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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  October 19, 2021 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines, for viewers in the uk and around the world. uk households to be offered a uk households to be offered 3 £5,000 incentive to install electric heat pumps as the government attempts to hit net to zero x 2,050. a new area for apple. two new high—end laptops powered by apple silicon chips. in the uk, manyjobs lost in the music industry since the start of the pandemic. it calls on the government to intervene.
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we begin in the uk where the government wants to and the sale of new gas boilers by 2035 in england and wales, while offering grants to homeowners from next april to replace them with heat pumps. households will be offered up to £5,000 to install new heat pumps or other greener heating, all in a £450 million boiler replacement scheme, part of a much bigger effort to decarbonise buildings, costing nearly £4 billion. however, critics say the scheme is unambitious as the scheme is unambitious as the grants only amount to 90,000 replaced boilers, as our consumer affairs correspondent reports. they came down there and into the corner. there is a
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secret under richard's garden. the heat from his home is absorbed through an underground network of pipes and come through a ground source pump. this is where the actual hardware is located. he swapped his as hardware is located. he swapped his gas guzzling _ hardware is located. he swapped his gas guzzling systems - hardware is located. he swapped his gas guzzling systems seven l his gas guzzling systems seven years ago, and he hasn't looked back. i years ago, and he hasn't looked back. u, years ago, and he hasn't looked back. , , back. i can safely say it is the best _ back. i can safely say it is the best thing _ back. i can safely say it is the best thing ever - back. i can safely say it is the best thing ever dead, i back. i can safely say it is - the best thing ever dead, the houses constantly pleasant temperature, not boiling hot but very liveable. the economics of it ijust fantastic. we paid 15,000 for the ground source and then 5000 for some solar panels for the roof, which supplies the hot water. ., ., ., . , , water. two a ground source pump work ou water. two a ground source pump work you need — water. two a ground source pump work you need a _ water. two a ground source pump work you need a massive - water. two a ground source pump work you need a massive garden, | work you need a massive garden, which is a pipe dream for most of us. the other type of heat pump works by compressing heat from the hour, cheaper to install and installer, but most homes will still need loads of insulation first.
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then we will go through and see some of the equipment we have set up. david researches heating efficiency and says although the money sounds like a lot, it won't go far. what we are left with is a gamble on the future that these things can be cheaper, and the industry will be more ready to install them, and crucially that people are going to want them. do you think this will be enough to convince people with gas boilers to make a switch? perhaps not yet, one of the problems they will face here is getting bad connection with people and households to make sure the policy actually works and it is something that people are happy to take on. because each home is different, getting 86% of households of gas is a monumental challenge. despite promises, this strategy will only begin to scratch the surface. iam now i am now joined iam nowjoined by i am nowjoined by an expert from the economics foundation,
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good morning. we have been waiting for a long time for the seat and building strategy. this is one aspect of that — changing gas boilers for electric heating. what do you make of this initiative — £5,000 - is it make of this initiative — £5,000 — is it enough? the government is following the playbook, to be honest. back in 2012 they started with the electric vehicles. fast forward ten years and you have these things falling in cost. back then, we argued the cost of the subsidy wasn't enough, but here we are where a lot of manufacturers are basically saying that we need to start to completely switch to electric vehicles. the same argument applies here as well. on the subsidy, ifully agree applies here as well. on the subsidy, i fully agree with a lot of commentators out there, but the cost transition, the cost of these technologies will keep falling over the next few years, then it will be much more affordable.
