london is to find out whether he is going to spend 25 years in a dubai jail, after four bottles of illegal vape liquid were found in his car. the court of appeal is due to review the evidence in the case of billy hood. the 2a year—old who was arrested in january, after moving to the country. he says he was forced to sign a confession in arabic,
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despite not speaking the language. in just under a week's time, the ultra low emission zone expands to cover the area within north and south circulars. its meant to encourage drivers to switch to cleaner cars, but there are concerns there aren't places to charge them. transport for london says the capital could need 66,000 electric vehicle charging points by 2030. at the moment there are 7,000. now the travel. minor delays on the metropolitan line. no service between hackney wick and stratford on the overground. now let's get the weather. hello, good morning. it has been a very mild night and temperatures have not dropped below the mid—teens in celsius, the sort of temperatures we would normally expect to see by day at this time of the year. a mild start, a very mixed picture. there could be some dribs and drabs of rain around for a time this morning and it is quite grey. lots of low cloud. quite a murky morning. the wind is brisk, and it is dragging the mild airourway.
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some strong winds at times but it should brighten up through the late morning and into the afternoon. we will even see some sunshine around. temperatures could rise to perhaps 20 or 21 celsius, well above the average for this time of the year. there will be more rain as we head into this evening. this band of rain is set to push its way eastwards. it will be heavy for a time. a mild night to follow. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius as we head into on wednesday we are expecting showery outbreaks of rain. some of it likely to be heavy for a time. brighter spells in the afternoon. it stays windy. more rain for southern areas as we had through wednesday night. by thursday, a big drop in temperature. a north—westerly wind, but also some sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. an end to new gas boilers within15
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years but the prime minister says, don't expect the green police to kick your door down. a major explosion shakes a housing estate in ayr. two adults and two children are in hospital. covid cases reach nearly 50,000. we'll ask one senior scientist if the nhs can cope with the growing number. england are hit with a stadium ban by uefa. at least one match will be played behind closed doors after ticketless fans stormed the turnstiles at last summer's euros final. once a staple of sunday night tv, could bergerac be in line for a re—make? will be cloudy, murky and unseasonably mild. some of the seizing some rain but sunshine in the south—east later will mean temperatures up to 21 degrees.
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it's tuesday the 19th of october. the prime minister has said the government's plan to phase out gas boilers will not be enforced with green shirts armed with sandals and carrots. he wrote the comments in a newspaper article promoting his aim to end of sale of new gas boilers in 15 years. £450 million will be spent on a boiler upgrade scheme which will run for three years. critics say it is not ambitious because it amounts to just 90,000 replacement boilers. there is a secret lying under richard's garden. the heat for his home is absorbed by an underground network of pipes. it comes in through a ground source pump. so, this is where the actual hardware is located.
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richard swapped his gas guzzling system seven years ago, and he hasn't looked back. i can safely say it's been the best thing we ever did. i mean, the house is constantly at a pleasant temperature. it's not boiling hot, but it's very livable. and the economics of it are just fantastic. we paid 15,000 for the ground source and then 5000 for some solar thermal panels for the roof, which supply the hot water. to make a ground source pump work you need a massive garden, which is a pipe dream for most of us. the other type of heat pump works by compressing heat from the air. it's cheaper to install and smaller, but most homes will still need loads of insulation first. then we'll go through and see some of the equipment we've got set up. david spends his time researching heating efficiency and says although the money sounds like a lot, it won't go far. what we are being left with is a gamble on the future, that these things are going to be
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cheaper and that the industry are going to be more ready to install them, and, crucially, that people are going to want them. do you think this is going to be enough to convince people with gas boilers to make the switch? perhaps not yet. one of the problems that they're going to face here is getting that connection with people and householders, to make sure the policy actually works and it's something people are happy to take on. because each home is different, getting 86% of households off gas is a monumental challenge. despite promises, this strategy will only begin to scratch the surface. coletta smith, bbc news, harrogate. chris mason is in westminster. serious omission from the government but the prime ministerchoice of language is unusual. it but the prime ministerchoice of language is unusual.— but the prime ministerchoice of language is unusual. it would be emerrain language is unusual. it would be emerging out — language is unusual. it would be emerging out of _ language is unusual. it would be emerging out of the _ language is unusual. it would be emerging out of the lips - language is unusual. it would be emerging out of the lips of- language is unusual. it would be l emerging out of the lips of anyone else, but it is quite borisjohnson
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style and its flourish. let me show you the article he has written in the sun newspaper this morning. the boiler police are not going to kick your door in with their sandal clad the, and seize your trusty old combi at carat point. what is he up to? he is trying to take us with him, making this argument about net zero, net zero carbon emissions by 2020. -- 2050. he net zero carbon emissions by 2020. —— 2050. he is conscious that for some critics, those who forever talk about all things green off on our middle class people with a lot of money and therefore have the money to worry about the sort of stuff. how do you take the rest of us with you if you are trying to make an argument about the amount of inconvenience and cost associated with our lives? the idea on this boiler scheme is you make it economically tempting to switch when
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the boiler packs up to go for some new technology. as we were hearing, a lot of this is complicated and can involve new insulation and is necessarily straightforward. head of the cop26 summit in a few weeks with lots of world leaders trying to hammer out agreements on climate change, he's trying to make sure that when we hear lots of lofty rhetoric and big promises, that the rest of us are willing to follow on behind. . ~ rest of us are willing to follow on behind. . ,, i. rest of us are willing to follow on behind. . ~' ,, , rest of us are willing to follow on behind. . ,, i. , . , four people have been taken to hospital after an explosion at a house in ayr. the two adults and two children were injured in a blast which was heard and felt for miles around. emergency services were called to the kincaidston area of ayrjust after seven o'clock. the blast in gorse park appears to have destroyed one house and damaged others nearby. dozens of people were forced to leave their homes. they gathered in a nearby school and community centre. just outside my house there were sort of broken roof tiles.
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we walked up to where the houses have been blown away, and it wasjust, it was horrendous, it was like something from a movie set. it was just quite overwhelming. an air ambulance arrived at the scene a short time after the explosion along with several ambulances, fire engines and police cars. we have about 50 families who are in the centres, working the way through, we are dealing with them. the council's response has been excellent. the partners' response has been excellent. the police, the fire service are here on time, very, very quickly. and all the professionals have done a wonderfuljob here. and the community have rallied round, which is absolutely wonderful. a large area around the blast remained sealed off overnight. gas engineers have been working with the emergency services to make sure the area is safe. katie hunter, bbc news. our correspondent jamie mclvor is there.
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good morning. good morning. as you can see behind _ good morning. good morning. as you can see behind me, _ good morning. good morning. as you can see behind me, there _ good morning. good morning. as you can see behind me, there is - good morning. good morning. as you can see behind me, there is still- can see behind me, there is still some police presence at the site. enquiries are going on to try to establish the cause of the explosion. the full story has yet to emerge. what we do know is it was clearly a very significant explosion, heard several miles away as we were hearing in the report. it meant that a number of nearby residents had to be evacuated and they spent the night at nearby west centres established in the church and school. clearly the important question is to try to find out what the cause of the explosion may have been. scottish gas networks have been. scottish gas networks have been on the side trying to make it safe. clearly a gas explosion is one possibility. the cause is yet to be established. two adults and two children taken to hospital but no
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word at present about their condition. clearly the immediate priority is to establish the cause of the explosion, make things safe, and also help the nearby residents with the practicalities because as well as the house which has been destroyed, other homes have been badly damaged. so inevitably there will be the question of trying to ensure that there is appropriate accommodation for the people directly affected.— accommodation for the people directly affected. thank you very much, directly affected. thank you very much. jamie. — directly affected. thank you very much, jamie, for _ directly affected. thank you very much, jamie, for that _ directly affected. thank you very much, jamie, for that update - directly affected. thank you very | much, jamie, for that update this morning. last night, a memorial service was held for the mp sir david amess who was killed on friday at a constituency surgery. a 25—year—old man remains in custody on suspicion of murder. a former british army soldier,
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who was standing trial over a fatal shooting during northern ireland's troubles, has died. dennis hutchings had denied attempting to murder john pat cunningham in county tyrone in 1974. the trial was adjourned last week after the 80—year—old, from cornwall, fell ill. he later tested positive for covid and died in a belfast hospital. the daughters of two men who died following covid outbreaks in their care homes begin a legal case against the government today. the high court hearing will examine policies such as sending elderly and disabled patients back from hospitals without suitable plans for testing or isolation. the government says it specifically sought to safeguard care homes and their residents. jon donnison has this report. from suspected covid—19. michael gibson was 88 when he died in a care home in april last year from suspected covid—19. his daughter cathy was only able to say goodbye to him through a window. the family is now part of a landmark legal challenge that will argue the government's failure to protect thousands of care home residents during the first wave of the pandemic was unlawful. at the same time that we'd all been told to stay at home,
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to not see anybody, to keep ourselves safe, the most vulnerable in society who were just in a larger home were left notjust unprotected but put at risk. the case will likely focus on the policy of clearing space in nhs hospitals, by discharging some patients into care homes initially without them being tested for coronavirus. at the time, the government defended its actions. so, right from the start, we've tried to throw a protective ring around our care homes. that view will now be challenged at the high court. during the first three months of the pandemic, more than 14,000 people in care homes in england and wales died from coronavirus. the outcome of this case could affect thousands of families. jon donnison, bbc news. we will have more on that story later in the morning. the department for health
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and social care have told us: "we worked tirelessly to protect the public from the threat to life and health posed by the pandemic and specifically sought to safeguard care homes and their residents, providing billions of pounds to support the sector, free ppe, additional testing and priority vaccinations." donald trump has filed a case against the congressional committee which is investigating the attack by his supporters on the capitol building in january. a pro trump mob stormed the building because they refuse to accept the election ofjoe biden as president. the lawsuit is an effort to keep records from his presidency secret. he claims the material is covered by executive privilege, which protects the confidentiality of some white house documents. astronomers at the queens university belfast are on the search for volunteers to help examine five years worth of footage which shows some of the brightest stars in the sky. the footage was captured by 12 robotic telescopes based in chile. scientists have analysed it but they want the publics help in checking there were no hidden planets they didn't spot. how is that going to work? that is a
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lot of work. taste how is that going to work? that is a lot of work-— how is that going to work? that is a lot of work. ~ . . . , _, ., lot of work. we have a gas coming on later but all— lot of work. we have a gas coming on later but all you _ lot of work. we have a gas coming on later but all you need _ lot of work. we have a gas coming on later but all you need is _ lot of work. we have a gas coming on later but all you need is access - lot of work. we have a gas coming on later but all you need is access to - later but all you need is access to a computer —— we have a gas coming on. and then they ask you to search the sky to see if there is anything they have missed because there is so much to look for. if you are an amateur astronomer, which is hard to say, feel free to get involved. you don't need any training. put say, feel free to get involved. you don't need any training.— say, feel free to get involved. you don't need any training. put quite a lot of spare — don't need any training. put quite a lot of spare time! _ don't need any training. put quite a lot of spare time! someone - don't need any training. put quite a lot of spare time! someone who i lot of spare time! someone who doesn't have any spare time is carol, she is so busy! if you are searching the sky in the highlands last night, you might have seen the northern lights, we will show you some pictures later on. todayit show you some pictures later on. today it is unseasonably mild. also we are looking at a rain coming in from the west heading north—east, and murky conditions around this. we have mist and cloud, breezy as well, the rain will be pushing north—east through the day, clear in northern
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ireland later. the rain in the north —— south—east is clearing as well. we could get up to 20 or 21 degrees in the south—east. widely we are looking at temperatures between 13 and 18 degrees. as we head through the evening and overnight we see some rain getting into the south—east, then clear skies through wales, northern england and scotland and northern ireland with showers. there will be areas adjacent to the english channel, and some further showers peppering the north and west. not a cold night. ten and 15 degrees, mild night in prospect. tomorrow morning the showers will pile across england and wales, heavy and thundery in places. more showers in the south—west later. then a weather front coming in across the north of scotland accompanied by a
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northerly wind. tomorrow will be mild but it will not be as mild as today and then it will turn colder from the north. thank you, talk to you soon. hospital admissions could surge overwinter — unless the rollout of the covid vaccine booster programme is sped up across the uk. one member of the covid—19 actuaries response group says less than half of those in the at—risk group who received a second jab at least six months ago, have had a third dose. let's look over some of the case figures from this week. yesterday, 49,156 new cases of the virus were recorded. that s an increase of more than 16% on last week and the highest number since mid—july. currently there are more than 7,000 people in hospital with covid—19. let's speak to mike tildesley, a professor in infectious disease modelling at the university of warwick. he is one of our regular breakfast
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experts. good morning. great to see you. let's go back over what we were just saying there, the numbers at the moment, the highest that they have been for a long time, how concerned should we be at this point? concerned should we be at this oint? ~ , ,., , concerned should we be at this oint? ~ , , ., . point? absolutely, good morning. we are in a situation _ point? absolutely, good morning. we are in a situation where _ point? absolutely, good morning. we are in a situation where case - are in a situation where case numbers are still very high, unfortunately we have not seen them come down. we are still in a situation where hospital admissions are starting to creep up slowly, but certainly not at the scale they were at the start of this year. but we need to keep an eye on this. is that gross, that is concerning. but we do need to put this into context. —— as that does grow, that is concerning. hospital admissions will go up in a winter because of respiratory viruses but it is important that we monitor this because we do want to avoid the nhs coming under the significant pressure they did last year so it is important to monitor
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the. 50 year so it is important to monitor the, , ., year so it is important to monitor the. , . , . the. so is there a number, are you aware of a — the. so is there a number, are you aware of a figure _ the. so is there a number, are you aware of a figure in _ the. so is there a number, are you aware of a figure in your _ the. so is there a number, are you aware of a figure in your head - the. so is there a number, are you i aware of a figure in your head where there is a number of cases where we get to a point where the government where the government might have to make decisions about the way we are living at the moment? i make decisions about the way we are living at the moment?— living at the moment? i would never sa a living at the moment? i would never say a particular— living at the moment? i would never say a particular number, _ living at the moment? i would never say a particular number, but - living at the moment? i would never say a particular number, but i - living at the moment? i would never say a particular number, but i don'tl say a particular number, but i don't think it isjust say a particular number, but i don't think it is just cases. when we look at cases, we need to also look at the number of people going into hospital and the number of people sadly dying from the disease. i will expect that will creep up over the next couple of months because hospitals do come under pressure in the winter anyway, even when we do not have a pandemic and people do sadly die from respiratory viruses in the winter. but all of these need to be put into context. what we need to be put into context. what we need to do is avoid what we saw last winter which is a severe nhs pressure and sadly very many people dying from covid. let’s pressure and sadly very many people dying from covid.— dying from covid. let's put that into some _ dying from covid. let's put that into some context _ dying from covid. let's put that into some context now. - dying from covid. let's put that into some context now. if - dying from covid. let's put that into some context now. if you | dying from covid. let's put that. into some context now. if you take
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covid out of the situation, at this point in the winter, what sort of pressures with the nhs be under four other respiratory infections and other respiratory infections and other people being hospitalised because they are ill with pneumonia and bronchitis and that sort of thing? and bronchitis and that sort of thin ? . . , and bronchitis and that sort of thing? can be very variable. if we no back thing? can be very variable. if we go back to _ thing? can be very variable. if we go back to 2017. — thing? can be very variable. if we go back to 2017, it _ thing? can be very variable. if we go back to 2017, it was _ thing? can be very variable. if we go back to 2017, it was a - thing? can be very variable. if we go back to 2017, it was a very - thing? can be very variable. if we j go back to 2017, it was a very bad flu year, we had a significant number of deaths as a result of flu. we didn't see anything of the scale of last winter but that he had the nhs was under pressure and hospital admissions were high. in 2019, cases were lower. this is what really needs to be monitored, where are we as hospital admissions creep up, not just compared with last year but compared with the previous years to see at what point the government might need to potentially introduce more restrictions, if we are at risk of being at a situation similar to last year. of being at a situation similar to last ear. ., . _ , .,
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of being at a situation similar to last ear. ., , ., ., last year. how easy is it for you to tell where — last year. how easy is it for you to tell where we _ last year. how easy is it for you to tell where we are _ last year. how easy is it for you to tell where we are at _ last year. how easy is it for you to tell where we are at this _ last year. how easy is it for you to tell where we are at this point - last year. how easy is it for you to tell where we are at this point of. tell where we are at this point of time in terms of hospitalisations, looking ahead to four you would be able to predict perhaps what is coming? —— looking ahead two to four weeks? it coming? -- looking ahead two to four weeks? . ' . coming? -- looking ahead two to four weeks? , , . ., , . weeks? it is difficult to predict. the numbers — weeks? it is difficult to predict. the numbers are _ weeks? it is difficult to predict. the numbers are reported - weeks? it is difficult to predict. the numbers are reported in i weeks? it is difficult to predict. - the numbers are reported in terms of numbers of individuals being admitted to hospital. we do need to remember, we always talk about the lag, whenever cases are reported, it is always one or two week lag before that it is always one or two week lag before thatitis is always one or two week lag before that it is reflected in hospital admissions, and a bit further before they are reflected in deaths. the difficulty is that if the government is going to react, they need to react slightly earlier than they might want to because of the lag. hospital admissions are onlyjust starting to creep up from covid but it is important to notjust report hospital admissions from covid but from all respiratory viruses so we
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can really assess where we are this year compared notjust with last year compared notjust with last year but with previous years. the government _ year but with previous years. the government has to react and pre—empt any problem as you have said. if they were to reintroduce any kind of restrictions, what with the first level of restrictions be, do you think? what might we see come back? again, this is very difficult to predict. the government do have a plan b, which includes mask wearing in certain places, certain basic levels of restrictions, putting back on slowly the restrictions that we had last winter. i'm sure what we all want to avoid is closures of work spaces, closures of businesses, and of course going into full lockdown. so these have to be a last resort measures. hopefully with relatively high levels of vaccination, we have been talking about boosters and that is a concern, it is important that as many people as possible step forward to take up the boosters when they
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are offered. hopefully with high levels of vaccination, we will only need a light touch restrictions as we move into the winter to prevent a severe wave of hospital admissions. let's talk about boosterjabs. is the next round coming through fast enough? the the next round coming through fast enou~h? . , . ., enough? the current rules laid out our that people — enough? the current rules laid out our that people should _ enough? the current rules laid out our that people should only - enough? the current rules laid out our that people should only be - our that people should only be coming forward for a boosterjab six months after their second dose. the vaccination programme only wrapped up vaccination programme only wrapped up injanuary or february so a lot of those individuals —— ramped up in january of every so a lot of people will have only had their second dose in may so a lot of people will not be eligible. there was a report earlier which suggested that around half of individuals who should have been eligible have not taken a second dose of the vaccine. if that is true, that is concerning and we need to find out whether those individuals have been offered the second dose and not taking it up,
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have not yet taken it up or for whatever reason have not been offered it. that needs looking at because it is important that individuals do take their booster jab if they are in the eligible categories. i jab if they are in the eligible categories-— jab if they are in the eligible cateuories. . . ., , m ., , categories. i am curious to know, is that information _ categories. i am curious to know, is that information out _ categories. i am curious to know, is that information out there - that information out there somewhere? you would think someone would be monitoring whether or not the boosterjabs have been offered and who are taking them up. i the boosterjabs have been offered and who are taking them up. i assume that information _ and who are taking them up. i assume that information is _ and who are taking them up. i assume that information is out _ and who are taking them up. i assume that information is out there _ that information is out there somewhere, i'm not aware of that information. but it is really clearly important. it is a case that the vaccination programme needs to be rolling out fast to those individuals that needs to be rolled out. if it is the case that people are not taking it up for whatever reason, that is a different issue that needs managing. it is important that needs managing. it is important that particularly the vulnerable categories, people to step forward to get the vaccine and they are offered it. to get the vaccine and they are offered it— to get the vaccine and they are offered it. ., ,., . , . offered it. how important is it that
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eo - le offered it. how important is it that people wait _ offered it. how important is it that people wait for _ offered it. how important is it that people wait for the _ offered it. how important is it that people wait for the six _ offered it. how important is it that people wait for the six months - people wait for the six months before they get their booster? is it possible to have the booster early or is it not as effective? i will or is it not as effective? i will hasten to _ or is it not as effective? i will hasten to say _ or is it not as effective? i will hasten to say i _ or is it not as effective? i will hasten to say i am _ or is it not as effective? i will hasten to say i am not - or is it not as effective? i will hasten to say i am not a - or is it not as effective? i will i hasten to say i am not a vaccine expert. vaccines do wane over time and it's all about how your immune system will react to the boosterjab when you receive it. we are in the very early stages of understanding how these vaccines work, they have only been in existence for a little over a year. it's very important that the vaccine boosters are applied at the right time so that there is the correct immune response. at the moment the information that we have suggests that around about six months after the second dose is the right time window to get the right immune reaction when you receive the booster vaccination.— reaction when you receive the booster vaccination. thank you very much, booster vaccination. thank you very much. like — booster vaccination. thank you very much, like tyldesley, _ booster vaccination. thank you very much, like tyldesley, professor- booster vaccination. thank you very much, like tyldesley, professor in l much, like tyldesley, professor in infections disease modelling. let us know what you think about that, really interesting. you can
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email us and you can always join the healthy debate on social media. a month—long strike by bin collectors in brighton could come to an end today after unions and the council negotiated a new pay deal. if the deal gets approval today, the teams will go back to work and start to tackle the huge piles of waste which have been building up. piers hopkirk has more on this. for two weeks, this was an industrial dispute which was mounted in full view of the people of brighton and hove. refuse bins overflowing into the streets as the gmb union and the council remained at loggerheads. but a settlement in sight. the gmb approving a deal thrashed out with the council in length weekend talks. brighton is a happy, welcoming town, and to seal this rubbish has been and to see this rubbish has been just dreadful for everyone. how relieved are you that it looks like it's now at a halt? very. it will be nice to see less piles of rubbish
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everywhere so yes, good stuff. i think if you're not. happy with yourjob, there's plenty of work around, leave and get another one. . to inflict this on the people that are paying their wages, - i think, is disgraceful. i'm glad it's over, i'm glad, i don't know if they paid them whatever they want, but it's pretty shocking. so, yeah, happy it's over. for drivers, that will see their wages pushed to the region of £30,000 per year. refuse collectors, to around 20,000. i'm sure the green party and the council officers must have sat down to budget this offer. i'm sure they wouldn't have put an offer on the table that they couldn't or didn't think the city could afford or weren't able to budget for. so, yes, there is a cost, we accept that but these are low—paid workers. and our part of the union, when this offer was put on the table, was to negotiate to make sure that as good a wage as possible could be delivered at the end of this. with an eye on equal pay legislation, the deal also boosts
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pay for lower paid council workers in other departments. the overall bill could run into millions of pounds. i can assure you that each and every decision i make, the taxpayer of brighton and hove city is always at the forefront of my mind, the impact potentially that may have. especially on the lower earners. and this is something which we will be scrutinising tomorrow to minimise any impact that this may have going forward. crews were back on the street as the big clear up continues. the strike seemingly resolved, that at what cost to the city? you're watching breakfast. it is 26 minutes past seven. not 27 minutes past six, sorry! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning. hundreds of afghan families who've recently settled in the capital, are leaving their temporary accomodation and declaring themselves homeless. bbc london has uncovered refugees are telling councils they don't want to stay in hotels, with some asking to be housed closer to their families here. harrow, which is dealing with nearly a dozen cases like this, received 10 homeless applications and says the government's resettlement scheme isn't clear. we need the home office to communicate with afghan refugees about what the process is and gives them clarity, as well as clarity to local councils about how this process is actually going to work. the home office says it's working closely with local authorities to ensure everyone temporarily in hotels has access to essential provision, healthcare, education and universal credit. a football coach from west london is to find out whether he is going to spend 25 years in a dubai jail, after four bottles of illegal vape
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liquid were found in his car. the court of appeal is due to review the evidence in the case of billy hood. the 24 year—old who was arrested in january, after moving to the country. he says he was forced to sign a confession in arabic, despite not speaking the language. in just under a week's time, the ultra low emission zone expands to cover the area within north and south circulars. its meant to encourage drivers to switch to cleaner cars, but there are concerns there aren't places to charge them. transport for london says the capital could need 66,000 electric vehicle charging points by 2030. at the moment there are 7,000. now the travel. now let's get the weather. hello, good morning. it has been a very mild night and temperatures have not dropped below the mid—teens in celsius, the sort of temperatures we would normally expect to see by
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day at this time of the year. a mild start, a very mixed picture. there could be some dribs and drabs of rain around for a time this morning and it is quite grey. lots of low cloud. quite a murky morning. the wind is brisk, and it is dragging the mild air our way. some strong winds at times but it should brighten up through the late morning and into the afternoon. we will even see some sunshine around. temperatures could rise to perhaps 20 or 21 celsius, well above the average for this time of the year. there will be more rain as we head into this evening. this band of rain is set to push its way eastwards. it will be heavy for a time. a mild night to follow. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius as we head into wednesday morning. on wednesday we are expecting showery outbreaks of rain. some of it likely to be heavy for a time. brighter spells in the afternoon. it stays windy. more rain for southern areas as we had through wednesday night.
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by thursday, a big drop in temperature. in north—westerly wind, but also some sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. let's return to our top story now. homeowners in england and wales are to be offered subsidies of £5,000 to replace their old gas boilers with heat pumps. the money will be available from april of next year, and it's part of the government's plan to slash carbon emissions. so how does the technology work? here is a quick explainer from here is a quick explainerfrom nina. that is what the heat pump would look like — that is what the heat pump would look like outside your house and this is— look like outside your house and this is the — look like outside your house and this is the inside. it is a bit like a fridge — this is the inside. it is a bit like a fridge a_ this is the inside. it is a bit like a fridge. a fridge soaks the hot air generated — a fridge. a fridge soaks the hot air generated by your food and pumps it
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out. generated by your food and pumps it out this _ generated by your food and pumps it out. this pulls in the hot air from outside _ out. this pulls in the hot air from outside and — out. this pulls in the hot air from outside and it is then stored here and end — outside and it is then stored here and end up— outside and it is then stored here and end up in your boiler. why would i and end up in your boiler. why would i bother— and end up in your boiler. why would i bother installing one of these? there's— i bother installing one of these? there's quite a few reasons but in terms _ there's quite a few reasons but in terms of— there's quite a few reasons but in terms of carbon _ there's quite a few reasons but in terms of carbon reduction - there's quite a few reasons but in terms of carbon reduction it's - terms of carbon reduction it's probably— terms of carbon reduction it's probably the _ terms of carbon reduction it's probably the biggest - terms of carbon reduction it's probably the biggest single . terms of carbon reduction it's . probably the biggest single thing you could — probably the biggest single thing you could do _ probably the biggest single thing you could do in _ probably the biggest single thing you could do in terms _ probably the biggest single thing you could do in terms —— - probably the biggest single thing you could do in terms —— as- probably the biggest single thing you could do in terms —— as well| probably the biggest single thing . you could do in terms —— as well as changing _ you could do in terms —— as well as changing your— you could do in terms —— as well as changing your vehicle _ you could do in terms —— as well as changing your vehicle to _ you could do in terms —— as well as changing your vehicle to reduce - you could do in terms —— as well as. changing your vehicle to reduce your personal— changing your vehicle to reduce your personal emission. _ changing your vehicle to reduce your personal emission. you _ changing your vehicle to reduce your personal emission. you can - changing your vehicle to reduce your personal emission. you can save - personal emission. you can save money— personal emission. you can save money on — personal emission. you can save money on your— personal emission. you can save money on your bills _ personal emission. you can savel money on your bills immediately. certainly— money on your bills immediately. certainly if — money on your bills immediately. certainly if you _ money on your bills immediately. certainly if you are _ money on your bills immediately. certainly if you are taking - money on your bills immediately. certainly if you are taking out - money on your bills immediately. certainly if you are taking out ani certainly if you are taking out an older. _ certainly if you are taking out an older. less — certainly if you are taking out an older, less efficient _ certainly if you are taking out an older, less efficient gas - certainly if you are taking out an older, less efficient gas boiler. i older, less efficient gas boiler. and also, — older, less efficient gas boiler. and also, there _ older, less efficient gas boiler. and also, there is _ older, less efficient gas boiler. and also, there is the - older, less efficient gas boiler. | and also, there is the potential older, less efficient gas boiler. i and also, there is the potential to -et and also, there is the potential to get grants— and also, there is the potential to get grants and— and also, there is the potential to get grants and schemes _ and also, there is the potential toj get grants and schemes available. and also, there is the potential to i get grants and schemes available. is get grants and schemes available. [£3 it easy get grants and schemes available. it easy to use? get grants and schemes available. is it easy to use? it _ get grants and schemes available. is it easy to use? it is _ get grants and schemes available. is it easy to use? it is very _ get grants and schemes available. is it easy to use? it is very easy - get grants and schemes available. is it easy to use? it is very easy to - it easy to use? it is very easy to use. it easy to use? it is very easy to use- we've _ it easy to use? it is very easy to use. we've had _ it easy to use? it is very easy to use. we've had ours _ it easy to use? it is very easy to use. we've had ours for - it easy to use? it is very easy to use. we've had ours for coming | it easy to use? it is very easy to i use. we've had ours for coming up it easy to use? it is very easy to - use. we've had ours for coming up to six years _ use. we've had ours for coming up to six years we — use. we've had ours for coming up to six years. we found _ use. we've had ours for coming up to six years. we found it _ use. we've had ours for coming up to six years. we found it quite - use. we've had ours for coming up to six years. we found it quite simple. i six years. we found it quite simple. it is six years. we found it quite simple. it is a _ six years. we found it quite simple. it is a consistent _ six years. we found it quite simple. it is a consistent heat. _ it is a consistent heat. that _ it is a consistent heat. that is— it is a consistent heat. that is explaining - it is a consistent heat. that is explaining to i it is a consistent heat. l that is explaining to you it is a consistent heat. - that is explaining to you how it works. we're joined now by mike childs, from the environmental campaign group friends of the earth. morning to you. thank you for spending a bit of time with us today. can we start with the overall
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picture, if you like? is this a positive step to changing the way we heat our homes, a £5,000 grant? i heat our homes, a £5,000 grant? i think they need to change our homes from gas _ think they need to change our homes from gas boilers to kind of electric heating _ from gas boilers to kind of electric heating via — from gas boilers to kind of electric heating via heat pumps is absolutely the right _ heating via heat pumps is absolutely the right thing. in many ways we implore — the right thing. in many ways we implore the government to make this change _ implore the government to make this change complete by 2025. we are starting _ change complete by 2025. we are starting at us now's pace and not offering — starting at us now's pace and not offering money to enough people to make _ offering money to enough people to make the _ offering money to enough people to make the switch. how many people have £5,000 or £6,000 laying spare, so they— have £5,000 or £6,000 laying spare, so they can _ have £5,000 or £6,000 laying spare, so they can upgrade their heating? we need _ so they can upgrade their heating? we need to see much more government money— we need to see much more government money and _ we need to see much more government money and we need to see a much more rapid switch— money and we need to see a much more rapid switch to _ money and we need to see a much more rapid switch to cleaner heating if we are _ rapid switch to cleaner heating if we are going to tackle the climate chaos _ we are going to tackle the climate chaos that — we are going to tackle the climate chaos that we are facing around the world _ world. that was the world. — that was the question i was going to ask you. quite a few people have been getting in contact this morning quoting what they have been quoted when they have looked into heat pumps. the most average one i could
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find was for a three—bedroom house, where persson was quoted £13,000 to install a heat pump, but the saving was between 100 and £130 per year. it would have been an environmental choice, but even the £5,000 would still leave them with an awful lot of money if they wanted to do that? yeah, that's exactly right. in our household — yeah, that's exactly right. in our household we have made that environmental choice. we are lucky, both of— environmental choice. we are lucky, both of us— environmental choice. we are lucky, both of us work, we can afford it. but for— both of us work, we can afford it. but for many people across the country — but for many people across the country they can't afford that switch. — country they can't afford that switch, and the government should be providing _ switch, and the government should be providing more money for people on lower— providing more money for people on lower incomes. the government is only looking at rolling out something like 30,000 heat pumps a year for— something like 30,000 heat pumps a year for the _ something like 30,000 heat pumps a year for the next three years. that is what _ year for the next three years. that is what we — year for the next three years. that is what we are already doing. if you look at _ is what we are already doing. if you look at france, sweden, germany, they are _ look at france, sweden, germany, they are doing so much more. boris johnson _ they are doing so much more. boris johnson is _ they are doing so much more. boris johnson is right when he tells us we -ot johnson is right when he tells us we got to— johnson is right when he tells us we got to tackle this climate emergency, we need to move fast on it, emergency, we need to move fast on it. and _ emergency, we need to move fast on it. and yet— emergency, we need to move fast on it, and yet the income to help
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householders make this shift is far from _ householders make this shift is far from adequate. there's virtually no income _ from adequate. there's virtually no income to— from adequate. there's virtually no income to help people fade home insulation— income to help people fade home insulation either. it is like we are on a _ insulation either. it is like we are on a 1500 — insulation either. it is like we are on a 1500 metres race but have decided — on a 1500 metres race but have decided to— on a 1500 metres race but have decided to walk the first lap. there is no _ decided to walk the first lap. there is no way— decided to walk the first lap. there is no way we can catch up in the two laps because — is no way we can catch up in the two laps because we have set off so slow _ laps because we have set off so slow the — laps because we have set off so slow. the golf should be doing more and more _ slow. the golf should be doing more and more quickly even if the direction _ and more quickly even if the direction of travel is the right trouble~ _ direction of travel is the right trouble. that's for the government. is it possible to do it at any other pace? we are very used to heating our homes in certain ways. on average we change our boiler once every 15 years. it will take a generation if there is going to be a change? it generation if there is going to be a chance? , . ~ generation if there is going to be a chance? , . ,, . change? it will definitely take a while, change? it will definitely take a while. ten _ change? it will definitely take a while, ten or— change? it will definitely take a while, ten or 15 _ change? it will definitely take a while, ten or 15 years _ change? it will definitely take a while, ten or 15 years is - change? it will definitely take a while, ten or 15 years is about i while, ten or 15 years is about right — while, ten or 15 years is about right. there is something like 1.5 million _ right. there is something like 1.5 million boilers replaced every year. to say— million boilers replaced every year. to say that — million boilers replaced every year. to say that 30,000 of those will be heat pumps is a tiny proportion. if we want _ heat pumps is a tiny proportion. if we want to— heat pumps is a tiny proportion. if we want to pull down the price of the heat — we want to pull down the price of the heat pumps, which we can and must, _ the heat pumps, which we can and must, one — the heat pumps, which we can and must, one of the key ingredients of
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that is— must, one of the key ingredients of that is beginning to build up the scale _ that is beginning to build up the scale. that is what is happening with solar— scale. that is what is happening with solar panels, renewable energy. we and _ with solar panels, renewable energy. we and other countries went out scale _ we and other countries went out scale with— we and other countries went out scale with those. here we are going at a snail's— scale with those. here we are going at a snail's pace with heat pumps. we should — at a snail's pace with heat pumps. we should be going faster if we want to bring _ we should be going faster if we want to bring the price down and make this affordable for everybody. because — this affordable for everybody. because everybody across the country cares about _ because everybody across the country cares about climate change. they know _ cares about climate change. they know the — cares about climate change. they know the impact it can have on future — know the impact it can have on future generations, on our kids. we have _ future generations, on our kids. we have seen— future generations, on our kids. we have seen the extreme weather around the world _ have seen the extreme weather around the world. why are they excluding people _ the world. why are they excluding people taking part in this big change — people taking part in this big change over by being so mean in terms _ change over by being so mean in terms of— change over by being so mean in terms of the grants they are giving? can i terms of the grants they are giving? can i ask— terms of the grants they are giving? can i ask about the comments from the prime minister in the papers this morning? i will read you the quote. he talks about the green shirts of the boiler police are not going to kick your door in with their sandal clad feet and the seas, add character point, your trusty old
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combi boiler. what did you think when you read that?— combi boiler. what did you think when you read that? well, he is good with a turn of— when you read that? well, he is good with a turn of phrase. _ when you read that? well, he is good with a turn of phrase. the _ when you read that? well, he is good with a turn of phrase. the reality - with a turn of phrase. the reality is nobody — with a turn of phrase. the reality is nobody is _ with a turn of phrase. the reality is nobody is talking about... heat pumps _ is nobody is talking about... heat pumps work as well as a boiler. we need _ pumps work as well as a boiler. we need to— pumps work as well as a boiler. we need to give — pumps work as well as a boiler. we need to give people carrots rather than stakes. the government is saying _ than stakes. the government is saying we — than stakes. the government is saying we are not going to use stakes, — saying we are not going to use stakes, which is right. they are not putting _ stakes, which is right. they are not putting the — stakes, which is right. they are not putting the carrots in place either. for most _ putting the carrots in place either. for most people, they will not be able to— for most people, they will not be able to make that shift. the government need to be more generous in helping _ government need to be more generous in helping people to make the shift. people _ in helping people to make the shift. people will then embrace that, much like people are beginning to embrace electric— like people are beginning to embrace electric cars, electric buses. there is this— electric cars, electric buses. there is this change over to being green. it is is this change over to being green. it is a _ is this change over to being green. it is a positive thing to do. we need — it is a positive thing to do. we need to— it is a positive thing to do. we need to provide people with carrots. and mike. _ need to provide people with carrots. and mike, just a reminder, can you
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just run us by the cost it was to you to put yours in and how much it saves you a year? i'm sure people would be interested in a case study like yours, because you have lbc looked through these figures. taste looked through these figures. we have had that he'd pop a couple of years _ have had that he'd pop a couple of years it _ have had that he'd pop a couple of years. it cost us £11,000 to fit. the grant — years. it cost us £11,000 to fit. the grant we got then is more generous— the grant we got then is more generous than the grants now. we got something _ generous than the grants now. we got something like £6,000, paid back over seven — something like £6,000, paid back over seven years, rather than up front. _ over seven years, rather than up front, which— over seven years, rather than up front, which they are talking about now _ front, which they are talking about now we _ front, which they are talking about now. we are going to be £5,000 out of pocket— now. we are going to be £5,000 out of pocket for making the shift. we are pleased we have done it. we can afford _ are pleased we have done it. we can afford it _ are pleased we have done it. we can afford it. like many viewers we care passionately about climate change and the _ passionately about climate change and the future. we are not saving anything — and the future. we are not saving anything on our energy bill. an energy— anything on our energy bill. an energy bill is basically the same because — energy bill is basically the same because even though we use less energy. _ because even though we use less energy, electricity is more expensive than gas. but this is the i’ili'it expensive than gas. but this is the right thing — expensive than gas. but this is the right thing to do. we want to do this for— right thing to do. we want to do this for are _ right thing to do. we want to do this for are children and our children's— this for are children and our children's children and we need to help make — children's children and we need to help make people make that shift.