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currently, less than 2% of uk homes have any form of low carbon heating. to switch the vast majority of homes, some of which are not new, to have a system that is not run by fossil fuels, system that is not run by fossilfuels, with system that is not run by fossil fuels, with the insulation required and everything else, it is a mammoth task, isn't it? it is huge, nothing we have tried to do before. the only thing i could refer to would be the 1960s and 1970s when from using remove to gas across all homes in britain. we are trying to do something similar here and the transition is huge. but we seem to be on the cusp of the change. business are coming out and saying that they
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support this programme, we would help our consumers and retailers transition away from fossil fuels as quickly as possible. the question always, when it comes to climate change, are we doing enough? are we going fast enough? here, we have a net zero target by 2050 so we have to do something to cut our carbon reductions. this does go along way, but whether it does enough we will have to wait and see because subsidy is only for the next three years. what happens after thatis three years. what happens after that is the next question. quickly, environmental levies, tax for example on electricity, thatis tax for example on electricity, that is pretty high isn't it? should they be changed? very high but also gas prices are at an all—time high, so what the government has done is instead of making the move roadway it has agreed to consult on it. we will see those levies are shifted from the next year onto gas, making electricity cheaper and therefore running a heat pump cheaper, but it isn't
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going to happen immediately. it will happen when gas prices stabilise. the devil is in the detail. thank you so much for getting up thank you so much for getting up so early to share your thoughts on the story. there's a lot more detail on our website that story. let's plan a subject of the cost of energy. as you are well aware, the cost of gas and oil is soaring right now, and fuelling inflation notjust in the uk but around the world. all eyes are on central banks to gauge when they will make them move and increase interest rates in the hope to come rising prices. in the uk, financial markets are factoring and —— factoring in a rate hike by the bank of england. do you think this will happen — rates will go up in november? personally, i think it is unlikely. we need to remember the bank of england is still in its quantitative easing
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programme and it is expected to continue until the end of december. it is possible that in november they will and the process and raise interest rates but i wonder whether it will be a two stage process — november they will either slow or and the process, and either december or february would be the moment at which they raise interest rates. it could be february for the reason that i doubt any person needs to be seen as a christmas scrooge, raising rates over the holidays. it raising rates over the holidays.— raising rates over the holida s. , ., , ., holidays. it will be a shock to us all, because _ holidays. it will be a shock to us all, because we _ holidays. it will be a shock to us all, because we are - holidays. it will be a shock to us all, because we are so - holidays. it will be a shock to i us all, because we are so used to interest rates being next to nothing, including the treasury — when interest rates are to go up, the treasury will feel the pain, won't it? absolutely, and the office for budget responsibility, the organisation that looks at common finances. they estimate a 1% increase increase will add
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£25 billion to the services of the national debt. 0utcomes out of the budget for education, healthcare, and other things healthca re, and other things the healthcare, and other things the government may want to spend it on, but it is also right to say that this will be a shock to uk households. the last time the interest rate markets were expecting notjust one rate increase but four over the next 12 months — that would be the fastest rate of increase in 15 years, a whole generation of borrowers who have never experienced anything like that. good to see you, thank you. apple has taken a major step in its transition away from its chipmaker intel. it has unveiled two laptop models coming equipped with their own chips, similarto coming equipped with their own chips, similar to the ones used in iphones and ipads. apple claims the new chips will achieve comparable performance to the one currently used, but
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will use 70% of the power. the claim has not been independently verified. let's talk about this with daniel ives, managing director of webb beach securities. this is quite a big deal, ever apple's claims are correct, is intel worried? they are beating the chipmakers at their own game. i think what they are doing here, it is showing the eco system that apple is building. you also google, tesla and others following the lead on this ship from. this shortage does it is apple flexing its muscles, and it will affect companies like intel. when you think about it, this shortage, the global crisis with regard to chips, it makes sense that companies will be looking at their supply. take a step back, you have apple introducing two new products in the midst of a chip
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shortage. new products coming, and coming to consumers where others are having those issues, so apple has more control over its system. it is very important. it is something that i think is under appreciated by investors, what is happening in apple. 0ther investors, what is happening in apple. other companies will follow. it shows the innovation. this isn't actually from the chipmakers, it is from companies like apple. when you say it has more control of its ecosystem, it also has more control over what it pays for these devices, does not have pay someone else a high price, so will we benefit from that point of view? as a consumer, maybe they will keep prices the same. for apple it will increase margin but what we are seeing here is that when they cut out the middleman, in terms of the chip firm, it gives them notjust control of price, control of what really gets put in but also the timing of that. that
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is where you see google, tesla and others following this lead of apple, especially in this chip shortage, but also for apple it is really dumb flexing the muscles that they can create new products were many other companies cannot get these products into the hands of consumers. thank you so much for being on the programme and giving us your take on what apple had to offer in their latest product launch yesterday. let's look at some other business stories. five us lawmakers say amazon may have lied to congress after reports the tech giant reached its search engine in india to favour its own brands and products. in a letter addressed to the ceo, they say that those reports contradict testimony by five top amazon executives including jeff bezos. the lawmakers say they are considering referring the matter to the justice department. us presidentjoe
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biden�*s administration wants cryptocurrency is could undermine the effectiveness of economic sanctions. the new guidelines and refining the use of sanctions as a foreign policy tool also advises the us treasury to invest in technology and staff to counter the threat from digital currencies. stay with us on bbc news. still to come — in the uk, 69,000jobs news. still to come — in the uk, 69,000 jobs have been lost in the music industry since the start of the pandemic. no it calls for the government to intervene.