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appreciate your time. thank you for running through your own personal choice as well. micah cassette of science, policy and research at front of the eye. time to go tojohn for the sport. talking about the consequences of the trouble at the euros final this summer. yes, good morning. reflecting on that too match stadium ban handed to england by uefa following those scenes we saw play out before the euro final between england and italy. joining us now is mark palios, who is the former chief executive of the fa, and was actually at the final in july. embarrassing for the fa. we will come to that in a moment what your reflections firstly on that? the same thing- — reflections firstly on that? the same thing- i— reflections firstly on that? the same thing. i was _ reflections firstly on that? the same thing. i was embarrassed when i saw what _ same thing. i was embarrassed when i saw what was going on around us and also disappointed that we were back to what— also disappointed that we were back to what seemed like the bad old days. _ to what seemed like the bad old days, as — to what seemed like the bad old days, as it— to what seemed like the bad old days, as it were. we were just approaching the cording, which was there _ approaching the cording, which was there to _ approaching the cording, which was there to assess your covid status
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etc, and — there to assess your covid status etc, and it — there to assess your covid status etc, and it was rushed by about, well, _ etc, and it was rushed by about, well, hundreds of young blokes, generally. not great scenes at all. we can— generally. not great scenes at all. we can see — generally. not great scenes at all. we can see some of these pictures. we can see some of these pictures. we obviously saw fans. it was a systematic breach of the turnstiles. we saw people tailgating, they were easy entry points to get into the stadium. ultimately, who was responsible for this? is this an fa issue or is it down to policing? the match itself— issue or is it down to policing? the match itself is _ issue or is it down to policing? the match itself is run by uefa. without sort of _ match itself is run by uefa. without sort of making excuses, there is an independent inquiryjust before independent inquiry just before christmas, independent inquiryjust before christmas, so we should wait to see what they— christmas, so we should wait to see what they say. my own view is it was almost _ what they say. my own view is it was almost a _ what they say. my own view is it was almost a perfect storm. we were coming _ almost a perfect storm. we were coming out — almost a perfect storm. we were coming out of covid. people were aware _ coming out of covid. people were aware of — coming out of covid. people were aware of the propensity for sort of civil disorder when you come out of covid, _ civil disorder when you come out of covid, we _ civil disorder when you come out of covid, we know that with some of the games— covid, we know that with some of the games we _ covid, we know that with some of the games we were trying to arrange. you have a _ games we were trying to arrange. you have a stadium that people knew was not full _
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have a stadium that people knew was not full. there were only 60,000. it was the _ not full. there were only 60,000. it was the first — not full. there were only 60,000. it was the first time in that had been in a final— was the first time in that had been in a final for— was the first time in that had been in a finalfor50 was the first time in that had been in a final for 50 years. it was a late _ in a final for 50 years. it was a late kick— in a final for 50 years. it was a late kick off. a lot of alcohol had been _ late kick off. a lot of alcohol had been consumed. there is a structural issue _ been consumed. there is a structural issue with _ been consumed. there is a structural issue with wembley because the two stations— issue with wembley because the two stations disgorged fans close to the stadium _ stations disgorged fans close to the stadium itself. it's not beyond the wit of _ stadium itself. it's not beyond the wit of man — stadium itself. it's not beyond the wit of man to actually put up according _ wit of man to actually put up according to fix that. it�*s according to fix that. it's estimated _ according to fix that. it's estimated there - according to fix that. it�*s estimated there were almost a quarter of a million fans outside the stadium on that match day. how was it allowed to get to that point? 60,000 tickets were sold. fans knew they were potentially 30,000 seats that had not been allocated. surely it should never have got to that point, surely the police should have stepped in it sooner? figs point, surely the police should have stepped in it sooner? has i point, surely the police should have stepped in it sooner?— stepped in it sooner? as i say, the independent _ stepped in it sooner? as i say, the independent inquiry _ stepped in it sooner? as i say, the independent inquiry will _ stepped in it sooner? as i say, the independent inquiry will look - stepped in it sooner? as i say, the independent inquiry will look at. independent inquiry will look at that specific issue. i would imagine the safety— that specific issue. i would imagine the safety advisory group will sit down _ the safety advisory group will sit down and — the safety advisory group will sit down and assess the match, i would imagine _ down and assess the match, i would imagine they decided they had enough police per— imagine they decided they had enough police per head, but clearly from what _ police per head, but clearly from what i _ police per head, but clearly from what i saw, _ police per head, but clearly from what i saw, the stewards were not capable _ what i saw, the stewards were not capable of— what i saw, the stewards were not capable of stopping people getting
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close to _ capable of stopping people getting close to the stadium. that was the issue _ close to the stadium. that was the issue if— close to the stadium. that was the issue if you — close to the stadium. that was the issue. if you look at major tournaments elsewhere, there were at least one _ tournaments elsewhere, there were at least one barrier, if not two barrios, _ least one barrier, if not two barrios, so by the time you get to the walk— barrios, so by the time you get to the walk to — barrios, so by the time you get to the walk to the stadium, you find that people with tickets, people not taking _ that people with tickets, people not taking bottles and etc. if they are drunk— taking bottles and etc. if they are drunk and — taking bottles and etc. if they are drunk and disorderly they are filtered — drunk and disorderly they are filtered out. that will be one of the recommendations i will expect to see come _ the recommendations i will expect to see come out, which is to keep people — see come out, which is to keep people away from the stadium. we await people away from the stadium. await that people away from the stadium. , await that independent investigation. ultimately though, what does this mean for the fa? potentially they are looking at a joint bid to host the 2013 world cup. will thisjeopardise joint bid to host the 2013 world cup. will this jeopardise that? well, i don't think it necessarily will well, idon't think it necessarily will of— well, i don't think it necessarily will of itself. i think the uk has a fantastic— will of itself. i think the uk has a fantastic record for putting on great — fantastic record for putting on great events. that is the first thing — great events. that is the first thing. wembley is the home of football — thing. wembley is the home of football. football people want to
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come _ football. football people want to come here. it is a fantastic stadium~ _ come here. it is a fantastic stadium~ '— come here. it is a fantastic stadium. i think it will be, depending on a couple of things. what _ depending on a couple of things. what comes out in terms of a response _ what comes out in terms of a response by the investigation. secondly, because you are basically on trial— secondly, because you are basically on trial now— secondly, because you are basically on trial now for behaviour... one of the things— on trial now for behaviour... one of the things that i think if you are looking — the things that i think if you are looking to — the things that i think if you are looking to curry favour in what is already— looking to curry favour in what is already a — looking to curry favour in what is already a difficult situation, try to get— already a difficult situation, try to get the world cup bid, bowing other— to get the world cup bid, bowing other people's national anthems is not conducive. —— booing. that is embarrassing to those sports people, football _ embarrassing to those sports people, football people. that is one of the issues _ football people. that is one of the issues i_ football people. that is one of the issues. i don't think it is vital at this issues. idon't think it is vital at this point— issues. idon't think it is vital at this point in— issues. i don't think it is vital at this point in time. the head of uefa has said _ this point in time. the head of uefa has said that. we will be looking to bid. has said that. we will be looking to bid we _ has said that. we will be looking to bid. we will have a very strong bid. we always— bid. we will have a very strong bid. we always do have. but politics intervene — we always do have. but politics intervene in fifa bids as we have seen _ intervene in fifa bids as we have seen many— intervene in fifa bids as we have seen many times.— seen many times. ultimately, i ruess, it seen many times. ultimately, i guess. it was — seen many times. ultimately, i guess. it was a _ seen many times. ultimately, i guess, it was a sorry _ seen many times. ultimately, i guess, it was a sorry and - seen many times. ultimately, i guess, it was a sorry and for. seen many times. ultimately, i. guess, it was a sorry and for what was a brilliant tournament for
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england through the summer? absolutely. if i look back we lost on penalties in the first final we had been — on penalties in the first final we had been in for 50 years. but the whole _ had been in for 50 years. but the whole night was solid by what happened on the day. and if we'd won, _ happened on the day. and if we'd won, there — happened on the day. and if we'd won, there would still have been a little _ won, there would still have been a little taste — won, there would still have been a little taste there, this wasn't quite — little taste there, this wasn't quite the uk. little taste there, this wasn't quite the uk-_ little taste there, this wasn't uuite the uk. ., . , quite the uk. unfortunately, the behaviour of _ quite the uk. unfortunately, the behaviour of some _ quite the uk. unfortunately, the behaviour of some fans - quite the uk. unfortunately, the - behaviour of some fans overshadowed by those who stormed the stadium before kick—off? by those who stormed the stadium before kick-off?— by those who stormed the stadium before kick-off? absolutely. and if ou look before kick-off? absolutely. and if you look at — before kick-off? absolutely. and if you look at the _ before kick-off? absolutely. and if you look at the fa _ before kick-off? absolutely. and if you look at the fa statement, - before kick-off? absolutely. and ifj you look at the fa statement, look at the _ you look at the fa statement, look at the wording of it, they sort of moved _ at the wording of it, they sort of moved towards blaming individuals. i think that's _ moved towards blaming individuals. i think that's right, there are individuals. but i think fifa also said there — individuals. but i think fifa also said there was general disorder, recognising the fact it wasn't a well— recognising the fact it wasn't a well policed game.— recognising the fact it wasn't a well policed game. great to get your thou~hts. well policed game. great to get your thoughts- many _ well policed game. great to get your thoughts. many thanks. _ well policed game. great to get your thoughts. many thanks. we - well policed game. great to get your thoughts. many thanks. we await i well policed game. great to get your| thoughts. many thanks. we await the findings of that investigation over the coming months. it was a disappointing end. after what was a
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great tournament for england. it certainly overshadowed things to end with that sour note and ultimately embarrassment ready for the affair. thank you, john. embarrassment ready for the affair. thank you. john-— embarrassment ready for the affair. thank you, john. some lucky people had uuite thank you, john. some lucky people had quite the _ thank you, john. some lucky people had quite the light _ thank you, john. some lucky people had quite the light show— thank you, john. some lucky people had quite the light show last - thank you, john. some lucky people had quite the light show last night. i had quite the light show last night. carol is going to tell us more. good morning. yes indeed. in part of the highlands the northern lights were out. you can see from our weather watchers pictures, lovely picture. that was taken in aberdeenshire. it was notjust in aberdeenshire. in moray we have the purple two and the yellows. this is quite a spectacular one. this is in lossiemouth. the final one i am going to show you is this one, which was taken in rogue arch. beautiful. such a spectacle to see. i have been lucky enough to see it myself. for the rest of us it is a fairly cloudy start. rain piling on from the west, moving north eastwards. you wouldn't see the northern lights now because there is
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too much cloud and rain. these pictures were taken last night. the other thing is the rain in the south—east will move away and we will see some sunshine coming through. you can see how much rain we hang onto. a lot of surface water and spray on the roads today. but it won't be cold. for northern ireland, the rain moves away from you ? but for you. the rain moves away from you ? but foryou. heavy the rain moves away from you ? but for you. heavy bursts of rain across parts of north—west england, wales into the south—west. ahead of that band of rain they will be a bit more cloud. where the cloud does break open, and the sun comes out, we are looking at 20, 20 one degree. even though we have all of this cloud and rain, it is unseasonably mild. average temperatures at this time of the year are roughly 12 in the north to 15 in the south—east. much higher than we would expect. through this evening and overnight eventually we see more rain piling into the south—east. some clearer skies. the showers peppering the north—west of scotland. time further heavy and potentially thundery showers coming
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in across the south west of england. through the english channel tonight there will be gusty winds and around areas adjacent to the english channel. but once again it is not going to be a cold night. most of us staying in double figures. as we head into tomorrow we say goodbye to the rain early on. these showers move north—east across england and also ways. still the potentialfor them to be heavy and thundery. behind them it brightens up with some sunshine. scotland and northern ireland, bara some sunshine. scotland and northern ireland, bar a few showers, will also see some sunshine. still mild. we have a weather front coming our way. this is a cold front. this is what is going to change our weather, particularly overnight into thursday. that front makes its way south as a weak feature, allowing a lot of sunshine. these white splodges represent snow. the snow is going to be in the hills, potentially as far south as north wales. you can also see it is turning that bit cooler. gone are
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the 22 and 215. it'll be fairly windy. gales around the coastline, particularly the coastline, particularly the coastline, particularly the coastline, particularly the north sea coastline. following on from a full moon on wednesday night we are looking at spring tide. there may well be some overtopping to look out for as well. it's all going on with the weather. it's busy. thank you, carol. we often talk _ it's busy. thank you, carol. we often talk about _ it's busy. thank you, carol. we often talk about the _ it's busy. thank you, carol. we often talk about the amazing i it's busy. thank you, carol. we i often talk about the amazing thing is achieved by our nhs doctors. the next story is truly incredible. it next story is truly incredible. it is about a fellow called warren higgs. his diseased kidneys weighed a total of 5.5 stone. thea;r higgs. his diseased kidneys weighed a total of 5.5 stone.— a total of 5.5 stone. they have been removed in — a total of 5.5 stone. they have been removed in a _ a total of 5.5 stone. they have been removed in a record-breaking - removed in a record—breaking operation. our health correspond report on the difference it has made to his life. it's crossing my lungs. i struggle to breathe.
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it's crossing my lungs. i struggle to breathe-— it's crossing my lungs. i struggle to breathe. , . . , to breathe. this was warren higgs in june. to breathe. this was warren higgs in me every — to breathe. this was warren higgs in me every major — to breathe. this was warren higgs in june. every major organ _ to breathe. this was warren higgs in june. every major organ was - to breathe. this was warren higgs in june. every major organ was under. june. every major organ was under intense strain. it’s june. every ma'or organ was under intense strain.— intense strain. it's crossing my stomach. _ intense strain. it's crossing my stomach. so — intense strain. it's crossing my stomach. so i— intense strain. it's crossing my stomach, so i can't _ intense strain. it's crossing my stomach, so i can't eat - intense strain. it's crossing my stomach, so i can't eat a - intense strain. it's crossing my stomach, so i can't eat a solid | stomach, so i can't eat a solid meal~ — stomach, so i can't eat a solid meal. . . stomach, so i can't eat a solid meal. . , . meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic _ meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidneys _ meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidneys it - meal. he was diagnosed with polycystic kidneys it disease i meal. he was diagnosed with - polycystic kidneys it disease more than 20 years ago. it has caused a series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side. it series of strokes which has left him paralysed on one side.— paralysed on one side. it will basically kill— paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me _ paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within - paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six i paralysed on one side. it will basically kill me within six to paralysed on one side. it will. basically kill me within six to 12 months — basically kill me within six to 12 months. ., u, , . basically kill me within six to 12 months. ., , . ., . months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys _ months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on _ months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either _ months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side - months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side of - months. you can see here a normal set of kidneys on either side of the | set of kidneys on either side of the spine. warren's kidneys were covered in cysts full of fluid and took up his whole abdomen. he had had enough and want of the organs removed. the 0 eration and want of the organs removed. the operation itself is dangerous. it is 50-50 _ operation itself is dangerous. it is 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it. 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it we _ 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it we got— 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it we got to — 50—50 chance. but i've got to take it. i've got to do it because it's not a _ it. i've got to do it because it's not a life — it. i've got to do it because it's not a life living on the sofa. surgeons _ not a life living on the sofa. surgeons discovered warren's kidneys weighed 35 kilograms. that is nearly
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5.5 stone, making it a highly complex operation. i’ee 5.5 stone, making it a highly complex operation. i've never seen an hinu complex operation. i've never seen anything as — complex operation. i've never seen anything as big _ complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as _ complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. _ complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. this - complex operation. i've never seen anything as big as this. this would | anything as big as this. this would be the heaviest kidneys removed anywhere in the world. when everything is distorted and not in the right place, you run the risk of damaging other organs. you run the risk of major haemorrhage. but risk of ma'or haemorrhage. but warren risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took — risk of major haemorrhage. but warren took that risk. and from struggling to breathe, to building back his strength. this is him three months after surgery. how are you feeling? abs. months after surgery. how are you feelin: ? . ., , . months after surgery. how are you feelina? . ., , . . ., feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better- i can _ feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe. _ feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. ican breathe. i— feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe. i can - feeling? a lot better! yeah, a lot better. i can breathe. i can eat i better. i can breathe. i can eat little _ better. i can breathe. i can eat little bits _ better. i can breathe. i can eat little bits. definitely a lot better _ little bits. definitely a lot better. i get a lot out of here. it is a mental— better. i get a lot out of here. it is a mental thing as well. this was a big _ is a mental thing as well. this was a big part — is a mental thing as well. this was a big part of— is a mental thing as well. this was a big part of my old life.— a big part of my old life. warren is still learning _ a big part of my old life. warren is still learning to _ a big part of my old life. warren is still learning to adjust. _ a big part of my old life. warren is still learning to adjust. having - still learning to adjust. having lost 45 kilos almost overnight, losing his balance can still be a problem. losing his balance can still be a roblem. �* . losing his balance can still be a roblem. �* , ., .,
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problem. it's weird for me to get around the _ problem. it's weird for me to get around the fact _ problem. it's weird for me to get around the fact that _ problem. it's weird for me to get around the fact that i _ problem. it's weird for me to get around the fact that i can - problem. it's weird for me to get around the fact that i can hold i around the fact that i can hold those, — around the fact that i can hold those, i— around the fact that i can hold those, i can feel this five kilograms, but the fact i had four to five _ kilograms, but the fact i had four to five kilos in front of me, it's hard _ to five kilos in front of me, it's hard for— to five kilos in front of me, it's hard for me _ to five kilos in front of me, it's hard for me to grasp. step-by-step warren is determined _ hard for me to grasp. step-by-step warren is determined to _ hard for me to grasp. step-by-step warren is determined to get - hard for me to grasp. step-by-step warren is determined to get his - hard for me to grasp. step-by-step warren is determined to get his lifej warren is determined to get his life back on track. hoffa warren is determined to get his life back on track.— warren is determined to get his lifej back on track._ hard. back on track. how was that? hard. that has smashed _ back on track. how was that? hard. that has smashed my _ back on track. how was that? hard. that has smashed my record. - back on track. how was that? hard. that has smashed my record. he i back on track. how was that? hard. that has smashed my record. he is| that has smashed my record. he is de endent that has smashed my record. he is dependent on _ that has smashed my record. he is dependent on dialysis _ that has smashed my record. he is dependent on dialysis three - that has smashed my record. he: 3 dependent on dialysis three times a week but is hoping to be added to the transplant waiting list by the end of the year. it the transplant waiting list by the end of the year.— end of the year. it would mean everything- _ end of the year. it would mean everything- lf _ end of the year. it would mean everything- if i _ end of the year. it would mean everything. ifi had _ end of the year. it would mean everything. if i had a _ end of the year. it would mean everything. ifi had a kidney. end of the year. it would mean everything. ifi had a kidney i i everything. if i had a kidney i would — everything. if i had a kidney i would be _ everything. if i had a kidney i would be able to do anything, do all my sports — would be able to do anything, do all my sports. yes, i would have to take more _ my sports. yes, i would have to take more tablets — my sports. yes, i would have to take more tablets but i'm free to get on with my— more tablets but i'm free to get on with my life. that will be so amazing _ with my life. that will be so amazing for me. it really would. find amazing for me. it really would. and we wish him — amazing for me. it really would. fich we wish him the very best of luck. what a transformation, life changing. wish you all the best. time for a bit of tv nostalgia now. and if you're over a certain age,
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this tune will almost certainly give you that unmistakeable sunday night feeling. that is, of course, the theme to the bbc one detective drama bergerac, which was first broadcast 40 years ago. the bbc archive is marking the occasion by releasing a stash of photographs, which were taken during the show�*s ten—year run on the island ofjersey. we can see a few of them now. brian constantine is a tv producer involved in plans
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it has turned you into a sex symbol? yes, _ it has turned you into a sex symbol? yes. this— it has turned you into a sex symbol? yes. this is— it has turned you into a sex symbol? yes, this is amazing. i can count my success— yes, this is amazing. i can count my success with — yes, this is amazing. i can count my success with women _ yes, this is amazing. i can count my success with women on _ yes, this is amazing. i can count my success with women on the - yes, this is amazing. i can count my success with women on the fingers. yes, this is amazing. i can count my. success with women on the fingers of one hand _ success with women on the fingers of one hand i— success with women on the fingers of one hand. ~ ~ . one hand. i like him. ithink it is marvellous- _ one hand. i like him. ithink it is marvellous. -- _ one hand. i like him. ithink it is marvellous. -- he _ one hand. i like him. ithink it is marvellous. -- he is _ one hand. i like him. i think it is| marvellous. -- he is marvellous. my my favourite bit was hearing from those ladies. you are never too old. brian constantine is a tv producer involved in plans to reboot bergerac. he joins us from jersey. good morning. thank you for being with us. for those who might be watching and have never watched bergerac before, my mum was completely obsessed with it. what was it that made the show so special and so popular?— and so popular? you're right, it was compulsive — and so popular? you're right, it was compulsive viewing. _ and so popular? you're right, it was compulsive viewing. we're - and so popular? you're right, it was
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compulsive viewing. we're talking i compulsive viewing. we're talking about _ compulsive viewing. we're talking about it _ compulsive viewing. we're talking about it 40 years on. i think what was so _ about it 40 years on. i think what was so special about bergerac, the original— was so special about bergerac, the original series was the appeal of this unknown island to quite a lot of people. — this unknown island to quite a lot of people, that really gave the writers — of people, that really gave the writers carte blanche to turn it into _ writers carte blanche to turn it into whatever they wanted, really. 15 million — into whatever they wanted, really. 15 million viewers. these days anything — 15 million viewers. these days anything south of 6 million is a really— anything south of 6 million is a really good day. so, yeah, it really had that— really good day. so, yeah, it really had that appeal, that uniqueness. and john — had that appeal, that uniqueness. and john nettles brought so much to the character. it will be hard to top it _ the character. it will be hard to top it but — the character. it will be hard to top it but we will try. gk, the character. it will be hard to top it but we will try.— the character. it will be hard to top it but we will try. ok, so what are ou top it but we will try. ok, so what are you going _ top it but we will try. ok, so what are you going to _ top it but we will try. ok, so what are you going to do _ top it but we will try. ok, so what are you going to do to _ top it but we will try. ok, so what are you going to do to top - top it but we will try. ok, so what are you going to do to top it? - top it but we will try. ok, so what i are you going to do to top it? well, as ou are you going to do to top it? well, as you know. _ are you going to do to top it? well, as you know, the _ are you going to do to top it? well, as you know, the show _ are you going to do to top it? well, as you know, the show is _ are you going to do to top it? well, as you know, the show is in - as you know, the show is in development so it is quite hard to talk about— development so it is quite hard to talk about any detail, which is a shame — talk about any detail, which is a shame we _ talk about any detail, which is a shame. we love to shout it from the rooftops _ shame. we love to shout it from the rooftops about our plans. i can reassure — rooftops about our plans. i can reassure you that it is a fantastic team _ reassure you that it is a fantastic team that — reassure you that it is a fantastic team that is working incredibly hard behind _ team that is working incredibly hard behind the — team that is working incredibly hard behind the scenes to bring this to
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fruition _ behind the scenes to bring this to fruition and see a bergerac reboot in the _ fruition and see a bergerac reboot in the not—too—distant future. we have _ in the not—too—distant future. we have a _ in the not—too—distant future. we have a partnership with and all, a bafta _ have a partnership with and all, a bafta nominated team were fantastic. they have _ bafta nominated team were fantastic. they have some really good ideas to brin- they have some really good ideas to bring it _ they have some really good ideas to bring it into — they have some really good ideas to bring it into a modern day, contemporary feel, and do itjustice to the _ contemporary feel, and do itjustice to the show— contemporary feel, and do itjustice to the show that it once was. contemporary feel, and do it 'ustice to the show that it once wash to the show that it once was. there is a lot of talk— to the show that it once was. there is a lot of talk about _ to the show that it once was. there is a lot of talk about the _ to the show that it once was. there is a lot of talk about the new - to the show that it once was. there is a lot of talk about the new james bond. there has been quite a lot of speculation about the new bergerac as well. have you started that process? as well. have you started that rocess? . . . ~ process? that is the fun bit. we have gone _ process? that is the fun bit. we have gone through _ process? that is the fun bit. we have gone through all _ process? that is the fun bit. we have gone through all the - process? that is the fun bit. we | have gone through all the boring elements in the development process. now it _ elements in the development process. now it is _ elements in the development process. now it is the exciting bit where we are getting our teeth into one of the show— are getting our teeth into one of the show is going to look like. of course, _ the show is going to look like. of course, we — the show is going to look like. of course, we will leave that up to the casting _ course, we will leave that up to the casting experts. but there has been a lot of— casting experts. but there has been a lot of interest from some big —— some _ a lot of interest from some big —— some very— a lot of interest from some big —— some very big names and it is encouraging. it was a multifaceted, interesting — encouraging. it was a multifaceted, interesting character. so, fingers crossed, — interesting character. so, fingers crossed, whoever it may be will do a fantastic _ crossed, whoever it may be will do a fantasticjob. maybe the nextjohn
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nettles, _ fantasticjob. maybe the nextjohn nettles, with his blessing. it nettles, with his blessing. doesn't nettles, with his blessing. it doesn't really matter this, but i'm just intrigued. we mentioned whether james bond would be a woman or like, would bergerac definitely be a bug? 7 would bergerac definitely be a bug? ? what might definitely be a bloke? in this day and age we explore other areas _ in this day and age we explore other areas it— in this day and age we explore other areas it has— in this day and age we explore other areas. it has certainly been discussed whether that would change, or we would go down a different route _ or we would go down a different route but — or we would go down a different route. but i think the feeling is that part — route. but i think the feeling is that part of the appeal of the original— that part of the appeal of the original show was this multifaceted sort of. _ original show was this multifaceted sort of, slightly damaged copper, who managed to have access to different — who managed to have access to different echelons of society in jersey — different echelons of society in jersey with each early hungerford character — jersey with each early hungerford character as well. so i thinkjust staying — character as well. so i thinkjust staying true to what it was is what we are _ staying true to what it was is what we are aiming for. i would never say never _ we are aiming for. i would never say never. ~ ., �* ., . . never. wow, so i've got a chance, i could be the — never. wow, so i've got a chance, i could be the female _ never. wow, so i've got a chance, i could be the female bergerac! - never. wow, so i've got a chance, i could be the female bergerac! that is fascinating. one of the brilliant things about the show was actually the setting, the star was the setting. how important is the island
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ofjersey in all of this? i setting. how important is the island ofjersey in all of this?— ofjersey in all of this? i think it's possibly _ of jersey in all of this? i think it's possibly the _ of jersey in all of this? i think it's possibly the biggest - of jersey in all of this? i think - it's possibly the biggest character in the _ it's possibly the biggest character in the show. jersey has become part ? in the show. jersey has become part 7 where _ in the show. jersey has become part 7 where it— in the show. jersey has become part ? where it has become part of the identity— ? where it has become part of the identity of— ? where it has become part of the identity ofjersey. it is a small island — identity ofjersey. it is a small island. the population ofjersey is very proud — island. the population ofjersey is very proud of bergerac. it is still spoken— very proud of bergerac. it is still spoken about all the time. i am from the island, _ spoken about all the time. i am from the island, so the pressure is on to do a _ the island, so the pressure is on to do a good — the island, so the pressure is on to do a good job. i have been as far as mexico _ do a good job. i have been as far as mexico and — do a good job. i have been as far as mexico and you mention the word jersey— mexico and you mention the word jersey and — mexico and you mention the word jersey and people go, oh, yeah, bergerac — jersey and people go, oh, yeah, bergerac. it had such an impact on the island — bergerac. it had such an impact on the island. there are tours, there are all— the island. there are tours, there are all sorts _ the island. there are tours, there are all sorts. it really showed off the beauty of the island and the tourism — the beauty of the island and the tourism that came from that is really— tourism that came from that is really noticeable as well. you said ou crew really noticeable as well. you said you grew op _ really noticeable as well. you said you grew up in — really noticeable as well. you said you grew up in jersey. _ really noticeable as well. you said you grew up in jersey. do - really noticeable as well. you said you grew up in jersey. do you - really noticeable as well. you said| you grew up in jersey. do you mind you grew up injersey. do you mind me asking you how old you are? were you a life when it started? it me asking you how old you are? were you a life when it started?— you a life when it started? it was sort of arm _ you a life when it started? it was sort of arm when _ you a life when it started? it was sort of arm when i _ you a life when it started? it was sort of arm when i started. - you a life when it started? it was sort of arm when i started. i - you a life when it started? it was sort of arm when i started. i was j sort of arm when i started. i was never— sort of arm when i started. i was never part— sort of arm when i started. i was never part of that first generation that watched it. but you can't
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really — that watched it. but you can't really move in jersey for people talking — really move in jersey for people talking about how their uncle passed my car— talking about how their uncle passed my car was— talking about how their uncle passed my car was in this scene or their mum— my car was in this scene or their mum was— my car was in this scene or their mum was on— my car was in this scene or their mum was on the beach. it's really important — mum was on the beach. it's really important to islanders. it is part of the _ important to islanders. it is part of the island a story and the population's story. brilliant. we wish ou population's story. brilliant. we wish you all _ population's story. brilliant. we wish you all the _ population's story. brilliant. we wish you all the best. _ population's story. brilliant. we wish you all the best. thank- population's story. brilliant. we | wish you all the best. thank you population's story. brilliant. we - wish you all the best. thank you for coming on and talking to us. will you come back and tell us when you have cast bergerac? can we have the exclusive? ~ , ,., , have cast bergerac? can we have the exclusive? ~ , , �* , have cast bergerac? can we have the exclusive? ~ , , �*, , , exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustratin: exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustrating not _ exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustrating not to _ exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustrating not to be _ exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustrating not to be able - exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustrating not to be able to - exclusive? absolutely. it's pretty frustrating not to be able to wax| frustrating not to be able to wax lyrical _ frustrating not to be able to wax lyrical about the plans for but we should _ lyrical about the plans for but we should have some very exciting news very soon _ should have some very exciting news ve soon. ., , should have some very exciting news very soon-— well. i very soon. how soon is soon? well, with a fair— very soon. how soon is soon? well, with a fair wind, _ very soon. how soon is soon? well, with a fair wind, we _ very soon. how soon is soon? well, with a fair wind, we could _ very soon. how soon is soon? well, with a fair wind, we could be - with a fair wind, we could be looking — with a fair wind, we could be looking at, you know, possibly next year. _ looking at, you know, possibly next year. early— looking at, you know, possibly next year, early next year, we don't know — year, early next year, we don't know. ., , know. not soon, soon, but soon! reau know. not soon, soon, but soon! really good _ know. not soon, soon, but soon! really good to — know. not soon, soon, but soon! really good to talk _ know. not soon, soon, but soon! really good to talk to _ know. not soon, soon, but soon! really good to talk to you. - know. not soon, soon, but soon! really good to talk to you. best i know. not soon, soon, but soon!| really good to talk to you. best of luck. i really good to talk to you. best of luck. ., . ~ luck. i thought he meant next week. m mum
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luck. i thought he meant next week. my mum will — luck. i thought he meant next week. my mum will go _ luck. i thought he meant next week. my mum will go absolutely - luck. i thought he meant next week. j my mum will go absolutely bananas. it is part of the holy trinity. poorer, more sand bergerac, with a bit of midsummer murders as well. she likes sunday night telly. she is in that situation _ she likes sunday night telly. she is in that situation where _ she likes sunday night telly. she is in that situation where she - she likes sunday night telly. she is in that situation where she can - in that situation where she can watch inspector morse again, because she can't remember it first time round. if she can't remember it first time round. , ., . she can't remember it first time round. i. . , she can't remember it first time round. . , . . round. if you had been watching it ou would round. if you had been watching it you would know _ round. if you had been watching it you would know every _ round. if you had been watching it you would know every line - round. if you had been watching it you would know every line of- round. if you had been watching it i you would know every line of script. don't get me started on that. later on we'll be crossing to our reporter fiona lamdin in maidstone, kent, to see a set of replica first world war trenches, which have been dug. let's have a quick look at the bird's eye view. that is like the perfect school field trip. that is like the perfect school field tri -. �* . that is like the perfect school field tri. �* . _ that is like the perfect school fieldtri.�* . _ , field trip. brilliant school trip. fantastic- _ field trip. brilliant school trip. fantastic. we _ field trip. brilliant school trip. fantastic. we will _ field trip. brilliant school trip. fantastic. we will be - field trip. brilliant school trip. fantastic. we will be live - field trip. brilliant school trip. | fantastic. we will be live there later. stay with us.