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this is bbc news. the top stories. the senior us envoy to afghanistan stepped down from his role less than two months after the taliban takeover. south korea's military says north has filed an unknown
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ballistic missile into the sea of japan for ballistic missile into the sea ofjapan for soul has ballistic missile into the sea of japan for soul has convened its national security council. after a year and a half, india is beginning to open its borders to international tourists this month. my colleague travelled to goa, the popular beach destination in india's west coast to find out how the travel industry is getting ready for this year's travel season. the calm before the holiday storm. this is the beachin the holiday storm. this is the beach in timothee —— goa. for the past 1.5 years, they have been no russians or international visitors stop now, government has begun lifting restrictions on their arrival. it lifting restrictions on their arrival. , ., ., , _ arrival. it is not that busy. this man _ arrival. it is not that busy. this man who _ arrival. it is not that busy. this man who manages i arrival. it is not that busy. | this man who manages the boutique resort on a cliff is excited about the upcoming holiday season. it excited about the upcoming holiday season.— excited about the upcoming holiday season. it is good news
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for us that _ holiday season. it is good news for us that we _ holiday season. it is good news for us that we are _ holiday season. it is good news for us that we are opening - holiday season. it is good news| for us that we are opening now. we have 30 to 40% from international tourists. it has been washed out.— international tourists. it has been washed out. 6096 of goa up 's hotels and _ been washed out. 6096 of goa up 's hotels and resorts, _ been washed out. 6096 of goa up 's hotels and resorts, largely - �*s hotels and resorts, largely the smaller places depend on international passengers and floods have still not open. solid domestic demand has kept like are very, very busy. a lack of activities for tourists during the pandemic and the desire to avoid crowds has driven indians to splurge in experiences says vincent, the area directorfor this experiences says vincent, the area director for this large group of hotels in goa. we are prejeeted _ group of hotels in goa. we are prejeeted to — group of hotels in goa. we are projected to double _ group of hotels in goa. we are projected to double what - group of hotels in goa. we are projected to double what we . group of hotels in goa. we are l projected to double what we are able to surpass that with international markets opening, and i think goa is going to see even further better than we did before. ' '
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even further better than we did before. ' , ., ,, even further better than we did before. ' , ., , , before. over 1596 of goa's gdp and 4096 of — before. over 1596 of goa's gdp and 4096 ofjobs _ before. over 1596 of goa's gdp and 4096 ofjobs depend - before. over 1596 of goa's gdp and 4096 ofjobs depend on i and 40% ofjobs depend on tourism. while the big hotels have done well, not everyone has benefited from this domestic travel boom. street markets are just coming back to life. nightclubs, casinos and stars only recently been allowed to reopen. they are all vying for the tourism dollars to make up for the losses in the last holiday season. translation: we the last holiday season. tuna/mom- the last holiday season. translation: ~ ., , , translation: we are completely de endent translation: we are completely dependent on _ translation: we are completely dependent on tourists _ translation: we are completely dependent on tourists and - translation: we are completely dependent on tourists and the - dependent on tourists and the foreign visitors are very important, unlike indians, they don't think much before they spend. i request them, please come back to goa. it spend. i request them, please come back to goa.— come back to goa. it is an eater come back to goa. it is an eager plea. _ come back to goa. it is an eager plea, but _ come back to goa. it is an eager plea, but india's - come back to goa. it is an l eager plea, but india's over numbers have come down after a bruising second wave, a big challenge tourists hot spots will be preserving the delicate balance between welcoming visitors back and devoting ——
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by averting a curved wave of the pandemic. so that is the tourism industry and its recovery in india. let's not talk about the impact covid—19 has had on the music industry. for example, if we look in the uk, it has wiped out around 69,000 jobs. it is one in three of the total workforce according to uk music's annual report that is out this morning. it is calling on the government to introduce tax incentives and action to resolve the problems facing musicians and grew when they are on tour in the european union. the uk is the third biggest music market in the world with revenues of around 1.5 billion dollars. let's talk this through with jamie who is the chief executive of uk music. good morning to you, jamie. like so many aspects of the economy, musicians, though, have been hit extremely hard,