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headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. an end to new gas boilers within15 years but the prime minister says, don't expect the green police to kick your door down. £5,000 of subsidies per household but is that enough money to tempt in homeowners and drive down emissions? a major explosion shakes a housing estate in ayr. two adults and two children are in hospital. after mp5 pay tribute to sir david amess in parliament, more discussions on what can be done to keep politicians safe. england are hit with a stadium ban by uefa. at least one match will be played behind closed doors after ticketless fans stormed the turnstiles at last summer's euros final. some parts of the highlands were
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lucky enough to see the northern lights last night but today we are looking at a lot of cloud, murky conditions, rain, breezy but unseasonably mild and riveted the sunshine, temperatures could get up as high as 21 degrees. —— where we see the sunshine. it's tuesday the 19th of october. the prime minister has said the government's plan to phase out gas boilers will not be enforced by "greenshirts" armed with sandals and carrots. borisjohnson wrote the comments in a newspaper article promoting his aim to stop the sale of new gas boilers within15 years. from next april households in england and wales will be offered grants of £5,000 to install air source heat pumps, or other green heating. £450 million will be spent on the boiler upgrade scheme, which will run for three years. but critics say the scheme is unambitious as the grants amount tojust 90,000 replaced boilers. our political correspondent
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chris mason is in westminster. so this is ambitious from the government, but the prime minister's choice of language has been criticised this morning.- choice of language has been criticised this morning. yes, good morninu. criticised this morning. yes, good morning- what — criticised this morning. yes, good morning. what we _ criticised this morning. yes, good morning. what we have _ criticised this morning. yes, good morning. what we have got - criticised this morning. yes, good morning. what we have got here | criticised this morning. yes, good. morning. what we have got here is the prime minister, ahead of the big summit coming up in the couple of weeks, cop26 in glasgow, loads of world leaders flying to the uk to try to crunch down new promises on climate change and cutting emissions. what we are getting from the government today are some concrete ideas about how you go about doing that. but crucially, what boris johnson about doing that. but crucially, what borisjohnson is trying to do is ensure that he takes us with him. so people don't think, i would quite like to be green but it will be costing me a fortune and be a complete hassle so why should i bother? let's have a look at the article he had written in the sun newspaper. you can see the headline. the boiler police are not going to kick your door in with their sandal clad feet, and seize, at carrot—point,
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your trusty old combi. classicjohnsonian rhetoric there. classic johnsonian rhetoric there. the classicjohnsonian rhetoric there. the essential message being that you don't need to be scared by this kind of stuff. it's notjust an obsession that rich people will worry about, the environment, we have to take everyone with us, that is the thrust of what downing street are saying. they hope that by offering these grants boiler replacement in england and wales is concerned, you not only tempt people to do it but you start shifting incentives within the market so more people come in to in to try to make the new things, these heat pumps. that will hopefully make them cheaper and the whole thing becomes a virtuous circle. that's the plan. expect plenty more of this from the prime minister in the next few weeks around that big summit, trying to ensure that people are willing to go green because it isn't too expensive and not too much of a factor. . . ~ , too expensive and not too much of a factor. . , ~ , ., ~ too expensive and not too much of a factor. . , ~ , . ,, i. too expensive and not too much of a factor. . , ~' , . ~' i., ~ factor. that is key, thank you. we will be finding _ factor. that is key, thank you. we
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will be finding out _ factor. that is key, thank you. we will be finding out how _ factor. that is key, thank you. we will be finding out how much - factor. that is key, thank you. we will be finding out how much of i factor. that is key, thank you. we will be finding out how much of a | will be finding out how much of a faff it might be or not from nina. she is at a training centre where people learn how to install these things, we will find about all of the cost and the implications later on at 8:30am. four people have been taken to hospital after an explosion at a house in ayr. the two adults and two children were injured in a blast which was heard and felt for miles around. our correspondent jamie mclvor is there. can you give us an update, what do we know, what is the latest? the full facts of _ we know, what is the latest? the full facts of this _ we know, what is the latest? the: full facts of this incident are still to be established, so i will talk about what we know. the explosion happened just after 7pm last night. it was clearly a very loud explosion, heard several miles away and local residents say they felt their houses shake. pictures on social media show one house appears to have been destroyed and police say a total of four houses have been
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damaged. two adults and two children were taken to hospital near kilmarnock but no word on their condition. the course of the explosion has still to be established. scottish gas networks were on the scene trying to make sure everything was safe. clearly a gas explosion is one express but —— is one possibility which must be explored but no confirmation of the cause of this expression. the area immediately around and about the explosion was evacuated, some nearby residents had to spend the night in rescue centres set up by the local council in a nearby school. one of the local churches as well. one of the local churches as well. one of the priorities today will have to be any help needed for anyone who is unable to return to their home. especially those whose homes have been badly damaged. as i say, investigations are under way into the cause of the explosion, and still, significant police presence this morning. still, significant police presence this morning-— still, significant police presence this morning. still, significant police presence this morninu. . ~' ,, .~ this morning. thank you, jamie, good to talk to you. — this morning. thank you, jamie, good
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to talk to you, thank _ this morning. thank you, jamie, good to talk to you, thank you _ this morning. thank you, jamie, good to talk to you, thank you for - this morning. thank you, jamie, good to talk to you, thank you for the - to talk to you, thank you for the update. hospital admissions could surge over winter unless the rollout of the covid vaccine booster programme is sped up across the uk. that's the warning from one member of the covid—19 actuaries response group, who says fewer than half of those in the "at—risk" group who received a second jab at least six months ago have had a third dose. earlier, we spoke to an epidemiologist who said that the timing of any response to increasing cases is crucial.— cases is crucial. epidemiologists like myself _ cases is crucial. epidemiologists like myself talk _ cases is crucial. epidemiologists like myself talk about _ cases is crucial. epidemiologists like myself talk about the - cases is crucial. epidemiologists like myself talk about the lag, l like myself talk about the lag, whenever cases are reported, its always one or two weeks before those are reflected in hospital admissions and a little bit further before they are reflected in deaths. the difficulty always is that if the government are going to react, they need to react slightly earlier than they think they might want to because of this lag. a former british army soldier, who was standing trial over a fatal shooting during northern ireland's troubles, has died. dennis hutchings had denied attempting to murder john pat cunningham in county tyrone in 1974.
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the trial was adjourned last week after the 80—year—old, from cornwall, fell ill. he later tested positive for covid and died in a belfast hospital. donald trump has filed a case against the congressional committee which is investigating the attack by his supporters on the capitol building in january. the lawsuit is an effort to keep records from his presidency secret. he claims the material is covered by executive privilege, which protects the confidentiality of some white house documents. the rapper kanye west has formally changed his name. he is now called ye. he made the application to a los angeles court in august and he hasjust been given the green light. the 44—year—old has long used the nickname ye and it was the title of an album he released in 2018. he used it in all my conversations with him, yes. no longer can the west, just ye. —— no longer kanye
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west. it west, 'ust ye. -- no longer kanye west. , ., . . . . west. if you are watching earlier, the breaking _ west. if you are watching earlier, the breaking news _ west. if you are watching earlier, the breaking news carroll, - west. if you are watching earlier, the breaking news carroll, this i the breaking news carroll, this morning, looking at baby names, fewer than three carols last were born last year. we are glad to have the number one carol! i would question that, but thank you! it is very mild for the time of year this morning, there is a lot of cloud, murky conditions, it is breezy and we have some rain around. the rain has been falling steadily through the night, coming in from the west, pushing north—east with heavy bursts in it. eventually, it will clear northern ireland, left with a few showers here, and some sunshine coming through. ahead of it a bit more cloud. after the morning rain in the south—east, it should brighten up and we will see some sunshine. i mentioned it is breezy
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but here are the temperatures, possibly 21 locally in the south—east. way above average, the average is roughly 12 in the north and south, 15. overnight in the rain pushes towards the south—east, we will continue with showers and parts of the northwest. by the end of the night we will see some heavy and potentially thundery showers coming into the south—west and wales. gusty winds through the english channel and areas adjacent to the english channel. these are the overnight lows, nine to 16 degrees. another mild night. tomorrow early on we say goodbye to the rain in the south—east. showers in the south—west pushing towards the north of england. still heavy and thundery, clearing into the north sea eventually, in between some sunshine. this weather event is salient, tomorrow will not be as mild as today but still mild. as the weather front wings colder conditions overnight into thursday.
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"one of the nicest, kindest and most gentle individuals to grace these benches" — that's how the prime minister described sir david amess, who was stabbed to death in his constituency on friday. our reporter ben bolous is in leigh—on—sea for us today and he's joined by someone who worked closely with sir david on a project that meant a lot to the southend west mp. southend will gain a city status in memory of sir david amess. it is a bittersweet moment for southend? very much so. bittersweet moment for southend? very much 50. that awarding of city status, it's a very rare honour indeed, and perhaps nobody knew that more so than sir david amess himself. he was the biggest champion for this area. he was someone who campaigned for that, year after year after year. and here we have a very quick decision on it, and in many
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ways, a lot of people are saying, there could be no betterfitting tribute to his memory. everyone we have heard from in south and is delighted by it, among them, with me is david stanley, —— in southend. david stanley campaigned alongside him for city status. how did you feel yesterday when the prime minister announced southend would become city? it minister announced southend would become city?— become city? it was such an emotional— become city? it was such an emotional moment. - become city? it was such an emotional moment. a - become city? it was such an i emotional moment. a build-up become city? it was such an - emotional moment. a build-up of all emotional moment. a build—up of all of the _ emotional moment. a build—up of all of the outpouring of the overwhelming feeling of loss and the devastating news on friday, and then yesterday. _ devastating news on friday, and then yesterday, for the prime minister to make _ yesterday, for the prime minister to make that _ yesterday, for the prime minister to make that announcement, i have to admit _ make that announcement, i have to admit i _ make that announcement, i have to admit i burst into tears. the emotion— admit i burst into tears. the emotion overcame me. because sir david _ emotion overcame me. because sir david loved — emotion overcame me. because sir david loved southend. so for that announcement to be made, in his memory. — announcement to be made, in his memory, this city, southend city. we
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will hopefully be able to in the future — will hopefully be able to in the future heal and thrive in his memory _ future heal and thrive in his memory-— future heal and thrive in his memory. future heal and thrive in his memo .~ , , future heal and thrive in his memo .~ , memory. why is a city state is so important. _ memory. why is a city state is so important. why _ memory. why is a city state is so important, why did _ memory. why is a city state is so important, why did it _ memory. why is a city state is so important, why did it matter to l important, why did it matter to sir david so much that it got that status? . . . david so much that it got that status? . ., david so much that it got that status? . , . ., , ., ., status? he was all about promoting southend and _ status? he was all about promoting southend and the _ status? he was all about promoting southend and the people _ status? he was all about promoting southend and the people of - status? he was all about promoting i southend and the people of southend. he was— southend and the people of southend. he was very aware that i think towns can be _ he was very aware that i think towns can be somewhat isolated, i think, in many— can be somewhat isolated, i think, in many ways, they can stay as they are and _ in many ways, they can stay as they are and people who achieve anything in it, are and people who achieve anything in it. it _ are and people who achieve anything in it. it stays— are and people who achieve anything in it, it stays under the southend regional— in it, it stays under the southend regional banner. sir david thought southend — regional banner. sir david thought southend was more than that. he wanted _ southend was more than that. he wanted southend to be a beacon, he wanted _ wanted southend to be a beacon, he wanted it _ wanted southend to be a beacon, he wanted it to be put on the map, not 'ust wanted it to be put on the map, not just in— wanted it to be put on the map, not just in this — wanted it to be put on the map, not just in this country but internationally. anyone who can do that for— internationally. anyone who can do that for the — internationally. anyone who can do that for the people that he loved in the town— that for the people that he loved in the town that he loved was a priority— the town that he loved was a priority for sir david. it's about putting — priority for sir david. it's about putting southend on the map. you worked with _
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putting southend on the map. gm. worked with him on that campaign to achieve city status for southend. how did that friendship come about, how did he rope you into the campaign? he how did he rope you into the campaign?— how did he rope you into the camaiun? . . ., how did he rope you into the cam-lain? ., ., ., .,, campaign? he had a wonderful habit of rain: campaign? he had a wonderful habit of raping everybody _ campaign? he had a wonderful habit of raping everybody into _ campaign? he had a wonderful habit of raping everybody into everything. | of raping everybody into everything. i had owned sir david the 25 years. as a musician in the town, he would often _ as a musician in the town, he would often ask— as a musician in the town, he would often ask me — as a musician in the town, he would often ask me to play piano at a reception — often ask me to play piano at a reception or a concept so we got to know— reception or a concept so we got to know each— reception or a concept so we got to know each other. then he supported my charity. — know each other. then he supported my charity, the music man project, which _ my charity, the music man project, which is _ my charity, the music man project, which is a _ my charity, the music man project, which is a wonderful organisation for people with learning disabilities. after awhile he would often _ disabilities. after awhile he would often say. — disabilities. after awhile he would often say, what can i do for you and your charity? — often say, what can i do for you and your charity? and as our friendship grew. _ your charity? and as our friendship grew. he _ your charity? and as our friendship grew, he roped me into helping him promote _ grew, he roped me into helping him promote southend. initially a few years _ promote southend. initially a few years ago— promote southend. initially a few years ago under the city of culture campaign. — years ago under the city of culture campaign, which we didn't succeed in and he _ campaign, which we didn't succeed in and he called as the alternative city of — and he called as the alternative city of culture which was very sir david. _ city of culture which was very sir david. more recently, iwas the city of culture which was very sir david. more recently, i was the vice chair— david. more recently, i was the vice chair of— david. more recently, i was the vice chair of his— david. more recently, i was the vice chair of his committee to try and
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work— chair of his committee to try and work the — chair of his committee to try and work the bid up for the application for city— work the bid up for the application for city status. and only a couple of weeks — for city status. and only a couple of weeks ago i was with him as we were _ of weeks ago i was with him as we were launching that campaign. he was so proud _ were launching that campaign. he was so proud to— were launching that campaign. he was so proud to do that. he just wanted to see _ so proud to do that. he just wanted to see how— so proud to do that. he just wanted to see how far we could go.- to see how far we could go. thank ou for to see how far we could go. thank you for speaking _ to see how far we could go. thank you for speaking to _ to see how far we could go. thank you for speaking to us _ to see how far we could go. thank you for speaking to us this - to see how far we could go. thankl you for speaking to us this morning on bbc breakfast. that most unusual thing in the commons yesterday, the house united and speaking with one voice, people sharing their memories of sir david amess, their colleague, and also theirfriend. of sir david amess, their colleague, and also their friend. among the tributes, the home secretary priti patel described him as mr southend. so for the talent to become a city in his honour could be no bigger, better fitting in his honour could be no bigger, betterfitting tribute. in his honour could be no bigger, better fitting tribute. it will certainly become sir david amess's legacy for the constituency represented for so many years. thank ou ve represented for so many years. thank you very much. _ represented for so many years. thank you very much, ben. _
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mp5 will be reflecting on their personal safety as normal business resumes in the house of commons. joining us from westminster is stephen timms who was stabbed twice as he carried out a constituency surgery in 2010. he knows the danger is all too well. good morning to you, thank you very much indeed for talking to us. you paid tribute to sir david yesterday. what kind of a man, a colleague, was he for you? i what kind of a man, a colleague, was he for ou? what kind of a man, a colleague, was he for you?— he for you? i felt i had a very close relationship _ he for you? i felt i had a very close relationship with - he for you? i felt i had a very close relationship with him i he for you? i felt i had a very - close relationship with him because i represent the area in which he grew up in the london borough of newham. he was always very supportive to our area into very important ways. it turned out yesterday what i thought was a rather remarkable event, that lots of mp5 thought the same about him. people who had worked with him on animal welfare, politically, people who had worked with him on animalwelfare, politically, members animal welfare, politically, members of animalwelfare, politically, members of parliament who are catholics, all sorts of people. they all felt very
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strongly that he was a very admirable person and felt very warm towards him and obviously extremely sad and distressed about what had happened. but he did a greatjob for our area, the one in which he grew up, as well as the areas he represented subsequently. you, of course, represented subsequently. you, of course. were _ represented subsequently. you, of course, were attacked _ represented subsequently. you, of course, were attacked more - represented subsequently. you, of course, were attacked more than i represented subsequently. you, of course, were attacked more than a decade ago now. how challenging has it been over the last few days to face up to this latest tragic case? well, it's been a horrible event. and the news on friday was just awful. and of course it is right that we all think again about the security arrangements in our surgeries. i was attacked in my constituency surgery, as sir david was on friday. we made some changes. but we do need to rethink it, as the
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home secretary and others have said. but accessibility of mps, home secretary and others have said. but accessibility of mp5, i think, is absolutely vital. it really is very important and a very valuable feature of our system that people can access their member of parliament, the person who asks them to vote for them every few years. and when we look at these arrangements, we need to make very sure that we don't lose that quality of accessibility which i think is so important and so valuable. considering what happened to you all those years ago, do you still get the sort of level of abuse and threats that we have heard other members of parliament talk about over the last few days?— members of parliament talk about over the last few days? well, there is alwa s over the last few days? well, there is always unpleasantness _ over the last few days? well, there is always unpleasantness on - over the last few days? well, there i is always unpleasantness on twitter. but i wouldn't say that's a major feature of my life, certainly nothing remotely untoward, like what
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happened in 2010, it has happened to me since then. a big part of my memory of the events of 2010 was the wave of support and warmth which i benefited from as i recovered from the attack, in the days afterwards. so, no, i don't feel that abuse is a big factor in my work at the moment. but for many mps, particularly i think for women mps, it is. sol agree with the calls that were made yesterday for steps to be taken to deal with that. band yesterday for steps to be taken to deal with that.— deal with that. and after you are attacked, what _ deal with that. and after you are attacked, what changes - deal with that. and after you are attacked, what changes did - deal with that. and after you are attacked, what changes did you | deal with that. and after you are - attacked, what changes did you make in your contact with the general public, or did you not make any changes? public, or did you not make any chances? ~ . . . , changes? well, we made some changes in the way my — changes? well, we made some changes in the way my surgery — changes? well, we made some changes in the way my surgery was _ changes? well, we made some changes in the way my surgery was laid - changes? well, we made some changes in the way my surgery was laid out. - in the way my surgery was laid out. so that somebody coming in with the same intention as the person who came in that day in 2010 would find it a bit harder than was the case
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then. but i have wanted to stay accessible. i think we have been able to do that. of course, in the last 18 months, although surgeries have been over zoom rather than face—to—face but we have gone back to face—to—face now. it's really important that people who want to come and see me face—to—face and tell me about the things that are worrying them are able to do that and they can, and that's how we want to keep it. bud and they can, and that's how we want to kee it. �* and they can, and that's how we want to kee it. . . ., to keep it. and we had over the weekend from _ to keep it. and we had over the weekend from kim _ to keep it. and we had over the weekend from kim leadbeater,j to keep it. and we had over the i weekend from kim leadbeater, jo cox's sister, of course she was the mp who was murdered. her family and her partner had said that he wanted her partner had said that he wanted her to step down after what happened on friday. did you ever consider doing that?— doing that? no, i didn't. partly because there _ doing that? no, i didn't. partly because there was _ doing that? no, i didn't. partly because there was such - doing that? no, i didn't. partly because there was such a - doing that? no, i didn't. partly because there was such a huge doing that? no, i didn't. partly- because there was such a huge amount of support expressed locally after
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the attack. so that's never been something i considered. i love the job, i've been doing for 27 years. it will really be conceding defeat to the person who attacked me and those who thought it was a good thing to do if i packed up, and it's not something i considered doing. how important is it to you, it seems terribly important, but how important is it that your constituents can come to you confidently and talk to you about the matter is that really concern them? how much do you get from that contact with your own constituents? i think it's absolutely vital, it is so important for me and i know it is important for my constituents. it's a really important element of our democracy and one which we must not discard, orallow democracy and one which we must not discard, or allow to be eroded.
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people have absolutely got the right to come and talk to their member of parliament, to explain their problems to the member of parliament, to get the mp to help them. and i think that is a vital building block, foundation stone for how our democracy works in britain. i think it's a very invaluable feature of the way our system works, and we really must not let it go. there was a real sense in westminster last night that there should be a legacy, sir david should have some legacy, there should be some change. what do you feel that legacy should be when it comes to mp5' safety? legacy should be when it comes to mps' safety?— legacy should be when it comes to mps' safety? clearly there will have to be another— mps' safety? clearly there will have to be another look— mps' safety? clearly there will have to be another look at _ mps' safety? clearly there will have to be another look at how _ mps' safety? clearly there will have to be another look at how these - to be another look at how these things work. one suggestion i made in the debate yesterday was that we have a list of people coming in who make appointments, perhaps we could ask for the police to have a look through the list and see if there are any, if there is anybody on the
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list who might give rise to some safety concerns. that might be one thing that we could do. but i'm sure there will be lots of other ideas, lots of reflections. what we must not do is make it difficult or unpleasant for constituents talk to their mp because that would be defeating the object of having surgeries in the first place. thank ou ve surgeries in the first place. thank you very much — surgeries in the first place. thank you very much for _ surgeries in the first place. thank you very much for talking - surgeries in the first place. thank you very much for talking to - surgeries in the first place. thank you very much for talking to us i surgeries in the first place. thank. you very much for talking to us this morning. how we warm our how we warm oui’ homes how we warm our homes in the future will take a big part of reducing carbon emissions, and part of the solution will be heat pumps according to the government, lots of people have been talking about this this morning, talking about the costs and whether £5,000 is enough. from next april, homeowners in england and wales will be offered incentives to help to replace old gas boilers with these pumps, but how do they work? nina is at a
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heating engineer training session this morning to explain it all. that is not small! it's a whopper, isn't it? we are all on a heat pump learning curve this morning. this is the kind of heat pump that would go outside of the commercial property, may be a block of flats with lots of people living in it. if you are a homeowner, it's more like this size which you might have outside your house and this is what it looks like on the inside. we have been comparing it to a refrigerator at home. the fan in yourfridge will suck out refrigerator at home. the fan in your fridge will suck out the heat generated from the heat and pump it out. this fan sex in the heat on the air, the energy goes into these chips which are then pushed into a boiler, a similar household boiler that you can see there. why are we doing this? you have been hearing loads and you will be hearing a lot more about this 2050 target of carbon neutrality, reducing the amount of emissions that we make but
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also offsetting the emissions that we do make. there is a problem with that target, partly because of domestic emissions. they make—up 15% of the greenhouse gases that we make so something has to change. that is where the heat pumps come in. they are not only better for the environment because they do not guzzle gas, but they are also three times more efficient than a gas boiler that you might have at the moment. as ever, there is a catch. a part of it is that the average cost of one of these at the moment is around £10,000, that's a lot of money. also some concern that we have a lot of gas engineers out there but how difficult is it to retrain them so that they know how to install that? on top of that, you probably know that electricity is not cheap at the moment, it is quite highly taxed to encourage us to reduce our electricity usage so will it be cheaper month to month? that
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is why the government is dangling the carrot of £5,000 per household, £450 million invested to encourage us to make this transition to heat pumps. but will it be enough? olivia works here, we had to spend here earlier, an engineer who has come from sweden where these are well established, but how difficult is it when you have engineers who have come in who worked on boilers for 20 years to learn how to install these ones? �*. years to learn how to install these ones? 3 . , years to learn how to install these ones? �*, . ., ones? it's really easy, although the acked ones? it's really easy, although the packed box — ones? it's really easy, although the packed box is _ ones? it's really easy, although the packed box is different, _ ones? it's really easy, although the packed box is different, the - packed box is different, the installation of the system is really easy. if you understand heating systems you can understand a heat pump. we have a lot of skilled engineers out there in the uk so it's not hard at all. it’s engineers out there in the uk so it's not hard at all.— it's not hard at all. it's 'ust a case of getting �* it's not hard at all. it's 'ust a case of getting them h it's not hard at all. it'sjust a| case of getting them through it's not hard at all. it'sjust a - case of getting them through the system. so why are they so expensive? system. so why are they so “pensive?— system. so why are they so expensive? there is a lot of technology _ expensive? there is a lot of technology involved, - expensive? there is a lot of technology involved, for - expensive? there is a lot of| technology involved, for the expensive? there is a lot of - technology involved, for the uk it is fairly new, but not everywhere else as we talked about earlier. as demand grows the cost will come
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down. homeowners do want these things in their home to help with reducing their carbon and as we get more installed, the price will come down. more installed, the price will come down. �* . more installed, the price will come down. �*, . ., , .~ down. it's about more people making the decision. — down. it's about more people making the decision, once _ down. it's about more people making the decision, once your— down. it's about more people making the decision, once your neighbour- the decision, once your neighbour has done it, you might and so you could see it as noble. let's speak to rory, a policy adviser on this issue. you crunch the numbers about whether this will work, how significant is the £5,000 incentive? it's a welcome start and a step in the right— it's a welcome start and a step in the right direction, and a clear signal— the right direction, and a clear signal from the government that heat pumps _ signal from the government that heat pumps will— signal from the government that heat pumps will be the way forward and fossil— pumps will be the way forward and fossil fuel— pumps will be the way forward and fossil fuel heating will be phased out. £5,000 grants are a good move and it— out. £5,000 grants are a good move and it is— out. £5,000 grants are a good move and it is getting to the nub of the issue _ and it is getting to the nub of the issue with — and it is getting to the nub of the issue with heat pumps which is the upfront— issue with heat pumps which is the upfront cost and that will stimulate -ood upfront cost and that will stimulate good interest in demand. is upfront cost and that will stimulate good interest in demand. is it good interest in demand. is it ambitious _ good interest in demand. is t ambitious enough? because we need to speed. ambitious enough? because we need to seed. . ambitious enough? because we need to seed. , ., ., speed. yes, compared to two weeks aro, we speed. yes, compared to two weeks ago. we were _ speed. yes, compared to two weeks ago, we were expecting _ speed. yes, compared to two weeks ago, we were expecting £100 - speed. yes, compared to two weeks| ago, we were expecting £100 million of funding. _ ago, we were expecting £100 million of funding, it is now 450/3 years.
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it of funding, it is now 450/3 years. it probably— of funding, it is now 450/3 years. it probably isn't enough, it could io it probably isn't enough, it could go further— it probably isn't enough, it could go further and be more ambitious because _ go further and be more ambitious because now is the time to act in terms _ because now is the time to act in terms of— because now is the time to act in terms of tackling climate change, the sooner we reduce emissions the better. _ the sooner we reduce emissions the better. ~' . , ., better. unlike with vehicles on the road, the better. unlike with vehicles on the road. they are _ better. unlike with vehicles on the road, they are stopping _ better. unlike with vehicles on the road, they are stopping short - better. unlike with vehicles on the road, they are stopping short of i better. unlike with vehicles on the | road, they are stopping short of an outright ban, does that blunt thesis policy? i outright ban, does that blunt thesis oli ? ~ . , . outright ban, does that blunt thesis oli ? ~ , , , . policy? i think slightly, there is a clear signal _ policy? i think slightly, there is a clear signal that _ policy? i think slightly, there is a clear signal that they _ policy? i think slightly, there is a clear signal that they want - policy? i think slightly, there is a clear signal that they want to - policy? i think slightly, there is a i clear signal that they want to enter fossil— clear signal that they want to enter fossil feel— clear signal that they want to enter fossil feel heating after 2035 and faze it _ fossil feel heating after 2035 and faze it out. other countries have had similar— faze it out. other countries have had similar long—term frameworks deployed — had similar long—term frameworks deployed successfully, if it was an outright _ deployed successfully, if it was an outright phase—out date it would be more _ outright phase—out date it would be more effective. if outright phase-out date it would be more effective.— more effective. if you have got a boiler on the _ more effective. if you have got a boiler on the brink— more effective. if you have got a boiler on the brink of— more effective. if you have got a boiler on the brink of going - more effective. if you have got a boiler on the brink of going in i more effective. if you have got a| boiler on the brink of going in the next few years, what should you be thinking about to future proof your home and make the transition? insulation is the key first step. wherever— insulation is the key first step. wherever you can reducing your heat demand _ wherever you can reducing your heat demand first can save you money on fuel bills _ demand first can save you money on fuel bills initially and it makes deploying heat pumps easier at a later date — deploying heat pumps easier at a later date and they will run more efficiently. you can upgrade the
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radiators — efficiently. you can upgrade the radiators in your home, making the bigger— radiators in your home, making the bigger can — radiators in your home, making the bigger can make your gas boiler run more _ bigger can make your gas boiler run more efficiently and you save on your— more efficiently and you save on your heating bills and then you will have much— your heating bills and then you will have much disruption in —— much less disruption _ have much disruption in —— much less disruption in — have much disruption in —— much less disruption in cost. an insulation is worth— disruption in cost. an insulation is worth looking at as a cheap alternative.— worth looking at as a cheap alternative. . , ., . alternative. fans of the earth said this is we are _ alternative. fans of the earth said this is we are on _ alternative. fans of the earth said this is we are on a _ alternative. fans of the earth said this is we are on a 1500 _ alternative. fans of the earth said this is we are on a 1500 metre i alternative. fans of the earth said| this is we are on a 1500 metre race but walking the first lap, saying this carrot is not big enough to dangle in front of noses. the prime minister say, the green shirt of the boiler police will not be kicking your door in in sandal clad feet and coming for your combi boiler. some people will be talking about whether thatis people will be talking about whether that is belittling the cause, with that is belittling the cause, with that language. and is there any point in doing this unless you are forcing people to make that change? at the moment this will fund 90,000
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households transitioning to a new heat pump but the ambition is 600,000 every year by 2028, says it does this go far enough? the jury is out. —— so, does this go far enough? lots of people asking what they need to do this morning, hopefully we have explained a little bit. i to do this morning, hopefully we have explained a little bit. i think a lot of people — have explained a little bit. i think a lot of people are _ have explained a little bit. i think a lot of people are thinking i have explained a little bit. i thinkj a lot of people are thinking about it, heat pumps is trending on social media which is always an indicator. that will be us, then. if media which is always an indicator. that will be us, then.— that will be us, then. if you have any more — that will be us, then. if you have any more questions, _ that will be us, then. if you have any more questions, if _ that will be us, then. if you have any more questions, if you i that will be us, then. if you have any more questions, if you go i that will be us, then. if you have any more questions, if you go onj that will be us, then. if you have i any more questions, if you go on the bbc breakfast social media places, you can see and explain from nina on how they work and the costs involved. how they work and the costs involved-— how they work and the costs involved. ~ . , ., , involved. we have sent our intrepid re orter involved. we have sent our intrepid reporter fiona _ involved. we have sent our intrepid reporter fiona lamdin _ involved. we have sent our intrepid reporter fiona lamdin to _ involved. we have sent our intrepid reporter fiona lamdin to a - involved. we have sent our intrepid reporter fiona lamdin to a replica i reporter fiona lamdin to a replica first world war trench this morning. she is in kent, what is life like in the trenches this morning? goad the trenches this morning? good morninu. the trenches this morning? good morning- let _ the trenches this morning? good morning. let me _ the trenches this morning? good morning. let me take _ the trenches this morning? good morning. let me take you - the trenches this morning? (13cm morning. let me take you back 100 years. the lads havejust morning. let me take you back 100 years. the lads have just come off night duty, the stretcher bearer is back, luckily there were no
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casualties. this is their breakfast, a smokeless fire so they don't attract any attention from the germans. a bit of bacon and bread and jam. and to wash it down, we have got rama. this is 100—year—old rum from the first world war. we have someone on sentry duty here, always looking out, and hopefully we will not need it, butjust in case, the gas gone. now the news, travel and where there wherever you are watching. good morning. hundreds of afghan families who've recently settled in the capital, are leaving their temporary accomodation and declaring themselves homeless. bbc london has uncovered refugees are telling councils they don't want to stay in hotels, with some asking to be housed closer to their families here. harrow says the government's resettlement scheme isn't clear. we need the home office
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to communicate with afghan refugees about what the process is and give them clarity, as well as clarity to local councils about how this process is actually going to work. the home office says it's working closely with local authorities to ensure everyone temporarily in hotels has access to essential provision, healthcare, education and universal credit. a football coach from west london is to find out whether he is going to spend 25 years in a dubai jail, after four bottles of illegal vape liquid were found in his car. the court of appeal is due to review the evidence in the case of billy hood. the 24 year—old who was arrested in january, after moving to the country. he says he was forced to sign a confession in arabic, despite not speaking the language. top it is thought there are 7000. this thursday the mayor will be on bbc london to answer your questions about the environment.
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now the travel. there's major disruption on southeastern trains to and from charing cross due to urgent track repair work in the new cross area. trains will be cancelled or diverted. now let's get the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it has been a very mild night and temperatures have not dropped below the mid—teens in celsius, the sort of temperatures we would normally expect to see by day at this time of the year. a mild start, a very mixed picture. there could be some dribs and drabs of rain around for a time this morning and it is quite grey. lots of low cloud. quite a murky morning. the wind is brisk, and it is dragging the mild air our way. some strong winds at times but it should
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brighten up through the late morning and into the afternoon. we will even see some sunshine around. temperatures could rise to perhaps 20 or 21 well above the average for this time of the year. there will be more rain as we head into this evening. this band of rain is set to push its way eastwards. it will be heavy for a time. a mild night to follow. temperatures in the mid—teens in celsius as we head into wednesday morning. on wednesday we are expecting showery outbreaks of rain. some of it likely to be heavy for a time. brighter spells in the afternoon. it stays windy. more rain for southern areas as we had through wednesday night. by thursday, a big drop in temperature. in north—westerly wind, but also some sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. we're on bbc one until 9:15,
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which the rip off britain team are back with a special week of live programmes. gloria, angela and julia can tell us more. good morning. morning, dan and sally. and good morning and thanks to all you breakfast viewers for sending in your comments while we were live on air yesterday. it really makes our day when we hear from you. and today, with the cost of living on so many people's minds, we're all about saving you money. one way of doing that is to insulate your home. but, if that's something you are considering to do that, be very careful how you go about it, as one has man found to his cost. i look at it and i think, it stressed _ i look at it and i think, it stressed us _ i look at it and i think, it stressed us out, - i look at it and i think, it stressed us out, i've i i look at it and i think, it stressed us out, i've not i look at it and i think, it- stressed us out, i've not been i look at it and i think, it— stressed us out, i've not been able to sleep. _ stressed us out, i've not been able to sleep. i've— stressed us out, i've not been able to sleep, i've been _ stressed us out, i've not been able to sleep, i've been panicking i stressed us out, i've not been able to sleep, i've been panicking and l to sleep, i've been panicking and where _ to sleep, i've been panicking and where im — to sleep, i've been panicking and where im going _ to sleep, i've been panicking and where i'm going to— to sleep, i've been panicking and where i'm going to find _ to sleep, i've been panicking and where i'm going to find the i to sleep, i've been panicking and i where i'm going to find the money. we'll have more on that and the government's latest scheme, announced just this morning, to help us improve our energy efficiency at home, as we look at ways for you to try and get on top of soaring energy prices.