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haven't they?— haven't they? they have. we went into _ haven't they? they have. we went into this _ haven't they? they have. we went into this pandemic - haven't they? they have. we went into this pandemic is i haven't they? they have. we went into this pandemic is a | went into this pandemic is a growing successful sector in 2019 and generated £5.8 billion for the economy, any people working in the sector and look like it this would be a really successful decade for the music industry. covid—19 hit, overnight, you couldn't do social performances, social distancing and we saw both positives from the year before stop overnight. it has been an incredibly difficult year for the industry, there have been billions wiped off the value. people working in the industry, and i think it has been absolutely catastrophic. for us now, the question is how do we recover? how do we rebuild? how do we return to that successful economy before the pandemic? 0ne economy before the pandemic? one of the big problems during this time is the fact that most musicians and those who work within the sector are notjust the musicians themselves, but the musicians themselves, but the crew, etc. they are
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self—employed. does that mean they missed out on a lot of the government programmes to support workers who were not working during the pandemic? absolutely. read pandemic, about 72% of the industry were self—employed. while some managed to get access to the schemes, a lot didn't. you saw instances of irrational musicians working their lives in industry going and being uber drivers, finding ways to make a living in a pandemic where they couldn't do their trade or craft. as things up to happen, hopefully they will come back to the industry. you sa ou come back to the industry. you say you have — come back to the industry. you say you have lost _ come back to the industry. you say you have lost nearly 70,000 people in this industry since the beginning of the pandemic. what makes you think those people will return? what is required for them to return? this is what it is so important we support the sector. we hear
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some anecdotal evidence from people saying they will come back, and some are not sure. will the sector be strong and will it recover? it is one of the reasons we: the government to resolve the crisis, a big thing facing people working in the industry, performance. and strengthening the sector for the long—term. strengthening the sector for the long-term.— strengthening the sector for the long-term. let's talk about what ou the long-term. let's talk about what you are — the long-term. let's talk about what you are asking _ the long-term. let's talk about what you are asking the - what you are asking the government to do then. the government to do then. the government says they have a £2 billion culture recovery fund, which is vital to the music industry. are you getting access to that? they talk about these funds and the size of them. from the point of view of musicians, what are they getting?— getting? we have been incredibly _ getting? we have been incredibly grateful - getting? we have been incredibly grateful to i getting? we have been. incredibly grateful to the government for what they have done over the course of the pandemic, the culture recovery fund, they have cell —— helped the sector revival. now it is
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making sure the investment, we are taking the opportunity than looking at what you can do to both music and education, make sure we're attracting investment with things like fiscal incentives, to ensure we are not choking off the recovery in the live sector. we are very grateful to the recovery and we need to make sure we play a key role in the uk's both pandemic economic and cultural recovery.— cultural recovery. when it comes to _ cultural recovery. when it comes to crew _ cultural recovery. when it comes to crew and - cultural recovery. when it. comes to crew and musicians working in the european union, what you need to happen with regards to making their lives easier from that perspective? the government's resolve to fix it, but we still see a number of problems. some countries you need visas and work permit and they are stopping tours, stopping trucks in the european union. it is absolutely devastating for us. we don't want to go to the table with
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the european union, finding resolution, because ultimately this is about us exporting international success. people want british music stop it is one of the biggest music industries in the world and we want to explore international success. in want to explore international success. ., , ., ,, success. in town the progress on the issue. _ success. in town the progress on the issue, because - success. in town the progress on the issue, because i - success. in town the progress on the issue, because i have l on the issue, because i have talked to other guests about this problem of people being able to work across europe, what progress are you saying on that, if any with regard to negotiations between the uk and the eu? ., ., , the eu? the uk government has come out and — the eu? the uk government has come out and said _ the eu? the uk government has come out and said some - come out and said some countries you can be working with our visas and work permit, but there are still a number which he bases like spain for example where you still need costly work permits and visas that we still need to see lots of progress on because particular international travellers are now starting up again, is where we will start to see the real impact of brexit because people can't tour, musicians, crewmembers aren't able to do their work in the european union, and that is impacting our industry and it