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personal finance expert sarah pennells is in the studio with her energy cutting tips. so, if you've worried about your bills or, with so many providers going bust, where you're getting your gas from, then send in your questions for her. plus, if money is tight, you'll want to avoid getting scammed. well, we've got the shocking story of how one man misplacing the password for his bitcoin account led him to be scammed out of nearly £150,000. if you're even thinking of dabbling in crypto—currency, you'll want to hear how to avoid that happening to you. plus our experts are on hand to answer your questions. so if you want some help or advice, you can email us right now, ripoffbritain@bbc. co. uk. and we look forward to your company once again at 9.15. see you then. we will see you then. we will see you then. we will continue to — we will see you then. we will
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continue to warn _ we will see you then. we will continue to warn people i we will see you then. we will continue to warn people up i we will see you then. we will| continue to warn people up for we will see you then. we will i continue to warn people up for you. it is 8:35am. the daughters of two men who died following covid outbreaks in their care homes begin a league —— landmark legal case against the government today. the heafina against the government today. the hearin: will against the government today. the: hearing will examine policies against the government today. tt9 hearing will examine policies such hearing will examine policies such as sending elderly patients back to hospitals sending them without suitable plans for testing or isolation. suitable plans for testing or isolation-— suitable plans for testing or isolation. , :, :, suitable plans for testing or isolation. ,:, :, :_ isolation. the government are saying they specifically _ isolation. the government are saying they specifically sought _ isolation. the government are saying they specifically sought a _ isolation. the government are saying they specifically sought a safeguard i they specifically sought a safeguard care homes and their relatives. jon donnison has this report. michael gibson was 88 when he died in a care home in april last year from suspected covid—19. his daughter cathy was only able to say goodbye to him through a window. family is now part of a landmark legal challenge that will argue the government's failure to protect thousands of care home residents during the first wave of the pandemic was unlawful. fist during the first wave of the pandemic was unlawful. at the same time we'd all — pandemic was unlawful. at the same time we'd all been _ pandemic was unlawful. at the same time we'd all been told _ pandemic was unlawful. at the same time we'd all been told to _ pandemic was unlawful. at the same time we'd all been told to stay i pandemic was unlawful. at the same time we'd all been told to stay at i time we'd all been told to stay at home, do not see anybody, to keep ourselves safe, the most vulnerable in society, who were just in a
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larger home, were left notjust unprotected, but put at risk. the case will likely _ unprotected, but put at risk. the case will likely focus on the policy of clearing space in nhs hospitals by discharging some patients into care homes, initially without them being tested for coronavirus. at the time the government defended its actions. 50 time the government defended its actions. ., , ., actions. so right from the start we have tried to _ actions. so right from the start we have tried to throw _ actions. so right from the start we have tried to throw a _ actions. so right from the start we have tried to throw a protective i have tried to throw a protective rin- have tried to throw a protective ring around our care homes. that view will now— ring around our care homes. that view will now be _ ring around our care homes. “mat view will now be challenged at the high court. during the first three months of the pandemic more than 14,000 months of the pandemic more than 1a,000 people in care homes in england and wales died from coronavirus. the outcome of this case could affect thousands of families. jon donnison, bbc news. it is something which will be watched very closely. let's speak now to cathy gardner, who you just saw in that report. she is with her solicitor outside the high court. cathy, let's come to you first. give
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us an idea of what happened to your dad? mi; us an idea of what happened to your dad? ~ , . ., , us an idea of what happened to your dad? g . ., us an idea of what happened to your dad? g . ., ., dad? my father was in a care home in oxfordshire — dad? my father was in a care home in oxfordshire which _ dad? my father was in a care home in oxfordshire which was _ dad? my father was in a care home in oxfordshire which was a _ dad? my father was in a care home in oxfordshire which was a fantastic - oxfordshire which was a fantastic place _ oxfordshire which was a fantastic place for— oxfordshire which was a fantastic place for him to be. i was really happy— place for him to be. i was really happy with— place for him to be. i was really happy with the care he had. but in early. _ happy with the care he had. but in early. mid — happy with the care he had. but in early, mid march 2020, right early on in _ early, mid march 2020, right early on in the _ early, mid march 2020, right early on in the pandemic, he became ill and the _ on in the pandemic, he became ill and the doctor that saw him said he thought— and the doctor that saw him said he thought it _ and the doctor that saw him said he thought it was covid. then my father rapidly— thought it was covid. then my father rapidly deteriorated and sadly died on april— rapidly deteriorated and sadly died on april three. find rapidly deteriorated and sadly died on april three-— rapidly deteriorated and sadly died on april three. and there were many like our on april three. and there were many like your dad- _ on april three. and there were many like your dad. for— on april three. and there were many like your dad. for you, _ on april three. and there were many like your dad. for you, looking - on april three. and there were many like your dad. for you, looking at - like your dad. for you, looking at it from your perspective, where did the system fail? l it from your perspective, where did the system fail?— the system fail? i think the system comletel the system fail? i think the system completely failed _ the system fail? i think the system completely failed because - the system fail? i think the system completely failed because of - the system fail? i think the system completely failed because of the i completely failed because of the failure _ completely failed because of the failure of the government to consider— failure of the government to consider the safety and well—being of residents in care homes like my father _ of residents in care homes like my father as — of residents in care homes like my father as i — of residents in care homes like my father. as i said in the clipjust theh, — father. as i said in the clipjust then, regular members of the public were being _ then, regular members of the public were being told to stay at home and isolate _ were being told to stay at home and isolate themselves. my father was not isolate themselves. my father was hot that _ isolate themselves. my father was not that lucky. he was not protected. then he was put at risk by what _ protected. then he was put at risk
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by what the — protected. then he was put at risk by what the government were doing. they had _ by what the government were doing. they had a _ by what the government were doing. they had a legal duty to consider the safety of those people and they did not— the safety of those people and they did not do— the safety of those people and they did not do it. the safety of those people and they did not do it— did not do it. paul, there will be many people — did not do it. paul, there will be many people watching - did not do it. paul, there will be many people watching this - did not do it. paul, there will be many people watching this case | many people watching this case closely. what do you think cathy's chances of success are? we closely. what do you think cathy's chances of success are?— chances of success are? we are ho eful, chances of success are? we are hopeful. and — chances of success are? we are hopeful. and l _ chances of success are? we are hopeful, and i think— chances of success are? we are hopeful, and i think there - chances of success are? we are hopeful, and i think there is - chances of success are? we are hopeful, and i think there is a l hopeful, and i think there is a genuine — hopeful, and i think there is a genuine concern— hopeful, and i think there is a genuine concern in— hopeful, and i think there is a genuine concern in the - hopeful, and i think there is a i genuine concern in the country, hopeful, and i think there is a - genuine concern in the country, that matt hancock's _ genuine concern in the country, that matt hancock's words, _ genuine concern in the country, that matt hancock's words, that - genuine concern in the country, that matt hancock's words, that we - genuine concern in the country, that| matt hancock's words, that we threw a protective — matt hancock's words, that we threw a protective ring _ matt hancock's words, that we threw a protective ring around _ matt hancock's words, that we threw a protective ring around residents . a protective ring around residents of care _ a protective ring around residents of care home _ a protective ring around residents of care home simply _ a protective ring around residents of care home simply doesn't - a protective ring around residents of care home simply doesn't ringi of care home simply doesn't ring true _ of care home simply doesn't ring true and — of care home simply doesn't ring true. and that— of care home simply doesn't ring true. and that will— of care home simply doesn't ring true. and that will now - of care home simply doesn't ring true. and that will now be - of care home simply doesn't ringi true. and that will now be tested. more _ true. and that will now be tested. more evidence _ true. and that will now be tested. more evidence has _ true. and that will now be tested. more evidence has been - true. and that will now be tested. more evidence has been coming l true. and that will now be tested. i more evidence has been coming out. setect— more evidence has been coming out. select committees _ more evidence has been coming out. select committees have _ more evidence has been coming out. select committees have done - more evidence has been coming out. select committees have done their. select committees have done their reports _ select committees have done their reports there _ select committees have done their reports. there is _ select committees have done their reports. there is increasing - select committees have done theiri reports. there is increasing concern that this _ reports. there is increasing concern that this simply _ reports. there is increasing concern that this simply is _ reports. there is increasing concern that this simply is not _ reports. there is increasing concern that this simply is not true. - reports. there is increasing concern that this simply is not true. we - reports. there is increasing concern that this simply is not true.- that this simply is not true. we did ask the health _ that this simply is not true. we did ask the health department - that this simply is not true. we did ask the health department for - that this simply is not true. we did ask the health department for a i ask the health department for a response and they say that they provided billions of pounds to support the sector, including on infection and prevention control. they talk about ppe, protecting the public from the threat to life posed
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by the pandemic. when you hear that, how does that make you feel? imull. how does that make you feel? well, it's hollow. — how does that make you feel? well, it's hollow, meaningless _ how does that make you feel? well, it's hollow, meaningless words. anything — it's hollow, meaningless words. anything that was done was done too late. anything that was done was done too late we _ anything that was done was done too late. we know from the select committee reports it was a devastating failure of public health _ devastating failure of public health. they failed to actually protect — health. they failed to actually protect residents in care homes at the start— protect residents in care homes at the start of— protect residents in care homes at the start of the pandemic despite knowing — the start of the pandemic despite knowing that they were the most vulnerable group. find knowing that they were the most vulnerable group.— knowing that they were the most vulnerable group. and during the andemic vulnerable group. and during the pandemic on _ vulnerable group. and during the pandemic on many _ vulnerable group. and during the pandemic on many occasions - vulnerable group. and during the i pandemic on many occasions when vulnerable group. and during the - pandemic on many occasions when we spoke to the health secretary, matt hancock, and we asked him specifically about what was going on with care homes, a point of the government repeatedly made was that it was a fast moving global situation and they and many other countries were learning as they went along. i wonder how that response at the time, what that makes you feel now? $5 the time, what that makes you feel now? �* , ., , the time, what that makes you feel now? �* , . , the time, what that makes you feel now? as angry as i felt last april, ma . now? as angry as i felt last april, may. governments _ now? as angry as i felt last april, may. governments don't - now? as angry as i felt last april, may. governments don't learn . now? as angry as i felt last april, may. governments don't learn as| now? as angry as i felt last april, - may. governments don't learn as they io may. governments don't learn as they go along _ may. governments don't learn as they go along. they have a duty to
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prepare _ go along. they have a duty to prepare, to make considered decisions _ prepare, to make considered decisions. there is no guesswork involved — decisions. there is no guesswork involved in— decisions. there is no guesswork involved in infectious diseases. we know— involved in infectious diseases. we know how— involved in infectious diseases. we know how they spread. we know the risk of— know how they spread. we know the risk of an— know how they spread. we know the risk of an asymptomatic spread from many— risk of an asymptomatic spread from many diseases like this. there was lots of— many diseases like this. there was lots of evidence to give them the information they needed to be as cautious— information they needed to be as cautious and careful as possible with the — cautious and careful as possible with the most vulnerable. and we believe _ with the most vulnerable. and we believe they completely failed to do that. believe they completely failed to do that i _ believe they completely failed to do that. ., ., , ., believe they completely failed to do that. ., ., ,., ., believe they completely failed to do that. ., ., ., , , that. i wonder what sort of support ou have that. i wonder what sort of support you have had _ that. i wonder what sort of support you have had from _ that. i wonder what sort of support you have had from others - that. i wonder what sort of support you have had from others who - that. i wonder what sort of support you have had from others who may have found themselves in a similar situation, and do you feel that you are taking this challenge on with others sort of putting you forward at the same time? == others sort of putting you forward at the same time?— others sort of putting you forward at the same time? -- pushing. i've had fantastic _ at the same time? -- pushing. i've had fantastic support _ at the same time? -- pushing. i've had fantastic support from - at the same time? -- pushing. i've had fantastic support from many i had fantastic support from many thousands of people who donated to crowdfunding. i wouldn't be here without— crowdfunding. i wouldn't be here without them and i am so grateful. also, _ without them and i am so grateful. also, moral— without them and i am so grateful. also, moral support from thousands of bereaved families around the country — of bereaved families around the country. that has been so important for me _ country. that has been so important for me to _ country. that has been so important for me to be — country. that has been so important for me to be here. | country. that has been so important for me to be here.— for me to be here. i am doing this for me to be here. i am doing this for all of them. _ for me to be here. i am doing this for all of them. paul, _ for me to be here. i am doing this for all of them. paul, the - for all of them. paul, the government of talked about this public inquiry into the pandemic which we are hoping will take place sometime next year. you think some of the questions you are asking in
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this court case will be covered and dealt with in that inquiry?- dealt with in that inquiry? clearly similar issues _ dealt with in that inquiry? clearly similar issues will _ dealt with in that inquiry? clearly similar issues will arise. - dealt with in that inquiry? clearly similar issues will arise. but - dealt with in that inquiry? clearly similar issues will arise. but it i dealt with in that inquiry? clearly similar issues will arise. but it is | similar issues will arise. but it is only— similar issues will arise. but it is only the — similar issues will arise. but it is only the court— similar issues will arise. but it is only the court that _ similar issues will arise. but it is only the court that can _ similar issues will arise. but it is| only the court that can ultimately hold the — only the court that can ultimately hold the government _ only the court that can ultimately hold the government to - only the court that can ultimately hold the government to account. | only the court that can ultimately. hold the government to account. it is only— hold the government to account. it is only the — hold the government to account. it is only the court _ hold the government to account. it is only the court which _ hold the government to account. it is only the court which is _ hold the government to account. it is only the court which is what i hold the government to account. it is only the court which is what we i is only the court which is what we are seeking — is only the court which is what we are seeking that _ is only the court which is what we are seeking that can— is only the court which is what we are seeking that can rule - is only the court which is what we are seeking that can rule that i is only the court which is what we are seeking that can rule that the government— are seeking that can rule that the government violated _ are seeking that can rule that the government violated the - are seeking that can rule that the government violated the most i government violated the most fundamental— government violated the most fundamental human— government violated the most fundamental human rights i government violated the most fundamental human rights of. government violated the most| fundamental human rights of a government violated the most i fundamental human rights of a very vulnerable — fundamental human rights of a very vulnerable group _ fundamental human rights of a very vulnerable group of _ fundamental human rights of a very vulnerable group of our _ fundamental human rights of a very vulnerable group of our society. i vulnerable group of our society. reatly— vulnerable group of our society. really good _ vulnerable group of our society. really good to _ vulnerable group of our society. really good to talk _ vulnerable group of our society. really good to talk to _ vulnerable group of our society. really good to talk to you - vulnerable group of our society. really good to talk to you both. j vulnerable group of our society. i really good to talk to you both. i know the weather is not the best outside the court in london but we appreciate your time. thank you for speaking to us. of course, we will be covering that story throughout the day as the court kate ? where case develops. john is here. many of our viewers will have enjoyed watching the euros over the summer but there is a slightly sour taste in your mouth for england at the moment? yes, following the final against
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italy. the possible fallout now. they are going to be issued with a stadium ban as a result of the fans trying to storm the stadium. england will play the opening match of next year's nations league campaign in front of an empty stadium following the unrest at last summer's euros final. but the former fa chief executive mark palio said it shouldn't impact the fa hopes of a potentially staging the world cup yearin potentially staging the world cup year in 2030. uefa issued the punishment for a lack of order and discipline inside and around the stadium before the final with italy. fans stormed the stadium. the ban will cost the fa between £2 million and £5 million in lost revenue but palio says a's record of staging major events will count in their favour in bidding for the world cup. i think the uk has a fantastic effort — i think the uk has a fantastic effort for— i think the uk has a fantastic effort for putting on big events. that is— effort for putting on big events. that is the first thing. football people — that is the first thing. football people want to come here. it is a fantastic— people want to come here. it is a fantastic stadium. sol people want to come here. it is a fantastic stadium. so i think it will be — fantastic stadium. so i think it will be depending on a couple of things — will be depending on a couple of things. one is what comes out in
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terms _ things. one is what comes out in terms of— things. one is what comes out in terms of a — things. one is what comes out in terms of a response by the investigation. secondly, behaviour. because _ investigation. secondly, behaviour. because you are basically on trial now for— because you are basically on trial now for the behaviour.— because you are basically on trial now for the behaviour. mark palio is s-ueakin now for the behaviour. mark palio is speaking this _ now for the behaviour. mark palio is speaking this morning. _ arsenal legend patrick vieira was given an incredibly warm reception on his return to the club, as manager of crystal palace. the former captain was a three—time premier league title winner with arsenal, and part of the invincibles, who went through the 2003—04 campaign unbeaten. you wonder how popular he would have been had his team won this one? 0dsonne edouard put them ahead only for alexander lacazette to equalise late on. when you spend nine years in a football club like that, and i was part of a generation who did well for the football club. so it's a reception that mean a lot to me, but i'm not surprised by the arsenal fans. an injury worry for england before the men's t20 cricket world cup has even begun for them. liam livingstone dropping this
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catch towards the end of their warm up game with india, before clutching his finger in pain and leaving the field. he's viewed as a key part of england's hopes of winning the world cup. rishabh pant hit a six to win the match by seven wickets with an over to spare. moeen ali gave a prognosis on livingstone's injury ahead of their opener against defending champions west indies on saturday. ireland are attempting to qualify for the main group stage — and curtis campher produced a spectacular performance in their win over the netherlands. he became only the third bowler to take four wickets in four balls in t20�*s, as they won by seven wickets. ireland are second in their group, with the top two going through to the super 12 stage. they next play leaders sri lanka tomorrow. and scotland are back in action today. they had a big win over bangladesh the other day. by, they had a big win over bangladesh the other day-—
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the other day. a brilliant victory. it's so important _ the other day. a brilliant victory. it's so important that _ the other day. a brilliant victory. it's so important that cricket i the other day. a brilliant victory. l it's so important that cricket grows the game in other countries. when you see an established nation being beaten like that, that is where the future of the sport lies. that beaten like that, that is where the future of the sport lies.— future of the sport lies. that has ut future of the sport lies. that has put scotland _ future of the sport lies. that has put scotland now _ future of the sport lies. that has put scotland now on _ future of the sport lies. that has put scotland now on potentiallyl future of the sport lies. that has| put scotland now on potentially a great course to qualify for the main group stage. let's see if they can do it again today, and they play papua new guinea. i know one person will be very happy here in good scottish sporting news. that is carol. when we had a chat yesterday we actually talked about you watching scotland against papua new guinea. run us through some of those key players for papua new guinea! look at the time! i want to show you some pictures from last night of the northern lights. they are all from the highlands. you can see this one in aberdeenshire. still quite dark. the purples and thes in this one.
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look at this one. and finally, this one which i think is my favourite. it is not a cold start to the day wherever you are today. these are the latest temperatures. in st helier it is currently 17. in durham it is 14. this mild weather is coming up from the azores. you can see it nicely in this chart. the mild! warm conditions represented by yellow and amber. with us all day today and tomorrow it will still be mild but not as mild as today. what we have got is a lot of cloud around, some misty and murky conditions, and also some rain. it is pushing north and east. it is a breezy day. it will eventually pull away from northern ireland. you will be left with some showers and some sunshine. the rain also moving away from the south—east. it should brighten up. temperatures today ranging from 13 in the north to 21 in the south. these temperatures are
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above average for october. normally at this stage we would be looking at roughly 12 to 15 north to south. as we head on through the evening and overnight eventually the rain does get over towards the south—east. we will see some clear skies, some showers in the north and west, still quite breezy. then we have got to be next showers coming on across the south—west heading towards the midlands and wales. some of those may notjust be heavy but also thundery. gusty winds through the english channels and coastlines. temperatures nine to 16. it is going to be another mild night. tomorrow we say goodbye to the rain early on from the south—east. all of these showers move north—east. still the potential for them to be heavy and thundery. on the south side of the showers, dry, some sunshine. on the northern side, a lot of dry weather with a peppering of showers here and there. at the end of the day we will see heavier showers in the south—west. this area of rain is
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another weather front coming our way. it is a cold front. and as it sinks southwards it is going to bring in colder air behind it. the rest of the week will not feel as mild as today or indeed tomorrow. wednesday's chart is quite messy. also as we go into thursday. the weather front sinking south, allowing the colder conditions to follow on behind on a north—westerly wind. the wind is going to be quite potent during thursday. we will look at that in a moment. the weather pushes southwards as a weak feature, eventually clearing. sunshine developing behind it. showers. they will be wintry in south wales. these black circles were a present of the wind gusts. for some it will be gales, particularly around the hills and coast. there is a full moon on wednesday night and also spring tide. they could be some overtopping on some of the coastlines as well. these are our temperatures. gone are
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20s and 21s and we are down to sixes and 1a. we will notice a difference. they will be a wind as well. lots to look out for. have a lovely tuesday. thank you. you too. and good luck on saturday. thank you. i was just about to tell you what dance i'm going to do but i am not allowed to. i will text you later. you are not allowed to say it publicly. you are not allowed to say it ublicl . ., . , you are not allowed to say it ublicl . ., ., , ., you are not allowed to say it ublicl . ., .,, ., , you are not allowed to say it ublicl . ., ., , ., , ., publicly. no, it has to be revealed via official channels. _ publicly. no, it has to be revealed via official channels. the - publicly. no, it has to be revealed via official channels. the song i publicly. no, it has to be revealed via official channels. the song is l via official channels. the song is amazing though. film via official channels. the song is amazing though.— via official channels. the song is amazing though. am i pretending i don't know what _ amazing though. am i pretending i don't know what the _ amazing though. am i pretending i don't know what the song - amazing though. am i pretending i don't know what the song is - amazing though. am i pretending i don't know what the song is now? | amazing though. am i pretending i l don't know what the song is now? if you could close your eyes and listen to the music and not concentrate on the dance... the music is belting. i just have to make sure that what we do to it is going to be good. idut’heh do to it is going to be good. when can we tell _ do to it is going to be good. when can we tell everyone? _ do to it is going to be good. when can we tell everyone? i _ do to it is going to be good. when can we tell everyone? i don't i do to it is going to be good. when i can we tell everyone? i don't know. i will ask and _ can we tell everyone? i don't know. i will ask and find _ can we tell everyone? i don't know. i will ask and find out. _ can we tell everyone? i don't know. i will ask and find out. this - can we tell everyone? i don't know. i will ask and find out. this next i i will ask and find out. this next bit is brilliant. _ i will ask and find out. this next bit is brilliant. a _ i will ask and find out. this next bit is brilliant. a field _ i will ask and find out. this next bit is brilliant. a field trip i i will ask and find out. this next bit is brilliant. a field trip to i bit is brilliant. a field trip to learn about the realities of the first world war were traditionally
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involved a journey to the former battlefields of belgium or northern france. ., ., , ., .., battlefields of belgium or northern france. ., ., , france. now though you can stay closer to home. _ france. now though you can stay closer to home. maidstone i france. now though you can stay closer to home. maidstone in i france. now though you can stay i closer to home. maidstone in kent to be precise. and fiona landon is there. she can tell us a bit more. good morning. you have had a great morning this morning. i have had a great old morning. they will be no texting going on in this trench because i am going to take you back100 years. this is the guy and periscope. he doesn't ever stop watching. he is permanently watching for what is going on out there. this is the stretcher bearer. he has had a busy night. he is fast asleep. and over here, this is the cocoa is making breakfast. it is a smokeless fire, so we don't attract any attention. —— the cook. we have bacon, bread and to wash it all down this is wrong. this is 100 years old. —— rom. here, just in case, get
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ready. in case of a gas attack, this is the gas rattle. this is all so realistic. what is it for? as you can see, i have been finding out, it is to help schoolchildren and the army bring it all back to life. it's over 100 metres long and two metres deep. it is a world war i replica based on the trenches near ypres, built 100 years later in a forest in kent. and it is europe's only accurate outdoor replica, according to its designer, who is a military historian. his grandfatherjohn fought in the first world war. he was a private soldier between 1916 and 1919. wounded twice, gassed twice. i mean, if he died in the great war, i am not here. and it's not his first. he built four trenches, including this one in his garden. as well as historian, he is also a hollywood film adviser, working with steven spielberg.
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here he is in 2011, blowing the whistle in war horse. the best exchange i ever had with steven spielberg is actually he gave the instructions to an actor to say fix bayonets and it all went horribly wrong. nobody knew what to do. i was able to say to him, you need to give a warning, fix bayonets, then it will work. and it did. he said, it's not rocket science, is it? and i said, no, it isn't, mr spielberg, but you have to follow the drill book, otherwise it won't work. so effectively you were in charge of spielberg at that moment? i was, come to think of it. he wouldn't like that very much. but there we are. now it is schools and the army who learn about the reality of war. today, the trench is full of 11—year—old boys rehearsing their school play. it shows how gruesome and dirty it has been for them and how strong they must have been to carry on, even in difficult times
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without their families. it has been really cool. and helpful to feel what the soldiers have felt, - because we've got the exact conditions and it's been really fun and it will really help _ to feel the emotions _ they were going through when inside and the pressure they were under. it is muddy and it is cold and it is grim. just walking around, like the periscopes and everything just there, it's quite hard just to imagine being in their with the threat of being shot at any moment. you would have to be careful to keep your head down and not be shot. that sort of thing. these pouches were to hold the ammunition. each soldier could carry up to 150 pounds of ammunition. they also learn about food rationing and ammunition. just being cold and terrifying straightaway from the beginning. the food wasn't great. you would have to make it last.
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you got tins of beef but i wouldn't eat all of that at one time. i'd make it last as long as possible. there would be rats. you would have friends dying. the weather would be horrendous. the weather is horrendous in a war zone. 20 metres behind the front line this was the officers' dugout. deep underground. this is where they slept, where they played cards, this was the hub. the meals came in here, the ammunition, and this is how they contacted each other up and down the lines. everything came through here. and above ground they have got ambitious plans, hoping to build a german trench the other side of no man's land. we are at the down trench. this is the latrine. i think you can imagine what goes on in there. and here is the stretcher bearer. he was asleep in a minute ago but he is back on duty. let's come to andy. this is all your creation. give us a sense, how long did it take to build? hat
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how long did it take to build? not that lonu. how long did it take to build? not that long- it _ how long did it take to build? not that long. it has been a team of people — that long. it has been a team of people working since january. we have _ people working since january. we have only — people working since january. we have only had about nine months at this. have only had about nine months at this there — have only had about nine months at this. there is a lot more still to build. — this. there is a lot more still to build. as— this. there is a lot more still to build, as you can imagine. just give me a sense — build, as you can imagine. just give me a sense of _ build, as you can imagine. just give me a sense of what _ build, as you can imagine. just give me a sense of what it _ build, as you can imagine. just give me a sense of what it was - build, as you can imagine. just give me a sense of what it was like i me a sense of what it was like digging it out?— me a sense of what it was like digging it out? physically, very hard work- _ digging it out? physically, very hard work. we _ digging it out? physically, very hard work. we used _ digging it out? physically, very hard work. we used a - digging it out? physically, very hard work. we used a digger . digging it out? physically, very| hard work. we used a digger for digging it out? physically, very - hard work. we used a digger for much of the _ hard work. we used a digger for much of the work _ hard work. we used a digger for much of the work. sandbags had to be filled _ of the work. sandbags had to be filled by— of the work. sandbags had to be filled by hand. remember, they would be doing _ filled by hand. remember, they would be doing this for real, by hand, in the dark. — be doing this for real, by hand, in the dark, potentially under fire. we had luxurious conditions compared to them _ had luxurious conditions compared to them. ~ , ., had luxurious conditions compared to them. ~ , ., ., had luxurious conditions compared to them. ., we had luxurious conditions compared to l them-— we are them. why are you doing this? we are doinu them. why are you doing this? we are doin: this them. why are you doing this? we are doing this to — them. why are you doing this? we are doing this to give _ them. why are you doing this? we are doing this to give people _ them. why are you doing this? we are doing this to give people an _ them. why are you doing this? we are doing this to give people an idea i them. why are you doing this? we are doing this to give people an idea of i doing this to give people an idea of the experience of living in a trance _ the experience of living in a trance. we are not dealing with combat~ — trance. we are not dealing with combat. we are talking about eating, sleeping. _ combat. we are talking about eating, sleeping, drinking and going to the toilet _ sleeping, drinking and going to the toilet. ., , toilet. you said something very interesting _ toilet. you said something very interesting about, _ toilet. you said something very interesting about, give - toilet. you said something very interesting about, give me i toilet. you said something very interesting about, give me a i toilet. you said something very i interesting about, give me a sense of what it's like for the man, and i thought he would be terrified but you said they would be bored? absolutely. a lot of veterans that i spoke _ absolutely. a lot of veterans that i spoke to _ absolutely. a lot of veterans that i spoke to said they were bored.
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occasionally scared stiff. we only see in— occasionally scared stiff. we only see in the — occasionally scared stiff. we only see in the movie is the going over the top _ see in the movie is the going over the top and — see in the movie is the going over the top and getting shot. people were _ the top and getting shot. people were living here five days at a time — were living here five days at a time 365— were living here five days at a time, 365 days of the year, whether it was— time, 365 days of the year, whether it was the _ time, 365 days of the year, whether it was the middle of summer or winter~ — it was the middle of summer or winter~ you _ it was the middle of summer or winter. you can imagine what that was like — winter. you can imagine what that was like. we winter. you can imagine what that was like. ~ ., winter. you can imagine what that was like. ~ . ., ., �*, was like. we have had a good night's slee -. was like. we have had a good night's sleep- what — was like. we have had a good night's sleep. what would _ was like. we have had a good night's sleep. what would it _ was like. we have had a good night's sleep. what would it be _ was like. we have had a good night's sleep. what would it be like - was like. we have had a good night's sleep. what would it be like for i sleep. what would it be like for those men who had been there for five days? those men who had been there for five da s? , ., ., , five days? they would have been snatchina five days? they would have been snatching a _ five days? they would have been snatching a few— five days? they would have been snatching a few hours _ five days? they would have been snatching a few hours sleep i five days? they would have been i snatching a few hours sleep during the day~ _ snatching a few hours sleep during the day. they work all night. one man_ the day. they work all night. one man and — the day. they work all night. one man and guard duty, one man resting, one man _ man and guard duty, one man resting, one man working. that is all night. they— one man working. that is all night. they stand — one man working. that is all night. they stand to encase an attack. rationing. _ they stand to encase an attack. rationing, breakfast, then their daytime — rationing, breakfast, then their daytime routine. they are still on guard _ daytime routine. they are still on guard duty— daytime routine. they are still on guard duty for a couple of hours. then— guard duty for a couple of hours. then they— guard duty for a couple of hours. then they try to get cleaned up. they— then they try to get cleaned up. they will— then they try to get cleaned up. they will be inspected, cook their meals _ they will be inspected, cook their meals it— they will be inspected, cook their meals it is— they will be inspected, cook their meals. it is an endless round of the same _ meals. it is an endless round of the same things. find meals. it is an endless round of the same things— same things. and you are an historian _ same things. and you are an historian but _ same things. and you are an historian but you _ same things. and you are an historian but you have - same things. and you are an historian but you have also l same things. and you are an - historian but you have also worked on loads of films. you have brought some props with you to this trench, haven't you?—
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some props with you to this trench, haven't ou? ~ , , ., haven't you? absolutely. some of the bits that we — haven't you? absolutely. some of the bits that we have _ haven't you? absolutely. some of the bits that we have got _ haven't you? absolutely. some of the bits that we have got here, _ haven't you? absolutely. some of the bits that we have got here, whether. bits that we have got here, whether it is the _ bits that we have got here, whether it is the trench periscope, the ammunition boxes, all came from the film t9t7~ _ ammunition boxes, all came from the film 1917. and a few real objects as welt _ film 1917. and a few real ob'ects as well. ., ., ~' film 1917. and a few real ob'ects as well. ., ., ~ ~ , film 1917. and a few real ob'ects as well. ., ., ~' ~ , , well. you worked with sam mendes is on that film. — well. you worked with sam mendes is on that film, didn't _ well. you worked with sam mendes is on that film, didn't you? _ well. you worked with sam mendes is on that film, didn't you? it _ well. you worked with sam mendes is on that film, didn't you? it was - on that film, didn't you? it was amazing- _ on that film, didn't you? it was amazing- i _ on that film, didn't you? it was amazing. i worked _ on that film, didn't you? it was amazing. i worked on - on that film, didn't you? it was amazing. i worked on it - on that film, didn't you? it was amazing. i worked on it for- on that film, didn't you? it was| amazing. i worked on it for over on that film, didn't you? it was i amazing. i worked on it for over a yeah _ amazing. i worked on it for over a yeah i_ amazing. i worked on it for over a yeah iwas— amazing. i worked on it for over a year. i was the military advisor on it. i year. i was the military advisor on it tatso _ year. i was the military advisor on it. i also helped with the correct uniforms — it. i also helped with the correct uniforms for our soldiers. and i put our two _ uniforms for our soldiers. and i put our two heroes... they were in the east _ our two heroes... they were in the east surrey— our two heroes... they were in the east surrey brigade. and our two heroes. .. they were in the east surrey brigade.— our two heroes... they were in the east surrey brigade. and you look at it now, east surrey brigade. and you look at it now. what — east surrey brigade. and you look at it now. what you _ east surrey brigade. and you look at it now, what you think _ east surrey brigade. and you look at it now, what you think when - east surrey brigade. and you look at it now, what you think when you - east surrey brigade. and you look at it now, what you think when you are | it now, what you think when you are here? do you feel like you are the war? ., ~' �* here? do you feel like you are the war? ., ~ �* ., here? do you feel like you are the war? ., 4' �* ., ., war? no. i feel like i've got more work to do _ war? no. i feel like i've got more work to do and _ war? no. i feel like i've got more work to do and we _ war? no. i feel like i've got more work to do and we are _ war? no. i feel like i've got more work to do and we are getting - war? no. i feel like i've got more i work to do and we are getting close but frankly. — work to do and we are getting close but frankly, we want an immersive experience — but frankly, we want an immersive experience of day—to—day life in a trance _ experience of day-to-day life in a trance. �* . �* , experience of day-to-day life in a trance. �* . 3 ~ experience of day-to-day life in a trance. . �*, ,, ., trance. brilliant. it's like a livina trance. brilliant. it's like a living museum. _ trance. brilliant. it's like a living museum. i- trance. brilliant. it's like a living museum. i want - trance. brilliant. it's like a living museum. i want to i trance. brilliant. it's like a - living museum. i want to show you this. this is original. it is from the first world war. everything here
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is just like the first world war. everything here isjust like being the first world war. everything here is just like being there. the first world war. everything here isjust like being there. they the first world war. everything here is just like being there. they call this place a living museum. the only good thing is there's no rats. that is aood to good thing is there's no rats. that is good to hear! _ good thing is there's no rats. that is good to hear! we _ good thing is there's no rats. that is good to hear! we have - good thing is there's no rats. that is good to hear! we have had - good thing is there's no rats. that is good to hear! we have had a i is good to hear! we have had a source themed _ is good to hear! we have had a source themed morning. - is good to hear! we have had a| source themed morning. thank is good to hear! we have had a - source themed morning. thank you for that. i source themed morning. thank you for that- i know— source themed morning. thank you for that- i know i — source themed morning. thank you for that. i knowi said _ source themed morning. thank you for that. i know i said earlier, _ source themed morning. thank you for that. i knowi said earlier, but- source themed morning. thank you for that. i knowi said earlier, but i'm - that. i know i said earlier, but i'm going to say it again. that would be my ideal school field trip. i love history. my ideal school field trip. i love histo . ., , ., , my ideal school field trip. i love histo . , . , history. lots of people have been in touch already _ history. lots of people have been in touch already asking _ history. lots of people have been in touch already asking if _ history. lots of people have been in touch already asking if we _ history. lots of people have been in touch already asking if we can - history. lots of people have been in touch already asking if we can all. touch already asking if we can all go there and a school trip. it would be a brilliant idea. you go there and a school trip. it would be a brilliant idea.— be a brilliant idea. you are watching _ be a brilliant idea. you are watching bbc _ be a brilliant idea. you are watching bbc breakfast. . be a brilliant idea. you are l watching bbc breakfast. the be a brilliant idea. you are - watching bbc breakfast. the time is 8:59am.
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hello, good morning. this is bbc news with the latest headlines. plans to end the sale of new gas boilers by 2035 in an effort to cut carbon emissions caused by heating homes. the prime minister says the boiler police won't be cooking your door down. grants of £5,000 will be given to help households switch to heat pumps. experts say the budget is too low and the strategy is not ambitious enough. would you consider replacing your existing boiler with a heat pump? and what else are you doing around the house to reduce your carbon footprint? let me know on twitter at @annita—mcveigh and use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. an explosion shakes a housing estate in ayr, two adults and two children

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