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is also bad for the country. 0k. well, thank you for talking us today. the chief executive, thank you very much. let's now show you the financial markets. a new trading week is under way. as you can see, not strongly going in one direction or the other. hong kong upjust over a percent. japanese markets up by two—thirds of a percent. investors are watching in asia today yet again the huge chinese developer that has more debt payments coming out, coupons it has to materialise. so that is happening in the next few days. if there are any problems with regards to meeting payments, it would have significant problems. we are keeping a close eye once again on evergrand in asia. you are up—to—date in all things business, news and sport. thank you for your company. if you wish to get in touch, i am on
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twitter. i have only mentioned there is much detail on all the stories we cover today on our website. do take a look. hello. good evening. quite a few parts of the country had temperatures of 18 degrees today, and it's likely to get warmer tomorrow, if and when the sunshine does come out. the warmer air is coming our way, thanks to the winds from the south or south—west, but as we've seen already, that has brought with it a lot of cloud. the cloud is still around at the moment, and this cloud here, coming infrom the atlantic, is going to bring the next area of rain later in the night. the earlier rain and drizzle is moving away and, for a while, there could be a few breaks in the cloud. that'll lead to the odd mist and fog patch, and then that thicker cloud arrives, mainly across the western side of the uk, to bring some rain for these areas. and, of course, after the warmth that we had during the day, then the temperatures aren't going to fall very low overnight, 12 to 14 degrees. we start, though,
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with a lot of cloud. we've got some outbreaks of rain around. that could be heavy for a while over some of these western hills. mostly, as we head into the afternoon, the rain is in the north and west. it could cheer up again later across parts of northern ireland. but ahead of the rain in the afternoon, we should get some sunshine in east anglia and the south—east, and it's here temperatures could reach 20 or 21 degrees, more typical of early summer. but even where we have cloud and outbreaks of rain, it's around 17 to 19 celsius, so a very mild day. but there's more rain in the forecast for wednesday, this time generally moving northwards across england and wales. some thundery downpours possible. either side of that, there's going to be some sunshine. it's still a mild day on wednesday, just not quite as mild as tuesday, and we've got this rain arriving in the north—west of scotland. that's going to be significant because to the north of that, there is colder air, and that will push across the country through the rest of the week, and the weather will feel very different. now, we still have a tangle of weather fronts on the scene during wednesday. as we head into thursday, these are the main ones drifting down across the uk, bringing with it some showery outbreaks of rain, and then those northerly winds come setting in,
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and it's those northerly winds that will drop the temperatures as well. now, we've still got some outbreaks of rain to clear away from some eastern parts of england on thursday. 0therwise, there'll be some sunshine, a rash of showers, the showers in the far north over the higher ground maybe of a wintry flavour as well, and it's going to be a windy day. the winds generally from the north, possibly touching gale force around some north sea coasts, and that of course will make it feel colder and very different from what we're feeling at the moment. so 8 degrees the best in northern scotland, 13 in southern england and wales.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. 0ur headlines today. an end to new gas boilers within 15 years under the government's green energy plans for england and wales. the prime minister says, don't expect the green police to kick your door down. instead ministers want us to use a heat pumps like this and they're offering grants to help us buy them, but is it enough? a major explosion shakes a housing estate in ayr. two adults and two children are in hospital. after mps pay tribute to sir david amess, more discussions on what can be done to keep politicians safe. england are hit with a stadium ban by uefa.
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at least one match will be played behind closed doors after ticketless

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